Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'ICM'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Group Builds
  • Model Show Calendar

Forums

  • Site Help & Support
    • FAQs
    • Help & Support
    • New Members
    • Announcements
  • Aircraft Modelling
    • Military Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Civil Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Aircraft
    • Ready for Inspection - Aircraft
    • Aircraft Related Subjects
  • AFV Modelling (armour, military vehicles & artillery)
    • Armour Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Armour
    • Ready for Inspection - Armour
    • Armour Related Subjects
    • large Scale AFVs (1:16 and above)
  • Maritime Modelling (Ships and subs)
    • Maritime Discussion by era
    • Work in Progress - Maritime
    • Ready for Inspection - Maritime
  • Vehicle Modelling (non-military)
    • Vehicle Discussion
    • Work In Progress - Vehicles
    • Ready For Inspection - Vehicles
  • Science Fiction & RealSpace
    • Science Fiction Discussion
    • RealSpace Discussion
    • Work In Progress - SF & RealSpace
    • Ready for Inspection - SF & RealSpace
  • Figure Modelling
    • Figure Discussion
    • Figure Work In Progress
    • Figure Ready for Inspection
  • Dioramas, Vignettes & Scenery
    • Diorama Chat
    • Work In Progress - Dioramas
    • Ready For Inspection - Dioramas
  • Reviews, News & Walkarounds
    • Reviews
    • Current News
    • Build Articles
    • Tips & Tricks
    • Walkarounds
  • Modelling
    • Group Builds
    • The Rumourmonger
    • Manufacturer News
    • Other Modelling Genres
    • Britmodeller Yearbooks
    • Tools & Tips
  • General Discussion
    • Chat
    • Shows
    • Photography
    • Members' Wishlists
  • Shops, manufacturers & vendors
    • Aerocraft Models
    • Above & Beyond Retail
    • Air-craft.net
    • A.M.U.R. Reaver
    • Atlantic Models
    • Bearhobbies.com
    • Bernd.M Modellbau
    • BlackMike Models
    • Casemate UK
    • Copper State Models
    • Creative Models Ltd
    • DACO Products
    • Freightdog Models
    • Hannants
    • Hobby Colours & Accessories
    • fantasy Printshop
    • Hobby Paint'n'Stuff
    • Hypersonic Models
    • Iliad Design
    • MikroMir
    • Kagero Publishing
    • Kingkit
    • L'Arsenal 2.0
    • Modellingtools.co.uk
    • Maketar Paint Masks
    • Marmaduke Press Decals
    • MJW Models
    • NeOmega & Vector Resin
    • Parkes682Decals
    • Pocketbond Limited
    • Precision Ice and Snow
    • Radu Brinzan Productions
    • Red Roo Models
    • RES/KIT
    • SBS Model - Hungary
    • Scale-Model-Kits.com
    • Scratchaeronautics
    • Shelf Oddity
    • Small Stuff Models
    • Sovereign Hobbies
    • Special Hobby
    • Sphere Products
    • Starling Models
    • Thunderbird Models
    • Tiger Hobbies
    • Tirydium Models
    • Topnotch - Bases and Masks for Models
    • Ultimate Modelling Products
    • Valiant Wings Publishing
    • Videoaviation Italy
    • White Ensign Models
    • Wonderland Models
  • Archive
    • 2007 Group Builds
    • 2008 Group Builds
    • 2009 Group Builds
    • 2010 Group Builds
    • 2011 Group Builds
    • 2012 Group Builds
    • 2013 Group Builds
  • Brits Abroad GB

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 212 results

  1. Hi all, first post here so please go easy! I have recently taken to scale modelling and after a few practice builds on a few Airfix starter kits I thought it was time to get my teeth into something a bit more challenging. After watching this brilliant video I decided to go for the ICM Spitfire Mk.IX 'Beer Delivery', so a quick trip to eModels and about £13 and a week later the kit arrived. I hope that some of you find this build interesting and am looking forward to receiving any tips. Boxing: Plenty of parts First off I started building the engine block and cradle. The moulding is pretty poor with lots of flash and mould lines but the plastic is pretty soft so not too bad to sand down. I like the amount of detail though with about thirty parts coming together for the block alone. Interestingly there are very few locating pins on this kit meaning that the parts have to be manually aligned. Next for the firewall and engine cradle (right word?) After a good bit of sanding down the joins time to paint. Tamiya paints sprayed at 15psi and 2xpaint:1xthinner. Rubber black for the engine block and cockpit green for the cradle and firewall Exhausts sprayed with flat iron and dry brushed with Humbrol rust acrylic Bringing it together after drybrushing the engine block and cradle with Humbrol aluminium That's all for now. Any tips or criticism are equally welcomed and hopefully I will get a chance to move forward with the cockpit and post an update at the weekend
  2. Shar2

    I-16 Type 29. 1:32

    I-16 Type 29 ICM 1:32 Design work on the I-16 began during the summer of 1932 at the Central Aero and Hydrodynamic Institute. When the tiny I-16 flew for the first time in December 1933, it was far ahead of any other fighter design in the world, featuring retractable landing gear, a cantilever wing and variable pitch propeller. Although not among the best remembered aircraft of the thirties, it was nevertheless a very able and rugged machine and featured prominently in the events of the time. When the Spanish Civil War broke out, almost 500 were put into service with the Republicans. The outstanding manoeuvrability, firepower and rate of climb, surprised the enemy leading to the opposition nickname of Rata (Rat) and the friendly name Mosca (Fly). Equipped with the Soviet 20 mm cannon it was the most powerful aircraft weapon in front line service with any nation on the eve of World War II. It had a very high rate of fire and was extremely reliable. Another batch of I-16s was purchased by China to fight the Japanese, again surprising the other side with excellent performance. When it first appeared, the I-16 Ishak (Little Donkey) was powered by a radial engine which developed a modest 450 hp. Even with this it achieved a creditable 376 km/h (234 mph) and, as the world's first single-seat fighter to have low monoplane wings, an enclosed cockpit (on some versions) and a retractable undercarriage. It was immediately put into mass production alongside the Polikarpov I-15 biplane fighter. Development led eventually to one version of the I-16 reaching over 520km/h (325 mph), with an engine of about two-and-a-half times the original power. At this point the I-16 might well have faded into obscurity, if not for the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War in July 1936. This war drew support from all over the world. The Nationalists, supported mainly by German and Italian forces, were the better equipped. Britain, France, the United States, the Netherlands, Czechoslovakia and Turkey all sent an assortment of aircraft to the Republican forces, directly or indirectly. But by far the major supporter of the Republicans was the Soviet Union, which supplied 1,409 of the 1947 aircraft contributed by other countries. 475 of these aircraft were Polikarpov I-16s. They first entered combat in Spain in November 1936. Flown in many cases by Soviet pilots, they proved more than a match for German He 51 fighters and Arado Ar68, but met their equals in the Italian C.R.32 biplanes and were overpowered by Messerschmitt Bf 109s. From March 1937, all remaining I-16s were concentrated into Fighter Group 31, and this was by far the most successful of all Soviet-equipped units. Meanwhile, I-16s were fighting also in China, and in 1939 were operated against the Japanese in Mongolia. Their final fling came during the early part of the Second World War, but by then they were overshadowed by more advanced foreign types. Suffering the brunt of the German invasion, those remaining were replaced by more modern fighters in 1942-1943. The Type 29 differed from the earlier Type 28 by having two synchronized ShKAS in the nose and a single 12.7 mm (0.50 in) UBS in the bottom of the fuselage; it had no guns in wings which were reserved for ground attack weapons. Three rocket racks were mounted in each wing. Additionally, starting in 1941, the external fuel tank hardpoint was changed so that it became multipurpose: it could carry the new type of drop tank, PLBG-100, or a FAB-100 bomb. Wartime photographs from the summer of 1941 show two configurations: one with 6 RS-82 rockets and two FAB-100 bombs and another with four RS-132 rockets The Model This is the third in ICM’s series of I-16’s, the previous releases being a Type 24 and a Type 28. As with the previous release there is a nice artist’s representation of the aircraft on the box top. Once you take the lid off the box and opened the inner lid, you will find four large sprues of grey styrene, one small clear sprue and a medium sized decal sheet. All the parts are superbly moulded, with no sign of flash or other imperfections and only a few noticeable moulding pips. There are a few swirl marks in the plastic, but nothing to worry about and will easily be covered when the kit is primed and painted. Since the aircraft was mostly wood there are very few panel lines, where fabric was used in the construction, the kit shows the underlying structure, but in a nicely restrained way. Is is interesting to note that this is not5 just a re-release of the Type 28 with added weapons. The wing sprue is completely new with the correct modifications/differences not only to the wings, but also the cowling front. Construction begins with the wings and the two upper sections being attached to the single piece lower section, after which the port and starboard clear navigation lights are attached. Each aileron is moulded in top and bottom halves, which, once joined together are fitted in the desired poses, along with the lower underside of the nose. The cockpit is assembled next, and is a very nicely detailed area. The rear bulkhead is fitted with the seat backrest and support, while the two piece rudder pedals are assembled. The pedals are fitted to the cockpit floor, along with the rear mounted battery box. The front and rear bulkheads are then glued into the left hand fuselage section along with some sidewall detail. The floor is then slide in through the front bulkhead opening and glued to the rear bulkhead. The two piece throttle is assembled and glued into position, and then the instrument panel, which is moulded in clear plastic is fitted with the instrument decal. The rest of the cockpit is then detailed with the oxygen bottle instrument panel, joystick, a couple of handles, and seat. On the opposite side wall the undercarriage handle and a couple of instrument clusters are attached. The firewall is fitted with the two piece oil tank and two gun troughs, before being fitted to one half of the fuselage. The two piece rudder and three piece elevators are then assembled, as is the two piece upper nose section. The fuselage halves are then joined, and the rudder, horizontal tailplanes and upper nose section attached, as are the two door panels. The fuselage and wing assembly are then glued together. The engine bearers and attached to the engine mounting ring, followed by gearbox case and intake manifold, the two halves that make up the cylinders, each with exquisite fin detail, are joined together, then fitted with the piston rods and individual exhaust pipes, before the gearbox assembly is fitted to the rear. The completed engine is then attached to the fuselage. The engine is cowled with three optionally fitted panels, plus the three piece nose cowl, with optionally positioned vents. The two machine guns fitted to the upper nose are then slid into their associated troughs, followed by the gunsight and windscreen. The build is finished off with the assembly of the two main undercarriage units and the various weapons, including two piece drop tanks and two piece rockets on separate single piece rails.. Each undercarriage unit is made up of a two piece wheel, single piece main leg, complete with actuator, two outer doors, with separate hinged lower section, there is a second support rod fitted with another door which is glued to the leg and rear mounting point in the wing. The tail wheel is then attached, as is the tail cone and rear light, the drop tanks and rockets, side mounted venturi style pitot, aerial mast and what looks like an aerial unit, aft of the cockpit. Decals The decal sheet is printed by ICM themselves. The decals are quite glossy, well printed, in register and nicely opaque, particularly useful for the large white arrow. There are four decal options with this release, they are:- I-16 Type 29, Red 75 of the 4th Guard Fighter Regiment of the Baltic Fleet Aviation, Winter – Spring 1942 in white over light blue camouflage I-16 Type 29, White 12 of the 4th Guard Fighter Regiment of the Baltic Fleet Aviation, Winter – Spring 1943 in dark green over light blue camouflage. I-16 Type 29, White 75 of the 71st Fighter Regiment, Autumn 1941 in dark green and black over light blue camouflage. I-16 Type 29, White 13 of the 158th Fighter Regiment of the Northern Fleet Aviation, Pskov Region, July 1941 in dark green and black over light blue camouflage. Conclusion I really like the I-16, there’s something about the old I-16, no matter which type. Whether it’s the cute little plane, or the plucky little fighter going up against the odds, with only the skills of the Soviet pilots keeping the aircraft, which was quite difficult to fly and fight with, in the air. Even though it is really very nice and will build up into a great looking model there is plenty of provision for the super detailers amongst us to really go to town on the interior. Review sample courtesy of
  3. "Britain’s position is hopeless. The war is won by us. A reversal in the prospects of success is impossible." -- Generaloberst Franz Halder, diary entry for 22 July 1940 Oh, it has its triumphs, but look at its countless defeats, missed blows, and repeat attempts! -- Wislawa Szymborska, "On Death, Without Exaggeration" "My experience over Dunkirk had taught me that when attacked the best counter was to go into a right turn. In this manoeuvre, the Spitfire was infinitely superior to the Messerschmitt, and so long as one remained in the turn, the enemy pilot could not bring his guns to bear. And this I did, as the German pilot flashed past, turning as he did so to get behind me. But it was I who finished astern of him. The rest was easy." -- Flight Lieutenant Al Deere, 54 Squadron As you may know, I have something of an interest in the Battle of Britain, and so I thought for my next build I would try something simple and easy and make it only slightly more complex. It's widely-acknowledged that the ICM 1/72 109E is eerily -- some uncharitable souls might say suspiciously -- similar to the 1/72 Tamiya 109E, but for fuselage halves of the correct length. How similar is it reputed to be? The kit parts have been said to be interchangeable. I decided to test this theory. The fuselage halves sure seem to fit the wings well! I painted the interior Colourcoats RLM02 with RLM66 detail bits (and like an idiot, managed to spill almost all of my brand-new pot of RLM66, which is almost impossible to do with Colourcoats tins unless you're an idiot, and guilty as charged Some speculative test-fitting suggests the Tamiya cockpit interior will fit without difficulty in the ICM fuselage. I'm using Xtradecals from their Battle of Britain 70th sheet (because both Tamiya and ICM decals are crap) to build Bf109E-3 "Yellow 15" of 3./JG52, flown by Unteroffizier Karl Wolff, which crash-landed in Calais on 30 August 1940. Wolff survived, only to be shot down and captured on 30 September 1940, a day of particularly heavy Bf109 losses for the Luftwaffe. The aircraft in question was photographed quite a bit, and as we can see, it received heavy field-applied mottling along the sides of the fuselage, in addition to having a white snout.
  4. In the framework of the recent toy tradefair Mir Detstva 2017, held at Moscow, ICM is reported having announced a new tool 1/72nd MiG-25RB/RBT "Foxbat-B" kit for 2018. To be followed. Source AlexGRD: http://master194.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=100171&sid=b7252e4ad3d849de8e26c4c009281a81 V.P.
  5. MiG-25 RBT Soviet Reconnaissance Plane 1:72 ICM In the early part of the Cold War, the strategic bomber was seen as the obvious means by which to deliver a nuclear payload. The interceptor - large, heavy and fast - was seen as the equally obvious countermeasure. The MiG-25 Foxbat was, in many ways, the ultimate embodiment of this technology. It wasn't particularly groundbreaking and nor was it particularly sophisticated, but it was capable of incredible speed and could carry four large missiles to high altitudes very quickly indeed. The MiG-25's shortcomings as a combat aircraft were largely addressed through the MiG-31 Foxhound, but the type continued as an effective reconnaissance platform in a variety of guises. The RBT was an updated version of the RB reconnaissance bomber, fitted with Tangaz ELINT equipment and manufactured during the early part of the 1980s. This kit is the first iteration of ICM's new 1/72 MiG-25 family. The model is pretty much a scaled down version of their 1:48 kit, which is a jolly good thing indeed. Inside the very sturdy top-opening box are five frames of light grey plastic and one of clear plastic. The airframe is covered in crisp, recessed panel lines which look very good indeed, and the mouldings are crisp and clean. The instructions are an A4 stapled booklet which has been printed in colour and the decal sheet is clear and well printed. The overall impression is of a well-executed, modern kit which looks like it should be thoroughly enjoyable to build. Construction begins with the cockpit and nose gear bay. Some detail is moulded in place on the sidewalls of the cockpit, while there are extra parts provided to represent additional details. Before the main structure of the cockpit can be completed, however, you have to add the bulkhead that forms the front wall of the cockpit and the rear wall of the nose gear bay. The instructions have you installing the nose gear leg at this stage, but I can't see any logical reason as to why this can't be done at the end. This would, of course, save you from breaking the leg part way through the build. The cockpit itself is nicely detailed, with the ejector seat alone made up of no fewer than five parts. An instrument panel and control column completes this section of the build. Once the forward fuselage halves have been joined together, the whole sub-assembly fits onto a spart that holds the huge engine air intakes. I've noticed that kit manufacturers are moving increasingly toward this style of construction, where certain parts are provided for purely structural purposes instead of the older slot and tab style of construction. I guess the main advantage, other than strength, is that everything can be positioned at exactly the right angle - a helpful feature for kits that feature quit a complex breakdown of parts, such as this one. Each engine intake is full-length, with engine compressor faces provided. What results is a complete forward section of the aircraft up to the wing roots, with the internal structure of the air intakes protruding from the rear. The lower face of the main fuselage can be joined to this structure once the main landing gear bays have been added. ICM suggest that you add the main landing gear legs at this stage. Again, I can't see any reason why they couldn't be fettled into place after the main construction has been completed. Once the lower face of the main fuselage is in place, another structural bulkhead can be added, after which the slab-sides of the fuselage, including the outer faces of the air intakes, can be added. The dustbin-like jet exhausts are added at this stage, and very nicely detailed they are too. Once in place, the upper face of the fuselage can be added. Some modellers have noticed that the central spine has a flattened profile instead of a rounded shape. This is true, but I imagine most modellers will choose to live with this flaw. All that remains now is to add the nosecone, flying surfaces and finishing details. Each vertical tail is split vertically, with a seperate rudder. The outer face is moulded with part of the rear fuselage in place, so presumably it will be impossible to fit these parts at the wrong angle. Somewhat surprisingly, the upper wings are not moulded in one part with the upper fuselage. Instead, they are split into separate port and starboard halves, with two seperate flaperons and upper wing fences and fittings for bomb shackles below. The nosecone is simply split vertically, with a separate part for the camera pack and clear parts for the camera lenses. The canopy is nice and clear and can be finished in either open or closed position. A huge auxiliary fuel tank is provided. Other than that, and a few aerials, lumps and bumps, the huge aircraft is now finished. Four options are provided for on the decal sheet: MiG-25RBT of the Soviet Air Force from the late 1980s; MiG-25RBT of the 47th GRAP, Russian Air Force, May 2001; MiG-25RBT, Iraqi Air Force, late 1980s; and MiG-25RBT, Libyan Air Force, 2000s. The decals look nicely printed and a number of stencils are included. Conclusion We've waited a while for a new, more more modern kit of the Foxbat in this scale. ICM's new effort looks to be slightly ahead of, er... the older ICM kit (which admittedly represents the interceptor version) and of course it is light years ahead of ye olde Hasegawa effort. The the mouldings are high quality, there is plenty of the detail and surface structures are fine and crisp. Overall this is a well executed and carefully designed kit which is very appealing indeed. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. Ju-88A-4 WWII Axis Bomber 1:48 ICM (48237) The Ju-88 was designed as a schnellbomber in the mid 30s, and at the time it was faster than current fighter designs, so it was projected that it could infiltrate, bomb and ex-filtrate without being intercepted. That was the theory anyway. By the time WWII began in the west, fighters had caught up with the previously untouchable speed of the 88, and it needed escorting to protect it from its Merlin equipped opponents. It turned out to be a jack of all trades however, and was as competent as a night fighter, dive bomber or doing reconnaissance as it was bombing Britain. They even popped a big gun on the nose and sent it against tanks and bombers, with variable success. The A series sported a pair of Jumo 211 engines in cylindrical cowlings producing over 1,000hp each, and was improved gradually up until the A-17, with the A-11 being the official designation for the factory produced tropicalised version. It was fitted with filters to protect the engine from dust and dirt, as well as a rescue kit for ditching and forced landings. The A-4 was an Improved variant over initial versions. It would feature a longer wingspan, (due to redesigned wingtips), better defensive armament, a reinforced undercarriage; and provision for external bomb racks (4). Powerplant for the A-4 was Jumo 211 J-1 or J-2 engines (1410 hp) driving wooden bladed propellers. The Kit This is a new variation on the original tooling released a couple of years by ICM, with new parts added to make it version specific. There are new engine nacelles and props; new fin and rudder; changes to the cockpit mounted machine-guns, and different glazing options are chosen from the same clear sprue. The box is the usual top-opening with an inner lid style, and inside you will find eight sprues in grey styrene, one in clear, decal sheet and a glossy covered instruction booklet with spot colour inside, and the decal options in full colour on the back cover. If you have been lucky enough to see the A-5, you'll know that detail is right up there in terms of quality and crispness, with ICM really improving over the last few years, which has to be great news for modellers, as they aren't frightened of tackling what to us may seem niche subject matters. With the sprue-related excitement out of the way, work on the fuselage begins with the addition of sidewall details in the capacious cockpit area. Rear bulkhead, side consoles and seats are all added to the cockpit sides for a change, with an insert in the fuselage for the circular antenna and tail wheel added into the starboard side. The instrument panel is supplied with decals, and fits into the fuselage during joining. The missing floor is added to the lower fuselage panel that includes the lower parts of the inner wings and gives the structure some strength. It also receives the rudder pedals, control column, and the two remaining crew seats before being joined to the fuselage. The tail plane has articulated flying surfaces, and the wings are supplied as top and bottom, with the flaps and ailerons separate from the box, and neat curved fairings so they look good when fitted at an angle. The flaps include the rear section of the soon-to-be-fitted nacelles, which are added as separate parts to avoid sink-marks, and these and the ailerons run full-span, terminating just as the wingtip begins. At this time the landing gear is made up on a pair of upstands that are added to the underwing in preparation for the installation of the nacelle cowlings. The engines have to be built up first though, consisting of a high part count with plenty of detail, and a rear firewall that securely fits inside the cowling. Even though this is an in-line engine with a V-shaped piston layout, the addition of the annular radiators gives it the look of a radial, with their representation added to the front of the cowling, obscuring much of the engine detail. The side panels can be left off to show all that detail. The cooling flaps around the cowling are separate, and the exhausts have separate stacks, which aren't hollow but are large enough to make boring them out with a drill a possibility. The completed nacelle fit to the underwing over the top of the main gear installation, securing in place with four pegs, two on each side of each nacelle. The props are made from spinner, backplate and a single piece containing all three blades, sliding onto a pin projecting from the engine front, which will require some glue if you want to keep them on. At this point the instructions recommend adding the canopy glazing, which consists of a choice of two faceted nose cones, and the main greenhouse for the cockpit aperture. The rear portion is made from two additional parts due to its double "blown" shape to accommodate the two rearward gun positions, so that the gunner's head isn't pressed against the canopy. The guns are fitted through the windscreen and the two circular ports on the rear, although no ammo feed is supplied. Under the wings the dive spoilers are added with four bomb crutches on aerodynamic mounts, with bombs supplied that have two of their fins moulded separately, along with the stabilising struts that fit into notches in the fins. While the airframe is flipped over, the two-part wheels and twin main gear bay doors are added, both having good detail and the former a radial tread. Addition of the canopy mounted antenna completes the build, but this is likely to be done long after main painting for safety's sake! Markings The kit includes four marking options for Axis Air Arms supplied by Germany. Stencils are the first page of the painting section details the application of these. From the box you can build one of the following: Junkers Ju.88A-4 Grupul 5 Bombardment Romania 1944 Junkers Ju.88A-4 3/1 Bombazo szazaf, Hungarian Air Force, Russia 1943 Junkers Ju.88A-4 1/PLeLv 44, Onttola, Finland Summer 1944 Junkers Ju.88A-4 3/PLeLv 44, Onttola, Finland Summer 1944 The colours are picked out using letters that correspond to a table on the front page, which gives the names and paint codes in Revell and Tamiya ranges, so should be easy to convert to your paint system of choice. The decals are printed in-house and have good register, colour density and sharpness, with additional instrument dials included on a clear carrier film to help with cockpit painting. All of the stencils are legible, and overall they inspire confidence, with a thin carrier film cut close to the printing, with a few exceptions where lettering has film that could have been dispensed with to reduce the menace of silvering. Conclusion ICM's range of Ju.88s and Do.17s are a good example of how far they have come in recent years, adding value to their brand, and improving their reputation with each release. The kit is well-detailed and comprehensive in what it includes, and with a nice pair of decal options it says "build me". Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. ICM is to release in 2016 two new variants from its Junkers Ju-88 kit. Already released: Ju-88A-5 kit http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234975682-148-junkers-ju-88a-5-by-icm-released/ - ref.48233 - Junkers Ju-88A-4 WWII German Bomber NEW - Q2 2016 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48233 - ref.48234 - Junkers Ju-88A-14 WWII German Bomber NEW - Q3 2016 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48234 V.P.
  8. In the framework of the recent toy tradefair Mir Detstva 2017, held at Moscow, ICM is reported having announced a 1/32nd Bücker Bu.131 (.181 ?) kit for 2018. To be followed. Source AlexGRD: http://master194.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=100171&sid=b7252e4ad3d849de8e26c4c009281a81 V.P.
  9. In the framework of the recent toy tradefair Mir Detstva 2017, held at Moscow, ICM is reported having announced a 1/32nd Polikarpov I-153 Chaika kit for 2018. To be followed. Source AlexGRD: http://master194.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=100171&sid=b7252e4ad3d849de8e26c4c009281a81 V.P.
  10. Paul A H

    Viking (IX Century) - 1:16

    Viking (IX Century) 1:72 ICM The latest figure in ICM's popular series of 1:16 figures is this ninth century Viking. The ninth century was, of course, the period in time when the Vikings rampaged through ancient Britain, subjugating most of the seven ancient kingdoms before having their progress halted by King Alfred, the great king of Wessex (now he would make a great figure). The kit is spread across two sprues of grey styrene. One holds the figure itself, while the other holds the armour, shield and weapons. There is a separate black pedestal. The parts are very well moulded with no sign of flash or other imperfections and the sculpted face of the figure is simply outstanding. The overall impression is of a well-executed kit which looks like it should be thoroughly enjoyable to build. As Julien has pointed out, the instructions are somewhat vague, comprising as they do a colour diagram of the completed figure with the part numbers identified. That said, as its a figure you'd have to be trying really hard to glue the legs on back-to-front. The figures comes with both sheathed and unsheathed swords, a knife, axe, shield and three arrows which can be fixed to the shield in order to enhance the sense of drama. The weapons appear to be accurate for the period. The painting diagram is nice and clear and colour references are provided for Revell and Tamiya paint. This is one model where you can use whatever you have to hand, however, for the colour references are only a guide and it's pretty obvious what colour the steel and leather components of the kit should be. Conclusion This is a lovely figure and it should prove to be immensely enjoyable to build. It will require a different painting technique to most other modern kits, so if you're better with the sable than an airbrush, you should enjoy this. I hope ICM follow up with some more kits in this range and perhaps some up with some modern replacements for the old IMEX medieval knights series. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. ICM is to release in Q4 2018 a 100% new tool 1/48th Dornier Do.217N-1 - ref. 48271 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48271 V.P.
  12. Model T 1912 Commercial Roadster ICM 1:24 24016 The Ford Model T car has gone down in history as the worlds first mass produced car. As early as 1909 the model T competed in the transcontinental race from New York to Spokane in Washington State. Seeing the potential for racing bodies were stripped of heavy items and bucket type seats installed. Glazing was reduced and most additional items removed. Stripped down the car was more than just a mass transportation vehicle but a fun Speedster. The Commercial Roadster was then seen as a sportier version of the road car. The Model The model arrives in the usual sturdy box with a separate top sleeve with a nice artist’s representation of the vehicle on the front. Inside, within a large poly bag, are four sprues of light grey styrene and, in a separate poly bag, two clear sprues, and four natural rubber tyres. As with the previously released Model T kits from ICM, the parts are really well moulded, with no sign of flash or other imperfections. There are a number of moulding pips, some of which are on quite fragile looking parts, so care should be taken when removing. The sprue gates attaching items like the exhaust are also quite heavy and I can see these parts breaking if you’re not careful. The build starts with the nicely detailed engine with the block and gearbox halves glued together followed by the addition of the rocker covers, fan belt, dynamo, exhaust manifold, cooling fan, cooling pipes, and other sundry items. The radiator is attached to the front axle and just needs the radiator grille glued to it to complete the assembly. The radiator/axle is then glued to the front of the floor pan/chassis. The rear axle, drive shaft and differential are built up from only three parts and fitted to the underside of the chassis along with the two piece exhaust/silencer unit. The front and rear axle support frames are then added, as is the steering rack. The four wheels, rubber tyres are added to the spoke wheels and are glued to the axles, the construction moves to the body work. The rear engine wall (not a firewall as its not solid) is made up and added, the engine covers are then added. The upper body pan is added The seat frames are added then the two seats are made up and added in. There is the double front seat and a single rear. The windscreen frame is the added with the steering wheel and its column. The hood is then made up which covers the front two seats. The front lights are then made up and added as well as the side lights. Decals There are no decals included in this kit. Conclusion This is another great addition to the Model T series that ICM have been releasing. As with the other versions, it looks like it wont be a difficult kit to make, but will look great once painted. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. French Infantry On The March 1914 ICM 1:35 (35705) The first thing to note about this set is the figures are not all French Infantry, and the second is that they are not on the March? There are three French Soldiers; one standing, one sitting, and one lying down. The forth figure is a French Taxi Driver. It would seem from ICM's site that these are designed to go with a French Taxi kit which we reviewed here. The figures though are well sculpted like all of ICM's recent offerings. The dress for the military figures looks correct and equipment does as well. Conclusion If you are looking for some figures for a French WWI diorama then these should fit the bill. Review sample courtesy of
  14. Mikoyan Mig-25PD Foxbat-E (48903) 1:48 ICM In an attempt to fulfil the perceived need for a supersonic interceptor that could take off, climb to height and attack an incoming bomber stream, which at the time was the most efficient method for delivering the newly invented nuclear warheads, The Mig-25 Foxbat was created. It managed the job to a certain extent, but as it never truly achieved its goals, it was left to its successor the Mig-31 Foxhound before the task was handled competently, by which time the role of ICBMs was about to make the primary role redundant. The Mig-25's inadequacies were hidden from the West however, until the famous defection of a Soviet pilot to an airfield in Japan revealed that the Foxbat wasn't as high-tech and all-conquering as we had been led to believe, having many steel parts instead of the high-tech alloys that the investigators were expecting. The prototype flew in 1964, and was constructed primarily of stainless steel, and reached service at the turn of the decade, although it had been seen before that, both in reconnaissance photos of the West, as well as at some parades. The West assumed that the large wing was to aid manoeuvrability, when in fact it was a necessity due to the aircraft's enormous weight, which made it fast, but changing direction was a chore due to all that momentum wanting to carry on in the direction it was travelling. It was also lacking in the avionics department, especially in one crucial aspect. It had no credible capability for targeting aircraft that were lower than itself, which coincided with the change in tactics to low level attack by the Western Allies, so a lack of a useful look-down/shoot-down capability was a serious deficiency. Nevertheless, several hundred were made, with the last one rolling off the production line in 1984 with a number of export orders into the bargain. The PD was the second iteration of the P interceptor, having improved engines, ability to carry R-60 missiles, and a more efficient Pulse-Doppler radar for basic look-down-shoot-down capability, which was later coupled with an infrared sensor under the nose. NATO gave it the Foxbat-E designation, which was also extended to the PDS, which were original P airframes that were later brought up to the PD standard. Although it suffered from some serious deficiencies, it held a number of speed and altitude records, and was theoretically capable of Mach 3, so could give an SR-71 a run for its money, probably at the expense of significant damage to its engines however. Attempts to improve the Foxbat were unsuccessful, and the Foxhound was its eventual replacement, and delivered everything that was expected of its forebear, staying in service until it is replaced by the Pak-Fa at some point in the near future. The Kit Since the release of the reconnaissance based RBT in Q1 and RB in Q3 of 2017, ICM are now releasing the interceptors, and we hope (well I do anyway), eventually the trainers, which relies of course on us all getting lots of the other marques, so what're you waiting for? Now the Revell/Monogram kit has been put out to pasture, we can delight in these kits from ICM that have given us a new level of detail and accuracy from the days of the Cold War when things had to be guessed at. The box is the same size and style as the other releases, although this time my review sample lid was almost destroyed due to it being such a tight fit on the box lower. I managed to get it off eventually, but it's a struggle every time. This is a revised tooling from the original, with four shared sprues and three new ones in grey styrene, the same clear sprue, and of course a different set of markings for the decal options, with the same stencils on a separate sheet. The instruction booklet is also different, and shows which parts aren't needed in this boxing, thankfully including the clear dials for the instrument panel, which I never quite understood the need for when you have a paint over it to depict the dials and the rest of the panel. Sharing much of the sprues of the original it has excellent detail, with lots of this apparent on the outer skin, as well as the new single part styrene instrument panel part that has a decal on the main sheet providing all the instrument faces. Good news! The build sequence is almost identical too, but as well as a new nose for this Interceptor (sporting the IR sensor with tracking facility), there is also the new instrument panel as mentioned above, and some slight changes to the exhausts. The biggest difference however is the inclusion of weapons! These are supplied on two of the new identical sprues, containing a quartet of R-60 Aphid Air-to-Air (A2A) missiles that can be fitted to the outer pylons for short-range fighting, and four R-40 Acrid long range A2A missiles, two of each of the Semi-Active Radar and Infrared homing varieties. These are usually fired in pairs with the Infrared missile first and the Radar missile second, to avoid confusing the former with the latter's heat signature. If the R-60s were carried on the outer rails, this reduced the Foxbat's long range capability to a one-shot deal, with only shorter range R-60 missiles left at its disposal. The Syrians claim to have shot down an Israeli F-15, but this was never confirmed for many reasons, some of which were political, some not. A US F-18 was shot down in the early part of Desert Storm by an Iraqi Mig-25, presumably not one of the ones they found buried after the fall of Saddam Hussein's regime. Markings There are four decal options included in the box, two from the Soviet Union and one each from Libya and Iraq. As mentioned earlier, the markings are on one sheet with the instrument panel decals, while the copious quantities of stencils for the airframe and missiles are on the other. Decals are printed anonymously, and have good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. From the box you can build one of the following: Mig-25PDS 146th Guard Fighter Regiment, Vasilikov 1989 – marked Blue 56 with 60 years celebration scroll on the intakes. Mig-25PD Soviet Air Force, 1986 – marked Red 17. Mig-25PD Iraqi Air Force, late 80s – Arabic code on the nose, Iraqi flag on the tail. Mig-25PD Libyan Air Force, 90s – Coded 6716. Conclusion It's nice to have the fighter (read interceptor) variants reaching us now, as although recce is an important task for any air force, the aircraft with the missiles and bombs are just that bit cooler to many. Another sterling effort from ICM who are now the kings of Mig-25 in 1:48. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  15. After almost finishing the Eduard 1/48 Fokker DVII (it is standing forlorn on the shelf like an abandoned puppy, waiting for me to gather enough strength to eventually complete its wooden propeller), it is time for something different. Not too different though, as it is still German and propeller driven, but this time it is the ICM 1/48 Dornier Do17-Z10 Kauz II night fighter. I guess many know the Do17 "Fliegender bleistift" history, a surprisingly fast light bomber in its day, but the Z10 night fighter version was a rare one indeed. Built to test the new infrared Spanner Anlage sighting system, it featured a infrared beam transmitter in the nose that would illuminate the target, and a sight scope for the pilot to aim at the target image displayed there. The beam transmitter and receiver/sight scope is easily seen in this picture, together with the armoured windscreen: Unfortunately for the Luftwaffe, the Spanner Anlage proved worthless as the range in which the targets became visible to the pilot was way too short to make it useful. The pilot would probably be better off replacing the infrared sight scope with an ordinary telescope, and try to find the British bombers himself like an old skool pirate. Yarrrr. So the Z10 ended up with just 10 examples being built, making it an interesting curiosity in airplane history. The kit is ICM 1/48 DO 17Z-10, which has gotten very good reviews, so I`m praying for an easy build here. This is both my first ever W.I.P and a project to learn new techniques, so if you are going to follow this I`d suggest you buy some Guinness at the bar, as lager could go flat and taste horrible in the time between updates to this thread.
  16. Beechcraft C18S American Passenger Aircraft ICM 1:48 (48185) The Twin Beech, or to give the aircraft its proper title The Beechcraft Model 18, is a six to eleven seater twin engines low wing, tail wheeled light aircraft made by the Beech Aircraft Corporation is the USA. Between 1937 and 1969 (an impressive production run) over 9000 aircraft were built. During WWII many aircraft were pressed into service and may more were built for the allied war effort serving as transport aircraft, light bombers, trainers, and for photo-reconnaissances. The C18S was a variant of B18S with seating for eight passengers, which was made pre war. The Model This is now ICM's fifth release of their new tooled Beechcraft Model 18 kit. The plastic is as good as any main stream manufacturer, the fabric effects are good without being over done and the panel lines nicly restrained, with an overall good level of detail out of the box. There are two main sprues of parts, with two small spures, the upper and lower wings; and one clear sprue. Construction starts with adding the glazing to the main fuselage halves. There is a small strip for the 3 main cabin windows, with individual parts for all other windows in each side, Where the kit differs from others is that the main cockpit glazing is supplied as one part for each fuselage half, which wraps around from the side; but does not reach all the way to the middle. There is then a centre section which is added towards the end of the build. Once the glazing is in then the internal structure of the cockpit and cabin can be added. There is a rear bulkhead to the cabin to add along with the bulkhead separating the cabin from the cockpit. In the cockpit itself the instrument panel is built up, the lower part of this featuring the rudder pedals. A single seat is made up which attached to the right fuselage half at the very back of the cabin. Once this seat is installed the main fuselage can be closed up. Construction now moves on to the main undercarriage. The mounting for which come of the rear of the engine firewall. These are a complicated multi part affair and need careful studying of the instructions to make sure all of the parts are in the right places. Once these are complete for both sides they can be installed into the lower wing. It should be noted here that the upper and lower wings are each one part, which when complete add straight to the underside of the main fuselage. Once the engine firewalls complete with landing gear parts are mounted to the lower wing the engine faces are added to the front of the firewall and then exhaust parts are made up and added to the inside of the engine area. The bulkheads are added next to the rear of the landing gear wells. Once the one part ailerons are added to the lower wing the upper wing can be added. The top of the upper wing forms the floor of the main cabin and cockpit. As such two cockpit seats and 4 main cabin seats must now be built and installed onto the floor section. The pilots control columns are also added at this stage. The completed wing/cabin floor assembly can then be joined to the main fuselage. The next construction stage is to make up and install the tailplane assembly. To wrap up construction the tail wheel needs to be built up and installed along with the doors to the compartment. The main wheels are added to the gear legs already installed and the main gear door put in place. The propellers are then installed. If the spinners are to be used then a small amount needs to be trimmed off the hubs. Lastly the rear cabin door is added and the centre section for the main wind screen (though it might be easier to add this to the fuselage before the wing is added). Decals The decal sheet printed in house gives two options; Falcon Airways, Biggin Hill, 1959 US Forest Services, Oakland, 1954 Conclusion This is a good kit and its good to see some civilian marking for it. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  17. The Beech is back in the new ICM catalogue: 1/48th Beech C-45F/UC-45F Expeditor "WWII USAAF Passenger aircraft" - ref.48181 Source: http://scalemodels.ru/modules/forum/img_974235_1391199687_IMG_0564.jpg.html V.P.
  18. My entry for this group build is ICM's Model T 1917 Ambulance with US Medical Personnel. A review of this kit can be found on this site here.
  19. As already announced in a ICM general thread (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234974439-icm-148-junkers-ju-88a5dornier-do-17z/), the Ukrainian brand is to release new tool 1/72nd Dornier Do.17 kits. Source - ICM 2015 catalogue : http://www.icm.com.ua/katalog/ - ref. 72303 - Do.17Z-10, WWII German Night Fighter - 100% new molds Box art (provisionnal) - ref. 72304 - Do.17Z-2, WWII German Bomber V.P.
  20. A usually reliable russian source announces ICM is to release in 2017 a 1/32nd Polikarpov I-16 kit. To be followed. Source: http://scalemodels.ru/news/10678-anons-ICM-1-48-He-111H3.html For the record a 1/48th I-16 type 24 kit is expected by ICM in December 2016 (link). V.P.
  21. Confirmed as new tool with ref.48261. Release expected for Q3 2017 https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48261 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Not mentioned in the 2016 catalogue (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234995418-icm-catalog-2016-programme/), dixit scalemodels.ru ICM is to release in 2017 a new tool 1/48th Heinkel He.111H-3 kit - ref.48261 Source: http://scalemodels.ru/news/10678-anons-ICM-1-48-He-111H3.html A new family of 1/48th He.111 in view? Would make sense after the 1/48th Do.17/Do.215 & Ju-88 ICM kits but wait and see. Scalemodel.ru info also show a box art... Dubious as it's the Revell 1/32nd He.111H-6 one! V.P.
  22. They 're rumours saying after its 1/48th MiG-25RBT "Foxbat-E", ICM is working on a MiG-25PD "Foxbat-A" kit in the same scale. Wishful thinking of more. Time will tell. Source: http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234994939-icm-148-mig-25rbt/&do=findComment&comment=2573774 V.P.
  23. Model T 1914 Fire Truck With Crew ICM 1:24 24017 The Ford Model T car has gone down in history as the worlds first mass produced car. By 1927 in a little over 9 years 15 million cars were produced. In 1999 the Model T was crowned the most influential car of the 20th Century. The Model The model arrives in the usual sturdy box with a separate top sleeve with a nice artist’s representation of the vehicle on the front. Inside, within a large poly bag, are four sprues of grey plastic, a clear spure and 4 rubber tyres. There is also one caramac sprue for the figures. The build starts with the nicely detailed engine with the block and gearbox halves glued together followed by the addition of the rocker covers, fan belt, dynamo, exhaust manifold, cooling fan, cooling pipes, and other sundry items. The radiator is attached to the front axle and just needs the radiator grille glued to it to complete the assembly. The radiator/axle is then glued to the front of the floor pan/chassis. The rear axle, drive shaft and differential are built up from only three parts and fitted to the underside of the chassis along with the two piece exhaust/silencer unit. The front and rear axle support frames are then added, as is the steering rack. The four wheels, rubber tyres are added to the spoke wheels and are glued to the axles, the construction moves to the body work. The rear engine wall (not a firewall as its not solid) is made up and added, the engine covers are then added. The floor pan is made up followed by the four part seat, which is then added in. The rear fire fighting tanks are made up and added along with an equipment basket which sits over the top. The racks for the side mounted ladders are part of the tanks construction. The steering column is then made up and added. The firefighting hose is added to the equipment basket and ladders made up and added to the side. Four different vehicle lamps are made up and added. Additional fire fighting equipment is made up ad added on the running board on the opposite side to the ladder. Decals There are no decals included in this kit. Figures This is ICM set 24006 "American Fire Truck Crew". It is a set of two figures for the fire truck. One is the driver and the second is another fireman standing on the running board directing the driver. The two figures are on one sprue of the now familiar caramac coloured plastic. There will be some seam lines to clean up on a few parts but nothing excessive. In general the mould in crisp and clean with plenty of detail. Conclusion This is another great addition to the Model T series that ICM have been releasing. As with the other versions, it looks like it wont be a difficult kit to make, but will look great once painted. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  24. shortCummins

    Beechcraft C-45F

    Here is my version of the ICM 1:48 Beechcraft C-45F using the Caracal Models MATS scheme… ICM 1:48 kit no.48181 Caracal Model decals Primed with UMP/Stynylrez Paints K Colors, Tamiya, vallejo & Alkan Weathered with Ultimate dark & concrete wash You can read my build log here. https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235043109-148-c-45f/ until next time as always, any suggestions or comments will be gratefully received. rgds John(shortCummins)
  25. Standard B “Liberty” Truck ICM 1:35 As America's war effort ramped up in 1917, there was a collective realization that the fleet of vehicles needed to support a semi-mechanized army needed some standardization. The Liberty truck was the solution. It was designed by the Motor Transport section of the Quartermaster Corps in cooperation with the members of the Society of Automotive Engineers. A group of leading automotive engineers was summoned to Washington in 1917 to design standardized trucks for the AEF. It took 50 men 69 days to design a 1-½ ton "A" model and the 3–5 ton "B" model. Production of the Liberty B began in the fall of 1917, and the first models were delivered to the secretary of war on 19 October. Of the almost 9,500 produced by 15 manufacturers, more than 7,500 were sent overseas. The Liberty's four-speed transmission coupled with its 52-hp engine gave the truck a top speed of about 15 miles per hour. The Model The model arrives in a strong box with a separate top sleeve with a nice artist’s representation of the vehicle on the front. Inside, within a large poly bag, are four sprues of medium grey styrene and, in a separate poly bag, one clear sprue. On initial inspection the parts are really well moulded, clean, with no sign of flash. There are a number of moulding pips, some of which are on quite fragile looking parts, so care should be taken when removing. The sprue gates attaching items like the tilt rails are also quite heavy and I can see these parts breaking if not careful. The build starts with the chassis, with each rail being fitted fore and aft leaf springs, each of two parts. Two of the cross-members are assembled from two parts each before being fitted to one of the chassis rails, along with three other single piece cross-members followed by the other rail. The radiator is then assembled from six parts before being glued into position at the front of the chassis. The single piece front axle is then glued to the front pair of leaf springs and a further cross-member is also glued into place. The rear differential is made up from fourteen parts which include the rear drum brakes. The front bumper beam and transfer box are also assembled and glued into position along witht eh drive shafts and three piece front mudguards. The front wheels and single piece items with a choice of separate hub caps, the rears being made up of inner and outer wheels with separate tyres and hub caps. The completed wheels are then attached to their respective axles. Work then begins on the engine, which is made up from eleven parts. Once assembled, it is fitted to the chassis along with the two piece exhaust pipe and silencer. The gearstick is then added to the gearbox and the engine fitted with two more parts. The cabin is then assembled from twenty one parts before being fitted to the chassis over the gearstick, followed by the outer radiator grille, and two piece bonnet, which could easily be made to be posed open to show off the engine, even though it’s not moulded that way. The next assembly is the truck bed, with the bed itself being fitted with the sides, rear, and front plank sections. On the underside, five lateral strengthening beams, and the sides with four vertical beams each. Two five piece storage boxes are assembled and fitted to the front underside of the bed before the whole assembly is attached to the chassis. There is a five piece searchlight and two piece horn attached to the cabin coaming and the steering wheel is also glued into place at this point. The pair of two piece headlights are attached to the front of the cabin bulkhead, while the bonnet latches, and grab handles, plus the cabin access handles are fitted, as is the starting handle. The cabin roof is fitted with left and right hand frames before being glue into place, and on the bed the modeller has the option of just fitting the five tilt rails, or the complete canvas cover which is made up from five parts, completing the build. Decals The small decal sheet gives the modeller just two options of vehicle, both in use by the US army in 1918, one with just unit badges and one with US Quartermaster Corps labelling on the tilt sides. The decals are nicely printed, clear and in good register with a slightly matt finish. Conclusion It’s great to finally see a WW1 Liberty tuck being kitted, especially in this centenary year. ICM have not only provided us with a nice tribute to one of the lesser sung vehicles of the First World War, but a very nice truck to build too. It’s not overly complicated, which is good to see, even though the truck itself was pretty simple, and would be a great kit for any level of modeller. Review sample courtesy of
×