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Julien

Walkaround Coordinator
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Everything posted by Julien

  1. What have you purchased 9

    Just picked up the new Takom AML-60
  2. Sad to hear this he was a true legend of the old school. http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-40978576 Julien
  3. Hesco barriers

    Does anyone make these that are cheaper than the meng ones at 4 in abox? I am looking to do this type of thing so will need a lot!
  4. AML-90 French Light Armoured Car 1:35 Takom The AML-90 was designed from the original AML-245 specification by Panhard originally being designated the AML-245C. The main feature of this model is the DEFA D921 low pressure 90mm gun. The gun was specifically designed for light vehicles (<10 Tonnes), This made the AML-90 well armed in proportion to its weight. The gun has shallow rifling and coupled with fin stabilised rounds gives a an improved range, however the low muzzle velocity does only favour close combat. Combat in the South African border Wars, and The Six Day War would show the AML-90 was out ranged by older T-34/85 and M48 Patton tanks. Optical fire control, and no power assist on the turret traverse also hampered operations. Even given these factors the AML-90 is capable of destroying older main battle tanks. A Libyan T-62 was reported destroyed in the Toyota War (Libyan/Chad border conflict of 1987). The Kit This is a welcome new tool from Takom who seem to be on a mission to bring us less mainstream vehicles. It is an addition to the Takom AML-60 kit as both vehicles use the same AML-245 chassis (the two kits sharing 3 common sprues & the lower hull). The kit arrives on 4 main sprues, a small clear sprue, 5 rubber tyres, a lower hull part, and the turret. All of the parts are up to Takom's usual standard. The kit does not feature an interior. Of note are the instructions (which I dont normally mention), it seems Takom have shrunk their normal A4 instructions down to A5 to fint in the box, and this had made them harder to read. Construction starts with the lower hull. The rear of the car is attached to the hull along with additional side parts the rear frame and the main side door. The rear wheel housing and suspension components and springs are also added. Additional handles and smaller parts are also added at this stage. The front suspension components are then built up and added to the lower hull. Followed by the wheel housing and their suspension components. The wheels can then be built up. These consist of five plastic components for each wheel in addition to the tyres. The upper hull deck can then be added to the lower hull. Tools and periscopes are added at this stage., along with a sand channel and other parts which I suspect a lot of modellers will leave off until the end. Next the turret is built up from the main part with the hatches, tools and other ancillary parts being added. This turret is much larger than the AML-60. The lower and upper parts are put together with the gun mantlet being added between the two. The hatches, other lights and smoke dischargers are added along with the rear turret bin. the 90mm gun is then made up and added. The completed turret can then be added to the hull. Markings There are 5 options included with the kit, and are featured on the coloured artwork. Argentinian Army - Falklands War 1982 (Green/brown camo) French Army - (Green / sand camo) Israeli Defence Forces (overall sand grey) Iraqi Army - Kuwait 1991 (overall sand) Lebanese Army Special Forces - 2012 (4 colour camo) Conclusion This is welcome new tool from Takom of Armoured Car which was used by the Armies of many nations around the world. No doubt the aftermarket producers will do decals and probably a full interior at some point. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
  5. What have you purchased 9

    This turned up;
  6. Walkarounds

    If you have any good walkarounds of subjects which are your own pictures, or ones you have copyright on the feel free to get in touch with me and we can put them into the Britmodeller walkaround section here. If they are just ones you have found on the internet then please feel free to post links only in this section. Thanks Julien
  7. Finnish Self Propelled Anti Aircraft Gun ltPsv 90 Marksman SPAAG 1:35 Takom The Marksman system was developed by Marconi to be a drop-in solution to the need for mobile, radar-targeted anti-aircraft gun platforms for close-in support of troops, installations and other valuable assets. The system comprises a pair of Swiss made 35mm Oerlikon guns with a fire rate of 18 rounds per second. The Marconi 400 series frequency agile surveillance and tracking X/J band radar is able to detect targets at 12 KM and track them from 10 KM Although the turret could be mated with many different hulls, the British chose the Chieftain tank for trials of this system. The second prototype was mounted on a Chieftain, and have the vehicle a top-heavy look, with the crew hatches perched high on the top of the turret, overshadowed by the radar dish that made it so accurate to its maximum range of 4,000m. Sadly, the Chieftain installation never progressed beyond prototype and it didn't see service with the British Army. The turret did see limited service with other operators such as Finland who mounted it on Polish T-55AM chassis. The Fins moved these systems to wartime storage but have since been fitting the turrets to Leopard 2A4 chassis The Kit This is a re-tooling of the new tool T-55AM kit with added parts for the Marksman turret as seen in the Chieftain Marksman kit we reviewed here. Construction starts with the T-55 chassis. The front plate is added to the rea hull and plates are added for the drive sprockets at the rear. The front idler wheels are made up and added to the hull, these are followed by the drive wheels and suspension arms for the road wheels. The ten pairs of road wheels (five either side) are made up. Here the rubber tyres on the outside of the wheels (moulded in plastic) are separate and are added over the main wheels. With careful construction this could ease the difficulty of painting the tyres that you get with tanks. With the road wheels then fitted you move to the upper hull of the tank. The three parts of the upper hull are joined together, PE rear engine mesh is added along with the drivers hatch. Some tools and a headlight assembly are then added though I suspect some will leave this until last. The upper hull can then be added and the rear bulkhead put in place. The tracks consist of 92 individual links per side. These are put together (i know not as easy as it sounds!). Once the tracks are on the track guards either side are completed. There are PE webs for these, and along with tool boxes and tow cables to add. Once complete they can be added to the sides and the vertical parts added over the tracks. Final assembly of the hull then takes place with a myriad of small brackets, tools, tool boxes etc to add. The turret is then started, with the guns built up first from two halves that have some lovely moulding that results in a hollow flash-guide as per the real thing. These then fit onto a five-part breech fairing that has an axle for joining to the turret body. The two interlock in the middle of the turret, but as there is nothing to provide a friction-fit braking on the pivot-points, you will have to either fabricate your own, or glue them in position, or they will flop. The lower turret with moulded in ring closes up the turret, whilst providing the floor of the bustle that is added later from a single part. A number of sensors and vision devices are installed on the top, along with an insert that contains the two crew hatches and forms the base of the radar installation. The top section of the insert flips up on a pair of hinges for stowage of the radar during travel. More small parts such as smoke dischargers and antennae mounts are added on the sides of the turret and then the tapered radar base is inserted on the hinged panel along with the motor housing. The radome and receiver are put together with some additional sensors on the head-unit, which must again be glued in position. The turret ring then has its bayonet-fitting added to the bottom. When dry the turret is fitted to the hull and twisted to engage the bayonet lugs. Markings Only one set of markings for a Finnish example are provided. These are in the two tone green & black scheme. Conclusion Following on the from the Chieftain marksman there was hope that Takom would kit the one real user of the type. It makes good use of the tooling already developed, and its good to see that they are prepared to invest in this type of kit. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
  8. AML-90 French Light Armoured Car - 1:35 Takom

    I think our French friend was making a joke
  9. AML-60/90 Wheels 1/35

    Does any one do replacement ones yet in resin? I really dont like the rubber ones. Thx Julien
  10. Kamaz Typhoon K - 1:35 Takom

    Kamaz Typhoon K 1:35 Takom The Typhoon-K is part of a family of modular armoured mine resistant vehicles (MRAP) developed for the Russian Armed Forces by Kamaz. There will be a complete family of 4x4, 6x6 and 8x8 vehicles developed. The interior features individual seats with weapons holders and head restraints. The seats are attached to the roof of the vehicle to reduce the effects on the personnel of mines. The vehicle itself is designed with reference to a NATO classification STANAG 4569 to withstand a mine containing 8Kg of TNT. The vehicle is also bullet proof using ceramic/steel armour for rounds upto 14.5mm, this also extends to the glazing. Auto inflation bullet proof tyres are also fitted. The crew can return fire from inside the vehicle using loopholes, and provision is made for a remotely operated gun platform. Entry is normally through the rear ramp though there roof hatches fitted. To date 260 have been built with the first vehicles appearing at the Moscow Victory Day parade in 2014. The Kit This is a welcome new tool from Takom who seem to be on a mission to bring us less mainstream vehicles. The kit arrives in a larger than usual box, when opened the large one part moulding of the upper body of the vehicle really stands out. There are a further four large sprues, a small clear sprue and a small photo etched fret. It should be noted that Takom have provided a full interior for this kit unlike some of thir smaller armoured cars. Construction starts with the chassis which seem fairly complicated, very much I suppose as the real vehicle is. The two sides are separate (left & right) with one large component for each side to which a large amount of chassis and attachement points for the suspension are added. The larger parts which sit between the main wheels are added last. When each side is complete the two sides of the chassis are joined together with three large central components. The suspension units for the three axles are then built up. These feature moveable steering, however the stubs for the moving parts have to be heated and flatened in a somewhat dated method of construction. Once these are on the "V" parts of the lower chassis can be added along with other additional armour parts. The chassis can now be flipped over to work on the inside. The main floor is laid in, and once down the seating along the sides of the main compartment can be made up and added. The front bulkhead of the main compartment can then be added. Up in the front compartment the driver and two passenger seats are made up and added, along with the dashboard and steering wheel. The front compartment can then be added to the chassis. Moving on to the one part top moulding additional internal parts are added along with the front bulkhead to the driving compartment, The seven top hatches are made up and installed along aerial housing and the main filter housings with their PE grills. The drivers compartment doors are constructed and added to the upper body along with the windows. The rear view mirrors are also added to the doors. External steps and a front sun visor are also added. To finish off a variety of external grab handles/lifting eyes etc are added to the main upper hull. the main rear bulkhead is added and the upper hull is then fitted to the lower chassis. The rear ramp is constructed and added in either the open or closed position. The last item is to build up the wheels & tyres and add them to the model. Markings Markings in the kit are sparse as the real vehicles dont seem to carry much. There is a simple set of red stars, and a set of bordered stars featured on the parade vehicles. Conclusion It is great to see Takom kitting these subjects. We have had many western MRAP vehicles mainly as they have been used extensively in recent conflicts. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
  11. Latest Walkaround Updates

    Soviet 203mm Howitzer M1931 (B-4) added today. http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235025496-203-mm-howitzer-m1931-b-4-soviet/ Julien
  12. Latest Walkaround Updates

    Hi, with help from Mike, the other mods and the review team I have been working on getting a walkaround section here on Britmodeller. This will hopefully contain the sort of detail shots only modellers need. ie the left handed widget on the Blackburn Wurlitzer etc. We are aiming for Aircraft, helicopters, Tanks, Softskins, airliners, Ships, Subs, Weapons, Ejection seats, ground equipment. Basically anything of interest to the modeller. Guys & gals this section will only be as good as the info we can get and post up. If you would like to contribute then please let me know. many thanks Julien
  13. Soviet 203mm Howitzer M1931 (B-4), Pictures taken at National Museum of the History of Ukraine in the Second World War, Kiev by Dave Haskell.
  14. Aviation of Japan Blog

    As the blog is up and running I am shutting this thread down. The name calling etc really has no place here, and should not be repeated. Julien
  15. For sure. It is cleared for a whole range of bombs, however JDAMs are probably more likely.
  16. L-39Cs Pics taken at The Ukraine State Aviation Museum Zhulyany, Kiev. Pics thanks to Dave Haskell.
  17. Latest Walkaround Updates

    Aero L-39 Albatros pics added today; http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235025445-aero-l-39-albatros/ Julien
  18. Takom Finish Marksman

    I am hearing that some of these kits have shipped from TAKOM without tracks in them. If you have one check it, and contact your retailer. Julien
  19. Just a note that it seems some of these kits shipped without the tracks in them, if you have one check it and contact Takom/your retailer if appropriate. Julien
  20. Heinkel He 115 "Scandinavian Service" Special Hobby 1:48 The Heinkel He 115 was the most successful German floatplane of the Second World War, and served as a reconnaissance and attack aircraft. When the Luftwaffe was officially established on 1 March 1935 the Heinkel He 59 was its only twin-engined floatplane. In July the Air Ministry issued a replacement for its replacement. This was to be a twin-engined aircraft that could act as a long range reconnaissance, torpedo bomber, minelayer or fog dispenser. The first prototype made its maiden flight in August 1937. Early test flights revealed that it was difficult to fly, but Heinkels designers were quickly able to solve this problem, and the resulting aircraft gained a very favourable reputation for its handling. The second prototype, V2, was similar to the V1, but with an improved nose, new tail surfaces, and NACA type engine cowlings. V3 had the separate cockpit canopies of the pilot and radio operator replaced by a single glasshouse canopy, while the V4 was the production prototype, with an improved tail and float supports. During the development process the original rather ungainly nose was replaced by the streamlined glazed nose used in production aircraft. The He 115 was in competition with the Ha 140. After tests in Lübeck Bay early in 1938 the Heinkel design was judged to be superior, and was put into production. After undergoing flight tests the V1 was modified in preparation for a series of record attempts. The early nose was replaced with a smooth wooden version, the radio operator and observer were both removed (a mechanic was carried), and a streamlined canopy installed. On 20 March 1938 the modified V1 set eight records, carrying a series of loaded from 0kg to 2000kg over 1,000km and 2,000km courses. These records were only held for eight days, before being broken by a CANT Z 509. The He 115 was an all-metal stressed-skin aircraft, with a slim streamlined fuselage. The mid-mounted wings had a rectangular centre section and tapering outer panels, and carried two BMW 132K engines (based on the Pratt & Whitney Hornet). The three man crew were carried in three cockpits. The observer was located in the glazed nose, with a bombsight and an MG15. The pilot was located just above the wing leading edge, and the radio operator/ rear gunner above the trailing edge. In the prototype the pilot and radio operator had been given separate canopies, but in production aircraft a single 'greenhouse' canopy was used, connecting their positions. An internal weapons bay was installed between the wings, and could carry either a 1,763lb torpedo or three SC 250 bombs (550lb each). The six aircraft exported to Norway soon found themselves being used against the Germans. At the end of the Norwegian campaign three of the Norwegian aircraft and a captured German aircraft escaped to Britain, where they were given an heavier armament of four forward firing and four rear firing machine guns, and used for clandestine operations. Two went to Malta, from where they were used to drop agents in German occupied North Africa, while two were used for the same purpose over Norway, operating from Scotland. These aircraft were withdrawn in 1942. One aircraft deemed unfit to be flown to the UK was flown to Finlandposing as a civilian aircraft. While the Fins interned the aircraft they let the crew go. The aircraft was used for ferry troops behind Soviet lines. However it was ambushed and forced to land where it was captured. Subsequently the aircraft was attacked by Finnish Fighters and sunk. There were reports the Soviets salvaged the wreck. Finland also borrowed two German aircraft to use inthe role of the ex Norwiegian example, one was retured but the second was surrendered to the Soviet. The Sweedish Air Force purchased and operated 12 aircraft, 6 more being on order but not delivered due to the outbreak of WWII. These were only retired in 1952 being well liked by their cres. The Model The kit comes in quite a large and sturdy top opening box. On opening the box the modeller is a large bag of medium grey styrene, a cardboard shelf on which the small poly bag of resin and another bag with the etched brass sheets and decal sheet are stapled. The styrene parts are very nicely moulded, with some very fine detail such as the recessed panel lines and raised panels where required. There is no sign of flash as one would expect of a new kit these days, and no moulding pip, just a few strengthening bits between the more fragile parts. The styrene appears to be quite soft and has a slightly rough texture, so paint should stick to it well. The clear styrene parts are quite clear and respectably thin, but there is some distortion on the curved areas, particularly the nose cone. The small bag of resin contains some very nicely moulded parts, such as the engines, spare machine gun ammunition drums, radio sets, levers and DF loop teardrop housing. There are a sheets of etched brass containing the instrument panel, seatbelts, boarding ladders, cockpit leavers and handles, radio operator’s panel, machine gun sights, and the float handrails. There is also an acetate sheet containing the instrument panels back sheets. Construction begins with the cockpit, which is quite complex with lots of parts from all three mediums making up into a very busy and detailed area. The instructions aren’t too clear for this area and should be studied carefully. It may be an idea to scan the instructions and print them in a larger format to improve things. The bomb aimers position is equally detailed with numerous parts being use to build a very detailed area. With the smaller parts in place the bomb aimers floor and support can be fitted, followed by the centre section, which consists of the bomb bay, cockpit floor, fuselage side inserts plus the fore and aft bulkheads. The radio operator’s position is also fitted out with the resin radio boxes and spare ammunition drums. Just forward of the radio position another bulkhead is fitted, onto which a brass and acetate radio panel is attached. The operators seat is then assembled and glued into position, at which point the fuselage can be closed up. The two piece wings are now glued together followed by a large panel just aft of the engine nacelles. The resin engines, once painted up are fitted with their two piece cowls. There are alternative horizontal tailplanes, each of which are in two halves and these should be assembled and put to one side. The completed fuselage is fitted out with the glass nose side panels, nose position canopy and the centre section roof. The tailplanes can also be fitted at this point. The large two part floats are now assembled and fitted out with the brass handrails, along with the two part float struts. The wing assemblies are now attached to the fuselage and fitted with the engine/cowling assemblies, propeller assemblies, (each from a back plate, three separate blades and the boss), and the cockpit windscreen. Turning the model over onto its back the tailplane struts can be fitted as are the main float struts, inner float struts, bomb aimers window, bomb sight, exhausts, and under fuselage panel. With all the struts in place the floats can now be attached. With the model the right side up and sitting on its floats it’s onto the final stages of the build. The machine guns are assembled from a separate breech, ammunition drums, PE gun sights and when fitted to their positions the barrel, with PE sight is fitted. In the case of the nose gun position the barrel needs to be fitted from the outside. The nose cone is then fitted along with the main canopy centre section, aft section and the cockpit canopy. The two PE boarding ladders are fitted between the floats and the aft cockpit position just aft of the wing trailing edges. And finally the rear gunners canopy can be posed either open or closed. If closed the machine gun needs to be posed in the stored position. Decals Decals are from Aviprint, look to be in register and are colour dense. Markings included are for the following aircraft:- W/Nr 3027, F-2 Wing of the Sweedish Air Force. 1939-1952 Ex Norwegian no.50. Defected to Finland 1940. Served with No.14 Recon Sqn. Later captured by Russia. Royal Norwegian Naval Air Service, machine 60. Captured by German Forces. Conclusion It is nice to see this imposing model re-released, with non German markings. It is a pity the instructions are small and sometimes complicated, though when blown up to A4 size on a photocopier it makes them much easier to read. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  21. Northrop Gamma 2E "Bomber in China" 1:72 Azur FR.ROM The Delta was designed by Jack Northrop in 1932 when the Northrop Corporation was set up with as a joint venture with The Douglas Aircraft Company. This was developed alongside the Delt, the Gamma was to be a mail plane. It was a low wing monoplane with a fixed undercarriage. The wings were common to both aircraft. The Gamma 2C was a proposed attack version to compete with the Curtiss A-12, with the 2E being a development of this but with a 1600lb bomb load. These were used by the Republic of China Air Force with some being built in China from kits supplied by Northrop. One aircraft K5053 was supplied to the UK and was tested by the Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment at RAF Martlesham Heath. Two aircraft were also supplied to the Japanese for testing. The aircraft was eventually developed by Northrop into the A-17. The Kit The kit has four sprues of plastic and a clear sprure. The detail and moulding quality are as good as ever. There is also one small photo-etch fret. Construction starts off unsurprisingly with the cockpit. The pilot seat, front & rear bulkheads are added to the main cockpit floor. The centre console and control column are also added. PE seatbelts are provided for the pilots seat. For the rear gunners area there is the rear gun with its mounting/seat to make up and add. Ammunition stowage is also added into the fuselage half. The instrument panel and a few other items are added to the fuselage half's and then they can be closed up around the cockpit area. The engine is fitted to the exhaust ring and fitted into it's cowling and once complete this can be added to the main fuselage. The tail planes are made up and fitted, along with the main wing. The single part canopy can then be added after adding in the PE gunsight. To finish off the wheel spats are made up and added to the wheels. The completed assemblies then being added to the underside of the main wing. The bomb racks are added which sit under the fuselage between the spats. The lower observation window is also made up and added at this time. Lastly the propeller is added. Decals This boxing of the kit gives four choices of markings; White 901, Chinese Air Force, 9th Chungtui, 2nd Tutui, transferred to 14th Volunteer Sqn, Hanklow 1937-38. K5053, British Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment, 1937-38. Black 14, unknown Chinese Unit 1937-38. Black 1412, transfered from unknown Chinese Unit to 14th Volunteer Sqn, Hanklow Jan 1938. Conclusion This is another left of field release from FFROM of an lesser well known but good looking aircraft from the earlier years of aviation. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  22. I am not a type expert, but everything looked good when I was doing my research. Julien
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