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molotow pen or bare metal foil


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i am about to build my first ever car being a complete novice some advice please. i need to replicate a chrome strip down each side of the car which of the above would you suggest i use. thanks

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If its a raised line I'd mask and use the Mototow pen

If its not raised I'd cut from BMF

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Personally, bare metal foil. I find the Molotov pens great for things like the interior of light lenses and mirrors, but it has no resilience and will mark and rub off any areas you need to handle during the build.

 

But @Black Knight's reply show we all have different preferences! :)

 

Keith

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I'm still practicing with Bare Metal Foil with varied results, but I can see it has its uses.

 

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The tail lamp surrounds here were done in foil but I think the chrome pen (which I did for a similar kit built at the same time) was a better tool for that job.

 

Depending on what your chrome trim is like you might want to try a different approach:

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This was before I had any BMF, the trim in the bumper is painted with the chrome pen (as are the window surrounds) but the side trims are pieces of straight, nickel silver wire, cut to length and glued in place.

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I've never used BMF, but have found the Molotow Chrome has done for my needs. As said above, it's not the most robust product so best to avoid handing with bare fingers as much as you can - it almost feels as if the oils in your skin can reactivate it sometimes. Also, it's a product which takes a while to harden so if you can leave for a week or so before touching it that will be for the best.

 

If you do use the pen, you will be best masking to create a good edge (I used the Tamiya 2mm tape). As an example of what it can do, the chrome strip (not to mention the windscreen surround) were done with the pen on this Honda:

 

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As you can see from the other pics in this thread, there are lots of ways to skin this particular cat.

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Just to muddy the waters, I have never used a molotov but use BMF on most of my models.  Once you get use to handling it is amazingly compliant and can be coaxed over quite complex surfaces (as used on the bumpers below).  However from experience you really need a good glossy surface for it to adhere properly and it is very easy to slip and cut into your paint work when trimming.  You also need a very sharp blade and the lightest of touch.   On the upside a sheet can last for ages and does not appear to degrade with time.  The stuff I applied below must be 8 years old when I used it and worked just like new.  Sorry but the only real way to find out is try them both and see which you prefer. But do it on a practice piece first 👍 

 

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I use both, the BMF for years now and as said before with a practice, after while it's quite easy to work with. 

The molotov is good for small items and I don't use the pen anymore. I got the refill bottle and apply it with a brush 

Marco F 

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I've used both. Molotow is good, but very easily spoiled just by touching it too much.

BMF is incredibly compliant if you take your time.

I BMF'd the entire body of my little Revell McLaren...

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Molotow pen option: I agree with comments above on it 1) being very fragile and 2) difficult to control without first masking the edges.

 

BMF: a good option if you first practice it on a junk model(s). My experience with BMF is it will not hide a bumpy surface underneath so surface prep is a must. Also, it’s an art to avoid getting kinks/ fold lines when cutting/ handling long pieces. I’m still learning but others here are masters at applying and cutting it. Unlike Molotow or paint, it’s easier to remove and redo if you mess it up. I’ve used it on small parts and bright work on car interiors but haven’t been brave enough yet to run an X-acto knife blade along the edges of painted car bodies.

 

A third (and some might say crazy option) that I’ve been doing is to mask off the stainless trim areas I want to paint, airbrush a base of gloss enamel and, once dry/ hard, airbrush a metalizer such as Alclad chrome or polished aluminum. For my skill level, this method works the best but, like Molotow, is fragile and should not be touched.  Photos below are for a Moebius ‘54 Hudson coupe I built last year. I clear coat my car bodies with Tamiya TS-13 before hand and use the green Frog Tspe to avoid tape reacting with the paint. I’ve had problems with all other masking tapes including Tamiya.

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Hope this helps. Try one or all ideas on a practice model and aim for whatever is the best combination of “fun” and “good enough”!

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Great timing on this thread for me as I was only thinking the same thing myself yesterday. Decided it was time to take a breather from the wingy things and build another car, the last time being a Matchbox MG back in the 80s. Just had an Aoshima Celica 2000GT drop on the doormat along with a Nissan 330 Cedric. I like my 70s Japanese cars and 70s cars mean a fair bit of chrome trim, so this thread has been really helpful. Thanks all!

 

Not sure what method I will try. I was looking into the Molotow pens, but the durability issue worries me a bit. BMF scares me rigid, but I'll certainly pick some up and have a practice. I do have a few tins of very vintage Humbrol Silver Fox which gives an almost chrome like finish. I may try that too as my rationale is that if I can paint canopy lines on a 1/72 Harvard, then I may be able to cope with painting trim on cars. Looking forward to getting cracking.

 

Steve

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I prefer BMF when possible. With a little training applying, Q-tips and shaped cocktail sticks are good tools, and perfectly sharp #11 blades for cutting, great results can be achieved.

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Another vote for BMF here. I’ve got a Molotov pen, Alclad ii Chrome and Bare Metal Foil. The Alcald can loose its chromyness if you’re not careful with multiple coats. The Molotov is good, but the paint is quite thick. BMF conforms fantastically over shapes, but it is possible to tear the foil when pushing it into gaps (I’ve done this many times!)

 

I did take some step-by-step pics the first time I used it:

 

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Edited by Mr Mansfield
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I am going to have to try Bare Metal Foil sometime...

 

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21 hours ago, Alan R said:

I am going to have to try Bare Metal Foil sometime...

 

It's certainly interesting stuff.  It might not be the cheapest place to find it, but you can buy it on Amazon.

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On 12/03/2021 at 09:47, johnlambert said:

It's certainly interesting stuff.  It might not be the cheapest place to find it, but you can buy it on Amazon.

Its £8:29 with free P&P from this seller on eBay, it was who I used when I last brought some, 2 to 3 day delivery from memory. 

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/str/mastercasters1

 

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