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Diorama Content

Showing topics in Diorama Chat, Work In Progress - Dioramas and Ready For Inspection - Dioramas posted in for the last 365 days.

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  1. Today
  2. Badder

    Delivering Monty's Tank

    Looking good so far. Nice looking kit. Rearguards, Badder
  3. Yesterday
  4. I live on the eastern outskirts and you can smell them before you see them when the wind is in the right direction. There's genuinely a fishy smell with a W'ly wind and with a N'ly; well, the sewage farm at Marsh Mills makes it's presence known
  5. Svedberg

    A diorama with a nostalgic touch

    Next up was to make the tree that would be growing to the right of the telephone booth. I made it as a wire armature tree, i.e. making the branches using twisted wires. I used a wood skewer for the core of the stem, creating a straight and fairly well pruned tree. This since the tree shall sit in an urban setting, and not grow freely in the wilderness. Here is a picture of the progress after the first step. I built up the stem using some modelling clay. The branches got some modelling paste to make the wires less obvious. Then I spray painted (rattle cans) the whole thing. First gray and then with some black. Last both the stem and the branches got a brownish wash. Before adding the leaves the tree needed some finer branches. So I sprinkled on some static grass fibres. First 6 mm fibres and then 3 mm fibres. I used ordinary hairspray to make the fibres stick. The picture below shows the tree after this step. The stem is covered with a piece of paper to avoid any hairspray or fibres to end up on it. The next and last step was to add the leaves. I used Noch Leaves, Light Green (#07142). Once again, hairspray was used to "glue" the leaves to the tree. Here is the final result.
  6. In the post above, I drew attention to the cavities in the wall around inner surfaces of the doorway aperture. These are always present in my thicker 'sandwich' walls as I do not bother to sand or file their facing surfaces flat so that they sit flush together. Instead, I use cardboard or wood, or even rolls of paper as spacers. These are CA'd to the back of one wall section and then become the contact/glue surf'aces between it and the other section. Once the walls are fixed together with CA and/or PVA, I then push near-to-setting plaster of Paris into the 'sandwich' into and around the edges. I always 'overfill' the sandwich so that I can file the edges of the walls flush. However, sometimes I want the cavities to be exposed, usually along the tops of walls, or on exposed breaks. Here, I do not fill the cavity with wet plaster, but rather insert crumbled cured plaster into the 'slots' and CA that in place to mimic the rubble/mortar mix which was used to both strengthen the walls and add insulation. Returning to the doorway however, I do not wish to have the cavities exposed. I could have filled them with plaster and filed it down flush, but there was no need to do this as I was going to face the doorway with plasticard anyway. So, I filed and sanded the doorway as true and square as I could and then CA'd plasticard strips around the inner faces of the doorway. These facings will be treated to look like wood. However there were gaps in places, between the facings and the wall. Again, I could have used plaster of Paris to fill the gaps, but I can be very lazy at times, and rather than mix up a tiny amount of plaster, I used plaster dust which I'd produced while scraping and filing and cutting out the doorway. This dust was pushed and brushed into the gaps and then fixed in place with thin CA. Once dry, the excess plaster dust was sanded off. During this process, some paint was accidentally removed from the surrounding wall, but this was fortuitious as it now looks as if the wall had once been painted/plastered. I rather like the effect here and will probably now use the same technique on the other wall surfaces inside the room. Regarding the wall section above... There are SOME areas where the stonework pattern remains after I'd scraped the wall surface flat. I'm going to emphasize these by recarving them. I'm also going to add more pattern, especially along the right hand roof slope, and down that side of the wall. I now plan to collapse part of this wall, this collapse being the cause of the roof's collapse. But before that... the staircase.... TFL Badder PS, Some of you will know that I often build/paint/weather something to an 'interesting' or 'realistic' standard, and then ruin/spoil/alter it at a later date. I've lost count of the times I've thought 'wow, this looks perfect', only for me to fiddle around with it and ruin it. But I stick at it and experiment and nearly always end up with something that looks even better. This is especially true of old buildings, I think. The fact is that it takes decades of sun, wind, rain, snow, ice and intrusion by ivy, mosses, lichen, woodworm, rot, damp, mould etc etc to turn a building into a ruin, and no one can replicate that accumulation with a couple of washes and a bit of dry brushing. I therefore do not worry if my buildings are spoiled, then worked on again, then worked on again and again. These are the layers that make for a realistic effect.
  7. Aeronut

    Horsa D-Day

    Gliders were used for exercises prior to operations, they were also stored in the open, picketed on the edge of airfields. Quite a number of aircraft were recovered from the Normandy LZs, repaired and used again at Arnhem. Look at the films of Arnhem and you will see some Horsa with just two black stripes from the D-day markings on the wings, this is because the white stripes were likely to have been painted in white wash rather than paint as used for the black stripes, and between June and September the white wash was washed off by the rain. The gliders were not all made in the same factory and as such there could be tonal differences between the paint on the wings from one factory and fuselages from another with the tape over the transport joints being painted at the MU where the aircraft was assembled being different in tone and shine as well. Some of these tapes can even be seen being left in the red dope with no finishing paint. In summary pristine examples of the Horsa could be seen alongside weathered ones.
  8. I assume there's plenty of fish in Plymouth as well.....
  9. Derek A

    Delivering Monty's Tank

    Thank you, that's what I'll do then along with some other useful bric-a-brac!
  10. Andrew Jones

    Delivering Monty's Tank

    Apparently early Diamond T's were supplied with ballast , but later deliveries weren't , so ballast was improvised locally . Up to 10 tons of ballast could be carried, either steel or concrete , whatever could be found, so I can see no reason why oil drums full of sand could not be used. Andrew
  11. BIG X

    Horsa D-Day

    I'd be really surprised if they didn't use some for practice. I'm sure you don't just jump in one and go. But, if less than perfect I am pretty certain those practice craft wouldn't be sent into the front line. I may be wrong...
  12. There's plenty of those in Plymouth
  13. Ratch

    Horsa D-Day

    They did practice with them before the assault. I have pictures of Horsas and Wacos at Spanhoe in '43-4, training for the airborne invasion.
  14. Here's the doorway giving access to the upper room. The staircase up to this door will be aligned with the paintbrush. I decided not to use the fancier plastercast window surrounds as filing them down to the correct thickness is a delicate, tedious and sometimes fruitless task due to breakages. Instead, I stuck with the original design, making a copy in plasticard and sticking it in place with medium CA. Notice the exposed cavities in the doorway. These are the gaps left between the two back-to-back plaster casts that form the wall. TFL Badder
  15. Hi Rich, I'm having second thoughts about the roofs intersecting. I am struggling to find a justification for building them that way. i will have a think about it some more. Yes, I absolutely do like the barn door idea. I will be fitting it in somewhere. And yes, a fair bit of broken glass. Rearguards, Badder
  16. I really need to get my eyes tested. I read that as, "That bum looks nice and trouty", and couldn't figure out what fish had to do with it....
  17. Hi Graham, Umm, yeah, I do tend to think of my dioramas as being fairly simple. If you were to go through them you'll notice that the groundwork is always pretty basic -- and I can't do buildings, so they're avoided like the plague. One of the few things I reckon I can do right is the composition and layout -- and I always try to tell the story, although that's probably always a bit ambiguous -- except to me of course. I really ought to have done a full diorama WIP thread, but have been way too busy recently, so here's a brief rundown; 21-June I've always wanted to do a Mary Queen of Scots scenario, but finding suitable figures is like trying to find hen's teeth. However, I was struck by how similar Spanish Tercio's in the early stages of the 30-Years War were to Lowland Scots and Border Mosstroopers of the late 16th century. Well, they looked similar to me -- and having recently re-read George MacDonald Fraser's book "The Steel Bonnets" about the Border Reivers, I decided I could live with the slight discrepancy in the time frame between the two eras. So the first job was to do the flags, and I must've changed all of them out around six times each before I got them right. 24-June I've done a WIP on my mounted Mary Stuart in the figure section so won't drone on about how I created her like some latter-day Igor assisting in Baron Frankenstein's lab. It's enough to say an awful lot of milliput was used..... However, I also had some kit figures that've been in my stash for years and reckoned they would work in this wee project, so a start was made on prepping and priming them. Note, I was also working on some kits for two different vignettes as well, so only the Border Heidman and mounted figure in the photo below were used for this diorama. 30-June Doing the figures for these projects is always time consuming, but they were coming on. That's the resin product from Deluxe Material that I used for the river. 02-July A bit more progress. 05-July The resin bridge was initially assembled with superglue gel and once it was set great dollops of two-part epoxy were ladled on for added strength -- where they wouldn't be seen of course. And after filling all the gaps at the span to arch joints, I had a bit of practice with the layout. Any excuse to just play around is always a good one. 06-July More progress on the figures, although I only used four of these in this diorama. And the weathering process on the bridge was started. I used printers inks for the initial washes of color. 11-July With the bridge about 75% finished, it was temporarily fixed to the groundwork, and the first layer of resin poured into the riverbed. Mmm, I got a bit silly with the rocks and whipped half of them out of there before the resin began to set. 12-July Began basing the figures into the groundwork and poured in the second layer of resin "water". The diorama base is sitting on a plastic tray out in our conservatory, just in case of leaks or spills. 13-July The third and final layer of resin was poured in. Remember I said the bridge was only temporarily fixed to the groundwork? That was so it could come back off while I detailed the resin stream. It then went back on and fixed in place. The Border Heidman was also located n his final position. So, yesterday was spent on the final detailing, adding more foliage. clumps of reeds, flowers and so on. I also made the nameplate and then left well alone overnight. The photoshoot was done this afternoon out in the conservatory so I could take advantage of the natural light. Hope this has been helpful, and the members here enjoy seeing the process and final results as much as I enjoyed the entire exercise. Next up? Well, there's a small rowing boat vignette to finish off over the next couple of days. I had intended to then do a small, maybe six figure, scenario featuring the Marquis of Montrose in 1645, but to be honest I might defer that one for a few weeks, cos I've a hankering for doing something with Cherry Blossom trees and Knights of Camelot in Shining Armor riding by, while Carl Orff's "O Fortuna Carmina Burana" is bouncing off the floor, walls and ceiling at full blast. And that's a blatant plug for the movie I'm going to be watching tonight.... Cheers H
  18. Outstanding; yet again. That burn looks nice and 'trouty.
  19. Spent an hour experimenting with ideas on how to get the rain water staining done on this and the idea I went with was mixing some Tamiya Rust from one of their weathering kits and watering it down. I then put a drop on the panel I wanted to look a little weather beaten and let gravity do it`s thing. Once dry, this was the result. What do you think?
  20. Thanks guys. I'm glad you like it.
  21. billybookcase

    WW1 Diorama

    Thank you Martin, you missed the broken windows which I was particularly proud of Darby, yes initially I thought it was a bit dull so lightened it up, can't remember what colour i used. It stands out even more because I photographed it in bright sunlight. I shall revisit and darken them up somewhat. Cheers BB
  22. Silver Fox

    Battle of Langside 13-May-1568

    Brilliant work on the figures, the composition of the diorama is well thought out and helps draw the eye to the key players. Tremendous work.
  23. CONTINUED FROM MY PREVIOUS POST Along with a small group of adherents, and intent on gaining an army and financial aid from her cousin Elizabeth I, the Scottish Queen crossed the Solway Firth and into England on 16 May 1568. Almost immediately placed into “protective custody” she would endure protracted and increasingly severe imprisonment, and be complicit in numerous failed plots and intrigues. Nineteen long years after Langside, Mary Stuart was put on trial for involvement in the Babbington Plot. The somewhat hair-brained plan was to assassinate Elizabeth and replace her with the Scottish Queen. Despite Mary’s spirited defense, the verdict was never in doubt and she was executed at Fotheringhay Castle on 8 February 1587. Mary Stuart’s half-brother, James Stewart the Earl of Moray and leader of the rebel forces at the Battle of Langside, was shot dead in 1570 by a Marian supporter. It was the first recorded assassination of a head of state by a firearm. Her third husband, James Hepburn the Earl of Bothwell was imprisoned in Denmark and kept in a dungeon under unspeakable conditions for ten years. Still in chains and probably completely insane, he died in 1578. Elizabeth I died in 1603 and was succeeded by James VI, son of Mary Queen of Scots, who now became James I of the United Kingdom. In 1612 James had his mother’s remains exhumed and re-interred in Westminster Abbey. Her final resting place lies at the opposite end of the aisle from Elizabeth’s tomb in the Henry VII Chapel, and one can’t help but wonder if, wherever they are now, both ladies find such close proximity to be somewhat……awkward.
  24. Graham Boak

    Battle of Langside 13-May-1568

    Very nice indeed - so that's one of your "simple dioramas"?
  25. Derek A

    Delivering Monty's Tank

    Been thinking about the need for balast Andrew, do you think 4 or 5 50 gallon drums full of sand would be appropriate, after all it would have been easy to obtain in the desert?
  26. Grey Beema

    Battle of Langside 13-May-1568

    Fantastic build Cadman..
  27. The decisive battle of Mary Queen of Scots personal reign took place on 13 May 1568 at the village of Langside, two miles south of Glasgow. The Queen’s army was destroyed in less than an hour. This diorama depicts the closing stages of the battle. Royalist forces have been pushed back to a large stream called the White Cart Water, a tributary of the River Clyde. With the remnants of Mary’s army on the point of a full-scale route, Lords Claud Hamilton and Maxwell Herries report that all is lost and counsel the Queen to return to France and await better times. Mary Stuart, who was still only twenty-six, chose to ignore the advice of her loyal Lords. The figures include several converted white metal castings from FL & KP, plus white metal kits from Art Girona and Masterclass. The animals are either from the toy shop round the corner, or were picked up at duty free in Hong Kong airport -- can't remember which it was. Flags and nameplate were done in Microsoft Excel. The base is a miniature display table and groundwork is instant papier mâché with added static grass and various other details. The stream is a one-part clear resin product from Deluxe Materials. The bridge is a resin kit by Reality in Scale, and I've no idea where the trees came from. The mounted Mary Stuart figure was cobbled together from various bits and pieces. For details, please refer to my "Mary Queen of Scots" thread in the Figures WIP Section. TO BE CONTINUED IN NEXT POST....
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