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Julien

Walkaround Coordinator
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Julien last won the day on July 13 2013

Julien had the most liked content!

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About Julien

  • Rank
    Excellente Spazzatrice
  • Birthday 01/01/2000

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    The Far Side
  • Interests
    Sabres, Wheeled AFVs

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  1. Julien

    Tornado - What’s behind the panel?

    If you look at my Walkaround from when I vited RAF Marham the Port Side appears to be an earth, and the stbd Ground power. Lot of other open pannel there. https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/71270-panavia-tornado-gr1-gr4/ This walkaround from Kandahar shows the same; https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234971017-panavia-tornado-gr4-zd843-operational-kandahar-afghanistan/ Nigel Heath's walkaround from the engineering wing at Lossiemouth shows the inside of the pannels better; https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234971011-panavia-tornado-gr4-zd793-raf-lossiemouth-engineering-logistics-wing/ Julien
  2. I thought that about the front Glazing when I saw this kit, having the original S-51 in the stash. Julien
  3. I generally let the pictures do the talking, but as you have asked the plastic looks quality, the panel lines such as they are are nicely restrained, detail is good and the decals look like they will pose no issues. I did say the decals were printed in house, but on closer inspection they are done by a Ukrainian company Decograph which I cant seem to find any information about, however I note AMP and BPK kits now have decals by them also. Julien
  4. There will be an FAA boxing at some point no doubt. Julien
  5. Westland Dragonfly HC.2 1/48 AMP via Mikromir The Westland Dragon Fly was a UK Built licence built version of the Sikorsky S-51. In the UK these were powered by an Alvis Leonides radial engine developing 500hp. While the Dragonfly was mainly used by the Royal Navy a few were by the RAF in the Casualty Evacuation role. These were designated HC.2 (2 built) and HC.4 (12 built); the earlier type with wooden rotors, and the later with metal ones. It is good to see companies bringing us kits of early helicopters as the are lacking. The kit from AMP (A Mikromir company) arrives on 6 sprues of plastic, four clear spures, a sheet of PE, a set of masks and resin parts for the rotor head. The plastic is more of the short run type but much better than seen before, there is little flash and the detail is better. The clear parts look a little cloudy in the pictures but its deceiving, a little polish up and they will be good. The small white resin parts seem to be made of a more durable material, the type I have seen Eduard use for tail wheels before. Construction starts in the cabin. The seats are made (3 off) and added to the cabin floor. PE belts are provided for the pilots seat. The read cabin bulkhead is then added. The instrument panel and pilots controls are also added. Next up the extensive glazing for the cabin is made up. The front bubble is actually two halves which attach to a central part, The sides are then added. The complete part is then supposed to slide onto the competed fuselage, though I suspect many modellers might tray a different approach. Next up the base for the rotor head is built up. The cabin floor and base rotor head can then be put into the fuselage and it closed up. The glazing is then slid on. The main landing gear is added at the sides along with the entry step rail. The tail rotor is then added. In picture of WF311 it can be seen there is a tail plane with an oval end plate on the opposite side from the tail rotor, however this is missing in the kit. It will not be that hard to make. Next up the full rotor head can be built up. This is quite complex so care will be needed. The blades can then be added. Last up for the main airframe is completion of the nose wheel. Lastly the side paniers to carry the casualties are made up and added. Decals A small decal sheet provides marking for one RAF Machine WF311. The instructions show this as being at RAF Yeovilton 1950. We know this is RNAS Yeovilton, and as the airframe was delivered in 1950 I would suspect this was delivered there, or could be at Westalnds site? The aircraft was used by 194 Sqn RAF (Far East Casevac Flight) and was written off on 16/3/53 when the engine failed. These airframes were fitted with external panniers for carrying the casualties. Conclusion This is something which is overdue, the kit is welcome addition to early Helicopters from AMP. Highly Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. Percival Vega Gull (72002 & 72004) Civil & Military Service 1:72 Dora Wings The Vega Gull was a development by Percival of their earlier D-Series Gull. The main advantages over the earlier design was the addition of a 4th seat, dual flight controls, and flaps were fitted. The airframe was made wider, the wings longer and the airframe made more streamlined. A feature of the aircraft was the ability to fold the wings for storage. The work was attributed to Arthur Bage's arrival at Percival. The resulting Vega Gull had extended range and payload without sacrificing performance. The aircraft was powered by a de Havilland Gipsy Six engine. As well as civilian operators the Air Ministry ordered 15 Aircraft. 11 were used by 24 Sqn RAF, 2 by the FAA, and 3 by British Air Attaches. At the outbreak of WWII many civilian aircraft were impressed into service in Britain and the Commonwealth. The Kit Dora Wings is a new company to us, and have kindly agreed to send samples for review. As it is this reviewers opinion that Percival Aircraft made some of the best looking Civil Aircraft in the UK, these new kits are more than welcome. Initially Dora Wings have given us two boxings depicting both the Civilian & Military users of the aircraft. Like the Proctor Information and help was gratefully received in the production of this kit from John Adams formally of Aeroclub models which can only be a good thing. Construction is fairly simple just like the real aircraft. The wheels and their spats are the first parts to be made up and then put to one side. We then move to the cockpit. The instrument panel is made form a plastic part with the film and PE making the front of the panel. This is then added into the coaming. Just to go off on a tangent the wings then put together, these are of convention left/right & upper/lower construction. Separate flaps are included as are landing lights for both wings. Now that the wings are done we can move back to the main cabin, the rear bulkhead is installed. Then the controls and seats are put in place, followed by the front firewall and instrument panel we put to one side earlier. The fuselage can then be closed up, and the canopy added. At the rear the rudder is added along with the tailplanes, and at the front the engine front and propeller. The wings can then be added along with the main landing gear. Markings Decals are printed in house For the Military boxing 4 options are provided; L7272 ex G-AFWG Allocated to British Air Attache Buenos Aires, Argentina 1939. ex L7272 Sold to Argentine Government in 1946 P10 Requisitioned by the Belgian Government 1939 N7571 Requisitioned by the Royal New Zealand Air Force 1944 For the Civilian boxing again 4 options are provided; G-AFBC 1952 Kings Cup Air Race, Joan Lady Sherborne. G-AFBW Alex Henshaw, Nicosia, Cyprus 1938. VP-KCC Beryl Markham trans Atlantic flight 1936. G-AEKE Winner of "Schlesinger Race" 1936. Conclusion It is high time that we had some modern toolings of British Civil aircraft from this period Very Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. Julien

    Kids and the future of modelling

    Nice work there. Also good that you local shop helps as well. Julien
  8. Depot Areas & Sludge Tracks Weathering set (A.MIG-7470) Ammo by Mig Jiménez More weathering products from those prodigiously productive people at Ammo. This set is six enamel washes and includes A.MIG-1002 TRACKS WASH, A.MIG-1004 LIGHT RUST WASH, A.MIG-1407 ENGINE GRIME, A.MIG-1408 FRESH ENGINE OIL, & A.MIG-3020 METAL SLAG (pigment). This set is designed to compliment the "Fast Method" set we reviewed here. You can of course mix these to create highly realistic vistas. Your artistry will of course play a part in whether you achieve such levels, but this is a good palette to start you railway diorama career or step up a level. Of course there are many other uses for these prducts outside of railway modelling. Review sample courtesy of
  9. Percival Proctor Mk.I (72003) 1:72 Dora Wings The Proctor was developed by Percival from their Vega Gull in response to an Air Ministry Specification for a radio trainer and communications aircraft. Percival made the fuselage 6 inches longer and incorporated larger rear windows. Modifications also had to be made to the seats in order that parachutes could be worn. The prototype first flew in October 1939 and was put into production fairly quickly. Over 1000 aircraft were built, the original 222 by Proctors, with the remainder by F Hill & Sons of Manchester. The original marks of Proctor (I through III) were very much of the Gull design, later ones were enlarged, but the larger aircraft suffered in terms of performance. After the war the aircraft were dispersed to various operators. The fleet was grounded in the 1960s due to concerns about the glued joints in the airframe; though some have been rebuilt with modern glues. They still make good light aircraft and inherited the Gulls folding wing which can make storage easier. The Kit Dora Wings is a new company to us, and have kindly agreed to send samples for review. Information and help was gratefully received in the production of this kit from John Adams formally of Aeroclub models which can only be a good thing. It is also this reviewers opinion that Percival Aircraft made some of the best looking Civil Aircraft in the UK, so these new kits are more than welcome. Initially Dora Wings have given us The Vega Gull and followed this up with the Proctor as Percival did. The kit arrives on three sprues of nice hard plastic, detail is good raised and recessed where necessary. The ribbing on the wings is nicely restrained. There is a clear sprue, instrument panel film, a sheet of PE and a set of masks. Construction is fairly simple just like the real aircraft. The tail wheel is the first part to be made up and then put to one side. We then move to the cockpit. The instrument panel is made form a plastic part with the film and PE making the front of the panel. This is then added into the coaming. Just to go off on a tangent the wings then put together, these are of convention left/right & upper/lower construction. Separate flaps are included as are landing lights for both wings. Now that the wings are done we can move back to the main cabin, Controls and seats are put in place, followed by the front firewall and instrument panel we put to one side earlier. The fuselage can then be closed up, and the canopy added. At the rear the rudder is added along with the tailplanes, and at the front the engine front and propeller. The wings can then be added along with the main landing gear. Markings The decals are from Decograph and look good with no registration issues, there are two decal options provided; P6240 Czech Air Attaché, RAF Hendon 1945 Ex P6240 now D-41 Czech Service, Kbei 1946-49 Conclusion It is high time that we had some modern toolings of British Civil aircraft from this period. Very Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  10. Not a trial as their are pictures of the airframe in Malaya with it still fitted. https://books.google.dk/books?id=FkfdCQAAQBAJ&pg=PA49&lpg=PA49&dq=dragonfly+wf311&source=bl&ots=cpB_XGVNd2&sig=cFSFgVgZfhSbBL9l13bDCTuvQa4&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi5jY6vj8HdAhXpx4UKHcemDDUQ6AEwCHoECAQQAQ#v=onepage&q&f=false
  11. Julien

    1/72 Matchbox Phantom Canopy

    Best bet is to replce them from the spares Fujimi had in their Phantoms as the MB canopy was less than good.
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