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Review Content

Showing topics in Aircraft Reviews, Kits, Aftermarket (updates/conversions), Decals, Reference material, Armoured Fighting Vehicle Reviews, Kits, Aftermarket, Diorama & Accessory, Reference Material, Kits, Aftermarket, Reference Material, Vehicle Reviews, Sci-fi & Real Space Reviews, Figure Reviews, Locos, Trains & Layout Reviews and Tools & Paint Reviews posted in for the last 365 days.

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  1. Today
  2. I have been using Master Models aircraft aftermarket, such as their refuelling probes & pitot tubes, and find that they enhance my models considerably. This venture into ships masts should be welcomed by the maritime fraternity. I have the Revell RMS Titanic and the kit masts certainly need improving so I shall be ordering this set. Thanks for the heads up Dave. Mike
  3. Yesterday
  4. Masts for the RMS Titanic and Olympic 1:350 Master Models Master models continue to build up their range of 1:350 scale accessory sets. They are well up to the standard we’ve come to expect from Master Models, but be aware, these items are very sharp, and once fitted to the model could catch someone’s face/eyes if there look too closely. [350-100] This set is designed for the Titanic and Olympic, doesn’t matter which manufacturer they are from. It consists of the foremast and main mast, gooseneck fittings for the foremast derrick, jackstaff and ensign staff. There is also a small etched sheet which contains a new crows nest and navigation light holder, for the foremast. You will need to add some reinforcement under the deck for the masts to sit in but this shouldn’t be a problem for most modellers. Once rigged, and the instructions show clearly how the masts are rigged, they will look much better than the plastic items in the kit which are quite oversized. Conclusion This is a nice easy way to give your big liners that little bit of finesse that makes a nice model look great. The masts are much more to scale than plastic can ever be moulded. With the addition of the other parts it will give that quality look to you r finished model. Review sample courtesy of Piotr at
  5. Pitot Probe for OV-10 Bronco 1:32 Master The latest release from Master Models in their series of replacement pitot probes have recently arrived at BMs London offices. It is well up to their usual standard and very sharp, so care should be taken once fitted. It is so much better than the styrene ones found in the kit. [AM-32-109] – Has been designed for the lovely North American OV-10 Bronco from Kitty Hawk Conclusion Master Models must have a tremendous machining set up to be able to produce these pitot probes and to produce them with such finesse. The always look great on the finished model. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of Piotr at
  6. snapper_city

    Cartridges and Shells. 1:35

    I saw a guy using the empty fifty cal cases on a build the other day. I'm going to get some for my M113.
  7. Cartridges and Shells 1:35 Master The latest releases from Master Models in their series of cannon shells and cartridges have recently arrived at BMs London offices. Trouble is they are seriously small and very difficult to photograph now that my macro lens has given up the ghost. There are loads of uses in dioramas or vignettes for both the empty cartridge cases and loaded cases, not sure so much with the separate shells, unless you glue them to the cases. [GM-35-018] – This set contains 15 German 2cm ammunition (cal. 20x138B) for Flak 30/38, KwK 30/38 - shells and 5pcs each of 3 types of projectiles [GM-35-019] – As above, but includes 25 German 2cm ammunition (cal. 20x138B) for Flak 30/38, KwK 30/38 - empty shells [GM-35-021] – This set includes 25 cartridges for the Browning .50 calibre heavy machine gun. [GM-35-020] – As above, but includes 25 empty cartridges, great for being strewn around the floor of a M3 half track of the turret of a tank. Conclusion Here we have some really useful and well produced items. Very handy for your dioramas. Review sample courtesy of Piotr at
  8. North American P-51D-5 Instrument panel Eduard LOOK 1:32 Not long ago Eduard introduced a new concept in modelling accessories the LOOK range. Each set contains a completely finished instrument panel, which includes all the instruments, levers and instrument glass on a pre-painted panel, this goes for the lower central panel and the switch panel beneath that. This set is designed for the Revell P-51 and is for the D-5 version, the earlier D version is also available. The quality is excellent and is a direct replacement of the kit part. The set also comes with etched steel seatbelts which are also pre-painted and when folded really look the part with the separate clasps and fixings.. Conclusion This new series is a great resource for those of us who are unable to replicate all the markings on a panel in one easy solution. My only concern is if a model was to be put into a competition without the modeller declaring they have used a LOOK set, as, to me, it’s a form of cheating. Review sample courtesy of
  9. Shar2

    Tiran 4 Late Type. 1:35

    If you fancied the kit above, but were afraid of all the interior parts, you can now get most of the lovely plastic shown above, with the interior parts removed. Review sample courtesy of
  10. T-34 on the Battlefield 2 Peko Publications This new volume from Peko's World War Two Photobook Series and as the name suggests it is primarily a book of photos, naturally. As Volume 2 of the set it covers more, shall we say, dismantled vehicles. In fact the title should in fact read T-34 destroyed on the battlefield as over 90% of the photos show destroyed tanks, even the ones that the Germans captured and reused. In keeping with the other titles in the series, the book is hardback bound with 112 pages, finished in an overall white cover. The photos are almost without exception full page, with space left only for the captions, which are in Hungarian and English, each one adding valuable insight to the photo, which may not be immediately apparent without it. For the modeller there are plenty of diorama possibilities, the Germans seemingly photographing everything they could. Seeing how they come apart when blown up is useful for diorama purposes, but thankfully there are no grisly scenes accompanying the destroyed vehicles. Quite a few of the photos are from private collections with attributions in the top corner as appropriate, with substantial quantity of soldiers standing in front of damaged or abandoned vehicles after the fighting is over, plus a number of groups investigating the wreckage after a cataclysmic explosion of the tank's magazine, or demolition by the escaping crew. Conclusion Whether you have the models that you intend to use this book for reference, or have an interest in the subject, this book will give you all the reference pictures and some besides, as well as some inspiration for dioramas. It is certainly in interesting book and can recommend it very highly. Review sample courtesy of
  11. Dornier Do335 and other Gun Barrels 1:32 Master Models The latest batch of items from Master Models included these three sets for 1:32 Do335’s, but can also be used on other aircraft in the same scale. As usual, they are beautifully turned and finished and are so much more realistic than the kit parts. [AM-32-106] – This set is for any German aircraft that used the Mk103 30mm cannon, such as the Do335 and Hs-129. The set includes turned brass barrels with 3D printed muzzle brakes turned brass mounting rings. The set contains two versions of cannon muzzle brakes. [AM-32-107 – This detail set has been designed for the HK Models 1:32 Dornier Do335 and contains turned brass MG-151 gun barrels, FuG 25a antenna and a pitot tube. [AM-32-108 – This detail set has been designed for the HK Models 1:32 Dornier Do335B-2 and contains turned brass MG-151and MK-103 gun barrels with muzzle brakes, FuG 25a antenna and a pitot tube. Conclusion Here we have another group of really useful and well produced items. All the sets are well up to standard we have come to expect from Master Models. All you have to do is a bit of research on what the particular aircraft you are modelling was fitted with and choose the correct set. Review sample courtesy of Piotr at
  12. FN Dunkerque/Strasburg Barrels 1:350 Master Models Master models continue to build up their range of 1:350 scale armament sets, but they are now increasing the items produced to add other accessories. As usual they are well up to the standard we’ve come to expect from Master Models. [350-101] - This set is for the Hobbyboss FN Dunkerque and Strasburg kits it includes both main, (330mm), secondary, (130”). These are all direct replacements for the kit parts, unlike the normal sets in which you just cut off the kit barrels, drill a hole and glue the metal barrels onto the remaining plastic parts, this set also includes resin mounts. You still need to drill out the resin parts to 1.9mm and 0.9mm respectively, and then you just add to the mounts within the turrets using the kit trunnion. [350-102] - This set is for the Hobbyboss FN Dunkerque and Strasburg kits, but can also be used on the Richelieu it includes four French training gun 90mm Model 1935. These are all direct replacements for the kit parts as they include a resin gun mount. You still need to drill out the resin parts to 0.3mm, and then you just add the barrel to the mounts and fit the recuperator to the top of the gun. [350-103] - This set is for the Hobbyboss FN Dunkerque and Strasburg kits, but can also be used on the Richelieu it includes four Twin Mount 37mm/50. Once again these are all direct replacements for the kit parts as they include a resin gun mount and etched details, for the seats and sights. You still need to drill out the resin parts to 0.3mm, and then you add the barrels to the mounts, carefully fold the etched part to shape and glue into place. [350-104] - This set is for the Hobbyboss FN Dunkerque and Strasburg kits, but can also be used on the Richelieu it includes four French Quad Mount Hotchkiss 13,2mm/76. As with the other sets these are all direct replacements for the kit parts as they include a resin gun mount and etched details, for the gun controls, mounting and sights. You still need to drill out the resin parts to 0.3mm, and then you add the barrels to the mounts, carefully fold the etched parts to shape and glue into place. Conclusion This is a nice easy way to give your big French battleships that little bit of finesse that makes a nice model look great. The metal barrels are much more to scale than plastic can ever be moulded and the smaller weaponry will look so much better with the added etched parts.. Review sample courtesy of Piotr at
  13. Shar2

    DeHavilland Sea Vixen FAW2. 1:48

    That's because the artist actually does some research.
  14. John_W

    DeHavilland Sea Vixen FAW2. 1:48

    And yet they got the underwing serials the right colour on the box illustration...
  15. Basosz, You may have already discovered it on your own, but my research indicates it was typically towed by a Sd.Kfz. 9 FAMO or a Hanomag SS-100. I plan to add use a Revell FAMO to tow mine. I hope this helps. Arrin
  16. Last week
  17. Seahawk

    Fairey Firefly FR.1. 1:48

    "A complete turkey" is the phrase that springs to mind.
  18. Julien

    Fairey Firefly FR.1. 1:48

    Thanks for the review, unfortuantley looks like one to avoid.
  19. Shar2

    Fairey Firefly FR.1. 1:48

    Fairey Firefly FR.1 Trumpeter 1:48 The Fairey Firefly was a British Second World War-era carrier-borne fighter aircraft and anti-submarine aircraft of the Fleet Air Arm (FAA). Designed to the contemporary FAA concept of a two-seat fleet reconnaissance/fighter, the pilot and navigator/weapons officer were housed in separate stations. It was superior in performance and firepower to its predecessor, the Fulmar, but entered operational service only towards the end of the war when it was no longer competitive as a fighter. The limitations of a single engine in a heavy airframe reduced its performance, but it proved to be sturdy, long-ranged, and docile in carrier operations. The Model The Fairey Firefly Mk.1 has been kitted many times by AZ Models in 1:48, but they have really been short run kits and while very nice, were not easy to build for the less experienced modeller. Now, Trumpeter have thrown their hat into the ring with this release of the Mk.1. The kit comes in a nice top opening box with an artists impression of the aircraft in flight on the top. Inside there are six sprues of grey styrene, one of clear a small sheet of etched brass and a decal sheet. This will certainly be an easier build for the average modeller, unfortunately, like the Sea Vixen in the same scale from Trumpeter it does have some, ok, quite a few detail problems. Working back from the nose, the spinner is a tad too pointy, the chin mounted radiator faring isn’t wide enough and the panel behind it too wide, the chin intake far too deep to the mesh grille, the oil cooler intakes don’t have any detail on them and the intakes under them are not very well represented, the intake lip should be at a light angle, whereas it’s straight on the kit. The fuselage is missing many bumps, intakes and other minutiae, while some of the panel lines actually match the real aircraft; the majority are a figment of the imagination. The pilots canopy is quite nicely done, with the blown areas correct, but it’s not long enough, as it doesn’t include the rear strip that is prominent over the fuselage spine. Not that it matters that much as you cannot open the canopy anyway as Trumpeter have made it flush with the fuselage. The interior is more the designers imagination than to any relation the real thing, in both cockpits. Moving to the tailplane and the model gets worse. The shape of the rudder is completely wrong and the kit rudder looks like it’s made of stressed metal, not fabric. Since the rudder is the wrong shape, naturally the fin is also wrong and also with spurious panel lines, and don’t get me started on the horizontal tailplane. Totally wrong shaped elevators, and consequently totally wrong shaped tailplane. Ok, some good news, the main undercarriage legs look ok, although the oleos look like they have no weight on them, so you might want to cut them down. The wheels are rubbish, with no depth to them and rather than what we would call spoked, they look like dished, the tread pattern is a little too soft on the tyres too. The undercarriage bays give a half hearted attempt at detail, and it looks like someone has tried, but the stringers are ribs are too flat and the wrong shape, while the outer bays don’t have any angles other than 90’. Whilst we’re under the aircraft the flaps are the wrong shape, bays not deep enough and the inner bays look like they’ve been plated over rather than being able to see all the pipework that’s in there. At least the modeller won’t have to worry about the wing-fold detail as you can’t build the model with wings folded. For those of you that are still here reading this, I will go through the build as per normal. Construction starts with the front cockpit, with the two sides, rear bulkhead, instrument panel and joystick. The rear cockpit is larger but of similar build with the addition of the shoulder height shelf and a couple of radio boxes. These assemblies are then glued into one half of the fuselage, along with the chin radiator which has been fitted with a PE grille to the rear. The propeller is then assembled from the boss, three blades, spinner and rear cap, which is sandwiched between the fuselage sides as they are glued together. The under fuselage radiator outlet si also fitted with a PE grille and fitted aft of the chin radiator panel, while the side oil cooler intakes are also glued into position. The wings consist of a single piece lower section and two upper sections between these are fitted the main undercarriage bays. The ailerons, cannon fairings, flap actuators, pylons and landing light lens are attached to the wing assembly before the whole assembly is glued to the fuselage. The main undercarriage is assembled, each side being made up from five parts before being fitted to their respective bays. The main gear bay doors are then attached and the flaps fitted. The kit comes with a choice of weapons to hang under the wings, two 500lb bombs and four rockets per side, in twin vertical arrangement. The tail wheel is then fitted along with the arrestor hook. The horizontal tailplane comes in upper and lower halves and single piece elevators; the assembly is then glued to the rear fuselage, followed by the two piece fin and two piece rudder. The windscreen and canopies are then fitted, followed by the exhaust stubs. Decals The largish decal sheet contains markings for four aircraft, it appears to be well printed, in register and opaque, they are also very glossy. Carrier film is fairly thin, so should take softening and setting solutions well. For those who don’t like painting the black and white identification stripes, these have been provided on the sheet. The aircraft included on the painting guide are:_ Firefly FR.1 DK477 of the Fleet Air Arm, 766Sqn, based at RNAS Lossiemouth 1949 Firefly FR.1 281, PP433 of the Fleet Air Arm, on board HMS Triumph, Far East Fleet 1950 Firefly FR.1 Z1832 of the A&AEE, Boscombe Down, during prototype trials, July-August 1943 Firefly FR.1 277, DK438, 1771Sqn. Fleet Air Arm, based on board HMS Implacable 1945. Conclusion As some will know, I am ex-FAA as is my Father, therefore I have a great interest in FAA aircraft, the Firefly being one of my favourites, so it is a great pity that once again Trumpeter have taken a wonderful British aircraft, matched it with their complete lack of proper research and ruined what could have been a very nice kit. Yes it will build nicely, yes it sort of looks like a Firefly FR.1, and if those are the standards you build by, then that’s fine, it’s your hobby, but for me this will be consigned to some other use, and I will stick with my AZ kits. Review sample courtesy o UK Distributors for
  20. Shar2

    PT-109 (53215) 1.72

    PT-109 (53215) Eduard 1:72 The PT-109 from Revell is getting quite long in the tooth now, even so, it’s nice to see it re-released. It can now also be detailed up with this set from Eduard, the first of at least two according to their website. PT109: The set comes in the standard poly sleeve and contains parts of the boat, a pre-printed flag and an acetate instrument panel, the weapons details will be in the next set. Included on the sheet are new hatches, which can be posed open, vent openings, which can also be posed open, torpedo tube rails and stops, cleats, machine gun mounting rings and bow hawse pipe. The exhaust silencers are fitted with new control rods, the liferings, new cleats and attachment surround. The skylights receive new grilles, while the deckhouses are fitted with new handrails. The cockpit is provided with new instrument panels, covers, hand holds, throttle levers, and a new flag locker. The mast gets new supports, while the front cabin roof is given new siren support brackets, handrails and the torpedo tubes fitted with new rear hatch ends complete with wing nuts. The kit can be finished off with a nicely painted ensign. Conclusion As mentioned above, the kit out of the box will make a nice model, but if you want something more, then this set will certainly go toward making a model with more finesse and improved detail. Review sample courtesy of
  21. North American T-28C Trojan detail sets Eduard 1:32 Since the release of the Kittyhawk NA T-28C, it was only a matter of time before Eduard released some etched sets for it’. The three sets cover the interior, seatbelts and exterior. There is also a mask set designed for the kit, which will come in particularly handy, and a zoom set. As with most of Eduards sets, some of the kit detail will need to be removed before any etch can be added. Interior Set (32924) The parts are contained on two sheets of relief etched brass of roughly equal size, with one being unpainted and the other pre-painted, and unusually not self-adhesive, as they usually are. The unpainted sheet contains items such as the two seats, cockpits rear panels, rear view mirrors, rudder pedals and HUD boxes. The pre-painted sheet contains the instrument panels complete with the instrument faces on the backplate. A little dab of aqua clear will give them the appearance of glass fronts. The sheet also contains the myriad of side console panels. The rest of the sheet contains the switch panels with separate switches and levers which are fitted from below, circuit breaker panels, radio panels.. Seatbelts (33190) This small single sheet set contains a complete and comprehensive set of seat belts, buckles and clasps for both the pilot and co-pilot. The belts look like they will be rather fiddly to assemble, but will look great when fitted. The seat belts are pre-painted so no need for some fiddly painting, just a slightly darker wash to tone them down a bit. To fit the lap-straps the modeller will need to cut a slot on both sides of each seat pad to all the ends of the straps to slide into them. Exterior (32421) This single sheet set contains a new wiring harness for the engine, new grilles for any and all the intakes and vents. The undercarriage gets new scissor links, brake disks and pads plus tie down rings. The airbrake is provided with new bay interior webs, and bulkheads. The pylons are fitted with bottom plates, while the bombs in the kit are fitted with replacement arming vanes. Undercarriage (32422) Whereas in previous releases of undercarriage details were provided in the exterior set, Eduard have decided to release this as a separate set. As the name suggests it provides all new details of the bays, including replacement bay roofs, stringers, sidewalls, bulkheads, and webs. Some of the plastic parts to which the sidewalls are attached will need to be drilled out for the lightning holes. Masks (JX212) This set of yellow Kabuki tape masks for all the Perspex on the kit as well as masks for the wheels. As with most masks the tape is only provided for the surrounds of the canopy, the infill being made up from masking fluid, the exception being the pilots windscreens, quarter screens. Conclusion Once again it’s proven that there’s never a kit release without an Eduard set of two being designed for it, they are so prolific. Whilst not as comprehensive as some of the previous releases, they will add that extra level of detail sought by some modellers. Review sample courtesy of
  22. metromanbw

    Acrylic Diorama Textures

    Any special requirements to seal a wood base prior to using these, other than my standard varnish/UV coat (or is that overkill here)?
  23. Shar2

    Wilder Aqualine Products

    As soon as I've tried them out properly I will add to the review Andy.
  24. Sgt.Squarehead

    Wilder Aqualine Products

    These sound interesting.....Any chance of pics from your experiments when you get a chance, intrigued to know if you could seal them with enamel varnish and then use other water-based products over that?
  25. Wilder Aqualine Products Wilder has developed the Aqualine range, a water based acrylic product that can be reactivated at any point during your weathering process. The Aqualine range of products are non-toxic, dry quickly to a matt finish and you can still use your enamel products over them. Aqualine colours are very thick and this provides the modeller with a wide range of opacities, also making them very cost-effective. White Winter Camo is for white wash and camo effects, combine it with other Aqualine colours, Textured Snow, Textured Earth or pigments to alter its colours and texture. You can also use enamels over the Aqualine colours after they dry. Black Smoke is great for burnt or smoke effects; combine it with other Aqualine colours, Textured Earth or Gunpowder pigments to alter its colours and texture. You can also use enamels over the Aqualine colours after they dry. Conclusion I’m looking forward to trying these out, and from the quick trial run I have found that they are very fine and you don’t need much to create an effective weathering look on whatever you’re building. As stated earlier I will be using these on a couple of builds and update this review shortly. But for now, from my brief experiment I think they will be great to work with. Review sample courtesy of
  26. Acrylic Diorama Textures Mig AMMO Mig AMMO have released another pair of acrylic diorama textures, Sand and Asphalt. The materials come in quite large pots and are to be used as is, straight onto your dioramas. Both the sand and asphalt are textured by what feels like sand so may require some stirring to get the mix right. Having used AMMO’s acrylic mud, I have found that the material goes on very easily and can be spread about for some time before it sets. Coverage is good and it’s easy to apply without leaving brush marks. If you’re using a plain base the layers can be built up to give it that deeper look. Once set it is tough, durable and able to be handled without distorting or leaving fingerprints. From AMMO themselves:- The asphalt is ready to use and has an acrylic base, which makes it easy to use. It can be applied to small and large scenery surfaces using very different styles of tools and can also be mixed with other materials like pigments to create amazingly realistic effects. It’s the ideal texture for a range of scales from 1/16 to 1/48. If the effect is deemed to coarse, you can lightly sand the surface once the product has dried, easily creating the desired effect. I think it should even be good for runways and even carrier decks. As with the asphalt, the sand can be applied to small and large scenery surfaces using any style of tool and can also be mixed with other materials like pigments to create amazingly realistic effects. Ideal texture for a range of scales from 1/16 to 1/72. If the effect is deemed to coarse, you can lightly sand the surface once the product has dried, easily creating the desired effect. Conclusion These sets are a very welcome addition to the Mig AMMO product line and can be used by all genres of modellers. They are so easy to use and the best bit is that all the tools, including brushes can be washed and cleaned using water. For the price, which I think is quite reasonable, you get a lot of material to play with. Review sample courtesy of
  27. Julien

    DeHavilland Sea Vixen FAW2. 1:48

    From what I read, and what I have seen of the couple of Sea Vixens I have looked at an Photographed in museums I thought Dave's comments were a bit restrained. Know one likes to bash a kit, but even from Photos you can see parts of this kit are wrong. Julien
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