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Spit Fan

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About Spit Fan

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  1. When were the gas detection patches, seen on fighter aircraft during the Battle of Britain, discontinued? I have seen references to both the color, a yellow/green with red dope outline and shapes, circles, squares and diamonds but no time lines. From images and profiles it would seem that their usage begin to decline about December of 1940 and was gone with the change over to Ocean grey/ dark green/medium grey. Many thanks in advance.
  2. Hi all, After reading Dogsbody’s post#14 on whether Airfix based the location of the radio transmitter/receiver aft of the turret on the Canadian built Bolingbroke I started looking through my references for a definite answer. My reference is Graham Warner’s “The Bristol Blenheim, A Complete History” which should be a must have for anyone with an interest in the Blenheim. Starting on page 154 there is a photo of the R1082 Receiver and the T1083 Transmitter mounted on a shelf behind the turret which is removed in this picture. On Page 155 is a description of the installation which mentions the wooden drawers under the shelf ,complete with brass kitchen handles, were the spare coils were stored. On page 275 there is a picture looking aft from just forward of the open overhead rear entrance which shows the very crowded interior with the open entrance hatch to the right of the image, the ladder to the left, the twin Browning turret and the radio sets behind. If anyone plans on leaving the entrance hatch open this is a must see image for detailing this area. According to the narrative the R1082/T1083 were replaced by 1941 with the later T1154/R1155. Starting on p559-560 there is a lovely set of three photos showing the three crew members of an 11 Squadron MK.IV. The image on p560 shows the Wop/Ag reaching beyond the turret controls to operate the side mounted R1155. Somewhere I recall reading that because of their location adjusting the T/R sets was always a bit awkward even under the best of conditions but so far I haven’t been able to lay my hands on it. Sorry to be so long winded but hope this helps. Still waiting for the kit to arrive on this side of the pond and I hope that my build is half as good as yours.
  3. Many thanks for all the replies. I had no idea that leather darkens so quickly with age. I had forgotten that the green leather color was also found in many Halifax’s but it was news to me that was also found in Mosquitoes too. So to recap the leather in WW2 RAF aircraft could be a very dark brown, dark green or black. A closer inspection of war time cockpit photos is in order. I had had tried the search feature but couldn’t get a working match up with my question. Looks like I need to fine tune my queries .
  4. after looking at a number of WIP builds of WW2 RAF aircraft I realized that there seems to be no standard color for the leather seat backs and cushions. Some are black, some various shades of brown and others like the Lancaster are green. Were colors depended on suppliers and aircraft manufacturers? I read somewhere that most Lancasters pilot’s were in a color referred to as Coach Green if so what about the nav’s and radio ops seats? Any information greatly appreciated.
  5. Many thanks for both your replies. Oddly enough I received this book for Christmas and thoroughly enjoyed it. I agree that it was a better aircraft that history has portrayed but unfortunately when needed most, the Battle of France, it was doomed to failure from the start . Given the conditions under which it was forced to operate in even a far more advance aircraft would most likely not have fare much better. The one surprise in the book for me was the claim that when it was felt that invasion was a very real possibility, and even training aircraft like the Tigermoth were being considered as light bombers, several Battle squadrons, who had actual Army Co-Operation experience, were totally ignored by the Air Staff. John R
  6. Thanks for a great story and a great photo give my best to your friend Ken. Not to many left who can say "I flew Spits!" John R
  7. I need to get a good look at the 30 gal and the 45 gal tank side by side or at leased installed so I can make an reasonable guess as to which is shown on the profile of the L Mk.Vb of Fob Fairbanks ' a/c. Thanks for the reply. John R
  8. Many thanks for the replies. As soon as I saw the bit on increased oil required for the increased flight time I realized that there was no way the 90 gal tank was used operationally from the UK (non tropical mod). I suspect that the tank shown in the Osprey profile of the L Mk. Vb was a 45 gal tank. I say that because it seems to be the same size and shape as one shown and labeled as a 45. gal tank on a Spifire Mk. XVI based in Germany July 1945 in "The Spitfire Story" by Alfred Price. If memory serves me right the Tamiya Spitfire Mk.Vb (trop) comes with a 30 or 45 gal tank. I guess I need to see if I can find one. By the way just where is the filler port on the fixed 30 gal tank on the Mk. IIa (LR). There doesn't seems to be one on the SAM resin tank. TIA John R
  9. Back again with another Spitfire question. On page 41 of the Osprey "Spitfire Mk.V Aces 1941-45" book there is a profile of a Mk. VB X4272/SD-J flown by Flt Lt David Fairband 501 Sqn, June 1944. The profile shows the a/c with a 30 gal belly tank. (This is not the cigar shaped tank normally seen on the Mk. IX.) My question is was the 30 gal tank widely used on ops? Was it's bigger brother the 90 gal tank also used on ops? I have a 90 gal tank left over from the ICM Spitfire Mk. IX and though it might be an interesting addition to my current project. Any thoughts will be greatly appreciated. John R.
  10. Back again with another Spitfire question. On page 41 of the Osprey "Spitfire Mk.V Aces 1941-45" book there is a profile of a Mk. VB X4272/SD-J flown by Flt Lt David Fairband 501 Sqn, June 1944. The profile shows the a/c with a 30 gal belly tank. (This is not the cigar shaped tank normally seen on the Mk. IX.) My question is was the 30 gal tank widely used on ops? Was it's bigger brother the 90 gal tank also used on ops? I have a 90 gal tank left over from the ICM Spitfire Mk. IX and though it might be an interesting addition to my current project. Any thoughts will be greatly appreciated. John R.
  11. Dave: Thanks for the info on this film I will see if I can find it on U-Tube. I suspect that it will be a gold mine of material. John R.
  12. Many thanks for your response. Silver it is for those items. I will leave the two ducts in place on my Mk.I (cannon). The machine gun opennings for the outer two .303s will be filled and the carriridge chute closed but can still be made out if you look closely. Oddly enough the Tamyia MK.I wing does not have the two gun heating ducts and from your post these ducts should be present. I will have to come up with a set for the MK.IIa (LR) that is also a WIP on my bench. Hopefully by the time I finish them I will have figured out how to post photos on site and will put them in the "Crtique" section for comment. John R.
  13. Hi all, back again with some more questions on the MK.I My apology if these have already been asked and answered. 1. What was the factory color of the insides of the oil cooler and radiator? Silver, RAF Grey-Green or the under surface color? 2. I am converting a Tamiya MK.Vb to a MK.I (cannon) and I am wondering if the two gun heating ducts found on the Mk.Vb wings would have been on the Mk.I wings and if so would these have been removed on the Mk.I (cannon) aircraft? I can see an argument for either view. Things are moving a lot at a very fast pace on my three Spits build at least for me. Did I mention I am a very slow modeller? As always all input is greatly appreciated. John R.
  14. Thanks Edgar! It's good to know that I wasn't totally imagining the dark color on the armor plate in some early Spitfires. It would seem from all that I read here that by August 1940 the armor was most likely painted in the same interior grey-green as the rest of the cockpit. I am in the process of coverting a Tamiya MK.Vb back to a MK.I (cannon), R6776 QV*H, as flown by Flt. Sgt. George Unwin during August 1940 and the armor plate will be interior grey-green. Happy Modeling, John R.
  15. HI, Another Spifire MK.I question. Approximately when did armor back plate and headrest begin to be seen on squadron a/c? The other question is what color was this armor plate painted? I seem to recall it was a dark color, black? As always any information will be greatly appreciated. John R.
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