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Found 200 results

  1. Picked up a cheap kit online to verify my Uni address, the ICM 1/72 Polikarpov I-1 in a Maquette Box. For 6$, it looks a treat so far, with the exception of the wings that are far more complicated than need be. For whichever reason, it was decided to split the wing lengthwise, and that means an unfillable line is created. At least it fits well. The plan is to finish it in plain Aluminum - Green over Blue looks nice but I haven't either color on hand. Little has been done so far other than the construction of one wing and the mounting of the top of the engine block to the left fuselage. The interior is simple so it shouldn't take long to close her up. More to come tomorrow. Thanks, Tweener
  2. Strong rumour: after the MiG-25RB recce and P interceptor variants, ICM is to release in 2019 a 1/48th trainer MiG-25PU "Foxbat-C" kit - ref. V.P.
  3. Hello all, Here's my just finished 1/48 ICM JRB-4 Twin Beech. I saw the kit with these markings at the hobbyshop a couple months ago and thought it would be nice to build something bright and colourful for a change. Painted with Tamiya (white) ,MR Paint (international orange) and Humbrol (the hinomaru), the decals came from the kit and were very nice to work with. Other than the engine cowlings with a nasty horizontal seam, the kit was a joy to build. I did change the antenna on the roof and pitot tubes under the nose to look more like the later ones. Gear doors were not used, as they are missing from the ones on photos of the real ones too. Thanks for looking, I hope you like it. Pete
  4. In the framework of the recent toy tradefair Mir Detstva 2017, held at Moscow, ICM is reported having announced a new tool 1/72nd MiG-25RB/RBT "Foxbat-B" kit for 2018. To be followed. Source AlexGRD: http://master194.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=100171&sid=b7252e4ad3d849de8e26c4c009281a81 V.P.
  5. Sd.Kfz.251/6 Ausf.A (35102) 1:35 ICM via Hannants The Hanomag Sd.Kfz.251/1 was the mainstay of the German armoured Personnel Carrier fleet, but was flexible enough to also take up many other tasks within the Nazi War Machine, from Anti-Aircraft duties to Howitzer carriage and back again to armoured reconnaissance, which led to a lot of variants. With two steering wheels at the front, the rear was carried on tracks, giving it good clearance and rough ground capabilities that a truck simply could not manage once the going got tough. It was armoured sufficiently to deflect non-armour piercing rounds from small arms fire, but with an open top it was susceptible to both grenades and aerial bombardment, where the armour would concentrate the blast and reduce the interior to a tangled mess. The Ausf.A was used at the beginning of WWII alongside the Ausf.B, and was generally fitted with an MG.34 on the front cab wall, operated from inside. There were more than 20 official variants and more unofficial field modifications, but despite their seemingly ubiquitous nature in German service, not many were preserved after the war, and they are highly sought after now, with many examples being based upon post-war builds from Czech factories that have been made to look as convincing as possible by their restorers. While the purist may notice the differences in films, they're still a huge improvement on repainted American half-tracks from an authenticity point of view. The command version being identifiable by the large antenna. The Kit This is a reboxing of kit number 35101 of the same vehicle, but with the addition of a sprue for the command antenna. We reviewed the original kit here, where you can see all the pictures below, as well as the build process and our thoughts on the model. This boxing arrives in a similar box, with the additional sprue taking up any spare space within, and on the exterior it has a new painting, which represents the more relaxed theme of the figures, which are either walking with their transport, or standing offering directions. There are now six grey, a clear sprue (just the headlamps are used), and the flexible tracks and wheels. Markings 2 markings are supplied in any colour you want as long as its Panzer Grey WH 179467 Command Vehicle of General H Guderian, Poland, 1939 WH 609084 1941 Conclusion We liked it first time around, and like it still, especially with the addition the command version. Highly recommended. Available in the UK from Hannants and other model shops Review sample courtesy of
  6. German Drivers (1939-1945) 35642 1:35 ICM So many vehicle kits arrive bereft of driver figure, so there's bound to be a market for additional figure to fill these seats. The seating position of vehicles can be quite different between trucks and cars, and even between types of these vehicles. Also, not every officer cared to have, or was appointed a driver, so sometimes drove themselves – the shame of it! This small set from ICM gives you four figures to fill those empty seats. It arrives in a sub-figure sized box with a lift off lid and tray lid inside, with a single sprue inside that has been attacked with sprue-cutters to enable it to fit in the box. It was also wrapped in the longest and thinnest releasable bag I have seen, which was unusual! I've attached the sprue back together for aesthetic reasons, but as you can see where it was cut you won't be upset when you open your box up. The boxtop shows some neat examples of the use for the drivers, as well as giving you a sneak peek at what they look like, and I do rather like the dynamics of the painting, with the cut-away doors and so forth. That chap in the saloon car is just a bit too cheerful, given the danger he's in though. The guy in the top left is also looking a bit cheesed off at being rear-ended whilst flying over two other vehicles too. It's safe to say that these figures are all posed in the seated position, and two are dressed in standard Wehrmacht uniforms with a forage and patrol cap on their heads. One other figure has a smock coat over his uniform with a lace-up neck, and the final one is an officer with a rather relaxed hand draped over the top of his steering wheel. Two of the drivers forage cap and smock guy are looking to their left (the two on top on the box art), while patrol cap guy seems to be looking at his steering wheel, perhaps at a map? Each figure comes broken down as torso, individual legs and arms, head and hat, with a couple of ammo pouches for the belt around the smock bedecked gentleman. The instructions are on a single sheet of glossy paper, with part numbers and colour call outs that reference a chart on the rear that shows Revell and Tamiya colour codes, plus the name of the colour in English and Ukrainian (that's a guess). Sculpting and moulding is excellent as we have come to expect from ICM, and the figures will doubtless fit a lot of applications without any adjustment, although that isn't guaranteed, so prepare yourself for a little sanding and such to adapt them. Conclusion A useful set of figures to add a little human scale to your German WWII vehicles, with typical quality from ICM's figure people. Available in the from their UK importers, H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  7. My entry for this group build is ICM's Model T 1917 Ambulance with US Medical Personnel. A review of this kit can be found on this site here.
  8. Julien

    Heinkel He 111H-6 - 1:48 ICM

    Heinkel He 111H-6 (48262) 1:48 ICM The He.111 was originated in secrecy, disguised as a civilian transport in the mid-30s, but once Nazi Germany came out of the closet and disregarded the Versailles agreement, it immediately became clear that they were rearming in a major way. The early civilian and military variants had a more traditional stepped canopy, and there is a famous piece of film that is used and reused in documentaries showing a D or "Dora" variant dropping bombs during the Spanish Civil War as part of the Condor Legion, which was Hitler's proving ground for his new designs and Blitzkreig tactics. Various revisions followed until the P, which introduced the now-iconic stepless fully glazed cockpit, which improved both aerodynamics and the pilot's situational awareness. The P series saw limited action in WWII as it was replaced by the more competent H variant, substituting Junkers Jumo 211 engines, detuned to give it the throbbing beat that was to be heard over Britain almost until the end of the war. The H-3 had an improved version of the engine and increased numbers of machine guns for self-defence. As is often the case with wartime development, the end of the Battle of Britain saw the introduction of the H-4 with better engines and external bomb racks. The H-6 had improvements in design. The Jumo 211 F-1 engine gave it increased. Defensive armament was upgraded with one 20 mm MG FF cannon in the nose, one MG 15 in the ventral turret, and in each of the fuselage side windows, some carried tail-mounted MG 17s. The performance of the H-6 was also improved; he climb rate was higher and the machine could reach a slightly higher ceiling. Overall weight of the H-6 increased to 14,000 kg (30,600 lb). The Kit This is an adaptation of the new tool kit from ICM which we reviewed here. who have raised their game substantially over the recent years. The kit arrives in their lidded top-opened with a glossy card lid and painting to top it off, with 11 sprues in medium, grey styrene, and two in crystal clear styrene, an instruction booklet in line-drawn colour, and a long decal sheet that can be found ensconced within the booklet. On opening the bags, it is very apparent that this is a modern tooling, with lots of lovely details, crisp moulding, and some very clever engineering on display. This version also includes torpedoes which the variant could use. Construction starts with the two wing spar parts, which are separated by the gear bay roof assemblies and a walkway part. Additional detail is added to the bulkheads along with the fuselage walkways and a smaller bulkhead toward the tail, with the lower portion of the mid-upper "turret" ring attached to the floor. The cockpit floor is then assembled with rudder pedals, instrument panels, seat and control linkages, slotting into the front spar once finished. An additional chair and the overhead instrument panel are installed later in the build. As a prelude to closing up the fuselage, the tail wheel is fitted together, which has the wheel moulded-in, and consists of three parts. Preparation of the fuselage halves involves adding the inserts into the wing roots and making good the join; inserting the paired side windows; adding ammo can racks; radio panel; the pilot's control column, and more glazing in the ventral gondola. The spar/cockpit assembly is then fitted to the starboard fuselage half and the port side is added along with some glue. The rudder is separate and fits to the fin with actuators, then the missing fuselage panels between the spars are added, which of course will need painting and fettling in if you're bothered about the "endoscope brigade". If you are intending to fit the tail armament option then the tail cone will need to be sawn off and the new one added. The mid-upper insert is designed to cater for different "turret" installations, and has a lovely serrated ring moulded-in, with controls and bracing strut added before it is installed into the fuselage opening, closing off much of the rear fuselage. You can pose the bomb bay open or closed by selecting one of the two panels, one of which has opening for the bomb bay, where the bombs are suspended tail-first in a framework that is peppered with lightening holes so that the included bombs are visible within. With the bomb bay finished, it is inserted into the fuselage from below, filling yet another gap in the skin. Even if you are leaving the bays closed, the bomb bay can be seen from the side windows, so it's best to build that assembly and install it anyway to prevent that section from being see-through from the sides. Racks for either bombs or torpedoes are added to the underside. The bombs themselves are built up from two halves that have two fins moulded-in, and a single part that fits on the tail forming the other two fins in a cruciform layout. To these are added stiffening brackets, with two bombs in total to make externally or two torpedoes. These are two part main bodies with main propeller and a 6 part tail to be made up and added. At this point the wings are begun, with the lower sides added to the fuselage/spar assembly first. The ailerons are separate, and are built up before the uppers are added, as are the elevators, and the two engines, which are provided in their entirety, along with much of the ancillary equipment and engine mounts. The completed Jumo 211s are fitted to the front of the spars and depending on whether you want to display them or not, and then enclosed by cowling panels, radiators and the intake/outlet ramps. The bottom cowlings can be split to reveal the engine detail, which is a good way of showing off the detail without ruining the lines of the aircraft. The upper wings and ailerons are fitted, the remaining cowling panels with the exhausts are added, with the latter having a decent indent at the tip to simulate being hollow, and finally the nose glazing, which has a machinegun and the aforementioned overhead instrument panel, which is moulded in clear styrene and is provided with a decal for the instruments. The nose "cone" is a separate clear part, and it too is fitted with a machine gun with a choice of single or twin drum mags and dump bag for the spent brass. Another two MGs are fitted to the front and rear glazing on the gondola, and the mid-upper gun is added to the turret ring, along with the protective clear shroud at the front. A different nose cone is provided if using the heavier armament and a different underside blister noses is included. A new clear rear blister nose is also included in the new box. A new open or closed top blister is also included. The main wheels are each built up from two halves, and placed between the twin legs that have the main retraction jacks moulded in, and secured with a number of cross-braces between the two legs. An additional ram is fitted within the bay, attached to the rear cross-brace. The gear bay doors fit to the bay sides with large tabs, as do the bomb bay doors if you are using them, and these last parts have the correctly separated four "petals" that are seen on the real thing, rather than a single panel. The props are made up from a single part with two part spinner and back plate, which fit onto the engine's output shaft through the vented front of the cowlings. Markings There are four decal options included in the box, all of which share the same RLM70/71 splinter pattern over RLM65 with the unit markings and codes to differentiate between them. From the box you can build one of the following: He.111H-6 3/KG.26 Norway Summer 1941 He.111H-6 Stab I/KG.26. Bardufoss, Norway, July 1942 He.111H-6 8/KG.53, Poland 1941 (Yellow Eastern Front Markings) He.111H-6 7./KG.27, Russia, November 1941, Temp white camo over topsides. Decals are printed by ICM, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas with a few exceptions around some of the fuselage codes. These can easily be cut off before they are applied however, so it's not an issue. No swastickers are provided so the modeller will have to source these. Conclusion The He.111 is a truly iconic shape, and we're long overdue a new tooling of the type in this scale. ICM have done a great job of it by the looks of things. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. Dornier Do.17Z-2 WWII Finnish Bomber 1:48 ICM (48246) The Dornier Do 17, nicknamed the flying pencil due to its slender shape, was a light bomber designed by Dornier Flugzeugwerke in the mid-1930s. Along with the Heinkel He 111, the Do 17 carried out the lion’s share of bombing raids against the UK up to the end of the Battle of Britain. The Do 17 Z was the main production variant and featured a redesigned forward fuselage that was enlarged in order to accommodate a rear gunner. The Z-2 sub-variant featured new 1000hp engines which addressed an earlier problem with under powered units. This enabled the bomb load to be doubled from 500kgs to 1000kgs, this full load did though limit combat radius to 210 miles. For the crew there were additional side firing guns, however as the three guns in the pod were only served by one gunner he could not do all at the same time. After heavy losses the machine guns were replaced with heavier MG 151/15 cannons. As the Germans supplied equipment to their allied No.46 Sqn (Later 46 Bomber Sqn) of the Finnish Air Force would receive 15 Aircraft in January 1942. Ten of these would be lost to operations but the remaining five would serve through to 1952 when they were scrapped. The Kit ICM have been releasing plenty of Do.17 and Do.215/7 variants in the last couple of years, which has been great news for the Luftwaffe modeller in 1:48, with only a few kits and variants to choose from previously. The Z-10 was first of the Do.17 variants to hit the shelves, with the Z-2 and Z-7 all based on the same basic sprues but with additional parts added to depict the differences. The origin of the tooling is 2015, and is part of the newly ICM that has been improving their mould manufacturing techniques, so is of good standard, with plenty of detail. There are a number of parts that will be left on the sprues after construction due to the nature of the tooling, and these are marked out on the instructions. The box is standard ICM fair with the inner flap protecting the parts, and inside the sprues are protected by a single resealable bag with another separating the clear parts within to prevent any issues. Construction begins with the cockpit, but unusually it is the sidewalls details that are inserted within the fuselage, which even includes the small raised platform on which the pilot's seat and control column sits. The other crew seat is fitted to the starboard fuselage side along with more details, and aft of this there are three bulkheads that bracket the bomb bay, which also has a stiffening lip added long the sides. The rear gunner's seat is fitted last on frames at the rear of the cockpit, and what passes for a cockpit floor is first glued to an insert that then attaches to the underside of the nose. The underside nose glazing is then added. A main internal tank is then made up and fitted behind the cockpit section. The upper wing is full span, and the lower wings are separate, with cut-outs for the landing gear bays that expose moulded-in detail within the inside of the upper panels. It has separate ailerons and fits over the top of the fuselage, covering the bomb bay over. If you're planning on opening the bay doors, remember to paint the inside of the wing a dark colour so it can't be seen, as it doesn't have any internal structure, but does have some recesses and ejector pin marks that could possibly be seen past the fuel tank or in the aft portion of the bay that is empty. The elevators are separate and form a H-shaped assembly with the rudders, which are also poseable, and these fit flush with the top of the fuselage by the usual slot/tab arrangement. Taking care to align these properly now will save a lot of work blending them in later. Building up the engine nacelles commences with the firewalls added to the lower wing cut-outs, following which the aft bulkhead has the retraction struts glued in place, and they too slot into the wing. The inner sides of the wheel bays are added to the wing, and these have pegs on their backsides that locate the outer nacelle skins on the airframe correctly, after the engine mounts are inserted into the port sides. The starboard sides are mounted in the same manner, and the radial engines are then constructed from a healthy number of parts, including detailed pistons, crank case, exhaust collector and fishtail tips, fitting onto the exposed engine mounts in each nacelle. The cowlings are provided as a frontal section with the annular radiator behind them, and then a framework that allows the access panels to be posed open or closed to show off the detail provided within. The props are single parts, with a spinner that fits over them, and if you're so minded, you could leave them able to spin just for the fun of it. A few scoops are fixed to the nacelles, the sturdy twin undercarriage legs with large tyres slot into the front of the bays, with two bay doors per nacelle, one each side fitting onto little hinge-points within the nacelle lip. The landing gear is made up of a two part wheel added to the main strut. A mud guard is also fitted. For the inside of the bomber full bomb racks and bombs are supplied which are now built up and slotted inside. The bomb bay doors can of course be closed as well as open but it would be shame not to include all the detail. The rear of the nose gondola is a clear part with two circular windows that will need masking off, and the canopy is moulded as a single part. Four ball-mounted machine guns slot through the front, rear, and both sides (at the rear), an aerial fits into a recess on the roof, and a blade aerial fit on top. The canopy can then be mounted. The nose glazing can also be fitted with its ball mounted machine gun. Decals There is a choice of two markings from 46 Sqn of the Finnish Air Force. Both are in Black/Green camo with blue undersides. They have yellow fuselage bands and underside yellow wing tips. One Aircraft also has large areas of white winter camo. Decals are in good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion Another of ICM's excellent line. Good detail with a slightly narrow choice of decals, which given only one sqn of the Finnish Air Force flew them its hardly surprising. It's now more possible than ever before to build a wide range of Do17s in 1:48, for which ICM are to be congratulated. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  10. Renault Taxi De La Marne (1914) ICM 1:35 The Renault Taxi de la Marne (Marne Taxi) is an automobile manufactured between 1905 and 1910 by Renault and used as a taxicab. The name Taxi de la Marne was not used until the outbreak of World War I, when the fleet of Paris taxis was requisitioned by the French Army to transport troops from Paris to the First Battle of the Marne in early September 1914. It was the first car produced after Marcel Renault's death in 1903, along with another four models. A car-rental company in Paris ordered 1,500 cars in 1905 as a result of a new invention that automatically calculated how much the passenger had to pay. It was called a taximeter and had been invented in 1891. Soon the Taxi de la Marne was popular for the rest of the decade in Paris and also in London from 1907. The Model The model arrives in the usual sturdy box with a separate top sleeve with a nice artist’s representation of the vehicle on the front. Inside, within a large poly bag, are four sprues of light grey styrene, four vinyl tyres, a small decal sheet and, in a separate poly bag, one clear sprue. On initial inspection the parts are really well moulded, clean, with no sign of flash. There are a number of moulding pips, some of which are on quite fragile looking parts, so care should be taken when removing. The sprue gates attaching items like the exhaust are also quite heavy and I can see these parts breaking if you’re not careful. The build begins with the joining of the two chassis rails, each with the front suspension springs integrally moulded, by two cross members. The single piece mudguards/running board part is then glued to the chassis. The carriage like cabin is then assembled from four parts before being fitted to the chassis too. Two longitudinal rails are then fitted between the forward cross member and front of the engine bay, while the four supports for the running boards are also glued into position. The sump tay is then attached, followed by the two piece front axle. The cute little engine is assembled from seven parts which includes the exhaust, before being glued into the engine bay, followed by the two piece gearbox and two piece radiator, which actually sits behind the engine. The single piece bonnet is then fitted as are the two, two piece rear doors, rear seat base and front bulkhead. The rear seat is fitted, along with the front seat base and front. The front bulkhead of the rear cabin is attached, as are the drivers bench seat and the two, two piece headlights. The rear suspension springs have to be slid into place and twisted for the location pins to fit properly. The two piece rear lamp is attached, as are the silencer and rear section of the exhaust pipe. The rear axle is made up form two parts, which includes the integrally moulded drive shaft. Each wheel is made from the single piece rim and the vinyl tyres, the completed wheels are then fitted to the axles, while the engine under tray, brake leaver and steering column are also fitted. The foot pedals are glued into position, as are the steering wheel, gear and handbrake levers. The front of the main cabin is further detailed with another panel onto which two headrests and fold down seat are attached. The spare wheel consists of a styrene ring and vinyl tyre, this is then glued to the drivers side running board. The rear cabin is fitted with the side and rear panels, while the drivers cabin is fitted with a headrest, armrests and frame for the folding rain cover. The three piece meter is assembled and fitted to the opposite side to the driver and the starting handle attached at the front. Lastly the rear cabin is fitted with its roof and roof hinges, while the drivers position is fitted with its two piece cover and all the doors have the handles glued into position. Decals The small decal sheet contains registration numbers for three vehicles and a couple of decals for the taximeter. The three vehicles are all painted in the overall red, with black mudguards and roof sections. Conclusion It’s good to see these rather unusual vehicles being released, particularly for the WWI aficionados and also remembers the role played by them during the Great War. It is also great to see a civilian vehicle of the time, for those who like something different in their collection. Whilst not a complicated kit, certainly by ICM standards, it looks like it will build into a nice little model. Review sample courtesy of
  11. They 're rumours saying after its 1/48th MiG-25RBT "Foxbat-E", ICM is working on a MiG-25PD "Foxbat-A" kit in the same scale. Wishful thinking of more. Time will tell. Source: http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234994939-icm-148-mig-25rbt/&do=findComment&comment=2573774 V.P.
  12. The Beech is back in the new ICM catalogue: 1/48th Beech C-45F/UC-45F Expeditor "WWII USAAF Passenger aircraft" - ref.48181 Source: http://scalemodels.ru/modules/forum/img_974235_1391199687_IMG_0564.jpg.html V.P.
  13. This is the recent Revell boxing. Nice straightforward build, only slight issue being the exhaust stack contact points which could be a bit more positive. Markings are all homemade stencils. Regards J A.
  14. King Of The Night ICM 1:16 (16201) In a departure from the World Guards series in 1:16 ICM bring us The Night King from the highly successful Game Of Thrones TV series, Though it might be called The King Of the Night for licencing rules? The kit comes on one sprue of grey styrene and one of black, with a separate black pedestal. There is a clear part for the Ice Sword. The parts are very well moulded with no sign of flash or other imperfections, and while the build is relatively simple, the painting will be a challenge to get the look right. Being 1:16 scale it’s large enough for the detail to be seen and painted, yet small enough to have a nice collection in a display cabinet. As with the other kits in 1:16 the instructions are not very clear. They consist of a colour drawing of the completed and painted model, with the parts numbered and arrowed. At least ICM have included some detail drawings on the painting guide this time, rather than having to squint and guess. As the kit is fairly straightforward it probably won’t worry the seasoned figure builder, but it might give the beginner some pause for thought. The kit comes with a nicely moulded pedestal with just single option of top. Alternatively the figure can be presented on a plain flat base. Conclusion If you’re a figure modeller then this will be a great way to pass the time. The painting will require a great deal patience to get right. This is really nicely made though and although quite small, and it will look really nice in the display cabinet. Review sample courtesy of
  15. Do 17Z-7 WWII German Night Fighter 1:72 ICM The Dornier Do 17, nicknamed the Fliegender Bleistift or flying pencil due to its slender shape, was a light bomber designed by Dornier Flugzeugwerke in the mid-1930s. Along with the Heinkel He 111, the Do 17 carried out the lion’s share of bombing raids against the UK up to the end of the Battle of Britain. The Do 17 Z was the main production variant and featured a redesigned forward fuselage that was enlarged in order to accommodate a rear gunner. The Z-7 was a dedicated night fighter, featuring a solid nose borrowed from the Junkers 88C. The new nose was was fitted with four guns; one 20mm cannon and three 7.92mm machine guns. An additional fuel tank in the bomb bay improved loiter time and for those dangerous head-on assaults, additional crew armour was fitted to the front bulkhead to protect them from defensive fire. This kit is the fourth iteration of ICM's excellent new tool Dornier. The plastic is essentially identical to the original Z-2 kit, but with a small extra sprue containing the new nose. Inside the very sturdy top-opening box are three largish frames of light grey plastic, a single clear plastic frame and the aforementioned nose. Together they hold a total of nearly 200 parts. The airframe is covered in crisp, recessed panel lines which look very good indeed, and the mouldings are crisp and clean. The instructions are an A4 stapled booklet which has been printed in colour and the decal sheet is clear and well printed. The overall impression is of a well-executed kit which looks like it should be thoroughly enjoyable to build. Construction begins with the very well detailed cockpit. Interior detail includes crew seats, rudder pedals, a control column (moulded in two parts), radio gear and other sidewall details. The instrument panel is made up from two parts and is really nice in terms of moulded detail. Internal frames for the bomb bay and wing spar are also included, as is the additional long range fuel tank for the forward part of the bomb bay. Interestingly, the instructions suggest you assemble and fit a full load of bombs into the aft part of the bomb bay. I think it's safe to say you can ignore this stage and save yourself the trouble of painting ten bombs! The upper wing is moulded as a single span, complete with interior detail for the main landing gear bays. The ailerons are moulded as separate parts, which is always welcome. The rest of the flying surfaces follow suite, with the rudders and elevators all moulded separately. The elevator balance mechanisms are also included. The bramo radial engines are presented in their complete form and are rather nicely detailed, which opens up the possibility of finishing the model in some form of maintenance diorama. The main landing gear legs have to be installed as part of the construction of the engine pods, so take your time making sure everything fits well together and is painted ready for installation. With the engines in place, the rest of the build is occupied with finishing details. The canopy is nice and clear, while the rear-firing MG15 is included. The new nose includes the muzzles for the cannon and machine guns, all of which were already included on the original sprues. Decal options are included for two aircraft, both of I.NJG 2, Glitze-Rijen, Autumn 1940 (R4+HK and R4+FK). Both aircraft are finished in the overall black scheme shown on the box artwork. The decals look nicely printed but no stencils are included. Conclusion ICM have certainly made the most of their investment in their new tooling, unlike Airfix who stopped at the classic Battle of Britain bomber. While both kits are excellent, ICM's effort is slightly ahead of the Airfix kit in terms of detail. The mouldings are high quality and the surface structures are fine and crisp. Overall this is a well executed and carefully designed kit which looks as though it will be thoroughly enjoyable to build. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  16. Hi folk's,WWI is a subject I've been fascinated with for year's,recent delving into my families history has revealed how many member's served throughout it's five year's my Grandfather was an artilleryman,Great Grandfather served in the Canadian army as a tunneller then engineer and Great Uncle died in the mud of Passchendaele in November 1917 add in brother's we are into double figure;s as a family.I tried to be a bit different when it came to choose a subject aircraft would be the preffered object but decided on confronting my weakest modelling skill figure's. I then decided on a theme of Mons where the British army fired the first shot's of the great war in 1914 with a simple vignette using ICM's infantry and Masterbox's farm cart on a simple base and some scenic's. That's the plan I still need to order/buy the kit's but doubt I'll start till after the holidays in a few week's,now I then decided to bookend this build with another vignette Mons 1918,probably with ICM's later equipped British infantry on a matching sized base this time with some kind of building or structure to represent the last shot's of the great war which although many year;s apart happened in tha same area.As soon as I plan the kit's I'll update the thread.
  17. Another project that languished for a bit. I mostly enjoyed the build, although the ICM T-34 had some fit issues, and the tracks don't want to take paint, which peels off easily. As a result, I was unable to weather the wheels and tracks as much as I wanted to.
  18. ICM is to release in Q4 2018 a 100% new tool 1/48th Dornier Do.217N-1 - ref. 48271 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48271 V.P.
  19. This 48th scale kit is my most recent and my proudest kit. Though the icm decals discintergrated in water, i am very fond of my work and the kit. The kit overall fitted well together, the wings required a bit of sanding to get the right shape but apart from these the kit was very nice.
  20. Hi Fellow Modellers, Bit of a gap between my last posting and now as two builds have not quite passed muster, but this one's just about good enough to publish IMHO. Nice kit actually, went together well with no real issues(apart from disintegrating decals). First real trial of my Iwata Revolution CR and I'm most impressed. Paints are Vallejo MA. Let me know what you think. PS: From my research there seems to be some disputed colours for the prop spinner, some sources say red & white, I went with the Black-green & white as per kit diagram. PS: I know my canopy framing sucks !! Cheers Nigel
  21. S.W.A.T Team Fighter #4 ICM 1:24 24104 With the current world situation armed Police officers and SWAT (Special Weapons and Tactics) Officers are seen all too frequently on the news. ICM have now brought us three 1/24 scale SWAT Figures. This figure is well sculpted and comes in a traditional format to build up. The main torso is on two parts with a join seam at the side, this should be covered in the build by added on equipment pouches. The left and right legs are one part each and are added to the torso. There is a mould seam on both sides of the leg to clean up. The arms are added and again these have mould seam to clean up, the shield then attached to one arm. The head is then fitted and a choice of three tactical helmets is offered for the top. Goggles are provided for the helmet with a separate clear part. Additional tactical equipment pouches are provided as are a selection of weapons. Different types of pistol (holstered and drawn) are provided. While these are not shown as being used for the figure it does provide many different possibilities for the modeller to use these if they wish to alter the figure in some way. Conclusion This is a new kit of a modern law enforcement figure in a large enough scale for the detail to pop out. Review sample courtesy of
  22. Sd.Kfz.251 Ausf.A with German Infantry (35103) 1:35 ICM via Hannants The Hanomag Sd.Kfz.251/1 was the mainstay of the German armoured Personnel Carrier fleet, but was flexible enough to also take up many other tasks within the Nazi War Machine, from Anti-Aircraft duties to Howitzer carriage and back again to armoured reconnaissance, which led to a lot of variants. With two steering wheels at the front, the rear was carried on tracks, giving it good clearance and rough ground capabilities that a truck simply could not manage once the going got tough. It was armoured sufficiently to deflect non-armour piercing rounds from small arms fire, but with an open top it was susceptible to both grenades and aerial bombardment, where the armour would concentrate the blast and reduce the interior to a tangled mess. The Ausf.A was used at the beginning of WWII alongside the Ausf.B, and was generally fitted with an MG.34 on the front cab wall, operated from inside. There were more than 20 official variants and more unofficial field modifications, but despite their seemingly ubiquitous nature in German service, not many were preserved after the war, and they are highly sought after now, with many examples being based upon post-war builds from Czech factories that have been made to look as convincing as possible by their restorers. While the purist may notice the differences in films, they're still a huge improvement on repainted American half-tracks from an authenticity point of view. The Kit This is a reboxing of kit number 35101 of the same vehicle, but with the addition of a set of German Infantry (4 figures) to accompany it. We reviewed the original kit here, where you can see all the pictures below, as well as the build process and our thoughts on the model. This boxing arrives in a similar box, with the additional sprues for the figures taking up any spare space within, and on the exterior it has a new painting, which represents the more relaxed theme of the figures, which are either walking with their transport, or standing offering directions. In addition to the five grey sprues there are three in sand coloured styrene (the figures), a clear sprue (just the headlamps are used), and the flexible tracks and wheels. The instruction booklet follows the same format, and is actually the one from the earlier box, but with the instructions for the figures slipped inside, along with a separate page for sprue diagrams and painting guide for the accessories that come with the figures. The figures are four in number, and come as separate torsos, legs, arms, heads and helmets/hats. Shoulder bags, weapons and all the usual parts such as gas mask canisters, water bottles, entrenching tools, ammo pouches, pistols, binoculars, weapons and bayonets are included, most of which are found on the smaller sprue. The third sand sprue contains two lengths of link for the MG34 that is included on the aforementioned smaller sprue, which were sometimes carrier over the shoulders for easy access in event of contact with the enemy. These are moulded in a more flexible styrene, and are also a slightly different colour to the others, which can hopefully be seen from the pictures. An officer is included looking at a map, while another soldier points with one hand, with an MP40 in his other. The other two figures are depicted walking, one with an MG34 over his shoulder and a scarf of bullets, the other with boxes of ammo in his hands, and his rifle slung over his shoulder. As always with ICM, the sculpting it excellent, and the level of detail in the accessories of similar quality. Painting call-outs are included in the Revell and Tamiya ranges, with colour names in English and Ukraine for those without access to one of the many online paint conversion tools. Markings As this is the same kit, the same markings options are supplied this time around, with Panzer Grey being the colour scheme of the era. It also explains why there are no MG42s included on the weapons sprue. WH 726465 1.Pz.D., France, May 1940 WH 179074 1.Pz.D., Russia, July 1941 Conclusion We liked it first time around, and like it still, especially with the addition of these figures, which add a human scale to the model, and lend themselves to a diorama base, possibly at a crossroads in France? Highly recommended. Available in the UK from Hannants and other model shops Review sample courtesy of
  23. Mike

    Junkers Ju.88C-6 (48238) 1:48

    Junkers Ju.88C-6 (48238) 1:48 ICM The Ju-88 was designed as a schnellbomber in the mid 30s, and at the time it was faster than current fighter designs, so it was projected that it could infiltrate, bomb and escape without being intercepted. That was the theory anyway. By the time WWII began in the west, fighters had caught up with the previously untouchable speed of the 88, and it needed escorts to protect it from its Merlin equipped opponents. It turned out to be a jack of all trades however, and was as competent as a night fighter, dive bomber or doing reconnaissance as it was bombing Britain. They even popped a big gun on the nose and sent it against tanks and bombers, with variable success. The C series aircraft were supposed to be primarily heavily armed fighters or ground attack, fitted with a collection of extra guns in a metal nose. Once Allied bombers started popping up over Germany however, they were quickly retasked with nightfighter duties, in which they found their ultimate role. The specification retained the gondola under the nose, but this was often removed in the field to reduce weight and increase top speed, all of which gave them an edge over an unmodified airframe. After design was completed, the C-4 was the first to enter production, with 120 made, split between new builds and conversions of the A-5 on which they were based. With the solid nose the C-6 took over from the C-4, and 900 were made until it too was superseded. The Kit This is another minor retool of ICM's new line of Ju.88s, and they seem intent on providing us with all the variants we could ever need, which has got to be good news. This one uses the earlier Ju.88A-11 as a base, which we reviewed here, using seven of its sprues plus the main clear sprue, and adding two new sprues, with an additional canopy sprue to give us the C-6 Nightfighter. In case you don't feel like doing the calculations for yourself that's nine sprues of grey styrene, two of clear, a sheet of decals and a glossy instruction booklet. As you can probably imagine, there will be a number of parts left in the box after you have completed your model, and these are marked out in red on the map inside the front cover. New Sprues The major differences centre around the solid nose, exhaust flame hiders, and inside there is a difference in the seating layout due to it not having a bomb aimer, and there is a gunsight mounted on the instrument panel for obvious reasons (those pointy things that go bang!). In the nose are a set of ammo boxes to feed the guns, while the wings and tail are identical for our purposes, as is the landing gear. The gondola under the cockpit is repurposed as a gun pack in the C-6, with slight changes to the housing parts, and an insert for the two guns, while the glazing is still used. The rear of the gondola has a zwilling (twin) mount machine gun, with the glazing in the front present as well. ICM provide two inline Jumo 211J engines, which have plenty of detail moulded in and just need a bit of wiring to complete them if you plan to show them off. They are installed in the nacelles against a firewall, with separate cowling panels to allow you to display the engine and pose the cooling flaps open or closed. A set of optional flame hiders are provided to cover up the exhaust stubs, which are used on one of the decal options (the winter distemper covered example). Now we get to the nose. There are three solid nose cones on the new sprues, so take care when selecting which one to use, as the other two have mounts for the "whiskers" carried by nightfighter marks. There are four guns in the nose, but only the bottom one is depicted fully, which has a breech cut from the provided parts glued inside the nose. All the muzzles are separate sections that are glued from the outside, and they don't have hollow muzzles, partly due to their small size. The new canopy has no mounting for the forward firing machine gun of previous versions, and this is then joined with the two part aft glazing, which has a pair of bulged mounts for more machine guns, so is moulded in two parts. Using a non-melting glue such as GS-Hypo cement will save you from any canopy fogging due to glue being absorbed into the clear parts. Markings There are four decal options in the box, and a separate page deals with the stencils common to them all. The decals have good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas, and instrument panel decals in the middle of the sheet. From the box you can build one of the following: Junkers Ju-88C-6, 11./ZG 26, Mediterranean, Summer 1943 Junkers Ju-88C-6, 11./ZG 26, Mediterranean, Summer 1943 Junkers Ju-88C-6, 13./KG 40, Lorient, France, Nov 1943 Junkers Ju-88C-6, 4./KG 76, Taganrog, Russia, Autumn 1942 Conclusion Another smashing boxing of this long-lived and successful aircraft that was a true multi-role aircraft. Detail and ease of construction is there, along with a selection of different markings that should please a lot of people. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  24. S.W.A.T Team Fighter #3 ICM 1:24 24103 With the current world situation armed Police officers and SWAT (Special Weapons and Tactics) Officers are seen all too frequently on the news. ICM have now brought us three 1/24 scale SWAT Figures. This figure is well sculpted and comes in a traditional format to build up. The main torso is on two parts with a join seam at the side, this should be covered in the build by added on equipment pouches. The left and right legs are one part each and are added to the torso. There is a mould seam on both sides of the leg to clean up. The arms are added and again these have mould seam to clean up, the shield then attached to one arm. The head is then fitted and a choice of three tactical helmets is offered for the top. Goggles are provided for the helmet with a separate clear part. Additional tactical equipment pouches are provided as are a selection of weapons. Different types of pistol (holstered and drawn) are provided. While these are not shown as being used for the figure it does provide many different possibilities for the modeller to use these if they wish to alter the figure in some way. Conclusion This is a new kit of a modern law enforcement figure in a large enough scale for the detail to pop out. Review sample courtesy of
  25. Shar2

    Soviet T-34/85 with Riders. 1:35

    Soviet T-34/85 with Riders ICM 1:35 History The T-34 was and remains a legend. It is not only the most produced tank of the WWII-era, with 84,000 built (compared to the 48,966 Shermans of all versions) but also one of the longest-serving tanks ever built. Many are still stored in depots in Asia and Africa, and some served actively during the 90’s (such as during the 1991-99 Yugoslavian war). They formed the backbone of countless armoured forces around the globe from the fifties to the eighties. The basic design was drawn for the first time in 1938 with the A-32, in turn partially derived from the BT-7M, a late evolution of the US-born Christie tank. The T-34/85 came about after it was recognised that there was a need to increase the firepower of the T-34/76 following the Battle of Kursk in 1943. While the hull stayed the same, a new turret was designed and was to be originally fitted with a derivative of the M1939 air defence gun. This gun wasn’t chosen to be produced en masse, that honour went to the ZIS-S-53 which armed the 11,800 tanks produced between 1944 and 1945. The Model The model arrives in a strong box with a separate top sleeve with a nice artist’s representation of the tank and riders on the front. Inside, within a large poly bag, are five sprues and two hull parts of green styrene and, four lengths of tracks, a small sprue of clear styrene, and a smallish decal sheet. On initial inspection the parts are really well moulded, clean, with no sign of flash. There are a number of moulding pips, some of which are on quite fragile looking parts, so care should be taken when removing. The sprue gates attaching some items like are also quite heavy and I can see these parts breaking if not careful. The build begins with the fitting of the engine cover onto the rear decking, and the bow machine gun, armoured tear drop, mantle and ball. The two intake covers are then assembled and also fitted to the rear deck. The two piece bow mounted machine gun is then assembled and slide into the ball of the mounting, being glued such that it is still moveable, whilst there are four plates that are fitted to the underside of the rear decking. The drivers hatch is made up form four parts before being glued into position. Back aft, the rear bulkhead is attached, followed by the radiator cover. Inside the lower hull section the eight suspension boxes are fitted, four per side as are the two driver’s control sticks, whilst the rear mudguards are fitted to the rear. On the outside the driver gearbox covers are fitted, as are the five axles on their torsion beam suspension arms and the idler axles. The drivers are machine gunners seats, each made from six parts are glued in their appropriate positions and the two hull halves joined together. Each of the idler wheels, drive sprockets and road wheels are made from two parts before being fitted to their respective axles. The four towing hooks are then attached, two at the front and two aft. The upper hull is then fitted out with grab handles, stowage beams and a couple of smaller hooks. Each of the two halves of rubber track lengths are joined together and slide of the wheels. While there isn’t really any interior, ICM have allowed for the fact that some modellers like to have the hatches open, to that effect there is some semblance of interior parts. The main gun breech is made up form thirteen parts, and although relatively simple, does look quite effective. On the outside of the turret the mantlet and fixed section of the mantlet cover are fitted, the breech assembly is then glued to the mantlet from the inside and the lower turret, including the turret ring is glued into place. The moving section of the mantlet cover is then attached, along with the machine gun muzzle. The three piece mantlet extension and three piece main gun is then fitted, along with the four piece cupola, gunners hatch, grab handles, ventilator dome, viewing block and top armour plate for the mantlet. There are more stowage bars, periscope sights, lifting eyes and viewing blocks fitted to the turret before the whole assembly si fitted to the upper hull. Final assembly includes the four, four piece fuel drums, each with two cradles, spare track links, stowage boxes and aerial base. There is a four piece folded tarpaulin, (in place of one of the fuel drums), another stowage box, two more track links headlight, horn, two towing cables and a large saw attached before the model can be declares complete. The riders are then assembled. There are four of them, and each is made up from separate legs, upper torso, arms, head and headgear. There are also separate pouches, water bottles, ammunition drums and ammunition pouches. The weapons are also separate with the ammunition drum or magazine to be attached. Three are armed with the PPSh-41 sub-machine gun and one with a German MP-40 sub-machine gun. Decals The decal sheet provides four options for tanks that each served in 1945. All of the tanks are in all over green, each with tank ID numbers and unit markings. The choices are:- A T-34/85, 7th Guards Tank Corps, Germany, Spring 1945 A T-34/85, 7th Guards Mechanised Corps, Germany, Spring 1945 A T-34/85, 4th Guard Tank Army, Germany, Spring 1945 A T-34/85, of an undesignated unit, from the Spring 1945 Conclusion This is another fine kit from ICM. Although not the most complicated of tank kits, it does look the part and would make a nice, relaxing weekend build. The addition of the riders makes for some interesting diorama builds. Review sample courtesy of
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