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Found 1,491 results

  1. Due to a hectic group build schedule around the start date of the Eleventh Hour GB, I did not declare myself as an initial entrant. But having read of @Wez with his HD.1 sadly having to withdraw from the GB, I thought that I would step up with the same kit. I know that it is getting near to the deadline date but I am hoping that I can still complete it in time, providing I do not hit any snags along the way. I still have to decide on which of the colour options to go with, probably the simplest one would be the wisest choice, a decision that will have to be made fairly soon though. Anyway, here are the photos showing the box and its contents along with the colour choices and reference book. by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr
  2. Blenheim Mk.IF Upgrade Sets & Masks (for Airfix) 1:48 Eduard At time of writing, we're currently waiting for the new Blenheim kit to get from the warehouses to the shelves, and as it's the first major injection moulded kit of the type to have been released in a long time, there's a lot of excitement. Eduard have a good relationship with Airfix, and because of their new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner even before the kit hits the shelves. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Upgrade Set (49935) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels and sidewall/consoles are the primary parts on the painted set, with new rudder pedal straps; throttle quadrant; gun details and other small equipment. Externally, there are nacelle internal structure parts; access panels; top hatch; crew steps; engine details, and cross-braces for the landing gear legs. Zoom! Set (FE935) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts STEEL (FE936) In case you don't already know, these belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the four point harness for the pilot, there are also three lap belts for the various "bar-stool" seats that are fitted to the interior. landing flaps (48975) Eduard landing flaps use an ingenious technique to achieve excellent true-to-scale flaps using few parts, and requiring the modeller to simply remove the retracted flaps from the lower wing, plus scrape the upper wings to accommodate the thickness of the completed bays and remove the moulded-in detail. Each half of the two flap sections (bay and flap itself) is constructed in the same manner, by twisting and folding over the attached ribs to create a 3D shape, with extra parts added along the way. The bays glue to the inside of the upper wing and the flap attaches to the rear wall of the new bay. Repeat this for the other side until all four are installed, and you're done. Masks (EX626) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, turret, landing light and wingtip lights. In addition you get a set of hub/tyre masks for the main wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Masks Tface (EX627) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with everything above, but also give you another set of canopy masks tailored to fit the interior of the glazing so that you can paint the interior and give your model that extra bit of realism. Don't worry about the missing inner lines on two of the wheel masks - I can assure you they're there on my copy of the masks. Review sample courtesy of
  3. Eduard leaflet for May: http://www.eduard.com/store/out/media/distributors/leaflet/leaflet2016-05.pdf change digit in link for older issues
  4. Well Telford is over for another year, had a great day down there on Saturday and all credit to the organisers this year as the huge que we joined at 9.50 evaporated almost as quickly as my excitement did when I first saw it! First stop was the Eduard stall and I managed to pick up Eduards latest kit along with a set of brassin exhausts, plan is to create a diorama based on some of the pics taken at Newchurch in June 44 with a Tempest being refuelled by the accurate armour Bedford, I did think about the flaps and gun bays as well to make it a little more fussy but in the end thought a simple build of the kit was in order and maybe my second will include these? Spent a few hours today comparing the parts to some references and the kit looks superb in the box, surface texture is well upto Eduards latest standards and even includes raised rivits on the rear fuselage (applicable) along with recessed ones elsewhere. Detail everywhere looks great with the cockpit and wheel bays being standout areas. There are however a few issues i've spotted (I never compare models to plans, my view is if i cant see the problem by comparing the kit to photos its not worth worrying about!) The spinner openings for the blades are much too large and totally the wrong shape, in my view ruining the look of the part. I am guessing Eduard based it on some of the museum examples that exist most of which seem to have odd looking spinners but compared to any wartime shots the difference is very obvious. Dosen't look like a huge issue to rectify and will work on it through the week ahead. Presumably the AM guys will be offer something suitable in the not too distant future. Most if not all series1 airframes have bumps on the upper wing fillets, these re missing in the kit, again looks like an easyish addition. I could be wrong on this but I think the lower surface bumps covering the wing attachment bolts need removed on series1 aircraft (not 100% sure on this, I am going to remove the ones on this build however unless I can confirm it either way?) There should be a handhold in one side at least at the rear of the canopy, may have a go at adding this just need to be careful with it being a clear part. Again not sure at the minute I need to find a few more pics but it looks like some of the early Tempests at least have cone shaped guides on the front face of the radiator, i know there are some available for the typhoon kits out there which given more time I may have tracked down, will see how I go with this one. There are rows of slots on both wing undersurfaces where the future tanks fit, I can't see any evidence of these in the underside shots I have so will probably fill these, may also fill or at least reduce the points for the rockets as not sure if these should be shown on these early aircraft? If the above sounds like undue critism its not meant to, the only deal breaker for me is the spinner the rest are just small details and easily overlooked, the kit really does look good and I cant wait to start cutting plastic tomorrow! Slight update, started cutting plastic tonight and one word of advice, be careful when removing the cockpit frames from the sprus, they are very fragile, don't ask how I know.... you have been warned!
  5. My first Eduard kit, and probably my last until the Tempest V Series 2 comes out. The aircraft was easy to build, but the decals (specially the wing´s Iron Crosses) sticked as soon as they touched the surface. I ended up replacing the crosses on the wings with spares from a Cartograf printed decal sheet, since I broke one. I also almost break one of the tulips that went over the engine scoops, but I saved it. Spinner spiral was painted. Here´re the photos:
  6. Eduard is to release a new mould from the 1/48th Focke-Wulf Fw.190A. Source: http://www.detailscaleview.com/2015/11/new-products-from-novemberfest-2015.html 3D renders V.P.
  7. All done The Eduard Spitfires are probably my favourite 1/48 scale prop kit. This is the third one I've built and all have been enjoyable builds. This one took less than 4 weeks to complete, in hours I estimate less than 20 hours all up. That said, there are few little things that I don' like, those being the two piece cowl, exhaust assembly and sloppy fit of the undercarriage. The cowl is easy to rectify and I'm looking at aftermarket exhausts for the next one. The Aussie MK VIII's have a heap of interesting marking options so I will definitely be building more in the future. This aircraft was flown by the RAAF's lead ace GPCAPT Clive Caldwell, the CO of No. 80 Wing, Morotai, March, 1945. More images and details at my blog
  8. My dad couldn´t resist and already unpacked the sprues of his today´s birthday present DSC_0001 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr
  9. Hi, I would like to show you some photos of one of my latest works. It's a Fw-190A-8 from Eduard in 1/72 scale, profipack edition. What a wonderful kit to build. The camouflage was done freehand with Gunze paints. For the weathering I used AK Interactive products and some artist's oils. The rigging was made with Uschi VdR superfine elastic thread. I'm sorry for the cellphone quality of the photos. I hope you like it! João Moura
  10. BL755 Cluster Bombs (672194) 1:72 Eduard Brassin The BL755 was the main RAF & RN Cluster bomb between the early 1970s until 2008 when it was removed due to the UK signing the Ottawa Treaty on Landmines. Each bomb contained 147 sub munitions and externally was shaped like a standard 1000Lb bomb. Each sub munition contained a shaped anti armour charge surrounded by wound tessellated square wire which produced upto 1400 anti personnel fragments. The unit was used by some NATO allies and some UK partner nations. They continue to be used recently by Saudi aircraft in the Yemen. Typically the units were kept in canisters prior to use so dont normally show the weathering which can be seen on bombs. This set contains four resin bombs, and a set of decals. Review sample courtesy of
  11. The Eduard line of Messerschmitt Bf109s love 'em or hate 'em we remain divided!!!! Personally I prefer them to the other two main competiters (Zvezda & Tamiya 1/48 of course) I know they have their faults but I don't feel they distract from the overall finished product (except the E series!). The latest in the line and my next two builds. A G-10 and a G-14/AS Mtt Regensburg, however I'm not satisfied with the Eduard rendition of the assymetric cowling which typifies these later sub types of 109. I think Eduard have captured the cowling shape well, but to my eyes and comparision with drawings and photos it looks too symetrical. Before this starts any great debate on this particular forum these views are my own personal feelings on this kit. If anyone is interested on discussions as to the 'accuracy' of this kit I refer you to the following links https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234947521-148-messerschmitt-bf109f-g-gustav-friedrich-family-by-eduard-next-variants-bf109g-14-avia-s-99c-10-october-2018/&page=6 https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/hyperscale/about-the-cowling-of-the-new-bf-109g-10-eduard-t497142.html https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/hyperscale/bf109g-10-oil-cooler-and-the-new-eduard-kit-t498072.html This is according to drawings, I found, the shape the cowling should be :- Plus these set of photos show the correct shape:- http://www.clubhyper.com/reference/bf109detailbg_1.htm To my eyes as I stated before the Eduard rendition is too symetrical in comparision, so before the build commences something needs to be done to rectify the cowling shape. The following is my way of doing this. I removed the outlined portion of the cowling with a saw and then glued it back so this panel overlapped the fuselage by a fraction (eyeballed) this gave the cowling a slightly larger bulge. According to several photos I found the cowling overlaps the fuselage on the port side (as shown in the photos in the last link). The front of this panel very slightly overlaps where it rejoins the cowling, this I gently sanded down, in doing this it gives a little more emphasis to the bulge at the rear of this panel. I then turned my attention to the top of the cowling and removed the outlined portion of this:- I then glued this to to the portion of cowling I had previously removed and rejoined to the fuselage. This will result in a small gap when the top cowling is added to the fuselage but I will fill this with plasticard. Onto the starboard fuselage, again from the photos on hyperscale it shows an excellent shot of the fuselage minus engine which shows quite clearly the scalloped fairings behind the cowling. Here you can see the starboard fairing is not as deep as the port fairing, where as on the kit they are the same depth so some careful sanding is called for within the area outlined in the photo below:- This removes some of the surface detail which will have to be replaced later, the upper cowling will also require some sanding down. I actually found in MMP's publication 'Bf109 Late Versions - Camouflage & Markings' a 1/48 front view of the G-10 cowling which I traced onto card, cut out and used as a rough template to get the cowling shape to my liking! The pics above give an idea of what I was after, with the assymetric effect more pronounced than Eduards rendition. I applied some filler to the top cowling to make the bulge covering the modified engine bearer more pronounced. This will require more attention when the fuselage is eventually assembled. Leaving the fuselage for now I turned to the undercarriage legs, these according to critics are incorrect for the later G models so I made an effort of sorts to modify them my efforts are shown below. Whilst not completely accurate will satisfy me! With all my builds of Eduards 109s I slightly modify the exhausts by cutting down the backing they are moulded to so I can insert them after painting is done. I sand the stacks down a little themselves, as they appear to be slightly on the large size a criticism of all Eduard's 109G series. My final work for now was to replace the solid wingtip lights with transparent ones. for this I decided to use a method I read of on Britmodeller, using UV glue. The solid lights are removed then a hole is drilled, a very small one, in the corner of the cutout into this a piece of transparent sprue coloured with Tamiya red or green clear paint, to represent the bulb. The glue is then applied into the cutout filling it, the UV light supplied is used to cure the glue. The hardened glue can now be treated as transparent plastic, sanded down and restored to clarity ( I use Brasso metal polish) easy!! The last pic shows how the UV glue is supplied, mine came from Amazon who have quite a selection of these glues at various prices. A brilliant way to sort out wingtip lights. Well that's it for now, more to follow in due course happy to hear your thoughts on this build, Cheers Andy
  12. SPS-141 ECM pod for MiG-21 (672195) 1:72 Eduard Brassin The SPS-141 ECM pod was a Soviet designed POD for protection from both air and ground threats. The POD was designed to automatically affect the missile guidance head once it had launched and locked on to the aircraft. The pilot had to manually select the most probable threats in order of priority. It is reported that the Iraqis used the pod in numbers during the Iran/Iraq war and that no aircraft carrying it was lost. This set contains the 2 part pod, pylon, and two horn antennas. Also included is the pods control panel to fit in the cockpit. The casting is up to Eduard's high standards. A small decal sheet is provided for the markings. Review sample courtesy of
  13. Before I start, I apologise for spamming so much this category, I'll try to reduce my posting here from now on. I've bought from abroad my first Eduard kit, a Bf 109G-14 in 48, but I noticed that it and many other Eduard 1:48 aircraft models don't have fuselage locating pins, should I expect to have issues when trying to align both fuselage halves, or does the cockpit serve as an alignment tool? Does Eduard have fuselage warping issues on their kits? Kind regards, Francisco.
  14. Hi guys! When I took pictures of a another model, I also improved photos from one of my first Eduard models. This is a Fw 190A-8 kit in 1/72 scale, which I build few months ago. I added to this kit brassin fuselage guns (fit perfectly!), brassin wheels, brassin exhaust stacks and Master armament set with pitot tube. Model was painted with Gunze and Tamiya paints. Weathering I make with oil paints for artists, dry pigments from Ammo mig and Tamiya Weathering Master sets.
  15. This is the reveal of my Eduard 1/32 Messerschmitt bf 109 D using the Alley Cat Conversion. A tricky build in places but overall very enjoyable. I have linked my full video build for this one below if you’d like a more detailed look at the build. I used Kora Decals for the Prop blades, not totally accurate as they should be slightly different but a good attempt, I also added an Eduard etch set and Quickboost gunsight as well as the Conversion kit.
  16. While I wait for the Dark Earth to dry on my Spitfire VC, I think it's time to start another. Here's the box: And what's inside: I'm planning on making MD324/ KW-R as it's the only one in the Group Build's timeframe, although I can't find any photographic evidence of it - can any of you help? Thanks for looking and more soon.
  17. B-25 Mitchell Wheels 1:72 Eduard Brassin for Airfix & Hasegawa Kits For the Airfix Kit & Hasegawa Kits. This set contains the 2 main wheels and the nose wheel. They are direct replacements for the kit parts. Also included (not shown) is a full set of masks for the wheels. Airfix (672205) Hasegawa (672206) Review samples courtesy of
  18. MiG-21MF Fighter-Bomber BIGSIN Set (67216) 1:72 Eduard This set brings together a number of resin sets in one money saving package. inside the box, you get the following resin replacements: cockpit exhaust nozzle undercarriage wheels fuselage / wing pylons The overall package is around 25% cheaper than buying all of the sets on their own. MiG-21MF Fighter-Bomber Cockpit This set provides a replacement resin cockpit for the fighter bomber version of the kit. The set comprises a complete cockpit tub (which replaces a multi-part version supplied with the kit), an instrument panel, coaming, control column, HUD unit and ejector seat. A small fret of photo etched parts is provided and this contains smaller details including harnesses for the seat, details for the instrument panel (which is otherwise devoid of cast detail). A small sheet of plastic film is provided for the HUD screen itself. While the plastic cockpit provided with the kit is no slouch when it comes to detail, there is only so much that can be achieved with injection moulded polystyrene. This resin version is a considerable upgrade over the plastic version and is well worth consideration. MiG-21MF Exhaust Nozzle This set manages to achieve the feat of improving on the parts provided with the kit while simplifying construction. The replacement resin jet pipe comprises just three resin parts and a small fret of photo etched components which represent a more detailed version of the afterburner flame holder. The replacement assembly simply slots into the kit fuselage with no cutting or surgery required. MiG-21MF Wheels This set is intended as a like-for-like swap for the kit wheels. A choice of two different main wheels are provided, although the instructions note that one type was rarely used on the MF, along with two identical nose wheels. This means you actually get enough wheels for two complete kits. As is the norm for a set of this type from Eduard, pre-cut masks are also provided to aid painting. These wheels, with their realistic tyre treads, offer a significant upgrade over the kit parts. MiG-21MF Pylons This is the 4 wing pylons and centre line pylon. Conclusion Eduard can hardly be accused of shyness when it comes to providing aftermarket for one of their marquee releases of the past 12 months. It's great that Eduard's approach caters for both the casual hobbyist (through the weekend range of kits) and the committed enthusiast through this extensive range of detail upgrades. The quality of the items on offer is excellent, with each offering considerable enhancement over the plastic equivalents. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  19. International Marine Signal Flags Steel 1:700 Eduard Following a familiar pattern, Eduard have followed up on their 1:350 scale signal flags with a set for the more dextrous modeller in glorious 1:700 scale. On the fret is a full alphabet of flags, with duplicates for more commonly used (in English, anyway) letters. I'm not sure how easily these flags can be manipulated in order to give them a more 3d shape - at least without causing the paint to flake off - but they should still be better than decals or those paper ones that Revell provide with their ship kits. Now we can all pretend to be our very own Bootneck, practicing naval communication in the day of Nelson's father! Review sample courtesy of
  20. Löök Resin Instrument Panels & Seatbelts – November 2018 1:48 Eduard You may have seen Dave's recent review of some of the 1:32 Löök sets that have begun to filter in from Eduard, and these sets are just the same, but in 1:48 Just like Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with red themed cover and a pale grey backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are found to the rear. Each panel and set of seatbelts are glued to the backing card, and while they look nice, the glue is pretty strong, and needs a blade or metal ruler to tease them away from the card without damage – especially true of the seatbelts. The instrument panels are made of black or grey resin as appropriate, and are likely the same parts that you can find in any of Eduard's cockpit sets, but with a crucial difference. The instruments, stencils and markings for the panel are printed onto the resin, with a glossy clear coat over the dials to give a realistic looking "glass" to finish off the parts. You can quite literally drop them into your finished cockpit once you've liberated them from the casting blocks, which are also colour printed with the Eduard logo. A massive time-saver for anyone that either doesn't have the skill to do good instrument panels, or just wants to crack on with the painting of the exterior. Different modellers have different skill sets and interests, so if you want to partake you don't need to feel guilty in any way, shape or form because it's your hobby. The seatbelts are the new thinner and more flexible STEEL belts, which In case you don't already know, are actually Photo-Etch (PE) steel (the title gives it away, doesn't it?), and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds additional perceived depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. The instructions are tailored to each set, showing any specifics for each model, and a set of diagrams that talk you through assembling the belts and draping them over the seat of your model. The first batch of sets are as follows: Bf.109G-6 Löök (644001 for Tamiya) Fw.190A-5 Löök (644002 for Eduard) Bf.109G-6 Löök (644003 for Eduard) Bf.109G-10 Löök (644004 for Eduard) Fw.190A-8/R2 Löök (644005 for Eduard) Spitfire Mk.IX Early Löök (644007 for Eduard) Spitfire Mk.IX Late Löök (644008 for Tamiya) Conclusion Detail is up to Eduard's usual standards in both departments, and is a great time-saver for anyone not wanting to spend too much time on the cockpit. The glue holding the parts in place could be a little less grippy, but I managed to get seven sets off their card without damage, so it's not really an issue, just a precaution to make note of. Of course they're not for everyone, and if the very idea mortally offends you, then why have you read this far into the review? Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  21. MiG-21MF Fighter Bomber ProfiPACK (70142) 1:72 Eduard The Mig 21 has the distinction of having been produced in greater numbers than any other supersonic jet fighter aircraft in the world. It has seen service with dozens of counties globally and has seen action in Vietnam, the Middle East, Yugoslavia, Cuba and during numerous conflicts in Africa. The design was even copied by the Chinese, where it is known as the Chengdu J-7. The MF is the export version of the SM (itself an upgraded version of the MiG-21S) with modernised radar and avionics and an upgraded R13-300 turbojet engine. This particular variant has seen service with many Soviet states and their post-Cold War descendants. Czechoslovakia had a substantial quantity that were split between the Czech Republic and Slovakia following the Velvet Divorce, eventually to be replaced by Saab Gripens and Mig-29s respectively. The Kit This is the first mainstream boxing of Eduard's long anticipated all-new 1:72 MiG-21 kit. As the kit is part of Eduard's Profipack line, it is supplied with photo etched details, masks and a generous selection of marking options. The kit is spread across three sprues of grey plastic and one of clear plastic. The parts are classic modern Eduard; beautifully moulded, with fine, crisp panel lines and fastener detail where appropriate. In common with many kits of single-seat jet fighters, the cockpit is combined with the nose gear bay. The cockpit itself comprises a floor which is combined with the roof of the nose gear bay, separately moulded sidewalls, rudder pedals and a control column, in instrument panel which can make use of decals or the included photo etched details, and front and rear bulkheads. Photo etched parts are provided for the sidewalls as well as the instrument panel, and again decals are provided as an alternative to the photo etched parts. The KM-1 ejection seat is broken down into three parts and is very nicely detailed. As this is a profipack edition, there are pre-painted photo etched details provided for the seat harnesses. Other parts that have to be assembled before the fuselage halves can be combined include the main landing gear bays and the jet exhaust pipe. The former is comprised four parts including the front and rear bulkheads. There is plenty of moulded detail here and it should take a wash quite nicely. The engine exhaust pipe includes a representation of the rear of the engine moulded into a bulkhead, as well as a single piece forward exhaust tube, the afterburner ring, and a two-part aft exhaust tube. As you will have seen from the photographs above, this kit is unlike most other MiG-21s as the lower wing is moulded as a single span, joined by the central section of the lower fuselage. To this part, the upper wings must be added before being joined to the now-complete fuselage. The dorsal spine of the MF - which includes the vertical tail - must also be added at this stage, along with the outer part of the jet exhaust and the air intake outer ring. Several cockpit components, such as the instrument panel coaming and HUD unit must also be fitted at this stage. Being as this is a profipack edition, the plastic 'odd rods' IFF array on the fin and below the nose can be replaced with photo etched parts. The slab elevators are, of course, moulded as solid parts, but the ailerons and blown flaps on the main wing are separate parts. Optional parts are included for open or closed airbrake configurations, and of course there are a plethora of scoops and intakes to add detail to the fuselage. The landing gear on these kits is well detailed. The single nose wheel is clamped in place by a two-part gear leg and the wheel itself features a separate hub. Two gear bay doors sit at either side of the narrow bay, linked to the fuselage by a pair of hinge tabs with some detail moulded into the inside. The strakes immediately aft of the nose gear bay are provided on both the plastic frame and the fret of photo etched parts. The main gear is a single strut for each leg with a separate hydraulic extender. The wheels have separate hubs and you get a lovely set of pre-cut tape masks to help you paint them. The main gear doors are nicely detailed and included separately moulded parts for the hydraulic mechanisms. The canopy is moulded in two parts and finishing details are provided on the fret of PE parts (including vanes for the pitot probe). The pre-cut tape masks (not shown) cover not just the canopy but the dielectric panels too. The Decals A generous five options are included on the decal sheet: MiG-21MF Fighter-Bomber 1/72 - No. 5121, flown by Pham Tuan, 921st Fighter Regiment, Noi Bai AB, Democratic Republic of Vietnam, December 1972 MiG-21MF Fighter-Bomber 1/72 - No. 9712, 9th Fighter Regiment, Bechyně, Czechoslovakia, 1989 - 1993 MiG-21MF Fighter-Bomber 1/72 - No. 127, 812th Training Air Regiment, Kharkov Higher Military Aviation School of Pilots, Kupyansk Airfield, Soviet Union, August 1991 MiG-21MF Fighter-Bomber 1/72 - No. 8447, No. 46 Squadron, Egypt, 1973 MiG-21MF Fighter-Bomber 1/72 - No. 9111, 3. Eskadrą Lotnictwa Taktycznego, Poznań - Krzesiny, Poland, 2002 The decals are well printed and a full set of stencils are included. I expect it will take a week to apply all of the stencils! Conclusion It has been a long time coming, but Eduard have at last given us the definitive MiG-21MF in this scale. The kit is a thoroughly modern tooling of an important and iconic aircraft and appears to be accurate in both outline and detail. The engineering does not seem to be as complex as some recent Eduard kits, but it is still rich in detail. The decal options are comprehensive (the inclusion of an African scheme is particularly welcome) and the usual plethora of aftermarket parts are already available. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  22. Messerschmitt Bf 109G-4 (84149) 1:48 Eduard Weekend The Messerschmidt Bf 109 is one of the iconic aircraft of WWII. The G models arrived in 1942 and the G-4 was nearly identical to the G-2 but was fitted with a much improved VHF radio set. The R versions were also designed for reconnaissance some versions of the G-4 were fitted with underwing canon pods. Due to the increasing weight of the G models larger main wheels were fitted which resulted in the teardrop fairings on the upper wing surfaces. A larger tail wheel was also fitted and the retraction mechanism removed as it was too large to retract. 1242 G-4s were produced in total. The Kit This is a weekend boxing, with 4 sprues of plastic, a clear sprue, and a small decal sheet with 2 options. Construction starts shockingly enough with the cockpit. Various control wheels and the main control column is added along with the armoured seat back. Following this the seat pan and rudder pedals are added. Following this side panels and parts are added into the fuselage sides. Once all of these sub-assemblies are made up they can be placed inside the fuselage and this closed up. As well as the cockpit the tail wheel and exhausts need to be added before the closure takes place. Once the main fuselage is together the intake needs to be added on the side. For the tropical version this will need the additional filter adding as well. Construction then moves to the rear of the main fuselage with the tail planes and rudder being added. All of the control surfaces are separate so can be posed as needed by the modeller. Next up are the wings. The lower is one part with left and right uppers. The wheel well detail needs to be added into the lower wing and then the uppers can be added on. Once complete the wing assembly is mated with the main fuselage. Next up the leading edge slats and ailerons can be added. On the underside of the wing the left and right radiators are assembled and added to the wing. The flaps can then be added making sure to get the radiator flaps at the correct angle. Moving towards finishing the model the main landing gear units are completed and added to the model. The wheels are a single part with a left and right hub. The gear leg is attached as is the door. The canopy parts can then be added not forgetting the pilots head rest & armour in the main centre part. Last but not least for the main kit the propeller and spinner are added. Decals Decals are in house from Eduard and should pose no issues. There is a main sheet and a supplemental sheet for the stencils, markings are provided for 2 examples; Bf 109G-4/R6, flown by Hptm. Waldemar Wübke, CO of 7./ JG 54, Lille – Vendeville, France, February/March 1943 Bf 109G-4/R6 Trop, flown by Lt. Franz Schiehs, CO of 8./ JG 53, Tindja, Tunisia, April 1943 Conclusion This is a welcome new G-4 release from Eduard in a weekend edition. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  23. Place-holder. Probably Wildcat, Hellcat, or Bearcat... Oh, but what about that TF-9J? [Edit: Probably too ambitious for me now, but we'll see...]
  24. Hey, here I present you my last build: Fw190A-5, Eduard 1/72 ProfiPack. I had added some extras to this build, her corresponding Flaps, some more details in PE, and the engine and fuselage guns, all from the same manufacturer. This is, for now, my very most difficult build because of the tiny of this size. The engine and the guns are so small for my big rude fingers! It was a challenge.... Well, I'm happy with the result. I have had some mistakes at the time to mount the engine, it was a lot of try and failure. The upper cowling cover also is a little bit bent from the correct line. Also there is some silvering in the decals. But it is not bad at all, for my short expertise. I have in my stash 4 more models in this scale, but I think I'm not gonna buy any other more at 1/72 because of mi sight!
  25. Beaufighter TF.X Upgrade Sets (for Revell) 1:48 Eduard Revell's newly minted Beaufighter TF.X (reviewed here) seems to be finding favour with the modelling world, as it's the first new tooling we've had in a long time, although the previous Tamiya model is still pretty good. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Detail Set (49926) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels with glossy dials are the primary parts on the painted set, with new rudder pedals; side console and sidewall details; crew hatch internal structure; antenna upgrade; intake meshes for the engines, and lamp holder for the landing light are also supplied. Zoom! Set (FE926) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts STEEL (FE927) In case you don't already know, these belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the two sets of 4-point crew belts, you also get a metal surround to the hole in the back of the seat, and to install all this you will need to first remove the moulded-in belt detail. landing flaps (48967) Eduard landing flaps use an ingenious technique to achieve excellent true-to-scale flaps using few parts, and requiring the modeller to simply remove the retracted flaps from the lower wing, plus remove the chunky flap detail and scrape the upper wings to accommodate the thickness of the completed bays. Each half of the three flap sections (bay and flap itself) is constructed in the same manner, by twisting and folding over the attached ribs to create a 3D shape, with extra parts added along the way. The two-section bays glue to the inside of the upper wing and the flap is attached to the rear wall of the new bay. Repeat this for the other side, and you're almost done. The bays have additional strips that run the width of the flaps, and actuator details, with a scrap diagram showing the correct angle. Masks (EX621) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy and blister, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition you get a set of hub/tyre masks for the wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Masks Tface (EX622) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with everything above, but also give you another set of canopy masks tailored to fit the interior of the glazing so that you can paint the interior and give your model that extra bit of realism. Review sample courtesy of
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