Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/21/2024 in all areas

  1. I have found my modelling heavily inspired by some of the excellent box artwork that has been produced over the year. With the recent loss of Roy Cross, I had to dig out a Stirling from my stash as I have always been impressed by this piece of his work: Ok, so this is the Italeri kit of the four engined monster but I decided to tackle this version. Loads has been written about the kit's surface detail. I wasn't that sure how to tackle it, when I found that sanding the whole airframe seemed, to me, to reduce the depth of the panel lines & rivets. Happy with the finish, I wanted to change the mid upper turret as I wasn't to enamoured with the earlier shaped one. I had the Airfix Dambuster Lancaster in the stash, and this comes with an unwanted mid upper that only needed a bit of a trim to get it to fit. Also courtesy of Airfix were the decals from their last boxing of the Stirling, without the excellent Roy Cross box art. I used the decals for a BIII. The model was painted with Xtracolor enamels, and to display the model I made a simple base and used the bomb trolley, tractor, and Bedford truck from their Bomber resupply set. Figures are from Airfix and some 3D printed ones I found on Etsy which are absolutely fantastic. A few photos taken outside in natural daylight: Thanks for looking Angelo.
    123 points
  2. Hi all I don't normally 'do' 1/72 as the parts are too small & fiddly for my sausage fingers these days, but I couldn't resist Airfix's new release. It's a cracking kit, fine panel lines and selected rivets with plenty of detail inside & out. I think I'm going to have to track down their B17 now, I can feel a 1/72 4-motor bomber theme coming on! Engine 2 though is a temporary resin cast while I wait for Airfix's spares dept to cough up a replacement for a missing cowling (drums fingers)... Thanks for looking, J.A.
    110 points
  3. I guess that the Airfix Beagle Basset needs no introduction since it's been around since 1969. So here is my take on this lovely little model in the colours of XS743, ETPS, c1989: I decided to give my interpretation a complete body makeover which entailed the removal of all raised panel lines and rivets, to be replaced by scribed and 'riveted' new ones. The scribing I had done before, but re-riveting, was a complete first for me. A bit of research highlighted the fact that the tail that Airfix modelled was that of the prototype and not that used for production. I thought about modifying the tail myself, but ended up using the AlleyCat resin replacement set which also included some rather nice replacement main wheels and props, these having far better renditions of the spinners and blades. Obviously, it's an old kit, but looking at some of the parts, eg, the clear pieces, seats, dashboard, I got the feeling that these may have been updated as their fit and details were perhaps 'too good' for a kit of this age. The only real issue for me was the side windows which were a bit thick. The wheels were awful, but the resin replacements took care of these. Several parts were scratch built including the exhaust outlets, some small doors under the engine cowlings that appear open on all parked aircraft (not sure what they do !), gear doors, aerials, sun visors, wipers, etc. This particular aircraft, XS743, is often seen modelled in the "Raspberry Ripple" colour scheme, which I was tempted by. However, as I'd spent so much time scribing and riveting, I decided to go for its optional lighter scheme as I feared that the dark Oxford Blue of the former would have virtually hidden all of my scribing and riveting ! Paints used were mostly Humbrol and Tamiya acrylics with Mr Hobby 1000 Black Surfacer used for the primer. I decided to just use matt paint and apply a gloss Tamiya varnish to bring back the shine. Decals used mostly from the XtraDecal set, X72342, with some smaller stencils coming from the kit's. Both were excellent and went down without any problems. Weathering was a dark grey Flory wash followed by Tamiya weathering powder. I got this kit in an Amazon sale for around £8 and have to say that I really enjoyed it, learnt a lot and acquired a host of new skills. Thanks for reading and taking the time to look.
    103 points
  4. B-26B Marauder Eduard/Hasegawa from limitede edition Wine,Women and Songs
    102 points
  5. Hello, I’ve just completed my journey with Airfix Fairey Gannet and I’d like to share its results with you. I rarely build models in 1/48 scale but I’ve heard so many praises about this kit that I had to give it a try. So here it goes: Fairey Gannet AS.1, serial XA331 in the Royal Australian Navy service. It is shown in the livery of 816 Squadron RAN in 1957 (301/Y). The aircraft was attached to HMAS Melbourne which at that moment was using the Y code letter. The weapons bay doors are wide open to facilitate the ordnance loading process. The kit is quite ok. I didn’t experience any major fitting problems and I also appreciate the idea of providing two sets of wings, it spared me lots of cutting and sanding. The manual is quite comprehensible although requires additional pair of glasses to decode the diagrams and read all the part numbers (they are really small). It’s wonderful that it reminds you about the front weight, pity that you really need to stretch your imagination to fit it properly (this bird is really nose heavy). There are also some annoying simplifications (e.g. air intakes) which should’ve been easily avoided in a kit of this scale. I used the famous Cartograf decals for stencils only and they did the job quite well. In general, the kit is not bad at all and I had a lot of fun building the model. And the Gannet itself turned out to be so superbly ugly that I really fell in love with it 😍. The model was built basically OOB with only a cockpit furnished with Eduard’s PE parts. The roundels and other RAN insignia were painted. The Melbourne’s aircraft elevator deck built from scratch. Please enjoy and comment at will. Cheers, Marcin And a few cockpit close-ups:
    101 points
  6. I've finished off Aeroclub's 1/48th scale Avro Vulcan over the weekend - this has been my 'holy grail' of kits for as long as I can remember and I was finally able to get hold of one last year. The kit is a beautifully moulded vacform with resin intakes and tail pipes, along with lots of white metal detail parts. It was a pleasure to put together and once the main parts were sanded and trimmed to shape, it was more or less like an injection build. The only tricky part was the fit of the tail pipes, and these required a bit of trimming and shimming and plenty of Milliput to get everything together. I did have a couple hiccups - one of my own making which was managing to ruin the paintwork when I didn't secure my airbrush cup properly and it managed to drip grey all over my carefully masked dark green and the other was the very old decals which silvered to the point of them having to come off. I managed to raid the spares box to cobble together some stencils and Xtradecal came to the rescue for the roundels and serials. I decided a kit of this size and quality needed an open bomb bay so spent a good few evenings scratch-building all the internal detail and I think it was worth it as it adds some nice visual interest to the bottom of the model. Paints were my usual Xtracolor enamels with lots of Tamiya tape for the masking of the camouflage - that's many hours of my life I won't get back! Other than that this is what you get in the box - a very large model of a very impressive aeroplane! For those interested, here's the 'Work in Progress' here Anyway, here she is all done and dusted - I've modelled XL386 as it was when on strength with 44 Squadron, based at RAF Waddington in the mid-1970s... Best regards, Tom
    101 points
  7. This is more of a test build than a straightforward RFI but I thought I'd post a few images of my completed Clear Prop! F-86A (due in stores imminently). Since the kit decals were not available when I received the kit, the scheme is a combination of Fantasy Printshop colour decal sheets, cut to shape etc (lightning bolt and tail insignia) plus various 1/48 F-86 decal sheets for national insignia and stencils (modified). Colour scheme depicts a 91st Fighter Interceptor Sqn aircraft, based at Moses Lake AFB in early 1951 and just prior to the aircraft being sent to Long Beach for upgrade. Thus the gun muzzle doors etc are correct for the period whereas a later UK-based 91st FIS F-86A would feature open gun muzzles, aluminium intake ring etc. The CP kit includes 120-gallon drop tanks but I wanted to model the larger 245-gallon ferry tanks and so those items are plunge-moulded as halves with the flange inserted between the two halves in plastic card. The rest of the model is OOB. It's a lovely kit and though my model isn't perfect, better modellers than I will be able to do truly great things with it
    80 points
  8. I am really pleased to present to you all my latest build, a North American F-51D-30-NA Mustang of Nevada Air National Guard as she was when seconded to the Icelandic Defense Force in 1952-53 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iceland_Defense_Force), based at Keflavik Airbase, Iceland and operated under United States Air Force control. This subject caught my eye many months ago and I have been determined to build her. I could have plucked any of the aircraft from this deployment but I chose 44-74482 “Nancy” as she had some of the markings that appeal to me – the stencil-type Buzz number, particularly, as well as the one named aircraft that I could identify. In building her I have used a little “Modeller’s Licence” in terms of the colours applied. You will see in the text below that there is detailed description. However, I fear that time has allowed memories to wain and so I have used “best guess” for this model, with reasoning for each difference using reference images. I have noted my changes in the following text. The following background has been extracted from Wikipedia (public domain and edited): One of the last overseas deployments of a F-51D Mustang unit by the U.S. Air Force was in late 1952 when 25 aircraft of the 131st Fighter Bomber Group, were assigned to the Iceland Defense Force (IDF) at Keflavik air base in Iceland. Most of the 25 Mustangs came from the 192nd Fighter Bomber Squadron, Nevada Air National Guard, with fillers from the 110th FBS, Missouri Air National Guard and 170th FBS, Illinois Air National Guard, as no squadron in the 131st had the originally required number of 35 airplanes to be readied for the mission. Distinctive "arctic-red" (Insignia Red) markings were applied to all IDF Mustangs before their transfer from USA to Iceland. This included the painting of the outer wingspan, fuselage aft end, and tail empennage (minus control surfaces) in Insignia Red. My note: wing control surfaces were red also. The sliding canopy frame, propeller spinner, and tips of wings and tail empennage were Insignia Blue (the standard colour trim for the 192nd FBS). The windshield frame and the anti-glare panels (between the propeller and the windshield) were black although some were Olive Drab (often not distinguishable from black in colour photos). Some aircraft had stainless steel panels around the exhaust stacks painted glossy black for easy cleaning. The landing gear strut fairings had a 6 inch colour at the panel bottom for separate flight identity, blue, red, and yellow. The panels over the filtered air intakes on the lower nose were painted red. My note: these were Insignia Blue. The wording “Nancy” was determined by me to be in Insignia Red. According to written personal notes from Col. Robert W. Gruenhagen (flight chief, line chief, and quality control inspector of the F-51 Mustangs stationed at Keflavik airbase in 1952) the deployment procedure was as follows (quote): "P/F-51 assignment, Iceland During august 27, 1952, 35 Mustangs were readied for launch from George AFB, Victorville, California with destination of Keflavik, Iceland by 1 September, 1952. The aircraft were prepared in A/W T.O. 00-25-4 for overseas transfer and modified with APX-6 transponders to provide the latest IFF capability. Two groups of 17 and 18 aircraft were flown across the U.S. in a northern and southern routing through bases coordinated for en-route support. Two C-119 aircraft were manned with 15 man crews to follow the flights and repair ant turn and launch the Mustangs at each base. Intend was to reach the east coast with 30 aircraft and proceed on with the best 25 for the final destination. The serials listed below were in place in Keflavik and on alert by 15 September of 1952. The aircraft were assigned to the 192 Ftr Bmr Sqdn. (TAC) with support crews made up from three squadrons of the 146 Ftr Bmr Wg, the 178th, 186th and 190th. Serial: 44-72708 44-73788 44-74482 44-74880 44-74845 44-74717 44-73769 44-74586 44-74963 44-72843 44-74377 44-74522 44-84769 44-74382* 44-73996 44-73826 44-74870 44-73409 44-74317 44-74811 44-84834 44-74975 44-74959 44-74368 45-11364. The aircraft served until April, 1953 and were replaced by F-94B interceptors assigned to the 82nd FIS. The Mustang unit designation changed to the 436th Ftr Sqdn on 1 December, 1952. The Mustangs were flown to England, (Renfrew) and transferred to AMC at Brookley field, Mobile Alabama and eventually to Norton AFB Sam Bernardino California were they were scrapped in May of 1954. *44-74382 was left at BW-1 (Narssasuak, Greenland) enroute for an engine change which was completed in one week. A B-26 Navigation aircraft accompanied the Mustangs on all the overwater legs and the later pick-up of 382.” Except for a few remaining on active duty, the three support units returned to Air National status upon return to the US. During this period, the Mustang units in Korea were also converted to jet aircraft with the Mustangs being assigned to the Republic of Korea Air Force and these units along with the Icelandic units were the last overseas assignment of the type with the USAF. What did I use/do? 1. Kit – Tamiya North American F-51D Mustang (60754) in 1/72 2. Decals – the aircraft specific markings were drawn and printed by Arctic Decals. The remainder were from the kit. 3. Aftermarket – Falcon Vacform canopy (9158), AML seat belts (AMLE 80 003), CMK exhausts (Q72 033), Uschi antenna line, Yalu instrument panel, various bits of rod and wire to create the radio box etc. 4. Paint – Mainly Colourcoats Insignia Red (ACUS26) and Insignia Blue (ACUS39), together with Humbrol 27002 Polished Aluminium. H27002+Humbrol 140 mix on the wings. The rudder is H11 Silver. Interior was primarily Colourcoats US Interior Green (ACUS09) and wheel wells are Colourcoats Zinc Chromate Yellow (ACUS23). Varnished at various stages with Humbrol Glosscote (first coat) and Vallejo Gloss and Satin. 5. Weathering – Flory washes used here and there – not the panel lines – plus Prismacolor Silver pencil and various Tamiya Weathering Powders. Here she is: I hope you like her. Martin
    79 points
  9. I finally got around to building the Special Hobby BAe Sea Harrier FA.2. In my opinion, worth as little as it is, this is the better of the two available kits (the other being Airfix). Airfix is the newer of the two, is more detailed, and is much more nicely molded but the forward fuselage is not as accurate as I would like. I think those issues have been discussed here before so I won't repeat them. That said, the Special Hobby kit is only a wee bit better. Being a short run kit, it has all of those issues. It is obviously based on the Hasegawa FRS.1 and therefore suffers from its forward fuselage inaccuracies, the underside curving up towards the front much too quickly resulting in it being too short. The Special Hobby kit has been described as a curate's egg - and that it is. I sold my Airfix kit and decided to tackle its issues nonetheless. Why? Apparently I'm a glutton for punishment... Project: BAe Sea Harrier FA.2 Kit: Special Hobby Kit No. SH72154 "Hi-Tech" Scale: 1:72 (Is there another?) Decals: From the kit, of ZH809 in 25th Anniversary scheme. The first decal (top engine panel stripes) splintered in water, so remaining sheet was coated with clear lacquer to try and keep things together. I had to recreate the splintered decal with stripes from the spares box, which is why the red is different from the rest of the stencils. The opacity of the kit decals left a lot to be desired. Resin: Quickboost QB72385 outrigger wheels; Pavla U72118 exhausts, C72096 cockpit sidewalls; Armory AW72404 weighted wheels; cockpit tub and ejection seat from the kit Photoetch: Eduard 72386 cockpit/exterior details; main fret included with kit Paint: Hataka C277 Roundel Blue, C205 Light Admiralty Grey; GSI Creos, H12 Flat Black, H11 Flat White, H331 Dark Sea Grey, H335 Medium Sea Grey, H90 Clear Red, H94 Clear Green, H318 Radome Tan; Tamiya XF-69 NATO Black, X-32 Titanium Silver; Alclad ALC-101 Aluminum, ALC-111 Magnesium; Floquil 110015 Flat Finish (egg shell sheen) Improvements/Corrections Donor wings with vortex generators (one needed to be removed from each wing) from Hasegawa FRS.1, leading edge altered to replicate FA.2 wing. Added extra fence to each wing with really skinny card stock Master AM-72-050 Pitot Tube added to vertical fin Reshaped radome/fuselage boundary and lower front fuselage contour to better match drawings and photos Added APU exhaust to top of fuselage Added slight bulge to closed nose gear doors Hasegawa FRS.1 donated the main gear legs; resin tyres from Armory Scratchbuilt and detailed a new air brake bay Added a bunch of resin intake scoops from the Island of Misfit Fiddly Bits Drilled out the RAM air exhaust, fire ports where wing meets fuselage, and intake at bottom of vertical fin Relocated the top fuselage navigation light off-centre GPS aerial discs made from card stock with Waldron punch & die set Added lower oil vent to port fuselage (donor from Hasegawa kit) and forgot to add the upper Scratchbuilt inner canopy bulkhead and detonator box; detailed the turtledeck All other mistakes occurred intentionally WIP can be found here. I know, you want pix! Five points do not determine a plane (although they did when I was adjusting the rear main pair). Family reunion: Cheers, Bill
    78 points
  10. This is my latest Orion completion. it is the 1/72 Hasegawa kit built OOB and finished with kit and Canuck Decals for a machine from 10SQN RAAF. I add HF wire antennas from Eziline.
    74 points
  11. Hi all, here my new built Meng F-4E Phantom II. Add some Eduard PE`s, Brassin intake covers and nozzles, Master pitot, Reskit fuel tanks and pylons, Quinta cockpit and decals by AirDoc for a 86th TFW/512nd TFS aircraft based at Ramstein AB in 1983
    74 points
  12. Hi Guys, I recently finished this but havnt been motivated to get photos until this weekend. It's a pretty decent kit though I'm sure many would rather go the ZM J or Tamiya B route now. I added Reskit Wheels, winders, burner cans ,FOD covers and Kelik 3D printed decals as well as Furball Decals kindly supplied by @Ian Painted in New Tamiya LP-34 Light grey and Tamiya LP metals with SMS white on the...white parts. Weathered with Ammo oil brushers, with Starship filth doing most of the heavy lifting.
    73 points
  13. The start of a bit of a Phantom marathon. WIP Here Primed with Tamiya Neutral Grey Painted with: Colourcoats Dark Green, Dark Sea Grey and Dark Gull Grey. Mr. Color Light Aircraft Grey. Xtreme Metals Steel, Pale Burnt Metal, Burnt Metal and Jet Exhaust. SMS Insignia White. Tamiya Clear Red, Clear Green Nato Black, Rubber Black, a mix of Olive Drab and Metallic Grey for the seeker heads and Semi-Gloss Black. Washes used: Flory Dark Dirt Citadel Nuln Oil Abteilung 502 Smoke thinned with lighter fluid. Finished with Windsor & Newton Galeria Satin Varnish AM used: Aerocraft Splitter Plates and Exhaust cans. Eduard PE Cockpit detail set. I found myself rather enjoying the stencilling sessions this time and it only took about 8 hours all in rather than the 10 1/2 on the FAA Phantom. Anyway on with the pics. The harsh lighting of the photo booth shows some silvering on some of the stencils but these don't show up in natural light, so, I'm happy with that. All in all I fairly chuffed with the finished item. And a couple of family shots. As always thanks so much for looking. Cheers, Alistair
    72 points
  14. Kit from Airfix. I use resin kits: cabin, bomb bay, wheels. Some of the parts were not included in my kit, I took them from a kit of Special Hobby or additional kits, I also made them myself. Decal from the company Xtradecal. Alex.
    72 points
  15. Hello Britmodellers, It is now 0:16 hrs, 6-6-2024 here on the continent. Exactly 80 years ago, Horsa PF 800 landed at the Caen canal bridge near Ranville in Normandy. Thanks for watching! Luka
    71 points
  16. Keeping on the them of inspirations. The Mosquito has always been a firm favourite. I grew up wit "633 Squadron" & "Mosquito Squadron" and remember building the Airfix and Frog kits. Recently I read "Mosquito" by Rowland White which covers the development of the famous De Haviland machine and also tells the story of their incredible low level raids to destroy various Gestapo head quarters. Taking this as my inspiration I dug the magnificent Tamiya kit of the Mk VI in 48th scale. The model was built with some modifications but no aftermarket as it didn't need any. I altered the pilots so they are wearing their oxygen masks, I deflected the control surfaces to (hopefully!) show it in its appropriate flight position. The only other modification was for the carburettor air intake guards. I replace the kit items with scratch built ones. Xtracolor enamels were used to paint the model and the roof section of the house was scratch built from plastic card. The spinning props are courtesy of a pair of electric motors. Please excuse my cack-handed attempts to edit out the support post from my photos. Thanks for looking Angelo.
    71 points
  17. hi all, This is the Tamiya 1/48 F-4B Phantom II. It is built straight from the box except for the back-dates to make an early version. These include Wolfpack MB Mk5 seats, no ECM or RWR lumps and bumps on the airframe and an early under-nose pod. Wheels are by Brassin. The VF-41 squadron markings are from Double Ugly and all other decals are from the kit and a Tamiya detail-up set, all of which went on very well. Hope you like it Andy
    70 points
  18. Here is my completed Zvezda C-130H. I posted a Work in Progress topic over the months of the build. The kit is the Zvezda 1/72nd scale kit with a couple of Eduard PE detail sets - cockpit, interior troop seats, and interior detail set. The kit is pretty good and is the only C-130 that I have built so I can’t comment on other available kits for comparison. One comment is that the Eduard sets are definitely not required. Almost none of the cockpit details are visible and the set does not include side panels or the navigation station. About the only parts visible are the seatbelts. For the cargo bay interior, the detail set has some good stuff, but the forward crew stairs are a little too big and some of the cargo bay structure pieces are very delicate and difficult for me to get aligned. Any of the parts forward of the wing box are out of view. The cargo bay seats are pretty good, but do offer some challenges. These are described in the WiP posts. The biggest kit challenge was a poorly molded canopy/windscreen. I am disappointed in how I resolved that problem. If you build this kit opened up like I did this one, I would recommend an LED light set to illuminate the cargo bay and the exterior lights. I’m not sure that cockpit lights would help with visibility into there. Finally, the kit is well designed and a great start for super detailing if you are a true fan of the type. European One camouflage colors are Hataka Orange line lacquers for the greens, 34102 and 34092. The gray is supposed to be 36118 Gunship Gray, but looking at photos, gunship gray looks way too dark in this scale. I used Testors Model Master 36270 Neutral Gray. Interior colors are various light greens that I had in my paint boxes. Tamiya interior green, IJN gray-green, and Model Master RAF Sky Type S. I wanted to put a 1/72 Humvee in the cargo bay but couldn’t find one.
    67 points
  19. My first time posting here so hopefully this works. Tamiya’s 1:48 F4U-1A Corsair, finished in the markings of NZ5262, Royal New Zealand Air Force, when it was with No.30 Servicing Unit on Green Island, March 1945. The aircraft would end up being destroyed in a takeoff accident on the 23rd of July, 1945. It was a good build with most of the time spent trying to get the paint fading to look accurate. I’m happy with how it turned out for the most part but there are a couple things I’m not too happy with, but that’s stuff to improve on for my next build. Decals were from Ventura and the resin wheels from Barracuda Studios.
    66 points
  20. I had a Bf 109 F in my stash and got hand on a Arma Hobby Hawker Hurricane by chance. Normaly I only build Luftwaffe stuff. But the Arma Hurricane is so nice that I had to build it. The Zvezda kit is, in the face of being only a snap kit, also very nice and comes with a great pilot. So I decided to show both planes in a low fying context with a little base made from foam. All in all a lot of fun and a nice litte project.
    66 points
  21. Hello Everyone, This is my last build - and my best so far. I've tried a lot of new technics and the result is quite satisfactionary for me. All markings have been airbrushed using Montex masks, stencils and riveting is from HGW. Painted with MRP paints. Unfortunately I couldn't take better pictures with my cell phone.
    65 points
  22. I present my build of the Tu-22. A fascinating aircraft that has always caught my interest due to the unusual engine location which lends the aircraft a very science fiction, Dan Dare comic book kind of look. Or maybe the artists of Dan Dare were inspired by the Tu-22! This was Russia's first supersonic bomber, and as such its entry to service was troubled by issues and a steep learning curve with both the aerodynamics and the engines themselves. It became known for limited performance and range, and as a challenging aircraft to fly with a high accident rate. Its takeoff and landing profiles had a relatively narrow margin for deviation and the engine placement, above the centtreline, added its own complications with a slow response rate and a tendency to push the nose down when power was increased or raise the nose when power was cut. Pilots struggled to convert to the new type partly because of the speed at which things tended to happen, but also because the much higher workload required. Bomber pilots were converting from types where they were used to having a copilot, onto the Tu-22 which was piloted solo. In retrospective analysis the accident rate wasn't particularly high for an advanced military aircraft and the Tu-22 went on to enjoy a very long career in a variety of roles including reconaissance and electronic warfare as well as being a bomber. Trumpeter's kit went together reasonably well. The critical join between fuselage and wings is important to get well cemented in because the loads applied on the join can pull it apart. Trumpeter happily provide a lot of surface area on that join which can be used to make a strong bond. The engine subassembly is tricky. The exhaust cans are supposed to be installed before the engine halves are joined, they don't fit fit in the holes afterwards. This makes masking them a bit more difficult. I guess they could be left slightly loose to make masking easier but I opted to leave them off and install them after the aircraft was fully painted. This required me to sand the cans down quite a lot until they would fit. Painting in general around the engine pod sub assembly is a challenge because of the lack of space and access to the lower, inner surfaces of the engine pods and the adjacent fuselage structure. Masking is a challenge, as is getting an airbrush stream into those tight spaces. That section could be painted before attaching the engines to the fuselage, but that join isn't a great one and needed some filler and smoothing. Alternatively that area might be a little easier to paint if the elevators are left off until afterwards. That's not so much a fault of the model as a fault of the shape of the aircraft itself, but it's something to plan for when building this kit. The cockpit is averagely detailed but it doesn't matter because you can't see any of it through the small glass area. You can paint it all black and probably leave the instrument panels and seats out completely because they won't be visible. That said, the kit does provide the option of having all three seats exposed in the "down" position, where they are all hanging in clear view out of the entry hatches beneath the aircraft, ready to accept their occupants. Then of course you'd want to have a bit more detail on them. Mine will hang from the ceiling so I had the entry hatches closed. This was my first NMF attempt, and also an early attempt at heavier weathering. Many of these aircraft look as though they've been stood outdoors through sleet and snow and have dirt and mud stains down the panels. I tried to emulate that look but it is heavier than I was going for. With the NMF, the actual aircraft look to be very uniform in colour which can look dull on a model so I tried break up the expanse of aluminium with different shades of grey. The contrast is a bit too high between the two shades. The panel selection I used also makes the end result look a bit patchwork, I perhaps should aim for bandings in contrasting colour instead in future. Still, learn from experience. I have to start somewhere. Paints are all Vallejo model air or metal color. Dull aluminium for the fuselage and the contrasting panels are a mix of dull aluminium and steel. The white is Vallejo aged white. Pure white really pops out on these and it looks too strong on a model even though the white really pops on the real aircraft too. The white, on random panels, is apparently anti corrosion paint. Anyway that's enough rambling, here's the model. Thanks for looking.
    65 points
  23. Re-engraved and riveted model, fuselage lengthened and increased in size, modifications to the fin, nose and wings, internal cabin reconstruction (non-existent), reconstruction of landing gear and airbrake compartments, improved landing gear legs, wing pylons, tail vortex generators. Good vision
    65 points
  24. This is the ICM 1/48 Cessna O2 build essentially out of the box aside of the Eduard colour etched cockpit set which includes main instrument panel and also seatbelts. This is a relatively simple kit, but I feel has nicely detailed surface details and sufficient interior. I painted the model exclusively with SMS acrylic lacquer before using the kit decals to depict a bird flown by Australian pilots during the Vietnam campaign. As an aside I have almost finished a Bronco, Bird dog and Cobra. Also, I used my now compulsory, Eduard cockpit masks (yes, I am getting lazy in my old age – however these make what is sometimes a tedious task a simple time saving process) A comment to those building this kit, the main undercarriage is very week and should be either replaced with a white metal accessory or some stiff piano wire to help support the airframe. Following are photos of the finished kit with period prop and also because I recall my father flying civil Cessna 327/s with the pointed spinner, included a few pics of the O2 with a set of these from an old Hawk kit. ICM are to be commended in proving a very nice model which in my opinion captures the unique lines of what is an unusual airframe well. RAAF o2 1 | Peter Jones | Flickr
    64 points
  25. This is 1/48 HKM’s B-17G-15 (42-31353) LG-Q named “Queenie” from 91st BG, 322nd BS in Bassingbourn –England April 1944. I have used Eduard instrument panel and seat belts in the cockpit. I shortened the length of the landing legs by approximately 1.5mm. Main landing leg scissors are Aerocraft customized products. Wheels are from Eduard Brassin set. Paints are Gunze Sangyo acrylics Happy modelling
    63 points
  26. This is the HK Models 1:32 'Nose Art' kit - which is a Lanc from the tip of the .303s in the front turret back to where the wings would be attached. It's a weird idea but I saw a build of one here and decided I'd have a go. I had an idea about how I'd approach it - to try to make it as if it was in a museum. Hence the noticeboard and the pilot figure. As this is a pretend museum I can pretend that the pilot is rather like a shop dummy with period clothes - which just about fits with my painting skills. The kit offers the option of having the right fuselage side as transparent. Which is why you can see out the other side in the image above. I got some extras: - Instrument panel upgrade from Airscale (which I think is just fantastic) - replacement .303 barrels from Master - masks from Eduard (that's a lot of glazing) I did a build thread - here: Not much more to say really, so here's some pics: Before closing it up: And finally, here it is in its' new home: Thanks for looking. all the best Mark
    62 points
  27. Model of Polish Air Forces F-16C with special anniversary Raven camouflage. Very nice and easy to build kit, but I can't say the same about painting scheme. It was really hard work to make it looking good. I have used Tamiya Aggressor kit, AWC-Model set for Polish Air Forces, Eduard ejection seat, Sniper and all weapons, ResKit exhaust Nozzle and TER, Master AOA sensors, Pitot tube and static dischargers, Model Maker decals and masks, Wheeliant wheels. And a lot and lot of my own scratchwork ,especially inside the wheel bays, cockpit and on landing gears. Enjoy.
    62 points
  28. Airfix 1/48 Seaking. Here's my rendition of the excellent 1/48 Seaking released in 2023. Essentially from the box with minor additions of seat belts aerial wire and some details around the door. Everything else (and more) is in the box. The fit is excellent but I was tipped off about closing the fuselage over the interior so spent extra time on this and got a perfect fit. Filler was needed only to fill the holes made for later variants and a little bit on the cockpit top seam. Decals from Model Aliance for HAS.2 XZ577 of HMS Ark Royal in 1974. Probably the best kit I've built for years and thoroughly enjoyable. More pictures and details in the build thread Here... Colin PS Please come and take a look at this in the IPMS Salisbury show next weekend, 1st June Laverstoke near Salisbury.
    62 points
  29. Greetings all! Well, it’s been over three years since I envisioned making this F-4E that I was stationed with at Spangdahlem AB, Germany in the mid-80s. One of my jobs was to secure and protect this aircraft standing on alert loaded with a B-61 nuclear weapon, also known as “the silver bullet”. The kit is the 1/48 Meng F-4E, and has a few aftermarket parts. These include the Eduard B-61; Quinta interior cockpit 3d decals, bellystrap and TISEO; ResKit exhaust nozzles, ALQ-131 and inboard pylons; Mini Craft Collection M.B. MK H7 ejection seats; and Detail and Wonder landing gear upgrade set. Paint is predominantly MRP lacquer paints and the decals used came from the Meng kit. Since this kit is my first serious stab in making this type of aircraft in over 20 years, it is not without a few flaws and blemishes. But I’m pretty happy with it. I hope you like it!
    61 points
  30. Hi fellow modellers I am pleased to present my latest model, a 1/48 scale replica of the Imperial Iranian Air Force F-5F, built using the high-quality AFV Club kit. This model features a combination of Tamiya and Gunze paints (painted free-hand), Modeler decals, Aires resin seats and Hasegawa weapon sets. This model represents a significant period in Iranian Air Force history during the rapid advancements of the 1960s and 1970s. This era left a lasting impact, notably during the Iran-Iraq War following the Islamic Revolution. The F-5F along with F-5E Tigers from Dezful AB played a crucial role in defending Khuzestan, their brave pilots ensuring the province remained part of Iran despite the fierce eight-year conflict. This model is depicted with a heavy loadout of MK-83 bombs, showcasing the formidable firepower these aircraft carried in their missions to protect their homeland. May the souls of the pilots who sacrificed their lives for the freedom of our homeland rest in eternal peace. Regards Barzin IMG_1141 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1097 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1095 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1104 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1103 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1116 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1123 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1110 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1125 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1100 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1101 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1111 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1128 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1134 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1132 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1139 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1158 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1129 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1145 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1166 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1137 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1163 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1176 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1168 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1162 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr IMG_1118 by Freddy Pilot, on Flickr
    60 points
  31. I'm glad I've finished this thing. It was one of the worst fitting models I've encountered. I've gone through a raft of putty, and my fingers were sore from sanding the putty back. I almost at several points nearly gave up with it and binned it, but I suppose my sheer bloody mindedness wouldn't let me. Nownits done I'm happy with how it turned out, and glad I persevered with it, and I once again used it as a learning model. I bought the stand separately as I wanted it wheels up. Given all the negatives of building it, it is an impressively sized model once finished. I hope you approve of my efforts
    57 points
  32. This time, one of the more interesting aircraft of the Cold War era: the MiG-23MF Flogger. The Trumpeter model is not perfect and requires a lot of work. I built the model the way I like best, straight from the box. I invite you to the gallery. MiG-23MF Flogger Trumpeter 1:32
    57 points
  33. Hot(tish) on the heels of the Mirage IIIC, I have finally finished this AH-1G Cobra. A little gem of a kit partly let down by stencils that are prone to silvering. I decided to add some PE, air intakes from BrenGun and bring some home-made improvements but it would really build nicely OOB. The WIP is there: I chose to build "the Gladiator" from C/16 Cav. at Can Tho in 1970. Not that I like movies about gladiators but the sharkmouth, red panels and black tailboom top bring some variety to the OD scheme. For once, I am rather pleased with the pictures: As usual, I am open to constructive criticism and do not hesitate to let me know if you spot anything wrong
    57 points
  34. Hi guys, Here is my rendition of the Platz T-33 in Japanese colors. I started this kit at the same time as my Greek T-33 (See link) but stalled and finally the mojo was mostly gone. I decided a few weeks back to really tackle what's on the shelf of doom, and I'm very happy that this one is finally done. I struggled with it until the very end, dropping the kit on the floor after the final coat of varnish, breaking a tip tank off and splitting it... Isn't this supposed to be a relaxing hobby? The Platz kit is the best T-33 in scale but it's not perfect and requires some attention. Intake fit leave some deep panel lines. Kink at the wing root which should be filled Fragile tip tank tabs. The arc in the middle of the canopy is overscalled and should be replaced (I used a piece of scrap photo etched) Airbrake mounts look pretty bad and are a pain to install. Underscaled wheels A huge thanks to Oleg Smilyk on Scalemates for his help with the decals. I wanted to build a Japanese T-33 without the cockpit canvas which allows for no-visibility training and the options weren't all that numerous. Oleg kindly sent me the left over from his build (Platz kit AC-20). Unfortunately Platz messed up the shapes and colors of the Air Defence Command, HQ Squadron. But since Oleg sent all of the leftovers from his fantastic build, I cut the correct(ish) shapes out of the solid colors decals meant for the special livery included in the AC-20 kit Here is a quick inventory of the build Platz AC-61 kit with 3D decals for the cockpit. The 3D decals are pretty bad and the regular decal sheet is less comprehensive in terms of stencils than other Platz T-33 boxings. Eduard CX-303 masks Res-Kit RS72-0173 wheels Eduard 73008 Remove Before flight Kit decals + leftovers from kit box AC-20 Paints: Mr Color Super Metallic 206. Mr Hobby Aqueous H309. AK RC207. Varnish: GX-112, MRP-126 Have a great day!
    55 points
  35. This one fought me at every step, I did not enjoy the build process at all. Fiddly, poor fit, inaccurate, and abysmal instructions. I just cobbled it together with minimal interest. Still....its done, and another aircraft I've had a close encounter with on a photoshoot is in the collection. It didn't beat me. It didn't end up in the bin. It will however languish on the shelf of shame in the furthest corner 😅
    55 points
  36. Another quick scratch conversion for me, the De Havilland Sea Mosquito prototype LR387, based on the old Airfix kit (1972 origin, 2007 issue) with new parts from the spares box (nose, arrestor hook), putty, sprue and plastic strip. I bought this kit back in 2008 because it came with the 4 blade propellers and hubs, and with a mind to building a Sea Mosquito, have steadily accumulated references and parts for it over the years. Decals are mostly from the spares box, with Xtradecal supplying the prototype "P"s (I chose the prototype to get around the issue of larger elevators and engine intakes, plus I prefer the look of the type B roundels on the upper wings). The radome is an old torpedo and the torpedo comes from an Airfix Beaufighter, but I have no idea where the perfectly fitting arrestor hook came from and can only assume there must be another kit in the stash somewhere that is missing its hook ! Oleos were beefed up with sprue to represent the Lockheed Pneumatic ones fitted on the Sea Mosquito, with the wingl fold represented by a scored line and plastic strip fairing. Paint is hand brushed Humbrol enamel with Klear, followed by W&N matt varnish. I also used a little decal softener for the fuselage roundels where they sit over the two longitudinal strengtheners. Although it is an older Airfix kit, I was pleasantly surprised by the good fit, but I removed most of the rivets on the wings and reduced many of those on the engine nacelles. The kit cockpit is very bare, so it received quite a lot of sprue and card-based "gubbins" to reflect the radar displays and naval radios. The nav lights were cut out and filled with 3 layers of Krystal Klear, the first one receiving the appropriate colour from a magic marker. It wasn't entirely successful, but its an approach I will try again. So there we have it; a long delayed project, but another unusual naval aircraft added to my collection!
    55 points
  37. This is one of the easiest biplane models to build - I like the kit a lot. Finished as a No. 1 squadron SAAF fighter, East Africa 1941. Decals by SBS and Xtradecals, Gunze paints and varnishes. The engine/cowling is SBS resin, rigging by Uschi (and the aerial wire has been repaired) and some Eduard PE parts were also used (seat belts, instrument panel, tropical filter intake mesh). Thanks for looking.
    54 points
  38. Hello folks! This is the second model of the Royal class box I bought not so long ago. I have already presented the first model so here is the second. I choose the Classic version with the folding glass canopy, and did "The Hun Hunter" from Captain Brown with the 355FG. Those plane were natural metal but received a RAF green upper surfaces camo. Some preparation was needed before applying the D-Day stripes, long boring and costly in tape, but with a good result in the end. A very great model from Eduard's increasing range. Recommended! 30FA7D3C-A8FB-4C51-A101-EDA47D80D8EC_1_201_a by jean Barby, sur Flickr D848B3D9-F48A-4DE1-BE22-877473815734_1_201_a by jean Barby, sur Flickr B12F9BFC-77CF-46C4-9A64-662A31D92CC4_1_201_a by jean Barby, sur Flickr 5E54362E-CBC5-47CB-AFF9-B4F636132440_1_201_a by jean Barby, sur Flickr 426C86DD-8B9F-4B19-936E-35FD7BAA8B5F_1_201_a by jean Barby, sur Flickr 52246235-036E-467D-9925-47ABBCAB3C8F_1_201_a by jean Barby, sur Flickr 3AB732AA-1374-4719-A835-80CEC4F2D449_1_201_a by jean Barby, sur Flickr 21B7A9B6-DEF7-4E53-97C0-E02B5DCA87F2_1_201_a by jean Barby, sur Flickr
    54 points
  39. Despite a few issues, the 1/48 Kinetic Harrier kit is a delight to build. Huge thanks to @NG899 for the superb information on corrections, etc - I did try to incorporate some of these. Aftermarket was just in the cockpit, with Eduard instrument panels and seatbelts. The kit itself has a little sprue of photo-etch but the seatbelts in that are too small. I used the lettering from the Xtradecal set for the serials, otherwise the rest is out of the box. This is the photo I used as inspiration, it captures the look of the mid-80s Harrier perfectly; one can almost feel the warmth of a sunny afternoon and smell of jet fumes and cut grass at Middle Wallop airshow back in those halcyon days for RAF aviation. XV758 entered RAF service in 1969 and was operated by 233 OCU throughout the mid 1980s. The aircraft survives to this day, on display at Decimomannu airfield on Sardinia. WIP thread here: https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235139885-raf-wittering-harrier-gr3/ I’m planning on an almost identical one but with 1 Sqn markings this time, plus a T.4 of 233 OCU. All comments, criticism and banter or general Harrier chat welcome as always!
    54 points
  40. MiG-29A Fulcrum Polish Air Force Trumpeter 1:32
    54 points
  41. Hello everyone Here's my latest work, two cold war brits! I mostly only do WW2 era subjects so this was an interesting sidetrack for me. Modern era stuff doesn't usually interest me that much but I enjoy the look of the Chieftain a lot. I say 'modern', this is a 1960's design afterall... 😅 This is my first experience with Takom, I have to say I was slightly disappointed with this kit overall. It has great detail but for some reason also tons of flash, and the overall fit isn't really that good. Some odd design choices and ridiculous amount of parts for all the stowage boxes, made this building process a little tedious. At least the detail level is good so it was worth the effort I think. One big plus point is that the wheels and tracks can be built as a separate assembly for easier painting. Also every hatch can be opened and has good inside detail. If you want to do a full interior FV432, this kit should be a great starting point. The figures are 3D printed by Peddinghaus. They are supposedly Bundeswehr, but looks close enough I think. There was not a lot of options when it came to British cold war tank crew in 1/72. My reference photo is a BAOR Chieftain from ca 1983, with a camo net. The camo net is made from elastic medical gauze and wine bottle tinfoil cut into small strips. Brush painted with Humbrol enamels, weathering with AK splatter effects "Dry mud" and some dust pigments. Thank you for checking them out!
    53 points
  42. Freshly completed, this is the Airfix 1/72 kit of the de Havilland Mosquito PR XVI, finished as an aircraft from 60 Sqn, SAAF, based in Italy in January 1945. It was one of my many builds in the WW2 Twins GB, which ended this evening. Pretty much OOB, I added resin wheels and exhausts as the only AM. Paint is mostly MRP, plus some Tamiya acrylics, and weathering is a combination of oil paints and pigments. The WIP is here: James
    53 points
  43. Good evening, dear ladies and gentlemen! I present to your attention my next model from the famous manufacturer Eduard. This is the most complex scheme presented in the set and I chose it. The effect of rags of paint was created using a liquid mask, the metallic effects were reproduced using a pencil.
    53 points
  44. Freshly completed, this is the Airfix 1/72 kit of the Messerschmitt Me410A-1/U4, finished as an aircraft from Stab II./Zerstörergeschwader 26, Königsberg, 1944. It was one of my many builds in the WW2 Twins GB, which ended this evening. Paint is Mr Hobby and Tamiya acrylics, and weathering is a combination of oil paints and pigments. The WIP is here: James
    52 points
  45. The old Academy kit is a good starting point, even if it needs various modifications and additions both in the cockpit… …and to the external surfaces of the fuselage, to the wings and finally to the landing gear/skid complex. The aircraft reproduced is a Me163 B-1 of 1./JG 400, based in Brandis in the autumn of 1944. The camouflage, given entirely by brush, is in the classic RLM 81/82/76; the fuselage appears to have been originally RLM 76 with spots 81/82, later repainted rather crudely in its central part with a coat of RLM 81. And finally the undersurfaces. Hope you like it. Thanks for your attention. Giampiero Piva
    52 points
  46. Here's my latest completed project, the 2009 new tool 1/72 Airfix Spitfire Mk IXc. This is the kit that comes with no cockpit other than a bulkhead, seat, and pilot. I can't paint a figure to save my life, so stuffing the pilot in wasn't an option. I used a spare bulkhead and instrument panel from an Eduard Spitfire, scratched out a "floor" using that part from a newer Airfix Spitfire as a guide. I used an old white metal seat and control stick I had on hand, and added Eduard seatbelts. I also added the tanks behind the bulkhead. I secured everything in place with epoxy, sealed up the fuselage, and realized I never took pictures of all the work I did. Oops! I removed the extra inboard landing gear humps from the upper wing halves and scratched some basic wheel well details. I also scratched out the rear view mirror, added the lower centerline identification light, and added the fuel filler. I chose to replicate MH779, FU-N, of 453 Squadron, based at Ford Field, Sussex. Paints are Vallejo Model Air, and the decals are a mix of Eaglecals and the kit decals. I relied on Eduard Spitfire instructions that included MH779 I found on Scalemates as a painting and decal guide. I've found, for me, especially on smaller scale subjects, less is more when it comes to weathering. The wear and weathering were done with oils, Tamiya Weathering Master, and a silver artist pencil. I replicated the wing root wear using Vallejo Metal Color dull aluminum, mixed with retarder medium, applied with a small fan brush and a piece of sponge. The whole thing was sealed with Vallejo premium matte varnish. I had FU-N with this build, the kit was easy to build and non-self inflicted troubles were minimal. I'm pretty satisfied with the end result. The last photo is of W/O Roderick Lyall in the cockpit of MH779 in June, 1944. Thanks for looking! Somehow I missed a couple photos. They've been added.
    52 points
  47. Hi All, Just completed this latest offering from the Armory stable which was well worth the wait ! Excellent mouldings comprehensive decal sheet a full mask set and some etched brass thrown in for good measure. The kit does need careful cleaning up of sprue attachment points and there are some mould lines to clean up as well. The worst culprits are the highly detailed seat frames although not much of them will be seen if the fuselage door is closed. I preferred to drill 0.4mm holes through the wings for my rigging attachments rather than the miniscule etched parts supplied and used invisible mending thread for the wires. The decals are thin but caused no problems although they seem to be transluscent not a problem over aluminium. I sprayed the airframe with Tamiya XF 16 Aluminium and the cabin internals with various Revell Aqua paints. The masking set supplied covers internal and external windows and were excellent although they needed a firm pull to remove. There are extra windows in the clear mouldings for those variants that had them and a cargo hold door so there are more variants to come A BEA one for me please! The chromed spinners are Molotow Liquid Chrome brushed on and the whole airframe was given a couple of coats of Alclad Aqua Gloss to seal everything in. A model kit I have waited a very long time for and can thoroughly recommend although not for beginners! Whats the verdict?
    51 points
  48. Howdy all, Bought this one to go with my `Frequent Wind` Prowler I built not too long back, so thought I`d subject you to some photo`s My attempt at Italeri`s 1/48 Tomcat kit Completed almost completely as Mr Italeri intended with only a few additions: scratch built some intake air bleed flaps to show them as they would be on deck instead of fully closed as the kit has them. Attempted to detail the cockpit to eliminate the gaps and open spaces using odd bits of plastic sheet and spare PE which did the job...... ...but wasn`t really good enough to display the canopy open, but looks better than it would have. Added some bits of wire and seat belts to dress the seats up a bit and some PE rear view mirrors Made some brake pipes from bits of wire too and an after market pitot tube. Left off the fuel tanks and Phoenix missiles and launchers as the weren`t carried at the time and I read whilst researching that there weren`t enough launchers to go round and they could be fitted one day and be missing the next. Decals were the kits and worked fine. Hope you enjoy the pic`s, thanks for looking Cheers Russ
    51 points
  49. I've finished a model. It's been a couple of years I think since I've managed that. Needless to say I started with high aspirations and became increasingly dissatisfied as time went on. This wasn't helped by cats which have always been around our house and normally cause no trouble like this whatsoever, but this model has been badly damaged twice now. The first time was when almost completed but before I'd added the seatbelts to the ejector seat. I placed it on a shelf where models have been fine for ten years at night before going to bed, and kicked it across the floor in the morning. It was in such a state that it almost went in the bin but my wife persuaded me to sweep up the large number of broken parts and put them upstairs. Even the counter measures pod was broken in half. After a few weeks I put it back together as best I could, but despite my best efforts the tailerons no longer move. About a fortnight ago, after I'd done some oil weathering but still hadn't done those seatbelts, another cat jumped in through an open Velux window and landed on the model sat on my bench and smashed it a second time. Now, well, it goes without saying that I'm dissatisfied with the turnout but given it's been wrecked twice before it was even finished I suppose it's about as good as I can expect. Anyway, it's the Tamiya F-16C kit. The cockpit and engine are Aires resin. Whilst the engine fit fine, the cockpit needed a lot of work to fit and if I built another I wouldn't bother. The GBU-87 cluster bombs are from Eduard Brassin and the AN/ALQ-119 counter measures pod is from ResKit. Paints are obviously my own. Decals are by Elite Decals. I think it has the wrong Heads Up Display for the aircraft I've tried to model but I know very little about jets and if the correct HUD is available out there I don't know what I'm looking for... I copied the load out and took some guidance for subtle weathering from the photograph on this page: https://www.f-16.net/g3/f-16-photos/album38/album87/album85/aas
    51 points
  50. Dear fellow Britmodellers, this is my 1/72 MPM Gloster Meteor F.3 in markings of 616. Squadron in 1944/45. Photos by Wolfgang Rabel. The MPM kit was originally released 15 years ago and several versions have been re-boxed by Special Hobby. The quality of parts is typically short-run with chunky gear doors and problematic fit in some places. The worst assembly is the landing gear which consists of several parts that have to be butt-joined and provide poor stability. I replaced the kit's pitot tube with a metal item from my spares box. Decals are from Barracuda cals. The model was painted with Mr.Hobby acrylics. Thank you for your interest! Roman
    51 points
This leaderboard is set to London/GMT+01:00
×
×
  • Create New...