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Diorama Content

Showing topics in Diorama Chat, Work In Progress - Dioramas and Ready For Inspection - Dioramas posted in for the last 365 days.

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  1. Yesterday
  2. bar side

    Building a HAS

    Bit of paint now going on the RF-4C back burner project. It’s come together quite nicely so now for the wrap around SEA camo
  3. Gorby

    Working Lift Bridge Diorama

    Wow! That looks fantastic!
  4. MiguelBR

    Seelow to Berlin

    Thank you BillyD
  5. Billydick

    Seelow to Berlin

    Nice original way to display a diorama. I enjoyed watching the video. Thank you ! BillyD
  6. Getunderit

    Working Lift Bridge Diorama

    Sealed the arcylic paint with PVA glue. After it dried . . . Tomorrow I will start applying a few coats of enamel gloss.
  7. Last week
  8. modelman182

    Next up - something with a choo-choo...

    That's a neat bit of composition, Pete. I like it! I shall add that to my considerations. Cheers Kev
  9. Pete in Lincs

    Next up - something with a choo-choo...

    Two lines, with the vehicles in between them. The line at the front is only 2/3 of the width of the shelf and is a siding. That can then have a couple more flatcars on it & viewers will then have to look around or over them to see the rest. Well, that's what I'd do.
  10. modelman182

    PIT STOP - ft. Rotten barn door

    Great work, as ever, Badder. I'm not sure that I could manage to do dioramas the way you do. You make more action plans in a week than I do in a decade! Still... the evolutionary aspect is fascinating to watch and there are loads of lessons to be learnt from watching your processes. Much appreciated. Oh, and you had better watch out or you'll be getting a "Parallel-o-Gram" from the Maths Police warning you about the severe consequences of messing with the language of mathematics (Parallelility indeed! What were you thinking?) Cheers (and beers, as you know you can enjoy them) Kev
  11. modelman182

    Next up - something with a choo-choo...

    Hi All Just beginning to get back into a modelling 'routine' and have an awful lot of catching up to do, but the train dio is ever present on my bench and I couldn't resist getting some more work done on it. Badder - just in case you hadn't seen my post in the Chat forum - I found the culprit(s) of my allergy. Turns out my system doesn't like Butyl Acetate - which is the prime ingredient of both Revell Contacta and Tamiya Thin Cement. I removed these from my workshop and returned to my long-trusted Mek-Poly and all is now well. Started work on the Locomotive this week. Only doing little bits at a time but making pleasant progress. I found a spare shelf under my desk (absolutely no idea where it came from or how long it's been there!) and discovered that it's a perfect width for the dio. Laid out the major components (or parts of them, anyway) and took a quick snap: Haven't decided whether to cut down the depth (front to back) of the shelf to match the original plan or to keep the depth and change the orientation of the tracks [as previously suggested] and then add some more details at trackside. I'll give it some thought and let you all know once I've decided. Cheers for now Kev
  12. Hi Major, Thanks, If you are talking about the doors, then yes, they ARE real. They are made of wood and have had a lot of rubbing, wear, splitting, paint application, paint peeling off, soakings with water, repainting, more rubbing/wear..... in other words, they've been weathered just like real doors, except years worth has been condensed into a few hours. UNFORTUNATELY, THEY NO LONGER EXIST! (and that will come as no surprise to many!) I failed to listen to @Sgt.Squarehead and tried to accentuate some of the rot and ruined them. Never mind, no big distaster. They were a little on the large side anyway, and actually, I was thinking it would be better to have rectangular doors instead of arched ones. So, I've made some more, and I'm about to apply the very final washes. I think they may end up better than the orginals. Pics in a bit. Rearguards Badder
  13. Major_Error

    PIT STOP - ft. Rotten barn door

    Just fantastic, It is hard/impossible to know if it is real or a model. (I am sure it is real!) 8-)
  14. Chewbacca

    Cobbled street

    Thanks everyone for your prompt responses. I really like those Fields of Glory bases but at the same time, given that I'm very familiar with working with Plaster of Paris for my usual seascape bases, I think my first attempt at this will be using the "fixative pipe" technique, but I will make the "pipe" from plasticard to represent a rectangular cobble. If that al fails, I can always turn to Fields of Glory as a fallback plan. I'll post some photos as I go.
  15. Gorby

    Working Lift Bridge Diorama

    Beautiful photos @Getunderit & @bar side. Having raised a step-son and a step-daughter from an early age (them not me) it's more likely to be “Oy, gitface, why's your nose so big?” or some such jollity. But obviously said with the tenderness and feeling that only a seven year old girl can manage.
  16. Getunderit

    Working Lift Bridge Diorama

    Thanks @bar side, I like the way the sky makes the crooked masts straight.
  17. bar side

    Working Lift Bridge Diorama

    Nice pictures. Water looks so different when the sun is coming up or going down. These are a couple I took from a boat off the very muddy Mersea Island. Nice boat it was too.
  18. Getunderit

    Working Lift Bridge Diorama

    @Pete in Lincs, yes, reflections are fascinating. Here is a photo I took one morning sunrise at the beach, where the water from a wave runs back to the sea. It sure does not look like a beach scene. Here is another one, but a sunset over the river. The snapshot was taken just right, where I can easily imagine the girl saying "It's time to go, brother".
  19. Pete in Lincs

    Working Lift Bridge Diorama

    Early Monday morning I drove across the Humber bridge. (East coast of England around 08:30, low cloud) A glance out of the left window and the water seemed dusky pink. A second glance and it was mud brown. A look to the right and on the other side of the bridge and it was grey! Love the extra touches you're making.
  20. Timmas

    Working Lift Bridge Diorama

    Blimey this is good. I'm seriously envious of guys like you who can replicate reality with paint and basic materials with such stunning accuracy. I hope the museum realises what a superb piece of work is coming their way!
  21. Badder

    Cobbled street

    I personally would use plaster of Paris. It's cheap and relatively easy to do, but if you mess it up you can always start again. FIrst, make sure that your base 'board' is absolutely rigid. Anything even slightly bendy will probably cause cracks in the plaster, if not during curing, then certainly at some point in the 'distant' future. A lot of people use 'photograph' frames for their bases. I've used them as well, with plaster 'ground', but ensured the rigidity of the hardboard by adding supports underneath. As for recreating a cobbled surface, you have three options IMHO. 1. Lay the plaster and whilst it is still 'damp' carve the cobbles with a scalpel and needle files. Start with a scalpel, scoring out the cobble pattern, then run needle files along those lines, around each individual cobble. Flat cobbles are easiest. Convex ones are harder to shape. 2. Lay a small bed of plaster, carve the cobbles as described above, then make a latex mould of that section. Then you can cast the cobbles in plaster. If you take care to get the original right, you can fix the sections side by side on the board, and get away with just a little bit of filling and sanding to hide the joins. If you're feeling adventurous, you can make the original pattern one that allows the fitting of the casts to be more like a jigsaw, with inter-linking cobbles. 3. Make half a dozen individual cobbles, each made and carved accurately in plaster, space them out on a board and again make a latex mould. Then use the mould to cast all the cobbles you require. Fix each individual cobble to your base. Probably best to 'sink' them into freshly laid 'runny' plaster, but you could glue them directly to the base using CA or PVA. I have tried making a mould and then pressing the mould down onto a freshly plastered base, but I found it difficult. The wet plaster doesn't always 'fill' the mould, but squirts/moves sideways instead, or is too far 'gone' and doesn't 'mould'. I suppose it might be possible to make a 'framework' of the pattern and press that into the wet plaster. But then you have to remove it. Leave it too long and your frame will be stuck fast, too early and the pattern will sag/run/fill up. There may be a way of doing it using some variation on this theme. I will defintely give it some thought when I get around to rebuilding my 'Somewhere near Villers Bocage' diorama. BUT, SHOULD YOU DECIDE TO PURCHASE A 'KIT' COBBLED STREET, ABSOLUTELY DO MAKE A LATEX MOULD OF IT BEFORE USING IT! You'll never have to purchase that kit again, but will have a mould and an endless supply of copies, should you wish. Hope that helps. Good luck, Badder
  22. Mancunian airman

    Working Lift Bridge Diorama

    Its still great to look at this Peter, I love your attention to detail . . . . .
  23. Hi Gorby and thanks, It's not really about skill in respect of how things turn out, it's more down to the skill in finding useful 'rubbish', which costs nothing at all, and then experimenting with it. If it works, great, if it doesn't, try again. If in the end it doesn't work all I've only wasted is a bit of time. But then again I'll have learned something. Thanks again. It's always nice to get a 'wow' Rearguards, Badder Hi Vince, and thanks. Thumbs up are always apprectiated. But not if you're a prostate specialist. Rearguards, Badder Thanks old bean, I wouldn't say 'incredible', because I know all the little mistakes and naff bits! There's a lot of things less than incredible, some are even sub-standard, but ivy is going to hide a lot of them! Rearguards Badder
  24. Gorby

    Cobbled street

    I find this site a fascinating source of ideas. I've not tried the cobble stone technique so I don't know how easy it is, but it looks quite effective. I'm not sure what a 'fixative pipe' is but some other hollow tube may work. https://davidneat.wordpress.com/2013/10/22/model-making-basics-creating-surfaces/ It's quite a long article, but just search for 'cobble'.
  25. Matt_

    House Rubbish ?

    Just for god's sake don't get caught rummaging around there with your car boot open!
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