This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

AlexN

Gold Member
  • Content count

    1,331
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

2,099 Excellent

About AlexN

  • Rank
    DIY Fool
  • Birthday

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.flickr.com/alex1n http://www.flckr.com/alex1n/albums

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Blaxland, Australia

Recent Profile Visitors

665 profile views
  1. Thank sithman, not me! And you appear to be up rather late/early: the cold?
  2. Hmmm, curiously, it's a damp day here in New South wales - well, the Blue Mountains, anyway - drizzle and mist for part of the morning. "You can't eat too many half-Great White Sharks", says . Of which there are an increasing number (of GWSs) in Oz coastal waters. People complain about this, but the stupid fools don't seem to realise that said coastal waters are the sharks' home and dinner table, and they visit them at their own risk. If the sharks started walking about on land munching people, on the other hand, that would be a totally different bucket o' snakes... Rather like one step forward, two steps backwards today. 1. FIMO F11 support with 'bolt' holes, after drilling holes though F11 FIMO F11 support with 'bolt' holes by Alex1N, on Flickr 2. Four Armour plate 'bolts' with 'knurled nuts': 0.6 mm rings glued to the 0.4 mm tube (possibly) with CA. Two 'bolts' were too short, so some more had to be made... Four Armour plate 'bolts' with 'knurled nuts' by Alex1N, on Flickr 3. More 0.6 mm rings cut More 0.6 mm rings cut by Alex1N, on Flickr 4. Cat 6e network cable external shielding braid, 0.08 mm thick! Just the thng for cables in a 1/72 aircraft cockpit :). The twisted-pair cables inside were in fact 0.135 mm (copper) - quite a bit thicker Cat 6e network cable external shielding braid by Alex1N, on Flickr 5. Lid with pieces of 0.08 mm wire. The glue-covered pin was used to apply, er, glue to the 'bolts'.... Lid with pieces of 0.08 mm wire by Alex1N, on Flickr 6. Piece of 0.08 mm wire with test bends, as a possible replacement for the broken-off electrical lead coming down from the voltage regulator on the Pavla F11 part Piece of 0.08 mm wire with test bends by Alex1N, on Flickr 7. Plastic jar of 0.08 mm wire offcuts: safe and secure. I probably have kilometres of the stuff in the shed, in actual fact... Plastic jar of 0.08 mm wire offcuts by Alex1N, on Flickr Follow the following link to my Seafire flickr album... Not a lot of progress for almost an hour's fiddling - I had expected hoped to be a little further along, for example, having glued the 'bolts and nuts' to the armour plate. I did manage to retrieve a couple of drill bits from the 0.4 mm tube stock by dint of poking them out again with a length of 0.2 mm rod, though. And have some nice thin usable wire as well, so I can't really complain. Cheers, Alex. doesn't like the sound of Great White Sharks at all, and would prefer that Little T gobble 'em all up, munchy munch...
  3. Now there's a diorama begging to be done! What a shame I flogged my 1/24 Stuka (and Sea Harrier, and...). A.
  4. Looking extra scrumptious this morning, Crisp . My sincere apologies for the completely unintentional double post on the previous page - I think that I thought that I had pressed the 'edit' button, when in fact it looks as though I had merely started editing the stuff that the version 4 editor 'saves' from a previous post... Me culpa for not checking carefully . +1 to what Jessica said - presumably the ding will be visible when looking up through the lower windscreen/open cockpit doorway. Cheers, Alex.
  5. Speaking of bomben, und writing thereon, vide TheBaron's post: 1. Extra Havana für Churchill no. 1: see the caption of the second scan for details © Arrow Books Extra Havana für Churchill no. 1 by Alex1N, on Flickr 2. Extra Havana für Churchill no. 2 - what happened to the bomb © Arrow Books Extra Havana für Churchill no. 2 by Alex1N, on Flickr 3. The Narrow Margin - Cover © Arrow Books The Narrow Margin - Cover by Alex1N, on Flickr. The Narrow Margin: The Battle of Britain and the rise of air power. Wood D with Dempster D. Hutchinson & Co. (Publisher), 1961, this edition revise and illius. Arrow Books Ltd, 1969. 09 002160 6. 4. Bf 109 E-4/B: this is the closest that I could find of something like your 109, Johnny; an E-4 being bombed up. If you squint, you can see that the port wheel well cover has been removed - revealing your detail . Note also the aerial detail abaft the mast, and the 'sooty'1 exhaust stain: © Arrow Books Bf 109 E-4/B by Alex1N, on Flickr Cheers, Alex. 1 The type of film used may or may not have accentuated the exhaust mark (by the end of the war such marks would definitely have been from soot as the octane ratings of German fuels plummeted)
  6. The Terrible Twos? You have my heart-felt sympathy. Spits Mk IX looking very crisp. Cheers, Alex. <-- not a TT
  7. Sadly, my iPad is pretty much only useful as a magazine. OK for twatter (which I avoid like the Plague) and bacefook (which I almost manage to avoid completely), perhaps, but almost useless for discoursing on proper forums. Looking great! There is a definite colour difference 'twixt the primed and 'Life-Colored' undersides, to my eye at any rate. Cheers, Alex. is (aka : clap2 :, now...)
  8. I repeated these two photos to bolster the following remark: what an excellent example of Modelling Smoke and MirrorsTM! Fantastic! I have been doing my own FAA researches researches recently - albeit of a much earlier and very different time, and for a non-existent detail - and have a much greater appreciation of the FAA. I also recently discovered via @TonyTiger66 that the Aus FAA Museum at Nowra on the NSW South Coast has a Mk 50 on display . A trip beckons. During my researches I remembered that the father of one of my doctoral supervisors (which he let slip in conversation) was the Big Boss of the RAN FAA for a time. I wish that I had hasked more questions about it, now! Enjoying this encyclopaedic thread immensly! Cheers, Alex. is enjoying it, too.
  9. You may want to skip the pages and pages where I waffle on a treat off topic... Thank you, your Baron-ship. Eet ees ecksairceesing zee leetle grey cells, Mon Ami. Apologies for the Belgelish. And that, too. I am now faced with very gingerly drilling or tube-punching a 1-ish mm hole and making four sateliite pinpricks (for the headrest bolt holes) in the top part of the armour plate. If, in fact, that dark circle is a hole. Glueing on a headrest would have been a lot simpler... That has to be done before mounting the armour plate to F11, so I had better add that to my list. Maybe a small disc of black transfer or a blob of paint... The idea of a very large hole in the middle of a piece of armour bothers me a lot, I have to say. Even with a headrest in front of it, and especially without. Something of a puzzle. Maybe it was in fact paint...
  10. I feel as though I have headrests coming out of my ears ...... I'll keep an eye out for your progress, Simon . 1. Separated 0.6 mm ring and 0.4 mm tube. Still threaded on the 0.2 nickel silver rod Separated 0.6 mm ring and 0.4 mm tube by Alex1N, on Flickr 2. Ring and tube together - and off the rod Ring and tube together by Alex1N, on Flickr 3. Ring and tube - sitting on the wide end Ring and tube - sitting on the wide end by Alex1N, on Flickr I decided to make some more casts: 4. Bubbles! More than a few... Bubbles! by Alex1N, on Flickr 5. Bubbles here too. Epoxy resin without filler powders, etc., since I thought that I would get a more resilient, less friable end-product (I've made small test items from cured resin before, very easy) Bubbles here too by Alex1N, on Flickr 6. Newly-cast items for the Seafire, plus the excess resin left in the milk bottle lid used to mix it in Newly-cast items for the Seafire by Alex1N, on Flickr 7. Closer-up view of seat support frame and Frame 12. The many small bubbles coalesced under squeezing the mould parts together into a few larger ones - as can be seen here Closer-up view of seat support frame and Frame 12 by Alex1N, on Flickr 8. Almost cleaned-up cast items: really easy to do with neat resin Cleaned-up cast items by Alex1N, on Flickr I was reading @CedB's lovely Spitfire Mk IX thread yesterday morning, and paid specific attention to his use of Plasticine as a support for spacing the blades of his five-balded propeller. I realised that something of the sort (vide also the use of a support for the seat centre section some pages back in this thread) was what was needed for supporting F11 for drilling the holes for the head armour plate supports. Ced's post linked to here (it's a habit from my 'research' days to refgerence everything...): So, out with the FIMO, not having Plasticine at the moment - and FIMO, when baked, doesn't stick to things quite as much: 9. Support for drilling armour plate bolt holes in Frame 11: F11 pressed into a piece of kneaded FIMO Support for drill.ojng armour plate bolt holes in Frame 11 by Alex1N, on Flickr 10. Frame 12 removed from FIMO pad Frame 12 removed from FIMO pad by Alex1N, on Flickr 11. F11 back on the FIMO pad after baking the pad (without the frame) at 110 ℃. I had to carve some bits out to get the part to lie flat after distortion from removing the part prior to baking (should have used cling wrap or something as a release agent) and possibly from baking. Sticky tape still used to positively locate and steady the part... F11 back on the FIMO pad by Alex1N, on Flickr 12. Double-sided tape for holding the armour plate part in place, preventing the plate from skating about all over the place when placed over F11 Double-sided tape for holding the armour plate part in place by Alex1N, on Flickr 13. Prodding the armour plate into position: not quite there yet. Note the damage to the armour plate caused by careless handling Prodding the armour plate into position by Alex1N, on Flickr 14. Holes drilled- but were they in the right place? Holes drilled by Alex1N, on Flickr 15. Bolt-holes drilled in F11, plate/template removed. The top pair are perilously close to the edges of F11 - a bit of tinkering will probably be in order in due course. This is a result of trying to retro-fit a aprt from another kit that was never meant to be in this one - and with quite a different shape to the other kit's F11 too boot... Bolt-holes drilled in F11, plate/template removed by Alex1N, on Flickr 16. Pieces of 0.4 mm tube in the drilled holes - a sort of test-fit. Using tweezers with unaligned points is a recipe for - feeding the carpet monster! Which is why I used tubes without rings for this escercise Pieces of 0.4 mm tube in the drilled holes by Alex1N, on Flickr Follow the following link to my Seafire flickr album... Given the hybrid nature of F11 by now, I am reasonably happy with progress on it, given the scale. When I'm at the bench these days, I seem to spend more time sitting there pondering, than actually doing anything to the bits and pieces - most of it is trying out alternative assembly sequences in my head. And when away from the bench, too. Which a rather prevaricating way of saying thatI may not get anything done today, either. Cheers, Alex.
  11. That made me remember Mark Gatiss' Doctor Who episode Cold War, which gave us the full detail of what a Martian looks like1 under his armour... . Which is responsible for many of my subsequent nightmares... 1 A small portion of which can be seen here
  12. I had to repeat this photo1 to bolster my remark: what an excellent example of Modelling Smoke and MirrorsTM! Fantastic! I have been doing my own FAA researches researches recently - albeit of a much earlier and very different time, and for a non-existent detail - and have a much greater appreciation of the FAA. I also recently discovered via @TonyTiger66 that the Aus FAA Museum at Nowra on the NSW South Coast has a Mk 50 on display . A trip beckons. During my researches I remembered that the father of one of my doctoral supervisors (which he let slip in conversation) was the Big Boss of the RAN FAA for a time. I wish that I had hasked more questions about it, now! Enjoying this encyclopaedic thread immensly! Cheers, Alex. is enjoying it, too. 1 Well, I would have incuded the photo if _ing Suckfari had let me : stupid, stupid, stupid ipad 'editing' 'tools' . I'll add the photo in when I get home. !!!
  13. is greatly relieved! Nothing like a giant cow pie to distract a ravening carnivore . Cheers, Alex and a greatly relieved , both of whom welcome you and little T .
  14. Weasel speak, made up of weasel words; not original: I think that I got the terms from either the late Messrs D Adams or T Pratchett - or both!
  15. I always wanted to learn German at school, and because only French and Indonesian (took both) were offered (no Latin, either ) I tried learning the language from a book/record tourist's German package. It didn't go well. This had repercussions for a young alex when it was in Germany briefly in late 1982 and then in a very cold mid-January 1983 im Hamburg 'mit keine Deutsche'... See my post above - definitely not the last word on the issue though... Is there a link to your Seafire III build? I'll do post some of the sporadic and minimal Seafire work in my next post. Cheers, Alex. <-- doesn't know Deutsche either...