Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Mike

Root Admin
  • Content Count

    1,043,078
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    28

Mike last won the day on May 20

Mike had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

14,083 Excellent

About Mike

  • Rank
    Proud dad
  • Birthday 05/09/1967

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Chester, UK
  • Interests
    Aircraft, AFVs & Sci-Fi

Recent Profile Visitors

75,504 profile views
  1. Some weird looking home-brew armour there. Wish I'd had a proper look inside before sending it to you now, but by gosh and by golly, I can't remember it arriving here at all!
  2. An awesome build, and a kit that I drooled over as a kid in the window of Arts & Crafts in Chester. I'd have made a total hash of it of course, but that diorama you're working on is the icing on the cake of a brilliant model.
  3. Apollo 11 Astronaut on the Moon (03702) 1:8 Revell On the 20th July 1969, a man by the name of Neil Armstrong stepped off the ladder of his flimsy spacecraft and onto the Moon's dusty surface, uttering the words that would become famous "That's one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind". His name and this quote, plus the likeness of the Saturn V rocket that got them there, and the Apollo 11 spacecraft that consisted of the Command Module (CM), Service Module (SM) and Lunar Module (LM or LEM if you add "excursion" into the mix) also became amongst the most recognised images of their time. Leaving many footprints in the dusty regolith of the Sea of Tranquility where they landed, they soon clambered back onboard and blasted off for home, paving the way for another six missions, only one of which didn't quite make it but became almost equally famous because of their accident and subsequent return to earth that was fraught with danger. Maybe they should have skipped the name Apollo 13? The Kit Following the 50th year since we walked on the Moon theme, we have more from Revell on the subject, which again is a new edition of a previously released kit from the same era as the Apollo 11 CM & SM that we reviewed recently here. The kit arrives in an end-opening box, with four sprues in white styrene inside, some of which have been cut to fit the new box. There is also a yellow tinted clear part for the visor, a small sheet of decals and the instruction booklet, which is printed in Revell's new colour style. As it's a special edition, there is also a pack of four thumb-pots of Revell paint, a small tube of Contacta semi-liquid glue, and a paintbrush, which as always with these sets has had its hair parted by the bag. The kit is clearly a product of its day, but has good detail throughout and a simple method of construction. The completed model stands at 258mm tall, a little over 2m in scale, out of which you must take the bulk of the suit, helmet and base to account for the difference between Neil's 1.8m height and that of the model. I'd say that scales out pretty well. The astronaut's face is moulded into the helmet area, with the yellow tinted visor added after paint, but here there is a slight deviation that stands out to the average Joe. The bottom edge of the visor is a little flattened when compared with those famous photos of Neil after touch down, so if it bothers you, you'll need a little putty to make that more to your liking. The suit is a pretty detailed rendition of the one that Neil wore, with some slight differences from the real thing such as the central panel on his chest and the lack of umbilical ports on the left of the chest plate. There are also some straps hanging around that are missing for obvious reasons, and the umbilicals that attach to the backpack should have insulating sleeves on them that give them a crinkled, faceted look. All of this can be fixed if you're minded, or you can just enjoy the model for what it is and build it to the best of your ability. Construction begins with the head and torso, which are split vertically front to back, with the astronaut's head moulded into the helmet, as mentioned. It's a generic face that's a very nice sculpt, but clearly not Neil Armstrong, and bears more of a resemblance to a face from a Captain Scarlet puppet. Whether that was for copyright reasons, I guess we'll never know. The legs and arms are next, with the former split the same way, and the latter split to give maximum detail to the gauntlets. The backpack is similarly split front and back, attaching to the torso with a central pin and two realistic-looking strap-ends, with a good amount of surface detail. On the front is another much smaller pack that resembles a claymore mine in shape, but has more to do with environment regulation. The fixed video camera glues into a slot on the front of the pack, and at this stage you are also instructed to install the visor into the helmet. If you've been brave and adjusted the shape of the lower edge, you'll need to reduce the glazed part to match. These things are gold-plated to protect the wearer from excessive sunlight exposure, as there is no atmosphere to speak of on the moon, so the light is undiminished by atmospheric backscatter. This has been mimicked by the clear yellow tint, but you could experiment with gold leaf of gold chrome paint if you feel the need. To complete the figure, the two umbilicals (umbilicii?) are routed from the backpack to the chest and chest pack, with the aforementioned caveat of them requiring insulating sleeves. The base consists of a chunk of the moon's surface with a depression for the lander's leg, and another flat-spot for the figure's left foot, then a raised flat area with that famous phrase engraved on it for posterity. You get a portion of the lander's leg, which has a section of the ladder added to the front, and the big dished foot at the bottom. This portion of the lander was covered in a golden mylar layer for insulation too, so treat yourself to some Cadbury's Bournville or other confection with a golden inner wrapper, and have a go at making it look suitably wrinkly if you feel up to the challenge. The completed figure is attached with one foot on the base, the other in the dished top of the landing pad, with two flat tabs ensuring a good join. Markings The majority of Neil's suit is white, with grey used mainly on his gloves and overshoes that protect his boots from damage, which incidentally debunks another of the deniers' arguments about the tread pattern on their boots being different. I digress. The moon is very dusty, so after even a few steps the suits got covered in an incredibly fine grey dust that was hard to shift. Check your references, and enjoy replicating some of it. There was a #2 Revell paintbrush included in the pack, but as the bristles were bent over, I decided not to photograph it. Ok, I forgot! The decal sheet is small and consists of a couple of American flags, two NASA meatball logos for the backpack and his chest, and a stencil for the water reservoir at the bottom of the backpack. There's no name tag for the suit, but that's hidden away under the chest pack, so hardly an issue. Decals are printed for Revell by Zanetti, in good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion This is a fun model that will give a lot of pleasure to a lot of folks if they approach it with the right attitude. If you treat it as a blast from the past, or a desktop model you'll have fun building it, but if you want something accurate, there are some alterations you can make and still have fun. Considering the age of the moulds there are some really nice cloth effects, with creases, seams and so forth giving a realistic landscape for you to paint over and weather. A fitting tribute to the late, great Mr Armstrong, may he rest in peace. Highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  4. There isn't a Reaction, available, so I'll just tell you you're mental instead
  5. Astronauts (A00741V) 1:76 Airfix Vintage Classics In the 60s and 70s there was a huge interest in going to the Moon, and consequently there were a lot of space-themed toys. These figures stand out in my memory because I used to own a set, and loved the little gadgets you could put together and play with. I have no idea where they went in the long-term, but when I opened the little box from Airfix the other day, I was beaming from ear to ear (not the Star Trek kind) almost immediately. Arriving in a small end-opening rectangular box, you get four sprues of pure white vinyl, unlike the old ones with were a cheesy yellow colour, even from new. Funnily enough, the illustration of the contents on the back of the box show them to be yellowish, but white is the colour, and a proper colour it is too. The copyright message tags them as from 1971, and time hasn't been too unkind to them. They hail from the era of angular sprues with no external runners to protect the parts, but vinyl isn't as prone to breakage as styrene, so everything is still attached to the sprues. There's a little bit of flash here and there, but most of it is on the sprues, so won't be an issue, and there are a few ejector pin marks too, most notably on the rear of the tyres and the astronauts' backs, although the latter will be covered by their backpacks anyway, so don't matter. Some of the design work is fanciful, including two types of lander that could allegedly be used for getting around faster than the moon rover that is also supplied. The vehicles are a little simplified for obvious reasons, but they still have that cool factor that makes me smile. In the box you get 59 parts to make up the following: 1 x Astronaut with a flag 2 x Astronaut with a probe/golf club 2 x Astronaut carrying a pair of containers 2 x Astronaut walking with his hands stretched out to his sides 2 x Astronaut with a video camera 2 x Astronaut with a personal one-man rocket-propelled travel platform 2 x Astronaut in a moonbuggy 2 x Astronaut on 1 x larger 2-seat lander-style travel platform A brief clean-up was done for this photo of some of the parts, but most of the figures were much as they came off the sprue. The round platform took the most clean-up. Preparation involves nipping the parts off the sprue and cutting the gate flush to allow them to sit straight on the moon's regolith, and then using an incredibly sharp blade to remove any small blemishes or flash that might be found. Be careful of cutting the pins too short on the various parts that slot together, as they're a bit hard to see amongst the white of the sprues. This can bite you in the bottom later on when you realise your rocketman won't stay on his platform, which is incidentally where the most flash is to be found in between the verticals. They're vinyl of course, so flexible and not likely to take standard paints if you get the modelling urge, but I believe that there are some flexible paints out there, or some that can be made flexible with the addition of something akin to PVA… my memory is hazy on this though, so have a Google if some bright spark doesn't help us out below. Conclusion I think they're awesome, but then I'm biased. They're still very cool IMHO, and surprisingly affordable if you're feeling nostalgic. Lots of play value for the 8 and older child, self included. What glues vinyl well? Nostalgically highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. It depends on whether you believe 4 is distempered over a splinter pattern or not. That's what's slowing down my choice. It's like painting a model, then painting over most of it with white(ish). Mein kopf ist boggling.
  7. I've narrowed it down to choices, using the helpful schemes from the book that @Martian Hale made me buy. "Yellow 4" from page 93, with a winter distemper that leaves wide squiggles of either a single green shade or a splinter scheme visible below. There's a yellow tail band, outers of the engines and tip of the nose cone too. "Yellow 3" in a tritonal splinter camouflage with the spinning part of the fuselage yellow, nose cone tip and three yellow stripes on the castor gear legs. There aren't as many pics of 4 in the book, so I'd probably have to make a bit of it up, and I'd also lose a lot of paint under that white, and there would be lots of chipping and mucking about with wearing out the distemper. 3 is easier and quite fetching, but a masking tape guzzler.
  8. ok - bear with me. Just doing summit else, and I'll start my reply soon after.
  9. Oh dear - Sorry Dave, I'm just not able to reply to everyone all at the same time, and you were at the back of a long queue. I had a quick look at your PM y'day IIRC, and because the reply is long-winded, I didn't have time to sort it there and then. Still want to play, or have we upset you?
  10. It's getting a bit swampy, but I think all you can catch is a little insanity, the harmless kind
  11. I'm not big on building more than one of something straight after the last one. It usually ends in a stall
  12. As promised, here's the first fix of the canopy, which just needs a little glue removing where it's oozed out, and maybe a bit of filling around the front of the windscreen. Otherwise it fits really snugly, which is nice An overall shot of the completed airframe minus wheels of course, which are winging their way to Scotland at the moment I now need to decide on a colour scheme. Do I go with the ones in the box (which I probably should), or should I do that green/white distemper one I liked and adapt it to the Flugel of the Trieb?
  13. I went away for a bit to do sleeping, and came back to.... what? I have no idea what happened overnight, but might I suggest you all contact your GP for a medication review? I can reach the photo booth today, so I'll post up a pic in a minute.
  14. AFAIK the RLM kept RLM02 on all interiors other than the cockpit throughout the war until the conditions got so bad that they were running out of paint
×
×
  • Create New...