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viscount806x

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About viscount806x

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    Very Obsessed Member
  • Birthday 02/03/1950

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Sussex, heart in the West Riding....
  • Interests
    Stayin' alive...

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  1. Just goes to show.....say it often enough and pufff, there it is! Scimitar, Venom, Scimitar Venom etc. etc. etc.
  2. Liberator to Privateer - anyone done a conversion?

    One here: https://www.kitsforcash.com/search.slr
  3. KP/AZ central discussion, questions & answers

    Yes please please please. Thank you so much. Happy New Year. Nige B
  4. That would be a Sea Pigeon I assume, with a MSG upper and White or Sky Type 'S' underside....
  5. Nose lengths of the nightfighter Meteors used to be a minefield until John Adams of Aeroclub, who I hope still visits this forum, got it sorted for us. At the risk of plagiarising his good work and findings, it might be worth repeating again. John did measurements from actual airframes using plumbs dropped onto the hangar floor so they are very reliable. Most sources have the NF.11 and NF.12 correct and most sources have the NF.14 WRONG. And I mean most sources, including many esteemed and worshipped books. Indeed, out of more than 10 books on my shelf specifically on the Meteor, all bar one gets the NF.14 length wrong. The correct one is the Haynes 'Super Profile' by MJ Hardy. Unfortunately he quotes the NF.12 as being the same as the -11/13. You just cannot win it all can you? The NF.11 and NF.13 are both the same, both being versions of the same variant. The NF.12 was longer and was identical in length to the NF.14, contrary to quotes still seen regularly. The apparent differences were due to the later NF.14 windscreen being redesigned in shape and appearing to be further back along the nose than the -12. The shorter 'Deep Breather' nacelles on the -14 compounds this visual anomaly. When the radar became redundant in the NF.TT.14 era, sometimes the metal ring around the rear of the nose dielectric cone also got painted on some a/c, making the nose radome appear longer. All this is detailed in a couple of places by John Adams. One I dug out today is a letter in Scale Aircraft Modelling Vol.26/10. Thanks John. Incidentally, the -14 length at 49ft 11in. is also confirmed in AP 2210AP Vol.1. Lengths: NF.11/13 48ft 6ins. NF.12 49ft 11ins. NF.14 49ft 11ins. It also turns out that later in life, all -14s and some -12s received a tail radar warning receiver, the antenna being in the extreme tail cone which shortened these a/c by 3.5ins. This wouldn't change the nose length though. at some point in prehistory, someone got the quoted length of the -14 wrong and it has been perpetuated ever since. Certainly Shacklady had it wrong. Was he the original sinner? Certainly his book has been the Meteor bible down the decades hasn't it? I hope Special Hobby read this forum! I also echo those comments on the SH Meteor wing thickness, a good opportunity for a retool of those too methinks. Nige B
  6. The inevitable Spitfire Mkix.///Finished////

    Good on you. I built a couple of these back in the day and always thought it looked the part, pre dating the Airfix VB which showed that the 'gull wing' could in fact be moulded and which this kit didn't have and therefore being ignored thereafter as a serious model, which in fact it was at the time. It seemed far better than the very old Airfix IX 'JE-J' and on a par with the contemporary Frog VIII/IX which had an over thick wing (but still nice if wings thinned down). My own Matchbox Spit efforts were a desert IX and a low back XVI, built using the Chris Ellis book 'How To Go Advanced Plastic Modelling' and my first cut and chop conversion, of which I was quite pleased. The book suggested JE-J as the donor kit but the Matchbox kit was much nicer . How easily we were pleased in those days, no etched or resin inserts etc. Nige B
  7. Xtrakit Swift 1/72

    Nice model coming along there. I know the Airfix kit sort of eclipsed the Xtrakit a bit but the latter still has the most accurate decal sheet of the lot, including the CMR kit. 27" roundels all round and a red thin box around the 74sqn markings
  8. Phil, it's not too bad a conversion if you simply cross kit two kits. If you want to do a cheapo hack job as a trial, you could use the old Airfix FIII with a Frog (or a Russian pressing) FIV. Still would work out cheaper than a resin conv. and probably more fun.
  9. Your Airfix top (REALISTIC) future releases?

    Regarding the future of Airfix, should we be concerned over this report in the news today? http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40371393 I do hope not.
  10. Trident question

    Not quite bzn. BAS was born back in the 1960s around 1967 if memory serves. It was a loose grouping of Cambrian and BKS and BEA had a 51% (controlling) interest in it. Otherwise both airlines continued independantly. BEA did impose some decisions though and supplied Viscount V806X fleet replacements to both airlines paid, no doubt, with 'wooden dollars' (in house credit transfers). Also, and you might find this one interesting, it was said that BEA blocked a hoped for deal by BKS for B737s and instead imposed the Trident 1E. That might be a conspiracy theory but we in the airline heard it often and believed it at the time. The hangar at Southend was measured for it apparently. Anyway, BAS persisted and appeared in print on the aircraft in early 1978, persisting after the BKS name change to Northeast and the Cambrian reversion back to Cambrian titling again but in small lettering. We went Orange (Cambrian) and Yellow (Northeast) in early 1972 and early 1971 respectively and thus it stayed until BA was born in 1973 and gradually all went to Speedbird colours but still with initially small Northeast and Cambrian on the forward fuselage sides. Nige B
  11. Trident question

    Or, yellow wings against the blue sky! Sorry, my BA origins were from Northeast/BKS, one of the constituent airline companies which formed BA initially, not just BEA and BOAC as is often quoted but also Cambrian and Northeast.. Yet another tale for another day! Nige B
  12. Trident question

    The 3B had a similar wing but it was fitted at a slightly increased incidence to the fuselage fore/aft datum. This can be seen on the rear wing to body fairing at the rear inner trailing edges. The wing fences are different as is the leading edge arrangement - the 1C had a simple droop which didn't help the short field performance very much. ALL other variants (inc. 1E) had l/e slats which were not segmented at the same points as the droop segments on the 1C. Filling and rescribing would be required to correct this. Passenger window arrangements vary between variants, photos will help you here. The rudder on the 3B is shorter because the bottom of it got truncated to accommodate the RB162 boost engine. This gave the 3B a far worse crosswind limit than the others coincidentally. Others have mentioned the Kuchemann wingtips on the 2E onwards, not fitted to 1C or 1E ever. Later removed from the 2E and 3B fleet during the awful wing mods required following the 'Rib 8' wing cracks found in 1977. If you model a 3B as it appears after 1977 then you would be quite correct to depict the wingtips as the same as the 1C. Oddly, the 1C and 1E fleets were fine and crack free here, lower operating weights probably saved them. I believe the Chinese fleet of 1E, 2E and 3B were never given the wing modifications because cracks weren't found on any of them but I'm not really sure on that one. I've certainly seen late images of a couple which had retained the Kuchemann wingtips when the BA fleet lost theirs. As an aside on the Kuchemann wingtips, it would seem that the RAF Buccaneer fleet also lost their (similar) wingtips after the mod programme which tried to prevent any more losses like the Red Flag incident where one of them shed a wing during manoeuvring at low level. I guess it helped a bit on relieving bending stresses on the rest of the wing. This is certainly why Tridents lost theirs but they had other stuff done too which completely destroyed any semblances of economic operations - but that is a story for another day. Sorry to go on a bit but I was very close and intimate to the Trident in it's later days as a ground (avionic etc.) engineer. It was a great aircraft for being fixable, well developed by BEA over the years and shedloads of spares! The best of the lot was the 2E, best reliability and easiest to work on and, due to it's longer routes, better catering left on board when it came back to us for the night! Nige B
  13. Tim's Car Door Typhoon -- COMPLETED

    Good builds there. Just to clarify, in case my comment was misread, the original Typhoon was released in 1959 and for that reason was 'ancient'. In it's favour, it was a good shape and of course it lasted well into the second decade of the 21st century. Not bad going for a kit which started it's life hanging up in Woolies for 2/- (10 new Pence). The Academy kit, also shown above) was quite recent by comparison. The canopy from the Airfix Typhoon was also recommended by Chris Ellis in his 1970 book as a way of producing a bubble canopy Spitfire from the Airfix Mk.IX (JE-J), a conversion which worked well at a time where bubble canopied model Spits were very unusual and not a little esoteric on a display shelf.
  14. Tim's Car Door Typhoon -- COMPLETED

    Steve the car door kit (F231) is late Frog, mid '70s whereas the old bubble top (kit 389P) is a much earlier effort, c.1959. The late James Goulding liked the later kit very much in his Aircraft Illustrated review. I rated his reviews highly and his one criticism was that the wing seemed at slightly less incidence to the fuselage than required and proceeded to tell us how to correct it. Nowadays, that sort of critique would kill a kit stone dead but in those days, the car door was a real departure from the norm and came at a good time to compliment the others. My memory is that all there was available was the ancient Frog kit mentioned above and the equally prehistoric Airfix 1B from the same era. This last only very recently replaced by the new tool kit. There was of course the 1/96 scale Eagle Typhoon kit, gone and forgotten by the 1970s. Anyone remember those? Nige B
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