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  1. Since my return to the hobby about 3 years ago, I have only been making 1/35 AFV’s. However, having recently taken part in the Canadian GB (my effort here) and looking at the many aircraft builds it got me interested in trying one myself. I did use to make aircraft as a nipper, but as the title says it was over 40 years ago. Hopefully my AFV modelling experience will give me some help, but I appreciate this will be a learning curve for me. Sure, I will have a few questions along the way, so any help will be appreciated. I posted a topic a couple of months ago asking for model recommendations and the Eduard Spitfire was mentioned a few times, so I have gone with that. I wanted an easy-ish paint job, so I have ended up with the MK.IX which I am going to do in the Malta scheme. I also decided to get the weekend addition to avoid the PE on my first build. George
  2. Eduard is to release a 1/48th Zlín Z-126 to Z-526 Trenér family. Source: https://www.facebook.com/EduardCompany/photos/a.122154977799458/3366784713336452 V.P.
  3. Hi my friends, During last south hemisphere summer I built this nice kit by Eduard. Good fit in general, not the recent Eduard standard, but after all a decent P-39. Only issue were the cockpit's doors. I tried to keep the left one closed as the records of war time use to describe, but the transparent separates piece didn't fit OK the fuselage, so I kept them open. I always like to add pilot figures to my kits, and for this Airacobra I used a USAAF Tamiya pilot (I name him 'Lio Messi', as his face resemblance the argentine idol, lol). Used Lio Messi also on my last 'Flying Tiger" P-40B. The cammo on this particular unit, the 46th FS, part of the 15th Pursuit Group, was used in the spring of 1943 when the fighter were deployed to Kanton Atoll in the Phoenix archipelago in the Pacific Ocean. Due to the conditions on the island, almost completely lacking vegetation, new Airacobras were repainted in the combination of the sand color on the upper and side surfaces while the lower surfaces were sprayed in light blue. Cheers to all, happy modelling! Cris.
  4. After a longer WW1 pause, my dad starts a new project, making an attempt on a third Oeffag Albatros for our homeland collection. DSC_0004 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr planned scheme DSC_0005 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0006 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr
  5. Eduard leaflet for May: http://www.eduard.com/store/out/media/distributors/leaflet/leaflet2016-05.pdf change digit in link for older issues
  6. Halberd Models has just announced for October 2022 a 1/48th Piper Enforcer conversion set for the Eduard's P-51D or F-6D/K kits. Source: https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=pfbid02Dy9kejba5QXzYbgJxvHXk1r2H1aEbMWF5tsfj4NKZJLz6sCyyLmW5vDhfjgfxwzrl&id=100064057054695 ] V.P.
  7. Thanks HKR Eduard worked in secret on a new kit and tomorrow it will be announced 7PM (Warsaw Time) UPDATE - It'll be a family of 1/48th Mitsubishi A6M "Zero" Source: https://www.modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=95280&start=33390#p2448351 V.P.
  8. My finished build of what I found to be a great kit, thoroughly enjoyable and excellent out of the box. First kit painted with SMS and hugely impressed with the finish and performance of this Lacquer range. Another first for me was tackling the carrier film on the Eduard decals and after a nervy start very please with the final result. Thanks for looking
  9. F/A-18F Ejection Seats & Wheels (648775 & 648776) 1:48 Eduard Brassin We recently reviewed the first batch of aftermarket from Eduard for the new Meng F/A-18F here, and now we have a second tranche, including wheels and a delightful pair of ejection seats, all highly detailed and pretty much drop-in replacements. As is now usual with Eduard's medium resin sets, they arrive in a shallow cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. The smaller sets are supplied in flat resealable packs with the instructions wrapped around the protective card inserts within. Ejection Seats (648775) The two seat Super Hornet carries its pilots on a pair of Martin Baker Mk.14 seats, and those seats are replicated in exceptional detail in this boxed set. Arriving in two Ziploc bags, the first bag contains two each of the main seat components, cushions and umbilical between the pilot and aircraft. The other bag has a small fret of brass Photo-Etch (PE) that depicts the anti-flail leg restraints that tighten in the event of ejection, a full set of four-point crew harnesses in pre-painted brass, plus the stripey pull-handles that initiated the process between the pilot’s knees, and additional loops and controls on the side of the seat pan. The decal sheet includes three stencils per side of each seat, one of which is a stripey rectangle that is wrapped around the alternative ejection handle on the right side of the seat pan. Paint codes are given using Gunze codes for acrylic and lacquer, and stencil decal placement is shown on a pair of diagrams on the instruction booklet. Wheels (648776) Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. This set includes two main wheels with separate rear hubs that have copious brake detail moulded-in, plus two nose wheels, all of which have fabulous detail on the side walls, circumferential tread on the contact patches, and a minimal amount of sag in the bottom of the tyre where the weight of the aircraft makes itself visible. This is also where the casting block is attached to each wheel, so once cut off, it just needs to be flatted off and doesn’t affect the tread. Painting is eased by the inclusion of a sheet of pre-cut kabuki tape masks (not pictured) that will allow you to cut the demarcation between wheels and tyres with little effort. Conclusion A fabulously well-detailed pair of resin and PE sets that will add extra detail to an already excellent kit. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  10. So here is (potentially) the start of part one of a dual/joint/two at a time build. Jury is still out in my head if to try two at a time having only completed two builds in 1/350 in the past 3 years especially as I still have a lot to learn and want them to turn out well. Also whether to do a joint thread or separate ones? As a kid I built 1/600 battleships, if it didn’t have big guns I wasn’t interested. A few years back I dabbled in 1/400 and built battleships, (you may see a pattern), now that I’m rather hooked on the hobby again I’ve started by building you’ve guessed it – battleships, specifically Zvezda’s Dreadnought and Hobbyboss’s Dunkerque (95% complete). As I looked at my stash of 12 and counting with a couple of those started I realised bar a modern Russian destroyer I needed to change it up. I settled on Aircraft Carriers, specifically 3, the bank said I could have 2 - fair enough I said. I wanted something unusual looking and Graf Zeppelin is certainly that. I’d actually discounted her as the aftermarket options aren’t great, Mk.1 do a set three times the cost of the kit which I personally think is too much. Eduard do a set in 4 prts, 2 prts of which are now discontinued. I contacted them about this and another set for Roma they have done similar with and they very bluntly said they wouldn’t bring it back into production even if demand went up which seems odd but that’s up to them. So I have coming on monday trumpeters kit of Graf Zeppelin in 1/350 with half of the eduard sets available, I did track down all four parts but when I compared the kit parts with those offered by eduard I found multiple areas when eduard merely replaced what was already included in the kit with little or no marked difference. I’ve also an extra set of six ME 109’s and Stukas. I plan to do my best with it, maybe scratch build a few bits, it won’t be jaw dropping in terms of PE but I think there is enough to lift the base model up a level or two. Part of the thing with Graf Zeppelin is of course she was never finished (about 95%) and in the process of not being finished she was changed several times. A brief history can be found on many a website, likely including this one on other builds but essentially, she had an Atlantic bow added post launch, was put on hold a couple times, had bulges added as well as changes to her super structure, AA armament, Aircraft complement and make up etc. You get the idea, the brilliant thing is it means you can’t really go wrong and where the line is drawn is any ones guess. As you’ll see from the following photos, Insert obligatory pictures (all from scale mates and Wikipedia) I plan to make minor changes to the super structure and funnel cap as I think trumpeter got it very very very wrong. I’ve no idea on paint schemes she’d likely have adopted, the Germans didn’t seem to do much up to early 42 which is potentially when she could have entered service had she not be placed on hold repeatedly. There is this picture on Scalemates that are supposedly GZ but to me I'm not convinced, the step/angle in the bow is gone, the tip of the bow is different as is the rake, as are the missing casemates (which is possible) but the bulge comes a lot further forward and the superstructure is stepped out to one side which would be massive work to undertake during the brief times she was actually worked on post 1940, I wondered if these are perhaps pictures of Weser but I don't think she got that far in construction? Now as for the second ship I may concurrently build – I’ll say nothing partially not to jinx it, Im told it'll be here in short order but time will tell. I'll be initially working to complete to a point of airbushing as the bank balance has taken a hit and so I can’t invest in an Airbrush right now. So any areas hairy stickable I’ll look to do and other areas be left ready for airbrushing later in the build. I'm not sure how easy to do as sub assemblies carriers are - but I'll guess I will fid out. Dunkerque has taken 10 months and isn’t huge but is nearly there so I doubt this will be a quick build initially but if you’d like to follow on and have made it through my inane ramblings I’d be glad of any input and suggestions as to: - paint schemes - paint sequencing given my Airbrish plan/delay - and modifications that may make her stand out. Photo's of the kit and PE to follow when they arrive, Thanks for bearing with me Sam
  11. P-38J Upgrade Sets (for Tamiya) 1:48 Eduard Tamiya’s new releases of the P-38F/G then H and later J variants has well-and-truly kicked the Academy kit off the number one spot in 1:48 for the most part, the J having been release in 2022, thereby triggering Eduard’s latest efforts. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE), small Brassin, SPACE and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Interior (491294) Two frets are included, one nickel-plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass, plus a small printed piece of acetate sheet. The sidewalls are first relieved of much of their moulded-in detail, to be redecorated with a substantial set of new parts to replace and augment the detail that is there. This includes the throttle quadrant, which has a garden of levers sprouting from both sections, plus more of the instruments that are dotted about the cockpit, and even an insert that is applied to the head of the control column. The gunsight is stripped of its thick clear styrene glass, and is refitted with a PE frame and a piece of acetate cut from the sheet. A complete set of new layered instrument panels and replacement rudder pedals are fitted to the kit panel after removing the original details, with even more instruments and details placed in every nook and cranny. The pilot’s seat is replaced entirely by a new PE unit, which also has a pair of cushions, requiring only a minor alteration to the frame it sits on. Moving to the engine nacelles, the gear bays are upgraded with new ribbed PE parts inside the bulkheads, a two-layered circular grille over the intakes under the prop, and a backing panel that covers the kit detail on the central intake deep inside the boom. Two large radiator fairings on each side of the tail booms are also given two-layer grilles to detail their interiors, with another circular grille and an intake on each side of both nacelles just under the exhaust outlets. The final parts involve removing all of the oleo-scissor links from the three gear legs, and replacing them with folded PE parts, plus additional details on the main gear struts. Zoom! Set (FE1294) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. SPACE 3D Printed Cockpit Decals (3DL48081) The Eduard SPACE sets use new 3D printing techniques that lay down successive layers of different colour resin, creating highly realistic almost full complete panels that are supplied on a decal sheet. They can depict metallic shades, plus glossy, satin and matt colours too, which really ups the detail on everything they print. In addition, a small sheet of nickel-plated and pre-painted PE is included for the aspects of the set that lend themselves better to this medium, such as seatbelts and rudder pedals. On the PE sheet is a set of pre-painted seatbelts for the pilot, with a comfort pad under the buckles, plus a lot of instrument box faces; rudder pedals; levers for the controls; circular bases for winders that require some 0.3mm rod sections from your own stock to complete. More details for the black boxes and a pre-painted frame for the gunsight glass are also included. The decal sheet has a gorgeous instrument panel replacement, plus stencils and all manner of instrument surfaces to give your cockpit the ultimate in detail. Externally, there are beautiful glossy printed identification lights that you will find four of each in green and red for the port and starboard wingtips, plus four more in blue for the sides of the tail fins, with all the kit lumps requiring removal before you can replace them with these super-realistic decals. Wheels (648782) Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. This set includes one nose wheel with separate spoked hub caps to be inserted into the centres along with optional PE discs to hide away all that beautiful detail, which seems a shame. The two main wheels have an outboard hub, plus the same bland disc that covers them if you really have to for accuracy. The nose tyre has oval tread and the main gear a diamond tread, with a small sag at the bottom where they join the casting block, and a set of kabuki tape masks (not pictured) to cut the demarcation neatly between tyres and wheels with little effort. A scrap diagram shows a method for removing the flash between the spoke of the hubs and in the middle of the nose gear wheel, using a cocktail stick or something similar to push it out toward the inside. I use the tip of a #11 blade myself, but it’s time consuming and there will be blood. Seatbelts STEEL (FE1295) These belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as a set of crew belts, you also get a comfort pad that sits under the buckles to prevent chaffing of the pilot’s general areas. Masks (EX883) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition, you get a set of hub/tyre masks for all the wheels (including the out-riggers), allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Masks Tface (EX884) Supplied on a larger sheet/two sheets of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with everything above, but also give you another set of canopy masks tailored to fit the interior of the glazing so that you can paint the interior and give your model that extra bit of realism. Conclusion A great bunch of sets to augment a great kit of a great aircraft that I just happen to be watching a documentary about as I type this. Spooky. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  12. Coyote TSV Update Set (36489 for Hobby Boss) 1:35 Eduard We reviewed this new kit from Hobby Boss here a couple of months ago, and it’s a nicely detailed kit of the British Army’s modern armoured support vehicle. This Photo-Etch (PE) detail set from Eduard is designed to improve on the detail that’s available in the kit, taking advantage of the thin etched brass to make in-scale parts. The set arrives in an A5 sized resealable clear foil bag, and consists of a single large fret of brass that is filled with a host of goodies. Two large skins are supplied for the inner sides of the main load area, and the undersides of the rear wheel wells are similarly skinned with a new part each, which also has a replica of flexible rubber “frill” that helps to keep the dust and aggregate from kicking up when in motion. When the glue is dry, you are advised to push the edges to give it a more organic look to better replicate the real rubber, so check your references if you’re unsure how they should look. A similar wheel arch insert with simulated rubber edges is supplied for the front arches too. The front of the vehicle and centre section stowage boxes between the cab and load area is covered with tie-down loops, all of which are removed and replaced with new PE parts with better detail. The running boards down the side of the vehicle have PE mesh included in the box, but the replacements in this set are more defined and to be honest, more capably etched. The seatbelts for the crew will stop them from getting thrown clear of the vehicle at the first bump, and four sets are included for all the crew, then the same courtesy is afforded to the big .50cal ammo cans around the gunner’s platform, which are lashed down on trays that are absent from the kit, so you’ll need to cut off the pins for the ammo boxes, glue the trays in place, then add the ammo boxes back, lashing them down if you wish. Another tray for a ready ammo can is included for the gunner’s ring, which again fits in place over the two locating pins once they are removed. The rear of this platform is covered with pioneer tools, all of which get new clasps after a short chop to remove the chunky mouldings. Next to these tools, a box is skinned over to include a mesh panel in the centre that is missing, as is a circular part on the floor behind it. A couple of weapon lashing points are added to the other side of the hump. The kit includes a large single part to represent a stowage box that is fixed to the A-frame door on the starboard side of the vehicle, and most of this part is removed, leaving the narrow top section to be reused. A new lower section is made up from PE panels, with internal load crates that have tie-down straps across their fronts. Lashings for a spade are added to the underside, then the top section of part D58 is glued atop the new assembly to complete it, giving the area much better scale authenticity. On the opposite side of the vehicle the similar framework “door” carries the spare tyre, which is fitted to its mount with a new PE bracket and large retaining nut for extra detail. The crew cab doors are detailed with additional small parts too, with the work duplicated on both sides, and new wire-cutters replacing the chunky kit mouldings on the sloped front roll cage around the cab. On the sides a pair of “shopping bags” made from strapping are made up from the etched parts on the fret, looped through itself and fitted on the two positions on the right side of the vehicle, adding some contents if you feel the need. At the rear of the Coyote, the two extensions that overhang the rear of the vehicle’s light clusters are replaced by a new PE pair, with mounts for the kit’s grenade dispensers with a more realistic hollow underside and scale thickness. The last area to be detailed is the antenna forest that is carried over the stowage in the middle of the vehicle behind the drivers. The kit platform is slightly incorrectly positioned, so it is replaced by a new assembly that consists of a flat top surface that has double-folded edges for strength, and is further stiffened by adding cross-braces and C-section stringers to the underside. On the flat top surface, an additional sensor is made from 2mm rod from your own stock with a circular base, and some of the other kit antennae are also placed on raised “washers”. This is then fixed to the two supports as shown on the final diagram. Conclusion A very comprehensive upgrade set for what is already a nice kit. The extra detail will definitely set your model aside from all the others. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. F4F-3 Wildcat Life Raft (648770 for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Just when you thought it was safe to back in the water (quite literally in the case of this set). More aftermarket for the new tool Wildcat from Eduard, and this is the second wave of aftermarket sets that they have released for those that want to increase the level of detail over and above what’s achievable using injection moulded styrene. As is now usual with Eduard's larger resin sets, they arrive in a deep Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. This set is an unusual one, and will doubtless appeal immediately to anyone that has a hankering to open up some panels, or anyone crazy enough to want to build a ditching diorama with a Wildcat in the drink and sinking as the pilot absconds with his dinghy. Inside the two Ziploc bags are ten 3D printed parts, plus a small fret of bare Photo-Etch (PE) in its own bag with a card protector. The instructions are wrapped around the parts to protect them, and are accompanied by two sheets of foam due to the delicate nature of some of the parts. For once, the instructions don’t detail the removal of the areas of the fuselage with their usual red-outlined drawings, but looking at the fuselage halves currently in my spray booth shows that it’s a very simple task to identify where to make the cuts. Work inside the panel lines and fine-tune the cut-out until your new bay part fits snugly, and the two hatches fit without looking sloppy. With the bay in place, you can choose to put the two bags inside and strap them down with some wires from your own stock, and add a small eyelet to the front of the bay. Your other option is to leave the bay empty apart from the afore mentioned wires draped over the edge of the bay, because Eduard have thoughtfully included a full dinghy in black 3D printed resin, which is finished off by adding a PE seat across the middle, and a pair of rollocks on the sides. A gas cylinder is placed at an angle across the bow in a shallow recess, and you can choose where you’d like to position the two oars, depending on what you intend to do with your dinghy. Finishing off the adaptation of your kit includes placing a narrow spine stringer down the centre and then gluing the doors in the opened position. I now need another Wildcat, and the skills to create a ditching diorama. Damn! Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  14. F-86F-40 Sabre Upgrade Sets (for Airfix) 1:48 Eduard The new Airfix Sabre has been out for a wee while now, and in their usual style, here comes a batch of upgrade sets for you to drool over. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE), SPACE and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Detail Set (491298) Two frets are included, one nickel-plated and pre-painted, the other larger fret in bare brass. It starts with a comprehensive overhaul of the ejection seat, which is very much different afterwards, having a pair of raised sides that make it look a bit like an arm chair; a more realistically shaped headbox; a set of more accurate foot plates that are folded up to shape and fitted in place instead of the moulded-in kit steps. The instrument panel is sanded back flat and has a two-layer pre-painted main panel and another centre panel installed. The same is done to the side consoles, but the removal of material includes reducing the height of the consoles to 8mm before applying the new parts on top, on the sides, and on the side walls, including a detailed throttle quadrant with protruding levers. Behind the pilot on the rear deck, the soft and ambiguous kit detail is augmented by numerous parts, then a shaped head-armour panel with fitments is glued in at an angle behind the seat headrest. In the canopy a single rear-view mirror is provided, needing your shiniest silver paint to give it some realism. The nose gear bay is built under the intake trunking, which has some ribbing moulded into it, which is first upgraded with rib-top details and the removal of a run of straight wires. The bay walls have some triangular fillets removed, then have details and surface skins fitted to the rear face before it is joined to the bay roof. The gear leg is updated with a PE oleo-scissor, and a support strut has additional details applied to the visible surface. When the bay is together and is inside the fuselage, additional panels and wiring looms are inserted to complete the overhaul. The main bays are left as provided, but the gear legs are augmented with new oleo-scissors and links between the Y-shaped captive bay door, which will require some short lengths of 0.6mm rod from your own stocks to complete. In the gun bays to the sides of the cockpit, a bump is first removed from the front corner, then new skins are fixed to the front and rear bulkheads before inserting the three .50cals on each side, which have been upgraded with detailed tops to their breeches after removing raised areas from front and rear. The bay doors in the kit are thicker than the real thing, which is fixed by the new two-layer gun bay doors included in the set, which also have appliqué parts fixed to the inner side. Before gluing the two layers together, they need to be bent slightly to shape to match the curve of the fuselage, which can be done by pressing the annealed parts against the kit doors and tweaking them until they sit flush with the fuselage during test fitting. The last area to see improvement are the air-brake bays found on the sides of the fuselage. The bays are left as-is, but the brake panels are replaced entirely by a totally new assembly that is made from a curved piece of PE for the exterior skin, laminated to an inner skin that is bent to shape to give it thickness. The hinge-point is buried in a hole in the inside skin, and a number of stiffening parts are fitted along the length of the inner face to form the pivot-points at the front of each brake. Each one is then glued in place once painted using the original actuator strut. The result is a much more in-scale look to the assemblies. Zoom! Set (FE1298) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. SPACE 3D Printed Cockpit Decals (3DL48083) The Eduard SPACE sets use new 3D printing techniques that lay down successive layers of different colour resin, creating highly realistic almost full complete panels that are supplied on a decal sheet. They can depict metallic shades, plus glossy, satin and matt colours too, which really ups the detail on everything they print. In addition, a small sheet of nickel-plated and pre-painted PE is included for the aspects of the set that lend themselves better to this medium, such as seatbelts and rudder pedals. The PE sheet has a set of four-point crew seatbelts with separate comfort pads under the buckles, plus levers for the throttle quadrants on the left side console. The decals require removal of the kit panel and side console moulded-in detail, after which they are replaced by superb new consoles, the throttle quadrant base, sidewall instruments, and the main instrument panel, which is in two parts and has a PE lever protruding from the left side. Seatbelts STEEL (FE1299) These belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as a set of four-point crew belts, you also get comfort pads underneath the buckles. Masks (EX887) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition, you get a set of hub/tyre masks for the wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Masks Tface (EX888) Supplied on a larger sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with everything above, but also give you another set of canopy masks tailored to fit the interior of the glazing so that you can paint the interior and give your model that extra bit of realism. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  15. Eduard is to rebox with add ons the Revell 1/48th MRCA Tornado GR Mk.1 "Gulf War/Desert Babe" kit - ref. 11136 Expected in March 2020.Source: http://www.kitreviewsonline.de/eduard-pressekonferenz-in-nuernberg/ V.P.
  16. Hi all, Here is my latest Spitfire Mk.Vc built as Eric Gibbs' BS164 personal aircraft. This is the Profipack edition of the Eduard kit in 1/48 with some 3d printed details added. The most important addition was De Havilland Hydromatic airscrew, which I couldn't find in any of Eduard's boxings. The entire undercarriage has also been printed. No colour photos of this aircraft have surfaced, so it is hard to say what camouflage was used on this Spitfire. I chose Foliage Green + Earth Brown over Sky Blue, because it seems to match the tonal differences seen on the black and white photos. I used exclusively Mr. Paint lacquers. If anyone has access to a 3d printer with 4K resolution or better (I used Phrozen Sonic Mini 8K), I have uploaded 3d models of all the parts I used in STL format. The link to the zip file with all STLs is at the end of the build article (unfortunately in Polish only), which can be found here: https://pme.org.pl/2022/08/27/spitfire-mk-vc-trop-54-sqn-darwin-eric-m-gibbs/ Cheers, Tomasz
  17. F4F-3 Cockpit w/Telescopic Gunsight (648765 for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin But wait… there’s more! More aftermarket for the new tool Wildcat from Eduard, and this is the second wave of aftermarket sets that they have released for those that want to increase the level of detail over and above what’s achievable using injection moulded styrene. As is now usual with Eduard's larger resin sets, they arrive in a deep Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. This set will please those that want to model an earlier Wildcat with the simple telescopic sight that was fitted to the first aircraft off the production line. There are three Ziploc bags within the box, two containing directly 3D printed parts, the other containing a fret of nickel-plated pre-painted Photo-Etch (PE), and a small decal sheet, both protected by a small sheet of white card. On emptying the parts out of the bag, the first thing you notice is the sheer level of detail present, but also the relatively small parts count thanks to the capabilities of 3D printers, where supports are all that is required to protect overhangs, and there is no degrading of mould fidelity over time because there are no moulds to wear out. The short parts list is also evident immediately on viewing the instructions, which begin with an ostensibly complete aft cockpit assembly, to which you add the seat with painted PE lap belts only for the initial batch of airframes. The control column slips into a deep recess in the gaiter, some half-moon levers are added at the sides of the pilot, then the forward bulkhead with integral tank, plus a separate head cushion are mated to the cockpit. The side consoles are slotted between the two bulkheads with detailed painting guide and decal placement instructions to complete those, then a little wire from your own stocks is threaded through sections of the cockpit, and the kit bulkhead is brought in from behind. The beautifully detailed rudder pedals are a single part that is truly amazing to behold, and it too has its own painting instructions and two decals for the centre of the piece. The kit insert to the tank is slotted into the 3D printed part to complete it, and then you have a choice of how to complete the instrument panel, using a blank panel with two-layer PE dial sections plus some tiny levers, or a detailed printed panel to which you add a decal, or if you’re very brave, paint fully yourself. The small angled coaming with separate tubular gunsight is glued to the top of the coaming to finish off. The cockpit can then be inserted into the fuselage as per the kit instructions, but with a small resin part fixed to the starboard interior, and a pair of tiny pegs are removed from the styrene part. If you are a little anxious about removing the 3D printed parts from their printing bases, and having to deal with all those tendril-like fingers that hold them in place and support them during printing and curing, fret not. As it was the first time I had dealt with a completely 3D printed cockpit from Eduard, I took the precaution of removing the parts from their bases of the previously reviewed later cockpit and preparing them for assembly as part of my build. It didn’t take me long, as I used the new CMK Razor Saw set we reviewed a wee while ago here. I used the square blade chucked all the way over on the fine-toothed blade side, and once I’d cut the attachment points, I snapped off the fingers so I could work on the next side easily. Some parts you can just saw at the base of the supports, but it gets messy and you can’t quite see what you’re cutting. Here’s a quick pic of the mess I was making during the removal process, remembering it isn’t this set, but one very similar: After a little sanding of the forest of tiny ‘pimples’ that were left under parts and the more delicate parts being trimmed by a new #11 blade, the results were very pleasing. There are detailed painting and decaling instructions given throughout the leaflet, in Eduard’s usual Gunze Aqueous and lacquer ranges, using H and C codes respectively. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  18. Hello, Here's another project of mine. 3 american aircrafts including 1 and a half under british management. Both are early Mustangs with différents armament and of course different wing. 1 MTO, 1 ETO and the last from CBI There's an Accurate min and 2 ICM, serioulsly they're almost identical. The first to be finished, I guess will be the MTO one a P-51A from an US Sqdn on loan to an brit squadron. The colours will be ... Let's say, unusual. One of my favourite game , you both should know the kind of remark "are you sure about the colours ???" I modify the camera rack for 2 of thede Mustang, because, you receive this... And you must have that... So, I cut the brackets, throw away the original support, add an armour plate ( from her cousins ) slightly modified. Add wiring to the camera, That seem promising, there's also lots of sanding but the ICM are worst. I keep on going, modifying the wings according to the 3 different type of early mustang is funny. Thank for watching. Corsaircorp
  19. Grumman F-14A Tomcat Decals (D48105) 1:48 Eduard Eduard’s decal range just keeps expanding, and as with their PE sets, they arrive in resealable foil bags with instructions to the front and the decals to the rear with a sheet of translucent paper protecting the printed adhesive side. The decals are printed by Eduard and are in good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. This sheet is for the much beloved and late, lamented Grumman F-14A Tomcat, which is probably a bit closer to the front of our memories right now, thanks to Top Gun Maverick, and Tom Cruise’s (WARNING: SPOILER) impromptu trip back to base in an ageing Tomcat from one of the ‘rogue states’ we’re not given too much information about. There are five decal options in total, and each one has a full side of A4 devoted to four-way profiles plus inner tail surfaces, plus a substantial paragraph of text on the subject matter. From the sheet, you can depict the following, providing you have enough kits: BuNo.161856, VF-211 Fighting Checkmates, USS Nimitz, 1997 BuNo.161621, VF-111 Sundowners, USS Carl Vinson, 1999 BuNo. 160390, VF-84 Jolly Rogers, USS Nimitz, 1993 BuNo.161601, VF-21 Freelancers, USS Constellation, 1987 BuNo.162589, VF-124 Gunfighters, NAS Miramar, 1987 My favourite is the darker grey Jolly Rogers option or the colourful Sundowners bird, but as I’ve only got one F-14A, I’ll have to make a hard decision one day. The Fighting Checkmates could make a nice Christmassy option if you’re planning on a build in time for that festive day, and the Fightertown option is a bit Top Gun-y, if you’re feeling the need… the need for. Umm… modelling. Don’t forget that as of 2021, the carrier film from Eduard decals can be coaxed away from the printed part of the decal after they have been applied, effectively rendering them carrier-free, thereby making the decals much thinner and more realistic, and obviating the need to apply successive coats of clear varnish to hide the edges of the film. It’s a great step further in realism from my point of view. Conclusion Useful and surprisingly colourful sheets for your Tamiya or other Tomcat in 1:48 that will allow the modeller to go off-piste without breaking the bank. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  20. F4F-3 Wildcat ProfiPACK (82201) 1:48 Eduard Grumman began development work on a new carrier-based fighter in the mid-30s, starting with the F2F, which was a biplane, but it and the successor F3F led to the basic shape of the Wildcat, minus two of the wings. Initially, the new aircraft was outpaced by the Brewster Buffalo and Grumman resigned their aircraft to carry a supercharged version of the Pratt & Whitney R-1830 "Twin Wasp" radial engine, and later new flying surfaces that gave it the needed improvement, receiving orders from the US Navy as a backup-plan in case the Buffalo was a let-down. Initial orders from France were delivered to the British Royal Navy after France fell before delivery, and was designated as the Marlet. The US Navy would adopt the type in late 1941 after the Buffalo turned out to be a disappointment, although it was quite a manoeuvrable little aircraft that saw some service elsewhere. Originally armed with 4 x 0.50 cal machine guns, the F4F-4 was introduced in 1941 with an increased 6 guns to increase the aircraft's weight of fire. Although the armament was increased to 6 guns, the ammunition capacity was not, giving pilots less time with their fingers on the trigger, which was generally disliked by the pilots for obvious reasons. The extra weight from the guns and wing fold gear also reduced performance. It was the primary US Carrier fighter during the early years of America’s war, with production continuing until 1943 when they switched over to building the replacement Hellcat, but one factory continued to make Wildcats for the British Fleet Air Arm (FAA). The Wildcat’s smaller size and slower landing speed was a boon on a smaller carrier that the British Navy operated in large numbers as escort carriers. The Kit This is a much-anticipated brand-new tooling from Eduard, and it seems that they have created yet another highly detailed and well-engineered kit, from which a wide range of variants can be produced for us, the modelling public. It arrives in Eduard’s modern gold themed top-opening box, and inside are five sprues in a dark grey styrene, a clear sprue, a nickel-plated pre-painted fret of Photo-Etch (PE), a sheet of pre-cut kabuki masking tape, a large and a small decal sheet, and the glossy instruction booklet with colour profiles in the rear pages. Detail is exceptional, as we’ve come to expect from Eduard’s engineers, right up there with, if not the best examples of plastic models as of today. There is some judicious use of sliding moulds to improve detail without increasing the part count unduly, the most notable being the rudder, which is hollow and ready for an insert during the build process. Construction begins in the cockpit, which takes over a page of the instructions and starts with the pilot’s foot boards that fit onto a Z-shaped bulkhead, and has the frame that holds the head cushion plus a pressurised bottle and two small PE parts that are only fitted to the later options. The two seat mounts are added to the frame before fitting the seat, which is prepared by adding a small PE strip diagonally across the rear of the seating area, plus a lap-belt for the early versions and four-point belts for wartime versions. The instrument panel is integrated in another frame that encompasses a tank, which is bulked out by adding another part to the other side, then you have a choice of applying a decal to the moulded-in dials, or a two-layer PE instrument panel that is applied in three sections, complete with a fully pre-painted set of dials and surrounds, plus the shiny curved dial glazing finishing. The side consoles are made up from a large number of parts, some of which are PE and pre-painted, with a part choice for early and later versions, then they are slotted into the rear frame and the instrument panel frame to create the cockpit’s tub. The rudder pedals are based on a single styrene part that is decorated by adding PE parts to the centre section, plus tiny little PE parts on each pedal, removing a little of the centre section before adding them. This slips in behind the instrument panel and is joined by a long rectangular lattice panel that mates to the front end of the foot boards. The cockpit is left to one side for a while so that the engine mount assembly can made. This is based upon the firewall, from which a tapered spar projects from each side. The engine mounts, a set of chains and the rear ancillary block of the engine are assembled to the front of the bulkhead, then a boxy assembly with two legs is added to the underside for the first decal option only, a strange clamshell-shaped assembly sits in the top of the mounts, and for most of the decal options there’s a C-shaped assembly that latches onto the sides of the mounts. If you are building the second decal option, the small location tabs should be removed and the part left in the box. The insides of the fuselage have fine ribbing moulded into them, and this is augmented by a number of PE parts, plus the removal of a moulded-in document folder that straddles one to the vertical ribs. Take care when removing this to ensure that the rib is still present once you’re done. There are also small rectangular windows with radiused corners in both sides of the fuselage, which are inserted from outside during closure of the two halves around the cockpit and engine mount. A tiny pip of styrene in front of the leading edge of the wing should be removed for one decal option, but it’s easy to miss as it’s right at the bottom of the page. Unusually for an Eduard kit, the landing gear is built next, even before the wings are considered, and that’s because the struts and retraction jacks are buried deep inside the fuselage, so would be difficult to leave until the end. Each leg is made of three parts with scrap diagrams showing how they are arranged, and once the glue is dry, they are inserted deep into the fuselage, the cylindrical top ends mating with cups that are moulded into the firewall. They are then buttressed by more styrene parts, and the front of the fuselage is able to be closed up by fitting a small insert into the bottom. The diminutive fixed tail strut is made up of two halves that trap a choice of two styles of wheel, and the main wheels are each made of a single tyre and two hubs that slip over the axles at the bottom of the main gear legs, with a pair of small inner doors added to the centreline while the fuselage is inverted. At the same time, the twin exhausts are slid into their troughs under the nose. The wings are next, and as they’re mounted mid-fuselage, they’re totally separate from each other. Each one is made from upper and lower halves, with a small insert with PE mesh parts wedged inside the bulged fairings on the underside before the two halves are closed, and the ailerons added to their position near the tips of the wings. The elevator fins are simple two-part assemblies each, and they’re attached to the tail via the usual tab and slot method, at the same time the wings are slid over their spars. The elevators are moulded as one piece, and clip into the rear of the fins either side of rudder fin, and are then locked in place by adding the rudder panel, which has a slide-moulded triangular hole inside, which is filled by adding an insert before gluing it in place. The very rear of the arrestor hook is slipped inside the fuselage with a clear light above it, and a clear light is inserted into the leading edge of the port wing and outlined by a PE strip. The engine is built up before adding the wings, and we get two banks of the Twin Wasp engine as separate parts, plus push rods and the bell housing that has the drive-shaft projecting from it. All it needs is some wiring for the spark plugs unless you’re going to get yourself some aftermarket for it. The cowling marks another choice for the modeller, with three choices of cowling lip, and a choice of two of the cylindrical sections depending on which decal option you select. One marking option has a panel line filled, a new line scribed and a pair of PE clasps added on both sides of the cowling. The final page finishes off the build with the canopy, starting with a tube sight pushed through the canopy for the first decal option. The other decal choices have a more usual early reflective gunsight inserted into the front of the cockpit before the glazing is started. The rest of the decal options have an alternative screen with no hole in it, and there are two canopy parts depending on whether you want to depict the canopy slid back over the spine or not. There are masks for all the included canopies included on the kabuki tape sheet, but only for the exterior. The model is then finished off with a number of clear lights at the wingtips; twin barrels in each wing leading edge; forward raked antenna on the spine with a clear light just behind it; pitot probe in the port wing leading edge; the single-part prop that has stencil decals supplied with an additional spinner; two bomb shackles for under the wing, and three PE aerials under the fuselage depending on which decal option you have chosen. There is another panel line on the lower cowling to fill for the first decal option here too, and again it’s easy to miss. Markings There are six decal options in the box, spread between one large sheet and another smaller one. The options are from the Wildcat’s earlier service, going back as far as the yellow-wing days before the US joined the war. From the box you can build one of the following: BuNo.1850, Lt. Charles Shields, VF-41, USS Ranger (CV-4), Dec 1940 VMF-111, Army-Navy Manoeuvres, Louisiana, United States, No 1941 Lt. Edward H O’Hara, VF-3, USS Lexington (CV-2), Hawaiian Islands, Apr 1942 BuNo.4019, Capt. Henry T Elrod, VMF-211, Wake Island, Dec 1941 BuNo.2531, Lt. Elbert S McCucskey, VF-42, USS Yorktown (CV-5), May 1942 BuNo.4006 (4008), Capt. John F Carey, VMF-221, Midway Island, Jun 1942 The decals are printed by Eduard and are in good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. It’s worth remembering that as of 2021, the carrier film from Eduard decals can be coaxed away from the printed part of the decal after they have been applied, effectively rendering them carrier-free, making the decals much thinner and more realistic, and obviating the need to apply successive coats of clear varnish to hide the edges of the film. It’s a great step further in realism from my point of view. Conclusion Blimey this looks like a nice kit. It’s incredibly well detailed out of the box, but if you have an even larger appetite for detail, there are tons of additional sets that Eduard have made available in time for the release of the kit. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  21. F4F Wildcat Upgrade Sets (For Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Eduard’s brand-new Wildcat kit is a gorgeous piece of plastic engineering, as I’m in the process of finding out here, although progress has been slow – my fault and nothing to do with the kit. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE), SPACE and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. SPACE 3D Printed Cockpit Decals (3DL48076) The Eduard SPACE sets use new 3D printing techniques that lay down successive layers of different colour resin, creating highly realistic almost full complete panels that are supplied on a decal sheet. They can depict metallic shades, plus glossy, satin and matt colours too, which really ups the detail on everything they print. In addition, a small sheet of nickel-plated and pre-painted PE is included for the aspects of the set that lend themselves better to this medium, such as seatbelts and rudder pedals. This set includes a full set of 3D printed instrument panel sections, plus additional parts that are applied to the side consoles to replace many of the raised portions of the styrene parts. There is also a pair of printed document cases for the sidewalls, and while the PE sheet is almost totally made up of seatbelt parts, there is also a handle for the side consoles and a backing plate for the larger of the two document folders. Seatbelts STEEL (FE1290) These belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as a set of four-point seat belts, you also get a pair of comfort pads for beneath the buckles to prevent the poor pilot from getting chaffed thighs. Masks Tface (EX878) Supplied on a large sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. It also gives you another set of masks tailored to fit the interior of the glazing so that you can paint the interior and give your model that extra bit of realism. In addition, you get a set of hub/tyre masks for the wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Review sample courtesy of
  22. Beaufort Mk.I Löök (674001 for Airfix) 1:72 Eduard This set contains a combination of pre-printed resin and PE parts to quickly and efficiently detail up your cockpit. There is a single resin part that replicates the instrument panel in front of the pilot, with glossy faced dials already painted for you on detailed black resin. The fidelity of the printing at this size and scale has to be seen to be appreciated, and stands up well even under 2.5x magnification. Additionally, the PE set of four-point belts for the pilot, plus a Y-shaped part that you fold in half to replicate a lever found on the right of the instrument panel. Review sample courtesy of
  23. A-1J Skyraider Update Sets (for Tamiya) 1:48 Eduard Another older kit from the Tamiya gets the modern Eduard treatment. The 1:48 Skyraider from Tamiya is another of their kits that were awesome when they were first released, and are still pretty good almost 25 years later. We’ve got new technologies to improve these kits with now, and Eduard are renowned for grabbing those technologies with both hands to improve our models. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE), Löök and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. The resin sets arrive in the new shallow Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. Brassin Wheels (648761) Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. This set includes three resin wheels, a 3D printed tail-wheel strut and a sheet of pre-cut kabuki-style yellow masking tape that allows you to cut the demarcation between tyres and hubs sharply and with little effort. Once the parts have been liberated from their casting and printing bases, they are drop-in replacements for the kit parts, with massively improved detail, especially around the tyre sidewalls, tread detail, and the brake housings on the rear of the hubs. Each wheel also has an element of sag engineered into the tyre that is suitable to an operational aircraft, without looking like it’s got a slow puncture. The rear strut for the tail wheel is removed from its printing base with nippers, a sharp blade or saw, and provides exceptional detail over and above what’s possible with injection styrene. Löök Pre-Painted Resin Set (644165) This set contains a combination of pre-printed resin and PE parts to quickly and efficiently detail up your cockpit. There is a single resin part to replace the kit instrument panel in front of the pilot, with highly effective gloss varnish simulating the glass covering painted over the dials for you on black resin. Additionally, the PE set contains the four-point belts for the pilot, complete with pale grey comfort pads that protect the pilot from the buckles. Seatbelts STEEL (FE1291) These belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. It includes a set of four-point belts for the pilot, complete with pale grey comfort pads that protect the pilot from the abrasion of the buckles during operations. You might have noticed they’re identical to the Löök set above, so bear that in mind if you’re planning on opening your wallet for multiple sets. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  24. Luftwaffe Rudder Pedals WWII PRINT (648778) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Although this set arrives in a flat package, the directly 3D printed parts are safe ensconced inside a clear plastic clamshell box inside the package, which also has a sticky pad inside to prevent the parts from rattling about. The parts are printed resin, attached to the base via thin tendril-like fingers that are easy to cut off and sand the little upstands away, leaving them ready for action. This set contains six individual rudder pedals in extreme detail that has been directly 3D printed with no casting involved. This gives you enough pedals to create three pairs, and they will be very useful if your kit is less than well-represented in the rudder pedal department, as is often the case with injection moulded styrene. When I say extreme detail I mean it literally, as the pedals are printed with all the perforations integral to the real parts, plus the foot straps that keep the pilot’s feet from lifting off under G, as well as the mechanism behind the pedals that transmits the movement of his feet to the flying surfaces at the rear of the aircraft. These parts will come in incredibly handy if you are building one of the many glass-nosed aircraft that were in the Luftwaffe arsenal during WWII in my favourite scale. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  25. Hallo, gentlemen! I am currently building an F4F-3 (no, not the Eduard one...) as a machine in the ill-fated VMF-211 at Wake Island, and a sudden doubt crept in. How were the propeller tips painted? Tri-color, Yellow, or nothing? From the well known photo of the wrecks, the cuffs are undoubtely unpainted metal, the blades are Black also at the front, but no hint of the tips can be discerned. If any, that they were left in Black like the blades. However, the (in its time) well researched YellowWings Decals decal sheet (which I am using) suggests Tri color, and even supplies decals for that (rather big... almost a quarter of fifth of the blade...) Conversely, the new Eduard kit decal sheet comes with none of that, and a glance at the instructions sheet shows that it has no indication whatsoever (instead, the blades themselves have a raised panel that would indicate the Yellow tip?) What is the general knowledge on the matter? Thank you very much, Fernando
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