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Shar2

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Shar2 last won the day on November 5 2012

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About Shar2

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    Wibble!
  • Birthday 27/08/65

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    Sunbury, Middx
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  1. USN 40mm Bofors Quad mounts 1:350 Master Models As we saw in the Twin Mounts sets reviewed HERE, MASTER models are upping their game with the maritime releases. Once again we see a selection of resin, PE and turned brass. The resin and etch have also been produced by North Star and incorporated into the sets. The new boxes the same style too, with the resin parts in their own compartments in the foam for added protection. [SM-350-093] As with the twin sets, this set contains six version 1 mounts, each mount is made up from no less than twenty two parts, so, once again you will need your optivisors and best tweezers, along with an extra bottle of patience, as you will need them. The resin gun mount is fitted with a two resin front pieces and two PE seats complete with footrests. The gun slides are then rolled to shape and fitted to the mount, along with two hand wheels. Two pairs of twin guns are built using a resin breech, two brass barrels, PE sights and sight covers and a PE elevation arc. The gun assemblies are then attached to the mounting, which is then finished off with the rear mounted railings which have ammunition storage racks built in. The set also include a Mk51 director sighting pedestal, made from a resin pedestal, shoulder guides and deck mounting ring. [SM-350-094] – This set is for version 2 of the twin 40mm Bofors mounts and is the same build as the version above, but, unlike the twin mounts, I cannot see any appreciable differences, unless it’s the fact that version 1 is a manual mounting and version2 is power operated as there is some slight equipment differences on the mounting, but only if viewed through a magnifying glass.. [SM-350-095] – This set is for version 3 of the twin 40mm Bofors mounts and is the same build as the version 2 above, with a different rear mounted railing, and a full splinter shield to the front. Conclusion Since these mountings were fitted to almost every US warship from the frigate and larger, these sets can be used on almost any model released. Just check you references to check which mounting was used. Review sample courtesy of Piotr at
  2. USN 40mm Bofors Twin mounts 1:350 Master Models We’ve had quite a few new sets in from Master Models, mostly turned brass or aluminium, yet with these sets they have added another dimension with the inclusion of resin and photo etched parts. The resin and etch seem to have been produced by North Star and incorporated into the sets. The new boxes are great too, with the resin parts in their own compartments in the foam for added protection. [SM-350-091] This set contains six version 1 mounts, each mount is made up from no less than seventeen parts, so get your optivisors and finest tweezers out, as you’re going to need them. Once finished though they will look amazing when complete. The resin gun mount is fitted with a resin front piece and two PE seats complete with footrests. The gun slide is then rolled to shape and fitted to the mount, along with two hand wheels. The twin guns are built using a resin breech, two brass barrels, PE sights and sight covers and a PE elevation arc. The gun assembly is then attached to the mounting, which is then finished off with the rear mounted railings. The set also include a director sighting pedestal, made from a resin pedestal, shoulder guides and deck mounting ring. [SM-350-092] – This set is for version 2 of the twin 40mm Bofors mounts and is the same build as the version above, with a different rear mounted railing, which is complete with ammunition storage racks. Conclusion I have to say, I really like these sets, the level of detail is amazing, if rather fiddly and eye watering. They will certainly add that extra something to a model. Review sample courtesy of Piotr at
  3. HMS Ark Royal Gun Set 1:350 Master Models Master models continue to build up their range of 1:350 scale armament sets, but they are now increasing the items produced to add other accessories, which now includes two of the three releases reviewed here. As usual they are well up to the standard we’ve come to expect from Master Models. [350-096] This set covers all the weaponry fitted to the recently released Trumpeter kit. Whilst the kit is great, you can’t beat some finely machine turned brass barrels to add that extra finesse to the model. In this set you get sixteen 4.5” barrels, 24 long plus 24 short barrels for the octuple PomPoms and 32 Vickers 0.50” barrels for the quad mounts. You will need to cut the kit barrels from the mountings/trunnions and drill appropriate sized holes both 0.5” and 0.3”. For pre November 1941 builds you will need to remove the flash hiders off the PomPom barrels. Conclusion This is another great and useful set to give your Ark Royal model that little bit of pizzazz. Review sample courtesy of Piotr at
  4. Pitot Probes and Guns for Mig 25’s, Mig 31 and AH-64 1:48 Master Models The latest releases from Master Models in their series of replacement pitot probes have recently arrived at BMs London offices. They are well up to their usual standard and very sharp, so care should be taken once fitted. They are so much better than the styrene ones found in the kits. [AM-48-125] – Has been designed for all kits of the AH-64A Apache and contains the M230 Chain gun barrels pitot probes and tail antenna. [AM-48-129] – This pack includes turned brass pitot tube and resin element for the ICM Mig 25 Foxbat kit. [AM-48-130] – This pack includes turned brass pitot tube for the Kitty Hawk Mig-25PD/PDS(Foxbat E) [AM-48-131] – This pack includes turned brass pitot tube and resin element for the AMK Mig-31 Foxhound Conclusion Master Models must have a tremendous machining set up to be able to produce so many different pitot probes and to produce them with such finesse. The always look great on the finished model. Review sample courtesy of Piotr at
  5. Primers Ammo by Mig Jimenez There are a plethora of different manufacturers primers on the market these days and Mig Jimenez has release three more in the AMMO One Shot range. Each of the three primers, white, grey and black are self levelling and water based. They have been designed to preserve the detail and to dry with a hard, flat finish. Fortunately, unlike some products they have little or no smell. You should clean the kit parts of any residue from the moulding process, but this isn’t always necessary as these primers should adhere to the plastic, or any other material such as resin or PE without problem. To use you just shake the bottle well before decanting into the airbrush cup and spraying at around 20-30 PSI in thin coats until the model or parts are fully coated. Once complete clean the airbrush out with you preferred cleaner, or you can use AMMO’s own A.MIG.2001 cleaner. White Grey Black Conclusion These are really nice primers and although I’ve only done some test pieces with them they do indeed level nicely and dry to a hard enough finish to be able to sand if required. Review sample courtesy of
  6. Flesh Colours Ammo by Mig Jimenez The art of figure painting is something that some people really don’t like to try, mainly because of the flesh tones. Well with this new set from Mig Jimenez you at least have a good starting point, with the various tones and colours, which you can use to build up the look on your figures. There are highlights and lowlights in addition to the actual skin tones included in the set. A.MIG-115 Light Skin Tone A.MIG-116 Basic Skin Tone A.MIG-117 Warm Skin Tone A.MIG-118 Burnt Sand A.MIG-133 Red Leather A.MIG-134 Burnt Brown Red The paints can be both brushed or airbrushed which will please a lot of modellers, yet the new formulation has been designed primarily for brush use. Once the bottles have been shaken very well colour density looks pretty good, and whilst I haven’t used these particular colours yet I have used others in the AMMO range and they do spray well with a little bit of thinning. I wouldn’t say they were ready to spray straight from the bottle though. Conclusion This looks to be a very useful and well thought out set of colours from AMMO and will prove a very useful to those modellers with an interest in figure painting. Review sample courtesy of
  7. Douglas Skyraider 20mm Cannon and Pitot Probes 1:32 Master Models The latest batch of items from Master Models included these two sets for 1:32 Skyraiders. As usual, they are beautifully turned and finished and are so much more realistic than the kit parts. Though easy to assemble and fit, one set is a little more fiddly than the other. [AM-32-093] – This set is for any 1:32 Douglas Skyraider. The set includes turned brass barrels without flash hiders and aluminium pitot tube. The set contains two versions of cannon muzzles. [AM-32-094] – Has also been designed for any 1:32 Douglas Skyraider and contains turned brass 20mm gun barrels with flash hiders and a turned aluminium pitot tube. Conclusion Here we have another pair of really useful and well produced items. Both sets are well up to standard we have come to expect from Master Models. All you have to do is a bit of research on what the particular aircraft you are modelling was fitted with and choose the correct set. Review sample courtesy of Piotr at
  8. Miscellaneous Items 1:35 Master The latest releases from Master Models in their series of replacement pitot probes have recently arrived at BMs London offices. They are well up to their usual standard and very sharp, so care should be taken once fitted. They are so much better than the styrene ones found in the kits. I really like the way they protect the resin parts, which have as much detail as the metal items do. [AM-35-003] – Has been designed for the big Trumpeter Mil Mi 24 Hind and contains The set includes turned aluminium boom for DUAS probe, resin DUAS vanes, resin and brass parts for JakB-12.7 machine gun. [GM-35-012] – This set is for the new KTO Rosomak from IBG Models, although can be used on any vehicle kit that uses this gun. The set includes turned brass part and resin muzzle break Conclusion Here we have another pair of really useful and well produced items. The Hind set is really well done with the resin parts so beautifully moulded, as is the Bushmasters muzzle brake. Simple to assemble and use they are an easy way to give your model a lift. Review sample courtesy of Piotr at
  9. Britmodeller

    Thanks very much Bill
  10. Messerschmitt Me-262 B1a/U1 Nightfighter Revell 1:32 Several two-seat trainer variants of the Me 262, the Me 262 B-1a, had been adapted through the Umrüst-Bausatz 1 factory refit package as night fighters, complete with on-board FuG 218 Neptun high-VHF band radar, using Hirschgeweih ("stag's antlers") antennae with a set of dipole elements shorter than the Lichtenstein SN-2 had used, as the B-1a/U1 version. Serving with 10 Staffel, Nachtjagdgeschwader 11, near Berlin, these few aircraft (alongside several single-seat examples) accounted for most of the 13 Mosquitoes lost over Berlin in the first three months of 1945. However, actual intercepts were generally or entirely made using Wilde Sau methods, rather than AI radar-controlled interception. As the two-seat trainer was largely unavailable, many pilots made their first jet flight in a single-seater without an instructor. Despite its deficiencies, the Me 262 clearly marked the beginning of the end of piston-engined aircraft as effective fighting machines. Once airborne, it could accelerate to speeds over 850 km/h (530 mph), about 150 km/h (93 mph) faster than any Allied fighter operational in the European Theatre of Operations. The Me 262's top ace was probably Hauptmann Franz Schall with 17 kills, which included six four-engine bombers and 10 P-51 Mustang fighters, although night fighter ace Oberleutenant Kurt Welter claimed 25 Mosquitoes and two four-engine bombers shot down by night and two further Mosquitoes by day flying the Me 262. Most of Welter's claimed night kills were achieved in standard radar-less aircraft, even though Welter had tested a prototype Me 262 fitted with FuG 218 Neptun radar. Another candidate for top ace on the aircraft was Oberstleutnant Heinrich Bär, who claimed 16 enemy aircraft while flying the Me 262. The Model With the issue of the extremely well thought of Me-109’s and Fw-190, Revell have now released another in their series of new mould 1:32 kits in the form of the Me-262 B1/U1 Nightfighter. Now while the kit is new and a great replacement for their venerable kit from 1971, they still insist on using the horrible end opening boxes, which, if it wasn’t so packed with plastic would collapse the minute you put it in the stash. Inside the box there are eleven sprues of grey styrene, two of clear styrene and a mid-sized decal sheet. The parts are very nicely moulded with some good surface detail, no signs of flash around the parts, although there is a bit on the sprues, no other visible imperfections and only a few moulding pips. The build begins with the front cockpit tub, which is made up of separate side consoles, and side sections of the seat area, rear lower bulkhead, battery tray, floor, which is fitted with the joystick and control cable run. The circuit breaker panel on the right side console is then attached, followed by the three piece rudder pedal assembly and instrument panel. The cockpit assembly is then attached to the front bulkhead. The front section of the rear cockpit floor is attached to the rear bulkhead of the front cockpit, followed by the separate side consoles, rear bulkhead, along with both seats, which are provided with decal seat belts and which you may wish to change for aftermarket etched or cloth belts for added realism. Both cockpits are then enclosed with the two sidewalls, making the structure strong and ready to fit into the fuselage. The Neptune control box and screen is assembled and put to one side, whilst work continues with the assembly of the gun bay and nose wheel bay. The gun bay floor is attached to the rear bulkhead and the nose bulkhead attached to eh floor. The nose wheel bays sides are fitted to the underside, whilst the ejector chutes are attached to the floor itself. The four cannon and fitted, with their barrels slid through the sub-bulkhead attached to the floor. The ammunition runs are then fitted, followed by two stays between the sub-bulkhead and the rear bulkhead. The instructions say that you will need 15g of weight fitted into the space just forward of the gun bay. I would probably add a little bit more jsut to make sure it’s not a tail sitter, but not too much as the undercarriage legs may not take the strain. The gun bay assembly is then fitted into one half to the fuselage and enclosed with the other half. The cockpits surround is then attached, as is the rear cockpit instrument panel into the upper fuselage and the Neptun radar set and its bracket. The cockpit assembly is then fitted from the underside, where the wings will later fit, followed by the underside cross-members, oxygen bottles, electrical boxes, and control rods. The front and rear spars are joined together by longitudinal bulkheads and attached to the lower wing section which has been fitted with the outer wing panels. The two upper wing sections are fitted with the two flap sections, each of which can be posed extended or retracted, as can each of the two piece ailerons and single piece actuators. The spring loaded slats are also provided as separate parts so that they can be posed extended, their normal position on the ground, or retracted, when in high speed flight. The completed wing assembly is the fitted to the fuselage assembly and it’s becoming to look like a plane now. Whilst you do get most of the engines in the kit, Revell have decided to keep things simple, and therefore cheaper, but not providing a separate engine, or engine covers, so if you want to show off an engine, which will need to be further detailed by the modeller, will also need the separate covers to be cut out. The intakes are made up from the intake surround, internal intake section, bullet fairing and compressor face. The rear section is made up from the exhaust outlet, built, rear stator and rear engine face. The centre section of the engine comprises of fore and after sections split horizontally glued together with a centre wing. With the three sections glued together there are five ancillary parts to fitted, before the nacelle halves are attached covering any engine detail fitted. The front and rear fairings are then attached then each nacelle is glued to their respective positions on the wings. The tail feathers are then assemble, each of the horizontal surfaces are in upper and lower halves, as is the rudder, whilst the elevators are single piece items. Once assembled, they are glued into position along with the separate rudder trim tab. Moving right forward the gun bay panels are attached. If you want to pose these open you will have to cut them in half longitudinally and scratch build a couple of struts. Moving on to the undercarriage, each of the nose wheel is made up from inner and outer wheels with alternative tires and with separate hubs, which will certainly aid painting, these are then glued to the axle on the leg. The main wheels come as two halves and are glued to the main wheel legs, The mains also have separate scissor links which appear t be a little too wide open, with the inner piston of the leg too extended as if it was taken from an empty museum aircraft. You may wish to change this by reducing the piston length and altering the rake of the scissor link. The undercarriage is then fitted to the model, followed by their associated doors, which will need to be split at the appropriate points as they are moulded as one for those who wish to build their model with the undercarriage up, followed by the door retraction jacks and undercarriage actuators. The front windscreen is fitted with a support bar and gunsight, as well as the internally mounted armoured windscreen before being attached to the fuselage. The front and rear canopies are also fitted, and can be posed either in the open or closed positions. Under the nose the bomb racks are attached and fitted with the two, two piece drop tanks. Under the tail section there is a fuel dump tube fitted, whilst at the nose the two Neptun aerial arrays are attached and finished off with the nose cone. Finally the slats are attached, along with the DF aerial, VHF aerials and the clear navigation light covers. Decals The medium sized decal sheet provides options for two aircraft. Messerschmitt Me-262 B1a/U1 “Red 12” 10./NJG 11, Schleswig, May 1945 Messerschmitt Me-262 B1a/U1 “ Red 8” 10./NJG 11, Schleswig, May 1945 The decals are nicely printed, with good opacity, in register and slightly matt. There is quite a bit of carrier film between the Balkenkreuz lines as well as number 12 markings. Naturally there are no decals for eh swastikas, so these will need to be sourced by the modeller. The markings were researched and designed by AirDoc. Conclusion This looks like it will build into another great kit. Revell really have upped their game with the latest releases of 1:32 aircraft. Being nicely detailed, there is still plenty of room for those who want to really go to town on it, yet easy enough for the intermediated modeller to have a go at and get some good results, the price point is also worth considering as it is half the price of a similar Trumpeter kit. Review sample courtesy of Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit
  11. USS Iwo Jima LHD 7 (53181) 1:350 Etch Part 1 The latest etched brass set from Eduard, this time for the re-issue of Revells USS Iwo Jima LHD-7. Whilst the model is superb it is still lacking in certain areas. Eduard have chosen to address some of these shortcomings with this, the first part in a series of five sets for the kit. This quite large single sheet contains parts for the assault craft, both the LCAC’s (Landing Craft Air Cushion), and the LCU’s, (Landing Craft Utility). The LCAC’s each receive a whole raft of replacement parts for the superstructures on each side. Before the etched parts can be attached though, a lot of the plastic detail needs to be removed. The PE parts include a new control cabin, air intakes, exhausts, navigation radar and support, exhaust openings, watertight doors, railings, vertical ladders, superstructure brace supports, masts, and liferings. The cushion section and transport deck also receive new railings, along with stowage boxes, cleats, ramp winch boxes, filter boxes and air conditioning units and the fans intake grills. The LCU’s are even more extensively modified with the whole superstructure replaced with a PE part which will require some very careful folding. Onto this there are new fixtures and fittings, such as watertight doors, which can be posed open or closed, upper steering position, complete with ships wheel, 50cal heavy machine gun and splinter shield, storage boxes, air intakes, vertical ladders and railings. The port side of the LCU is also replaced with PE and fitted with vents, liferings, intakes, which can also be posed open or shut, drainage ports, cleats, and railings. There are also, new anchors, anchor supports, a new bow ramp tread plate and two chains. Conclusion Whilst this is a great set, boy will you need a good set of optivisors and very good set of tweezers, not to mention patience and a steady hand. What you will get at the end of it are some amazingly detailed landing craft, which could be used on their own or with the ship. Review sample courtesy of
  12. T-34/85 Running Gear Late Type 1:35 MiniArt The parts in this track and wheel set from MiniArt are suitable for their T-34/85 plus SU-85, SU-100 and SU-122 kits. There are 10 sprues of the track links with guide horns and 7 lengths of the intermediate links. The 10 sprues with the horned track links also contain the main road wheels. There are also two sprues with idler wheels and a small panel plus another two sprues with the drive wheels, which also have a stowage box with separate lids. The links with the guide horns have small pins on then which are designed to click into holes on the intermediate links. Conclusion While these links do indeed look good, while attempting to get a set to link together to include in the review I found that they would not "click" together easily. I found that the pins in the guide horn links would often bend over, rather than click into the receiving holes. With these it's a one-shot deal, as once they have bent there is no easy way of getting them back, so you end up with track links that you have to glue together. The wheels are very well moulded, and look great with the markings on the edges of the tyres also represented. Review sample courtesy of
  13. National Ensign Flags Eduard 1:350 Quite a few maritime kits these days provide a selection of flags and pennants that are printed on paper. These can look ok, but generally always have a tired well worn look, like they’ve been left in the sun for a few months. Eduard have now countered this look with the release of this pre-painted steel sets, which supersedes the etched brass set previously available. The four flags are beautifully painted and will look great on either an ensign staff or in the battle ensign position. To use, just cut the chosen flag from the sheet and wrap it around your favourite rigging material. How you get the wavy flapping effect is entirely up to you, but it may take a bit of experimentation to get the desired effect. Conclusion These are very nice and easy to use sets which would add a dash of colour on your warships. Review samples courtesy of
  14. US Mk-82 Bombs with Retarding Tail 1:32 Brassin Whilst some of the big 1:32 scale kits provide a decent selection of weaponry in the box, they aren’t always up to the standard we seem to have come to expect when attaching them to our masterpieces. This is where Eduard and their Brassin range come in and the ever expanding catalogue of resin bombs come into play. Arriving in the pretty standard cardboard box, the set has parts for six complete bombs. The casting is up to the usual standard, with some very fine details, such as the bomb lugs moulded onto the bomb casing, although several had managed to be broken in the box, along with one of the retard tail fins. I think Eduard need to rethink their packaging, at least separate the bombs from the tails. Assembly is nice and simple, as once the fins and bodies are removed from the casting blocks and cleaned up it’s just a matter of joining them together, then deciding what fuse type you’re going to fit. There are two types of nose fuse, one short and one on a fuse extender, there is also the option of just having a plain nose cap for an un-armed weapon. Then it’s just a matter of adding the etched brass tail ring, painting, (any colour as long as it’s olive drab it seems), adding the supplied decals, and weathering as required. Conclusion As is becoming the norm for Brassin these bombs are really well manufactured. Great moulding, good attention to detail and an excellent addition to any modellers armoury. Review samples courtesy of