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Found 180 results

  1. Hi folk's,WWI is a subject I've been fascinated with for year's,recent delving into my families history has revealed how many member's served throughout it's five year's my Grandfather was an artilleryman,Great Grandfather served in the Canadian army as a tunneller then engineer and Great Uncle died in the mud of Passchendaele in November 1917 add in brother's we are into double figure;s as a family.I tried to be a bit different when it came to choose a subject aircraft would be the preffered object but decided on confronting my weakest modelling skill figure's. I then decided on a theme of Mons where the British army fired the first shot's of the great war in 1914 with a simple vignette using ICM's infantry and Masterbox's farm cart on a simple base and some scenic's. That's the plan I still need to order/buy the kit's but doubt I'll start till after the holidays in a few week's,now I then decided to bookend this build with another vignette Mons 1918,probably with ICM's later equipped British infantry on a matching sized base this time with some kind of building or structure to represent the last shot's of the great war which although many year;s apart happened in tha same area.As soon as I plan the kit's I'll update the thread.
  2. Shar2

    Polikapov I-153 Chaika. 1:32

    I-153 Chaika ICM 1:32 The Polikarpov I-153 was the last of Nikolai Polikarpov's biplane fighter aircraft to enter service and despite being the most advanced entry in the series was already obsolete when it first entered service in 1939. The I-153 was developed as a result of a misreading of the results of the aerial combat during the Spanish Civil War. In July 1937 a meeting chaired by Stalin concluded that the Fiat CR.32 biplane was superior to the Polikarpov I-16 monoplane. The nimble Fiat fighter had achieved impressive results against the Soviet fighter, but partly because the I-16 pilots had attempted to dogfight rather than use their superior speed to break off combat. The successful introduction of the Bf 109 was ignored, and instead of focusing on producing a superior monoplane the Soviet authorities decided to work on an improved biplane. The new aircraft needed to maintain the manoeuvrability of the I-15 and I-152 while also increasing in speed. This presented Polikarpov with a problem, for he had already argued that any increase in speed came at the cost of an increase in weight (from the heavier more powerful engine and stronger fuselage needed to support it). The heavier aircraft would then be less manoeuvrable. Work on the I-153 was officially approved on 11 October 1937. Polikarpov's main aim was to reduce drag and weight in an attempt to compensate for the weight of a heavier engine. He did this in two main ways - first by introducing a retractable undercarriage, and second by returning to the 'gull wing' configuration of the I-15, in which the upper wing was linked to the fuselage by diagonal sections, eliminating its central section. This had worked on the I-15, but had been unpopular with some pilots and higher authorities, and had been removed from the I-152. As a result that aircraft had been less manoeuvrable than its precursor. The 'gull wing' on the I-152 was an improved version of that on the I-15, with a bigger gap between the wing roots, which improved the pilot's forward view when landing and taking off. The fuselage and wings of the I-153 were similar to those of the I-15 and I-152, with a steel tube framework, covered by metal at the front of the fuselage and fabric elsewhere. The manually operated retractable undercarriage rotated through 90 degrees before folding backwards into the fuselage. The first prototype was powered by a 750hp M-25V engine. Its maiden flight is variously reported as having taken place in May or August 1938, with A.I. Zhukov at the controls. Tests that began on 27 September are variously described as state acceptance or factory trials. These tests weren't entirely satisfactory and production was delayed while some of the problems were solved. In June-August 1939 state acceptance trials were conducted using an I-153 powered by the new Shvetsov M-62 engine, a version of the M-25V with a two-stage supercharger. These trials were not officially concluded until January 1941, long after the type had been superseded. Next in line was a version powered by the 900hp M-63, and this version passed its trials on 30 September 1939. Only a handful of aircraft were produced with the M-25 engine. The 800hp M-62 was used in the largest number of aircraft, around 3,018 in total. The 1,100hp (at take-off) M-63 was used in 409 aircraft. A total of 3,437 I-153s were produced, beginning in 1938. 1,011 aircraft had been completed by the end of 1939, and a massive 2,362 were built in 1940, at a time when the Soviet Union desperately needed more modern monoplanes. Production came to an end early in 1941 and only 64 aircraft were completed that year. The standard I-153 was armed with four ShKAS machine guns. These replaced the PV-1 guns used on the I-15 and I-152, and had a much higher rate of fire (1,800 compared to 750 rounds per minute) as well as being much lighter. The four under wing bomb racks could carry up to 441lb of bombs. The Model Having done a couple of versions of the I-16, it’s great to see ICM release its biplane stablemate. Contained in a sturdy box the three large sprues of grey plastic are pretty well protected in their single plastic bag, with the clear parts in a separate bag, there is also a largish decal sheet. All the parts are superbly moulded, with no sign of flash or other imperfections and only a few noticeable moulding pips. There are a few swirl marks in the plastic, but nothing to worry about and will easily be covered when the kit is primed and painted. Since the aircraft was mostly wood there are very few panel lines, where fabric was used in the construction, the kit shows the underlying structure, but in a nicely restrained way. Construction begins with the lower wing and the two upper sections being attached to the single piece lower section, after which there are two insets that fit into the main undercarriage bay roof. The cockpit is assembled next, and is a very nicely detailed area. The two seat supports are attached to the seat back and glued to the cockpit floor, followed by the seat base. The two piece control column is glued into place along with its separate control rod and rudder pedals. The tubular framework of the cockpit is quite delicate, and care should be taken when removing from the sprues and assembling. Side tubular structures are fitted with ancillary instruments, levers, radio controls, throttle lever and flare pistol. The side sections are then glued to the front and rear sections. The whole assembly is then attached to the cockpit floor assembly and the whole lot glued to the lower wing assembly.The fuselage sides are then detailed with an oxygen bottle, and side access doors before being glued together. The fuselage is then slid over the cockpit structure and glued to the lower wing. The horizontal tailplanes, elevators and rudder all come in two halves. When glued together they are attached to the rear fuselage. The upper wing comes as single piece upper section and two piece lower sections. Once joined, the assembly is attached to the forward fuselage and the two interplane struts glued into position. The engine is quite a simple affair, being moulded in two halves, to which the valve rods are attached, followed by the exhausts. The cooling shutter ring is then fitted to the inside of the nose cowling, followed by the engine assembly, rear bulkhead, and separate exhaust stubs and five piece propeller. The engine/nose cowling assembly is then attached to the front fuselage, followed by the two side panels, top panel, windshield, gunsight and oil cooler duct. Each of the main undercarriage is made from five parts, once assembled they are glued into their respective positions. The tailplane struts are then added, along with the undercarriage bay doors and two piece tail wheel. You then have the option of adding wither eight rockets, each of three pieces, two small bombs, also three parts or four larger bombs also three parts. The bombs have separate crutches while the rockets are fitted to rails. Then it’s just a bit of very light rigging and the model is done. Decals The decal sheet is printed by ICM themselves. The decals are quite glossy, well printed, in register and nicely opaque, particularly useful for the large white numbers. There are four decal options, the four aircraft being:- I-153, aircraft No.26 of the 70th Fighter Regiment, Khalin-Gol, August 1939 in Aluminium overall, with Field Green squiggles all over the upper sides of the wings and fuselage sides. I-153 aircraft No.28 of the 15th Fighter Regiment, Lithuania, June 1939 in an overall Aluminium finish I-153 aircraft No.6 of the 72nd Mixed Regiment, North Fleet Air Force, Vaegna, 1940 in an Field Green upper surfaces and fuselage sides, and Light Blue undersides. I-153, aircraft No.102 of the 71st Fighter Regiment, Baltic Fleet Air Force, Lavansaari, Summer 1942 in Field Green over flat black upper sides of the wings and fuselage sides and Light blue undersides. Conclusion As with the I-16, this is a very cute and recognisable little aeroplane. The biplane design, whilst out of date, makes this aircraft look a nicer design then the I-16. It’s certainly great that ICM are catering to those of us who like the larger scales and there is still plenty that could be done with the interior should you wish t go to town on it. Review sample courtesy of
  3. A usually reliable russian source announces ICM is to release in 2017 a 1/32nd Polikarpov I-16 kit. To be followed. Source: http://scalemodels.ru/news/10678-anons-ICM-1-48-He-111H3.html For the record a 1/48th I-16 type 24 kit is expected by ICM in December 2016 (link). V.P.
  4. After the Dornier Do.215 ( http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234947782-icm-148-do17-do215-for-2014/), ICM is to release two 100% new molds 1/48th Dornier Do.17 kits in 2015: - ref.48244 - Dornier Do 17Z-2 - WWII German Bomber (100% new molds) Sources: ICM 2015 catalogue : http://www.icm.com.ua/katalog/ http://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48244 Box art - ref.48243 - Dornier Do 17Z-10 - WWII German Night-Fighter (100% new molds) Sources: ICM 2015 catalogue : http://www.icm.com.ua/katalog/ http://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48243 Box art (and the same in 1/72nd: http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234975686-172-dornier-do17z-2-z-10-by-icm-box-arts-release-in-2015/ V.P.
  5. ICM is to release in 2016 two new variants from its Junkers Ju-88 kit. Already released: Ju-88A-5 kit http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234975682-148-junkers-ju-88a-5-by-icm-released/ - ref.48233 - Junkers Ju-88A-4 WWII German Bomber NEW - Q2 2016 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48233 - ref.48234 - Junkers Ju-88A-14 WWII German Bomber NEW - Q3 2016 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48234 V.P.
  6. New Chaika from ICM, nice kit, fast to build. I made conversion to early type - with spinner similar to I-16 or I-15 Bis. I think that it is prettier than late - but it is only my opinion. It looks like a cartoon plane, from Mickey Mouse comic book . After doing photo session i got info that metal parts of plane were light grey, so i corrected it and first two photos are with this change. WIP: https://forum.largescaleplanes.com/index.php?showtopic=75355&hl= \
  7. In the framework of the recent toy tradefair Mir Detstva 2017, held at Moscow, ICM is reported having announced a 1/32nd Polikarpov I-153 Chaika kit for 2018. To be followed. Source AlexGRD: http://master194.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=100171&sid=b7252e4ad3d849de8e26c4c009281a81 V.P.
  8. After the RBT (thread here: link), ICM is to release in Q3 2017 a 1/48th MiG-25RB "Foxbat-B" (new variant - photo reconnaissance and bomber) kit - ref.48902 Sources: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48902 http://scalemodels.ru/news/11036-katalog-ICM-2017-god.html And, for the moment no trace, of future interceptor MiG-25P/PD/PDS variants kit... V.P.
  9. Dornier Do.17Z-2 WWII Finnish Bomber 1:48 ICM (48246) The Dornier Do 17, nicknamed the flying pencil due to its slender shape, was a light bomber designed by Dornier Flugzeugwerke in the mid-1930s. Along with the Heinkel He 111, the Do 17 carried out the lion’s share of bombing raids against the UK up to the end of the Battle of Britain. The Do 17 Z was the main production variant and featured a redesigned forward fuselage that was enlarged in order to accommodate a rear gunner. The Z-2 sub-variant featured new 1000hp engines which addressed an earlier problem with under powered units. This enabled the bomb load to be doubled from 500kgs to 1000kgs, this full load did though limit combat radius to 210 miles. For the crew there were additional side firing guns, however as the three guns in the pod were only served by one gunner he could not do all at the same time. After heavy losses the machine guns were replaced with heavier MG 151/15 cannons. As the Germans supplied equipment to their allied No.46 Sqn (Later 46 Bomber Sqn) of the Finnish Air Force would receive 15 Aircraft in January 1942. Ten of these would be lost to operations but the remaining five would serve through to 1952 when they were scrapped. The Kit ICM have been releasing plenty of Do.17 and Do.215/7 variants in the last couple of years, which has been great news for the Luftwaffe modeller in 1:48, with only a few kits and variants to choose from previously. The Z-10 was first of the Do.17 variants to hit the shelves, with the Z-2 and Z-7 all based on the same basic sprues but with additional parts added to depict the differences. The origin of the tooling is 2015, and is part of the newly ICM that has been improving their mould manufacturing techniques, so is of good standard, with plenty of detail. There are a number of parts that will be left on the sprues after construction due to the nature of the tooling, and these are marked out on the instructions. The box is standard ICM fair with the inner flap protecting the parts, and inside the sprues are protected by a single resealable bag with another separating the clear parts within to prevent any issues. Construction begins with the cockpit, but unusually it is the sidewalls details that are inserted within the fuselage, which even includes the small raised platform on which the pilot's seat and control column sits. The other crew seat is fitted to the starboard fuselage side along with more details, and aft of this there are three bulkheads that bracket the bomb bay, which also has a stiffening lip added long the sides. The rear gunner's seat is fitted last on frames at the rear of the cockpit, and what passes for a cockpit floor is first glued to an insert that then attaches to the underside of the nose. The underside nose glazing is then added. A main internal tank is then made up and fitted behind the cockpit section. The upper wing is full span, and the lower wings are separate, with cut-outs for the landing gear bays that expose moulded-in detail within the inside of the upper panels. It has separate ailerons and fits over the top of the fuselage, covering the bomb bay over. If you're planning on opening the bay doors, remember to paint the inside of the wing a dark colour so it can't be seen, as it doesn't have any internal structure, but does have some recesses and ejector pin marks that could possibly be seen past the fuel tank or in the aft portion of the bay that is empty. The elevators are separate and form a H-shaped assembly with the rudders, which are also poseable, and these fit flush with the top of the fuselage by the usual slot/tab arrangement. Taking care to align these properly now will save a lot of work blending them in later. Building up the engine nacelles commences with the firewalls added to the lower wing cut-outs, following which the aft bulkhead has the retraction struts glued in place, and they too slot into the wing. The inner sides of the wheel bays are added to the wing, and these have pegs on their backsides that locate the outer nacelle skins on the airframe correctly, after the engine mounts are inserted into the port sides. The starboard sides are mounted in the same manner, and the radial engines are then constructed from a healthy number of parts, including detailed pistons, crank case, exhaust collector and fishtail tips, fitting onto the exposed engine mounts in each nacelle. The cowlings are provided as a frontal section with the annular radiator behind them, and then a framework that allows the access panels to be posed open or closed to show off the detail provided within. The props are single parts, with a spinner that fits over them, and if you're so minded, you could leave them able to spin just for the fun of it. A few scoops are fixed to the nacelles, the sturdy twin undercarriage legs with large tyres slot into the front of the bays, with two bay doors per nacelle, one each side fitting onto little hinge-points within the nacelle lip. The landing gear is made up of a two part wheel added to the main strut. A mud guard is also fitted. For the inside of the bomber full bomb racks and bombs are supplied which are now built up and slotted inside. The bomb bay doors can of course be closed as well as open but it would be shame not to include all the detail. The rear of the nose gondola is a clear part with two circular windows that will need masking off, and the canopy is moulded as a single part. Four ball-mounted machine guns slot through the front, rear, and both sides (at the rear), an aerial fits into a recess on the roof, and a blade aerial fit on top. The canopy can then be mounted. The nose glazing can also be fitted with its ball mounted machine gun. Decals There is a choice of two markings from 46 Sqn of the Finnish Air Force. Both are in Black/Green camo with blue undersides. They have yellow fuselage bands and underside yellow wing tips. One Aircraft also has large areas of white winter camo. Decals are in good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion Another of ICM's excellent line. Good detail with a slightly narrow choice of decals, which given only one sqn of the Finnish Air Force flew them its hardly surprising. It's now more possible than ever before to build a wide range of Do17s in 1:48, for which ICM are to be congratulated. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  10. German Luftwaffe Pilots (1935-1945) 31101 1:32 ICM Adding figures to a model gives it scale and realism that is hard to otherwise achieve, and often this is done with resin figures that are both expensive and for those not too keen on resin, this can be off-putting. Styrene figures however are simple to deal with, and with advances in sculpting and moulding techniques they are becoming more detailed and realistic as time passes (unless I paint them!). This new set from ICM, who have an excellent reputation for injection moulded figures, depicts a group of WWII Luftwaffe pilots stood relaxing. It arrives in a top-opening box, with the usual inner flap on top, with a single sprue of medium grey styrene inside, together with a sheet of instructions on glossy paper. The figures are moulded very crisply, and at 1:32 they are large enough to show off subtle details such as zipper pockets, boot details, insignia and other badges. Couple this with the breakdown of parts, and you will have a highly detailed figure once you have assembled them. The moulding seams are minimal, with slender sprue gates that also won't need much clean up, and the parts join at convenient breaks such as waists, trouser seams etc. One chap has his hands out in front of him, which necessitates his arms being separate from the elbow down, so a little filler may be needed there, but precious little if any should be required elsewhere. The two capped figures have their heads moulded as a single part, while the pilot with a peaked cap has a two part head, split at the cap brim, and each pilot has a side arm in holster that should be glued onto his waistband. Two of the figures have moulded-in life vests, while the third does not, instead having a ¾ length coat with fleecy collar turned up around his neck. Each of them have their faces turned subtly skywards as if they are watching their colleagues return after a mission, having already landed themselves. The instructions show the part numbers and paint codes on the same diagram, which relates to a table on the rear in Revell and Tamiya codes with the colour names in English and Cyrillic text. Conclusion Excellent sculpting, sensible part breakdown to maximise detail, and three pilots in the one box make for a good value package that will be of great use to large scale WWII Luftwaffe modellers. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. For me, it was an unusual step into the "dark side" of 1/48, but I enjoyed the build. It was our club activity, we started the work on several ICM kits at the same time so we experienced a different problems on the same kit so good planning in building this kit is essential. Main problem was nose section which is better to be glued first, then the wingtips are thinner than the wing, so it is better to thin it before gluing wing halves together. There are some gaps and not logical steps in the instruction sheet so the Revell instructions helped a bit, especially when building it without the engine like me. Decals were Aeromaster set, Gunze colors, seat belts were scratched from paper. This kit had an appearance on our SIG Spitfire Serbia display table in Belgrade's New Years Cup. Hope you like it.
  12. My dad keeps going with his single engine WW2 fighters. This soon to be started project will be his next. A South Front machine in the rarely seen maroon-sand camo, using this ICM Yak-9T kit. The M version had the same fuselage as the T and the wings provided in the kit, according to drawings in the Soviet Airforce Fighter Colours book by Erik Pilawskii, match a M version and not a T. DSC_0001 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr
  13. In the framework of the recent toy tradefair Mir Detstva 2017, held at Moscow, ICM is reported having announced a new tool 1/72nd MiG-25RB/RBT "Foxbat-B" kit for 2018. To be followed. Source AlexGRD: http://master194.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=100171&sid=b7252e4ad3d849de8e26c4c009281a81 V.P.
  14. Model T 1911 with American Mechanics ICM 1:24 24010 The Ford Model T car has gone down in history as the worlds first mass produced car. By 1927 in a little over 9 years 15 million cars were produced. In 1999 the Model T was crowned the most influential car of the 20th Century. The Model The model arrives in the usual sturdy box with a separate top sleeve with a nice artist’s representation of the vehicle on the front. Inside, within a large poly bag, are four sprues of grey plastic, a clear spure and 4 rubber tyres. There is also one caramac sprue for the figures. The build starts with the nicely detailed engine with the block and gearbox halves glued together followed by the addition of the rocker covers, fan belt, dynamo, exhaust manifold, cooling fan, cooling pipes, and other sundry items. The radiator is attached to the front axle and just needs the radiator grille glued to it to complete the assembly. The radiator/axle is then glued to the front of the floor pan/chassis. The rear axle, drive shaft and differential are built up from only three parts and fitted to the underside of the chassis along with the two piece exhaust/silencer unit. The front and rear axle support frames are then added, as is the steering rack. The four wheels, rubber tyres are added to the spoke wheels and are glued to the axles, the construction moves to the body work. The rear engine wall (not a firewall as its not solid) is made up and added, the engine covers are then added. The rear coachwork body is then made up and added to the chassis. The driver floor pan is added along with the steering wheel and column. Drivers pedals are added. The seats are then made up and added, along with the windscreen and its supporting stays. If fitting the roof this is the next part to be added (note there is no option for the roof down). The rear part has its window added and then its fixed to the roof. The stays are then added and the roof can be fitted. The horn arrangement is made up and fitted . The last items to be made up are the head lights, lights and the motormeter for the radiator. Decals There are no decals included in this kit. Figures This is ICM set 24009 "American Mechanics 1910". This is a set of three women mechanics in poses fixing the car. Like ICM's recent figures these are well sculpted and should build up well. Conclusion This is another great addition to the Model T series that ICM have been releasing. As with the other versions, it looks like it wont be a difficult kit to make, but will look great once painted. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  15. S.W.A.T Team Fighter #3 ICM 1:24 24103 With the current world situation armed Police officers and SWAT (Special Weapons and Tactics) Officers are seen all too frequently on the news. ICM have now brought us three 1/24 scale SWAT Figures. This figure is well sculpted and comes in a traditional format to build up. The main torso is on two parts with a join seam at the side, this should be covered in the build by added on equipment pouches. The left and right legs are one part each and are added to the torso. There is a mould seam on both sides of the leg to clean up. The arms are added and again these have mould seam to clean up, the shield then attached to one arm. The head is then fitted and a choice of three tactical helmets is offered for the top. Goggles are provided for the helmet with a separate clear part. Additional tactical equipment pouches are provided as are a selection of weapons. Different types of pistol (holstered and drawn) are provided. While these are not shown as being used for the figure it does provide many different possibilities for the modeller to use these if they wish to alter the figure in some way. Conclusion This is a new kit of a modern law enforcement figure in a large enough scale for the detail to pop out. Review sample courtesy of
  16. Soviet Drivers (1979-1991) ICM 1:35 35641 While it would be good to get a driver figure in a kit, some people dont use them so it does make sense that companies will offer them as an "added extra". This set from ICM is aimed at some of the great Russian truck models they are currently producing; how ever they can be used as and where the modeller wants. There are two figures in the box, one sitting on a higher type seat and one on a lower type. They are well sculpted. Conclusion These figures will enhance any Russian truck model the modeller wants to use them on. Recmended. Review sample courtesy of
  17. Mikoyan Mig-25PD Foxbat-E (48903) 1:48 ICM In an attempt to fulfil the perceived need for a supersonic interceptor that could take off, climb to height and attack an incoming bomber stream, which at the time was the most efficient method for delivering the newly invented nuclear warheads, The Mig-25 Foxbat was created. It managed the job to a certain extent, but as it never truly achieved its goals, it was left to its successor the Mig-31 Foxhound before the task was handled competently, by which time the role of ICBMs was about to make the primary role redundant. The Mig-25's inadequacies were hidden from the West however, until the famous defection of a Soviet pilot to an airfield in Japan revealed that the Foxbat wasn't as high-tech and all-conquering as we had been led to believe, having many steel parts instead of the high-tech alloys that the investigators were expecting. The prototype flew in 1964, and was constructed primarily of stainless steel, and reached service at the turn of the decade, although it had been seen before that, both in reconnaissance photos of the West, as well as at some parades. The West assumed that the large wing was to aid manoeuvrability, when in fact it was a necessity due to the aircraft's enormous weight, which made it fast, but changing direction was a chore due to all that momentum wanting to carry on in the direction it was travelling. It was also lacking in the avionics department, especially in one crucial aspect. It had no credible capability for targeting aircraft that were lower than itself, which coincided with the change in tactics to low level attack by the Western Allies, so a lack of a useful look-down/shoot-down capability was a serious deficiency. Nevertheless, several hundred were made, with the last one rolling off the production line in 1984 with a number of export orders into the bargain. The PD was the second iteration of the P interceptor, having improved engines, ability to carry R-60 missiles, and a more efficient Pulse-Doppler radar for basic look-down-shoot-down capability, which was later coupled with an infrared sensor under the nose. NATO gave it the Foxbat-E designation, which was also extended to the PDS, which were original P airframes that were later brought up to the PD standard. Although it suffered from some serious deficiencies, it held a number of speed and altitude records, and was theoretically capable of Mach 3, so could give an SR-71 a run for its money, probably at the expense of significant damage to its engines however. Attempts to improve the Foxbat were unsuccessful, and the Foxhound was its eventual replacement, and delivered everything that was expected of its forebear, staying in service until it is replaced by the Pak-Fa at some point in the near future. The Kit Since the release of the reconnaissance based RBT in Q1 and RB in Q3 of 2017, ICM are now releasing the interceptors, and we hope (well I do anyway), eventually the trainers, which relies of course on us all getting lots of the other marques, so what're you waiting for? Now the Revell/Monogram kit has been put out to pasture, we can delight in these kits from ICM that have given us a new level of detail and accuracy from the days of the Cold War when things had to be guessed at. The box is the same size and style as the other releases, although this time my review sample lid was almost destroyed due to it being such a tight fit on the box lower. I managed to get it off eventually, but it's a struggle every time. This is a revised tooling from the original, with four shared sprues and three new ones in grey styrene, the same clear sprue, and of course a different set of markings for the decal options, with the same stencils on a separate sheet. The instruction booklet is also different, and shows which parts aren't needed in this boxing, thankfully including the clear dials for the instrument panel, which I never quite understood the need for when you have a paint over it to depict the dials and the rest of the panel. Sharing much of the sprues of the original it has excellent detail, with lots of this apparent on the outer skin, as well as the new single part styrene instrument panel part that has a decal on the main sheet providing all the instrument faces. Good news! The build sequence is almost identical too, but as well as a new nose for this Interceptor (sporting the IR sensor with tracking facility), there is also the new instrument panel as mentioned above, and some slight changes to the exhausts. The biggest difference however is the inclusion of weapons! These are supplied on two of the new identical sprues, containing a quartet of R-60 Aphid Air-to-Air (A2A) missiles that can be fitted to the outer pylons for short-range fighting, and four R-40 Acrid long range A2A missiles, two of each of the Semi-Active Radar and Infrared homing varieties. These are usually fired in pairs with the Infrared missile first and the Radar missile second, to avoid confusing the former with the latter's heat signature. If the R-60s were carried on the outer rails, this reduced the Foxbat's long range capability to a one-shot deal, with only shorter range R-60 missiles left at its disposal. The Syrians claim to have shot down an Israeli F-15, but this was never confirmed for many reasons, some of which were political, some not. A US F-18 was shot down in the early part of Desert Storm by an Iraqi Mig-25, presumably not one of the ones they found buried after the fall of Saddam Hussein's regime. Markings There are four decal options included in the box, two from the Soviet Union and one each from Libya and Iraq. As mentioned earlier, the markings are on one sheet with the instrument panel decals, while the copious quantities of stencils for the airframe and missiles are on the other. Decals are printed anonymously, and have good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. From the box you can build one of the following: Mig-25PDS 146th Guard Fighter Regiment, Vasilikov 1989 – marked Blue 56 with 60 years celebration scroll on the intakes. Mig-25PD Soviet Air Force, 1986 – marked Red 17. Mig-25PD Iraqi Air Force, late 80s – Arabic code on the nose, Iraqi flag on the tail. Mig-25PD Libyan Air Force, 90s – Coded 6716. Conclusion It's nice to have the fighter (read interceptor) variants reaching us now, as although recce is an important task for any air force, the aircraft with the missiles and bombs are just that bit cooler to many. Another sterling effort from ICM who are now the kings of Mig-25 in 1:48. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  18. Hi all....Please, let me show you my latest model. It's an ICM Spitfire LF.IXe, in 1/48 scale.....Built OOB, except for some seat belts made from lead foil. Entirely painted with god old Humbrol enamels, and slightly weathered with pastel chalks. My inspiration came after watching an excellent movie, "A dark blue world". Please, fell free to leave any comment... IMGP0014 by Arturo Navarro, en Flickr IMGP0012 by Arturo Navarro, en Flickr IMGP0010 by Arturo Navarro, en Flickr IMGP0013 by Arturo Navarro, en Flickr
  19. They 're rumours saying after its 1/48th MiG-25RBT "Foxbat-E", ICM is working on a MiG-25PD "Foxbat-A" kit in the same scale. Wishful thinking of more. Time will tell. Source: http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234994939-icm-148-mig-25rbt/&do=findComment&comment=2573774 V.P.
  20. Paul A H

    FW 189A-1 - 1:72 ICM

    FW 189A-1 1:72 ICM The Fw189 was created by legendary Focke Wulf designer Kurt Tank prior to WWII. Its intended role was as a short range observation and reconnaissance aircraft, with the requirement for excellent all-round visibility giving rise to the distinctive shape and extensive cockpit glazing. It won the contract by beating off competition from Arado and Blohm & Voss (the latter with their asymmetrical Bv. 141). It entered service in 1940, and production continued until 1944. The aircraft was popular with crews due to its manoeuvrability; it could often out turn fighters to escape destruction. It was tough as well, and there are stories of 189s returning from missions with parts of the tail and boom blown away. The Fw 189 is the latest all-new tooling from Kiev-based outfit ICM. Inside the very sturdy top-opening box are two largish sprues of light grey plastic and one clear sprue which together hold a total of 170 parts. The airframe is covered in crisp, recessed panel lines which look very good indeed, and the mouldings are crisp and clean. The instructions are an A4 stapled booklet which has been printed in colour and the decal sheet is clear and well printed. The overall impression is of a well-executed kit which looks as though it should be enjoyable to build. Construction begins with the central wing section and cockpit. The lower part of the central wing is moulded as a single span, complete with recesses for the main landing gear bays. Onto this part, the flaps, cockpit floor and fuselage sidewalls can all be added. The cockpit itself is nicely detailed, which is just as well as a lot of it will be on show under that greenhouse canopy. Interior detail includes the crew seats, rudder pedals, control column (moulded in two parts), radio gear and a large number of spare magazines for the defensive machine guns. The instrument panel fits to the top of the frontal canopy glazing, which is itself made up of four parts. It's inevitable with a model like this, but great care will need to be taken when assembling both this and the remaining eight parts of the canopy so as not to get messy glue smears over the clear plastic. Your patience will be tested to the limit when it comes to masking the expansive canopy, but there is good news in the form of a set of pre-cut masks on the way from Eduard. Look out for our review soon. Once cockpit/fuselage has been assembled, the upper panels for the inner wing can be fitted. The remaining steps in the construction process are essentially a sequence of sub-assemblies, starting with the landing gear bays. These areas behind the engine nacelles but ahead of the tail booms are separate parts, which makes for more complex construction but better detail. The tail booms themselves are split vertically and benefit from separately moulded rudders, while the tailplane has a separately moulded elevator and a neat tail wheel assembly. The engine nacelles are another sub-assembly, and are made up of two main parts, split vertically, with a separate radiator face, exhaust, frontal cowling, propeller and hub. As with the rest of the flying surfaces, the outer wings feature separate control surfaces. The landing gear is next, and is just as nicely detailed as the rest of the model. Each of the main gear legs is comprised four parts, while the wheels are split vertically and have separate mud guards. Step 63 in the instructions brings the fuselage/centre wing section together with the engine nacelles, tail booms and outer wings, leaving you with a more-or-less complete Fw189. All that remains to do then is add the finishing touches, such as the landing gear doors, the odd antenna mast or pitot tube and the four bombs and bomb shackles that fit under the outer wings. Three options are provided on the decal sheet: • Fw 189A-1 5(H)/12, Poltava, June 1942; • Fw 189A-1 11(H)/12, Russia, Summer 1942; and • Fw 189A-1 1(H)32, Finland, March 1943 All three aircraft are finished in RLM 70/71 over RLM 65, with the third aircraft finished in a temporary winter distemper over the top of the camouflage. The decals look excellent and include a smattering of stencils. Conclusion There haven't been all that many kits of the distinctive FW189 over the years, but ICM's new effort looks to be the best of them by quite some way. The mouldings are high quality, there is plenty of detail and surface structures are fine and crisp. Overall this is a well executed and carefully designed kit which is rich in detail. The only real drawback is the complexity of the clear parts, but there is no way around this if the desired outcome is an accurate and well detailed model. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  21. RCMP Female Officer ICM 1:16 ICM continue their theme of World Guards, with this model of a Female Royal Canadian Mounted Police Officer, which also includes her dog. The kit comes on two sprues of grey styrene and one of black, with a separate black pedestal. The parts are very well moulded with no sign of flash or other imperfections, and while the build is relatively simple, the painting, although one of the easiest in the series, is still a challenge to get the look right, both with the figure and the dog. Being 1:16 scale it’s large enough for the detail to be seen and painted, yet small enough to have a nice collection in a display cabinet. As with the other kits in this series the instructions are not very clear. They consist of a colour drawing of the completed and painted model, with the parts numbered and arrowed. AT least ICM have included some detail drawings on the painting guide this time, rather than having to squint and guess. Seeing that the kit is fairly straightforward it probably won’t worry the seasoned figure builder, but it might put off the beginner. The two legs are glued together as the waist, and then the two part torso is glued together and attached to the legs. The front of eh jacket comes as two separate parts and are glued on once the torso and legs have been joined. The separate arms, hands, one of which includes the end of the lead, two piece head, separate hair bun, separate epaulettes and three piece hat are the glued into place. Smaller items, such as the holster, ammunition pouch and a small unidentified pouch are affixed to the belt. The dog consists of a four part body, two piece head and separate tail. The lead is not provided though and it will be up to the modeller how best to address this. The kit comes with a nicely moulded pedestal, large enough for both figures with just single option of top. Alternatively the figure can be presented on a plain flat base. Conclusion If you’re a figure modeller then this will be a great way to pass the time. The painting will require a great deal patience to get right, particularly the shading, and the dog even more so. This is really nicely made though and although quite small, (you will need an optivisor to paint the finer details), and it will look really nice in the display cabinet. Review sample courtesy of
  22. In the framework of the recent toy tradefair Mir Detstva 2017, held at Moscow, ICM is reported having announced a 1/32nd Bücker Bu.131 (.181 ?) kit for 2018. To be followed. Source AlexGRD: http://master194.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=100171&sid=b7252e4ad3d849de8e26c4c009281a81 V.P.
  23. Shar2

    Soviet T-34/85. 1:35

    Soviet T-34/85 ICM 1:35 History The T-34 was and remains a legend. It is not only the most produced tank of the WWII-era, with 84,000 built (compared to the 48,966 Shermans of all versions) but also one of the longest-serving tanks ever built. Many are still stored in depots in Asia and Africa, and some served actively during the 90’s (such as during the 1991-99 Yugoslavian war). They formed the backbone of countless armoured forces around the globe from the fifties to the eighties. The basic design was drawn for the first time in 1938 with the A-32, in turn partially derived from the BT-7M, a late evolution of the US-born Christie tank. The T-34/85 came about after it was recognised that there was a need to increase the firepower of the T-34/76 following the Battle of Kursk in 1943. While the hull stayed the same, a new turret was designed and was to be originally fitted with a derivative of the M1939 air defence gun. This gun wasn’t chosen to be produced en masse, that honour went to the ZIS-S-53 which armed the 11,800 tanks produced between 1944 and 1945. The Model The model arrives in a strong box with a separate top sleeve with a nice artist’s representation of the tank and riders on the front. Inside, within a large poly bag, are five sprues and two hull parts of green styrene and, four lengths of tracks, a small sprue of clear styrene, and a smallish decal sheet. On initial inspection the parts are really well moulded, clean, with no sign of flash. There are a number of moulding pips, some of which are on quite fragile looking parts, so care should be taken when removing. The sprue gates attaching some items like are also quite heavy and I can see these parts breaking if not careful. The build begins with the fitting of the engine cover onto the rear decking, and the bow machine gun, armoured tear drop, mantle and ball. The two intake covers are then assembled and also fitted to the rear deck. The two piece bow mounted machine gun is then assembled and slide into the ball of the mounting, being glued such that it is still moveable, whilst there are four plates that are fitted to the underside of the rear decking. The drivers hatch is made up form four parts before being glued into position. Back aft, the rear bulkhead is attached, followed by the radiator cover. Inside the lower hull section the eight suspension boxes are fitted, four per side as are the two driver’s control sticks, whilst the rear mudguards are fitted to the rear. On the outside the driver gearbox covers are fitted, as are the five axles on their torsion beam suspension arms and the idler axles. The drivers are machine gunners seats, each made from six parts are glued in their appropriate positions and the two hull halves joined together. Each of the idler wheels, drive sprockets and road wheels are made from two parts before being fitted to their respective axles. The four towing hooks are then attached, two at the front and two aft. The upper hull is then fitted out with grab handles, stowage beams and a couple of smaller hooks. Each of the two halves of rubber track lengths are joined together and slide of the wheels. While there isn’t really any interior, ICM have allowed for the fact that some modellers like to have the hatches open, to that effect there is some semblance of interior parts. The main gun breech is made up form thirteen parts, and although relatively simple, does look quite effective. On the outside of the turret the mantlet and fixed section of the mantlet cover are fitted, the breech assembly is then glued to the mantlet from the inside and the lower turret, including the turret ring is glued into place. The moving section of the mantlet cover is then attached, along with the machine gun muzzle. The three piece mantlet extension and three piece main gun is then fitted, along with the four piece cupola, gunners hatch, grab handles, ventilator dome, viewing block and top armour plate for the mantlet. There are more stowage bars, periscope sights, lifting eyes and viewing blocks fitted to the turret before the whole assembly si fitted to the upper hull. Final assembly includes the four, four piece fuel drums, each with two cradles, spare track links, stowage boxes and aerial base. There is a four piece folded tarpaulin, (in place of one of the fuel drums), another stowage box, two more track links headlight, horn, two towing cables and a large saw attached before the model can be declares complete. Decals The decal sheet provides four options for tanks that each served in 1945. All of the tanks are in all over green, each with tank ID numbers and unit markings. The choices are:- A T-34/85, 7th Guards Tank Corps, Germany, Spring 1945 A T-34/85, 7th Guards Mechanised Corps, Germany, Spring 1945 A T-34/85, 4th Guard Tank Army, Germany, Spring 1945 A T-34/85, of an undesignated unit, from the Spring 1945 Conclusion This is another fine kit from ICM. Although not the most complicated of tank kits, it does look the part and would make a nice, relaxing weekend build. Review sample courtesy of
  24. Ju-88A-4 WWII Axis Bomber 1:48 ICM (48237) The Ju-88 was designed as a schnellbomber in the mid 30s, and at the time it was faster than current fighter designs, so it was projected that it could infiltrate, bomb and ex-filtrate without being intercepted. That was the theory anyway. By the time WWII began in the west, fighters had caught up with the previously untouchable speed of the 88, and it needed escorting to protect it from its Merlin equipped opponents. It turned out to be a jack of all trades however, and was as competent as a night fighter, dive bomber or doing reconnaissance as it was bombing Britain. They even popped a big gun on the nose and sent it against tanks and bombers, with variable success. The A series sported a pair of Jumo 211 engines in cylindrical cowlings producing over 1,000hp each, and was improved gradually up until the A-17, with the A-11 being the official designation for the factory produced tropicalised version. It was fitted with filters to protect the engine from dust and dirt, as well as a rescue kit for ditching and forced landings. The A-4 was an Improved variant over initial versions. It would feature a longer wingspan, (due to redesigned wingtips), better defensive armament, a reinforced undercarriage; and provision for external bomb racks (4). Powerplant for the A-4 was Jumo 211 J-1 or J-2 engines (1410 hp) driving wooden bladed propellers. The Kit This is a new variation on the original tooling released a couple of years by ICM, with new parts added to make it version specific. There are new engine nacelles and props; new fin and rudder; changes to the cockpit mounted machine-guns, and different glazing options are chosen from the same clear sprue. The box is the usual top-opening with an inner lid style, and inside you will find eight sprues in grey styrene, one in clear, decal sheet and a glossy covered instruction booklet with spot colour inside, and the decal options in full colour on the back cover. If you have been lucky enough to see the A-5, you'll know that detail is right up there in terms of quality and crispness, with ICM really improving over the last few years, which has to be great news for modellers, as they aren't frightened of tackling what to us may seem niche subject matters. With the sprue-related excitement out of the way, work on the fuselage begins with the addition of sidewall details in the capacious cockpit area. Rear bulkhead, side consoles and seats are all added to the cockpit sides for a change, with an insert in the fuselage for the circular antenna and tail wheel added into the starboard side. The instrument panel is supplied with decals, and fits into the fuselage during joining. The missing floor is added to the lower fuselage panel that includes the lower parts of the inner wings and gives the structure some strength. It also receives the rudder pedals, control column, and the two remaining crew seats before being joined to the fuselage. The tail plane has articulated flying surfaces, and the wings are supplied as top and bottom, with the flaps and ailerons separate from the box, and neat curved fairings so they look good when fitted at an angle. The flaps include the rear section of the soon-to-be-fitted nacelles, which are added as separate parts to avoid sink-marks, and these and the ailerons run full-span, terminating just as the wingtip begins. At this time the landing gear is made up on a pair of upstands that are added to the underwing in preparation for the installation of the nacelle cowlings. The engines have to be built up first though, consisting of a high part count with plenty of detail, and a rear firewall that securely fits inside the cowling. Even though this is an in-line engine with a V-shaped piston layout, the addition of the annular radiators gives it the look of a radial, with their representation added to the front of the cowling, obscuring much of the engine detail. The side panels can be left off to show all that detail. The cooling flaps around the cowling are separate, and the exhausts have separate stacks, which aren't hollow but are large enough to make boring them out with a drill a possibility. The completed nacelle fit to the underwing over the top of the main gear installation, securing in place with four pegs, two on each side of each nacelle. The props are made from spinner, backplate and a single piece containing all three blades, sliding onto a pin projecting from the engine front, which will require some glue if you want to keep them on. At this point the instructions recommend adding the canopy glazing, which consists of a choice of two faceted nose cones, and the main greenhouse for the cockpit aperture. The rear portion is made from two additional parts due to its double "blown" shape to accommodate the two rearward gun positions, so that the gunner's head isn't pressed against the canopy. The guns are fitted through the windscreen and the two circular ports on the rear, although no ammo feed is supplied. Under the wings the dive spoilers are added with four bomb crutches on aerodynamic mounts, with bombs supplied that have two of their fins moulded separately, along with the stabilising struts that fit into notches in the fins. While the airframe is flipped over, the two-part wheels and twin main gear bay doors are added, both having good detail and the former a radial tread. Addition of the canopy mounted antenna completes the build, but this is likely to be done long after main painting for safety's sake! Markings The kit includes four marking options for Axis Air Arms supplied by Germany. Stencils are the first page of the painting section details the application of these. From the box you can build one of the following: Junkers Ju.88A-4 Grupul 5 Bombardment Romania 1944 Junkers Ju.88A-4 3/1 Bombazo szazaf, Hungarian Air Force, Russia 1943 Junkers Ju.88A-4 1/PLeLv 44, Onttola, Finland Summer 1944 Junkers Ju.88A-4 3/PLeLv 44, Onttola, Finland Summer 1944 The colours are picked out using letters that correspond to a table on the front page, which gives the names and paint codes in Revell and Tamiya ranges, so should be easy to convert to your paint system of choice. The decals are printed in-house and have good register, colour density and sharpness, with additional instrument dials included on a clear carrier film to help with cockpit painting. All of the stencils are legible, and overall they inspire confidence, with a thin carrier film cut close to the printing, with a few exceptions where lettering has film that could have been dispensed with to reduce the menace of silvering. Conclusion ICM's range of Ju.88s and Do.17s are a good example of how far they have come in recent years, adding value to their brand, and improving their reputation with each release. The kit is well-detailed and comprehensive in what it includes, and with a nice pair of decal options it says "build me". Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  25. P 204(f) with German Armoured Vehicle Crew ICM 1:35 (35382) The Panhard 178 was at the time of its manufacture (1935) an advanced reconnaissance armoured car used by the French armed forces. The 178 being Panhard's internal project number. The vehicle features 4 wheel drive a 25mm main gun supplemented by a 7.5mm machine gun. It was the first 4 wheel drive type of vehicle mass produced for a major power. A feature of the vehicle was a driving position in the front for the drive, and a separate one at the rear for the second driver. The second driver also doubled as a radio operator in command vehicles. The main gun used was a shorten version of the 25mm Hotchkiss L/42.2 the then standard French Antitank tank gun. To allow for the shorter barrel the gun used heavier charges, this would penetrate 50mm of armour using a tungsten round, 150 rounds of 25mm ammunition were carried. Secondary armament was a coaxial Reibel 7.mm machine gun for which 3750 rounds were carried, approximately half of them being armour piercing. A further machine gun was carried which could be mounted on the turret for anti aircraft use. The magazines for this gun were carried on the walls of the fighting compartment. Approximately 370 vehicles were completed and available for use once war broke out and they were employed by infantry units as well as the Cavalry. When in combat with German vehicles armed with 20mm cannon the Panhards often came out much better than the enemy vehicles. Following the French defeat nearly 200 (many brand new) were used by German reconnaissance units. An interesting modification made by the Germans was to develop the Schienepanzer as railway protection vehicles which were fitted with special wheels to allow them to run on railway tracks. The Kit The kit is a re-release by ICM of their new tool kit from 2015 (Which we note has also been re-boxed by Revell & Tamiya). This kit also includes a set of 4 figures. The kit has a full interior, both in the fighting compartment, both driving positions and the engine bay. The detail on the parts is very well done, down to the rivets on the main hull to the checker plate main floor, and the louvres on the engine covers. There are 4 sprues of tan (or caramac) plastic and 4 rubber tyres in the kit. Construction begins with the fighting compartment floor being glued to the lower hull, followed by the rear driver’s bulkhead and both drivers seats. The longitudinal bulkhead between the rear driver’s compartment and engine compartment is then glued into position, followed by the eleven piece engine. The drivers steering columns and steering wheels are next, along with the gear sticks and foot pedals. The rear drivers transverse bulkhead is then fitted as is the rack of shells for the main gun, which is glued to the fighting compartment bulkhead. Each of the two sides of the hull has a door that can be posed either open of closed. On the inside of each side there is are numerous ammunition drums, for the machine gun, to be glued into position, along with the driver’s instruments and a spare machine gun. The sides are then glued to the lower hull, followed by the front and read bulkheads and front glacis plate. The rear mounted engine deck is then attached, along with the fighting compartment roof. The engine louvres and rear mid-bulkhead hatch are then attached, and can all be posed open should the modeller wishes. The rear wheel arch mounted storage boxes are then fitted and finished off with their respective doors. Fortunately, the running gear an suspension on this kit is really simple, just the two axles with two piece differentials and drive shafts are assembled, the four suspension spring units are then fitted to the underside of the hull, followed by the axles/drive shafts. The steering linkages are then attached, along with the brake accumulators, drop links, horn and towing hooks. The wheels are each made up from two part wheels and a rubber tyre. Once assembled the four wheels are glued onto their respective axles. The rest of the hull is then detailed with grab handles, door handles, pioneer tools, headlights and a rack on the rear bulkhead. The turret is then assembled; beginning with the co-axial machine gun, which is assembled from three parts before being fitted to the left hand front of the turret. The main gun comes in two halves, which once joined together are fitted with the trunnion mounts and elevation wheel. This is fitted to the turret ring along with the turret traverse mechanism. The turret ring and turret are then joined and the commanders and gunners seats are assembled and glued into position. The commander’s hatch is fitted with a handle and vent before being fitted into position. The two rear hatches on the turret can be posed open or closed. There are two, two piece periscopes fitted forward on the turret roof, and two lifting eyes on the rear sides. The completed turret is then fitted to the turret ring on the hull, and the last parts added. These include the two, two piece drivers viewing ports, which can also be posed open, the two piece exhaust silencer, wing mirrors and four miscellaneous panels. Figures The figures are all on a separate sprue and are in fact ICM's German Armoured Vehicle Crew Set (35614). There are 4 crewmen one carrying a jerrycan and 3 others in various relaxed poses, to accompany the guy playing with a cat you do get the cat figure as well. The figures are well sculpted. Decals The small decal sheet provides markings for four vehciles; Unknown unit France 1940 92nd Panzer Aufklarungs Abteilung, 20th Panzer Division, Belorussia, July 1941 German Police Force, Central Russia, Spetember 1941 37nd Panzer Aufklarungs Abteilung, 7th Panzer Division, Moscow, December 1941 Conclusion This is a great little kit from ICM of an important French Armoured Car used by the Germans as well. The addition of the vehicle crew makes it much more complete. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
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