Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'eduard'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Group Builds
  • Model Show Calendar

Forums

  • Forum Functionality & Forum Software Help and Support
    • FAQs
    • Help & Support for Forum Issues
    • New Members
  • Aircraft Modelling
    • Military Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Civil Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Aircraft
    • Ready for Inspection - Aircraft
    • Aircraft Related Subjects
  • AFV Modelling (armour, military vehicles & artillery)
    • Armour Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Armour
    • Ready for Inspection - Armour
    • Armour Related Subjects
    • large Scale AFVs (1:16 and above)
  • Maritime Modelling (Ships and subs)
    • Maritime Discussion by era
    • Work in Progress - Maritime
    • Ready for Inspection - Maritime
  • Vehicle Modelling (non-military)
    • Vehicle Discussion
    • Work In Progress - Vehicles
    • Ready For Inspection - Vehicles
  • Science Fiction & RealSpace
    • Science Fiction Discussion
    • RealSpace Discussion
    • Work In Progress - SF & RealSpace
    • Ready for Inspection - SF & RealSpace
  • Figure Modeling
    • Figure Discussion
    • Figure Work In Progress
    • Figure Ready for Inspection
  • Dioramas, Vignettes & Scenery
    • Diorama Chat
    • Work In Progress - Dioramas
    • Ready For Inspection - Dioramas
  • Reviews, News & Walkarounds
    • Reviews
    • Current News
    • Build Articles
    • Tips & Tricks
    • Walkarounds
  • Modeling using 3D Printing
    • 3D Printing Basics
    • 3D Printing Chat
    • 3D Makerspace
  • Modelling
    • Group Builds
    • The Rumourmonger
    • Manufacturer News
    • Other Modelling Genres
    • Britmodeller Yearbooks
    • Tools & Tips
  • General Discussion
    • Chat
    • Shows
    • Photography
    • Members' Wishlists
  • Shops, manufacturers & vendors
    • Aerocraft Models
    • Air-craft.net
    • Amarket Modl
    • A.M.U.R. Reaver
    • Atlantic Models
    • Beacon Models
    • BlackMike Models
    • Bring-It!
    • Copper State Models
    • Freightdog Models
    • Hannants
    • fantasy Printshop
    • Fonthill Media
    • HMH Publications
    • Hobby Paint'n'Stuff
    • Hypersonic Models
    • Iliad Design
    • Hobby Colours & Accessories
    • KLP Publishing
    • L'Arsenal 2.0
    • Kingkit
    • MikroMir
    • Model Designs
    • Modellingtools.co.uk
    • Maketar Paint Masks
    • Marmaduke Press Decals
    • Parkes682Decals
    • Paulus Victor Decals
    • Red Roo Models
    • RES/KIT
    • Sovereign Hobbies
    • Special Hobby
    • Test Valley Models
    • Tiger Hobbies
    • Ultimate Modelling Products
    • Videoaviation Italy
    • Wingleader Publications
  • Archive
    • 2007 Group Builds
    • 2008 Group Builds
    • 2009 Group Builds
    • 2010 Group Builds
    • 2011 Group Builds
    • 2012 Group Builds
    • 2013 Group Builds

Categories

  • New Features
  • Other

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

  1. I need to find some motivation to continue work on my F-84, but still have plenty of time for that. So I figured I’ll start my thread here in the meantime. I have plenty of planned subjects to choose from, including a couple for my yet to be built Wisconsin Aces collection, but I’m going to do a 361st bird for this GB. Specifically, Jasper Joker II flown by Lt. Donald Vulgamore. I’ll be building my first Eduard kit and using Aeromaster decals. And of course using an excellent Schiffer Military History book for reference.
  2. Hi All, My contribution will be one of the first ships to open fire on D-Day, still able to be visited, one of the few elements of Britain's maritime history to be saved from the breakers yard, - HMS Belfast. In truth I'm also attempting to build USS Franklin as well over in a different group build but why not set myself a challenge right, A few shots of the ship herself in all her glory, personally i think she looked her best in her WW2 days, Thanks to some special dispensation I'll likely be painting her in this final scheme that she wore during the war, i might yet change my mind and go for her D-day camo but i don't have all the paints and i honestly don't know if i can face masking it all off sorry, I'll get some shots up of the kit itself and the etch parts up later, Cheerio, Sam
  3. When Italy joined NATO in 1949 she was still flying sleek and shiny Spitfires. As part of my "Spitfires-by-the-Seas" project, in which I am building a pair of Spitfires in the markings of countries bordering five seas, I will build an Italian Mk IXc as part of my "Ionian Sea" pair for this GB.
  4. Eduard leaflet for May: http://www.eduard.com/store/out/media/distributors/leaflet/leaflet2016-05.pdf change digit in link for older issues
  5. Morning All, As Mr Mojo has been somewhat capricious of late, I rather fancied a little indulgence. Although I've been increasingly drawn to gentlemans' scale, I do still have a few 1:48 kits in my modest stash. So, what could be more indulgent than an Eduard Spitfire - Profipack indeed!! I have built a few of these, so the build is a well-trodden path, although this is a rather unusual version of the iconic aircraft. Here's the box art: What immediately jumps out is those pointy wingtips - that's not normal! I've been hankering after this lovely 'high altitude' colour scheme for a while, so there is no contest in the choice of scheme: This is an aircraft of 32 Sqn RAF, based in Foggia, Italy in early 1944. Here's a photo of JF364: I have seen this scheme completed with a red spinner, which I think will be a nice cherry on top of this most aesthetically pleasing scheme (which more than compensates for the weirdy-beardy wingtips, to my mind). Here's the sprue shots: Eduard's usual exquisite decals: So, off we trot for a bit of Eduard fun! Thanks for looking, Roger
  6. After the P-51D/K Eduard is to release 1/48th North American P-51B/C Mustang kits Source: https://www.eduard.com/out/media/InfoEduard/archive/2022/info-eduard-2022-10-special.pdf V.P.
  7. Hi, Although there are many P-51D's that I'd like to build, I'm going to go with the new Eduard P-51B. One reason is that I find it fascinating that the 8th AF succeeded in putting escort fighters over Berlin in daylight in March 1944. The Bullseye sheet has some of these. I'm going to go with B6-Y. 😉 Cheers, Stefan.
  8. Its been sometime since i posted here . I seen this Hind E helicopter , Looks like a great OTB. Please enjoy Rick
  9. I decided to double down with a second build. It will be another 1/48 Eduard kit, this time being a fillet-less D-5 version. I’ve had this kit in the stash for a couple years with the intent of doing Richard Peterson’s “Hurry Home Honey” because I really really like the dark green over NMF scheme the 357th FG had on its early Ds. While researching the plane the other day on the LittleFriendsUK site, I came across a different plane from the same squadron with a pilot from my home state of Wisconsin. Always one to want to learn about the pilots from my state, I soon found out the pilot, Col Irwin Dregne, was an ace and was the last CO of the Yoxford Boys. His plane carried the same camo as Peterson’s and since Bullseye Decals’ excellent Yoxford Boy series has markings for it, I decided I’m going to build Dregne’s plane (just had to purchase the decals since it was on a separate sheet from HHH). It carries two names: Bobby Jeanne for his wife and daughter, and then Ah-Fung-Goo II which apparently was a name chosen by Dregne’s crew chief.
  10. I am planning on building Tamiya`s Spitfire Vb kit in 1/48th scale as a artillery spotter of the US Navy`s VOS-7. This unit comprised of US Pilots who had flown Seagulls and Kingfisher floatplanes, but these were considered too vulnerable for the assault on Normandy, so converted to Spitfires and flew out of Lee-On-Solent. I plan on building 4Q which seems to have more invasion stripes than camouflage. On the Fundekals sheet 4Q has full span wings whereas the new Eduard Spitfire Vb Overlord kit has the same aircraft with clipped wings, As the squadron in its role worked at quite low level. I am tempted to go with clipped wings. What are others thoughts? This kit was purchased from Hannants secondhand and previous owner had removed most of the sprues for some reason. The kit looks complete. More images when i have figured out how to post them.... Grahame
  11. In the Czech Modelforum it's mentioned that after the 1/48th MiG-21, Spitfire and Bf.109 families, Eduard has as long term project the North American P-51 Mustang in the same scale. Wait and see. Source: http://www.modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=68170&start=5865 V.P.
  12. Hello! Something from Saddam's era. 💣 OOB kit with no changes at all. This kit was started like years ago and I kept it in some box until last summer and decide to finish it whenever I have some time. Camouflage is based on only one available photo from the internet and camouflage pattern from R.V. Aircraft so it's a mixture of both worlds to get close to real one. Not quite sure if there were roundels on upper surfaces but it looked good to me so I applied them. On some Bis/MF versions, there were 2 roundels on top surfaces, some had only one, there was not a standard when it comes to painting and marking all the aircrafts. Enjoy the pictures! 😉
  13. I had big plans to enter quite a few GB’s this year, but installing a new kitchen over the last couple of months has seriously hampered my model making. The kitchen is finally finished (ish) now so I can start getting some decent bench time in again. My entry will be the Eduard Hellcat Mk.I. I will be making the box art version from 800 Sqn FAA, HMS Emperor, June 1944. This is a dual combo profipack so I have 2 of everything. All looks very nice. Few variations on the build as you can make a Mk.I or Mk.II. I like the look of the coloured PE especially, should look great in the cockpit. I'm hoping to make a start this weekend, fingers crossed. George
  14. Eduard is to rebox in June 2020 the hasegawa 1/72nd Martin B-26 Marauder kit - ref. Source: http://www.kitreviewsonline.de/eduard-pressekonferenz-in-nuernberg/ V.P.
  15. Hello, Here's another project of mine. 3 american aircrafts including 1 and a half under british management. Both are early Mustangs with différents armament and of course different wing. 1 MTO, 1 ETO and the last from CBI There's an Accurate min and 2 ICM, serioulsly they're almost identical. The first to be finished, I guess will be the MTO one a P-51A from an US Sqdn on loan to an brit squadron. The colours will be ... Let's say, unusual. One of my favourite game , you both should know the kind of remark "are you sure about the colours ???" I modify the camera rack for 2 of thede Mustang, because, you receive this... And you must have that... So, I cut the brackets, throw away the original support, add an armour plate ( from her cousins ) slightly modified. Add wiring to the camera, That seem promising, there's also lots of sanding but the ICM are worst. I keep on going, modifying the wings according to the 3 different type of early mustang is funny. Thank for watching. Corsaircorp
  16. Bf.109G-10 WNF/Diana ProfiPACK (82161) 1:48 Eduard There must have been billions of words written on the Bf.109 over the years, which was the mainstay of the Luftwaffe's fighter arm, despite having been supposedly superseded by the Fw.190 and others during its service life. It kept coming back to prominence due partly to it being a trusted design, the manufacturer's sway with the RLM, and the type's ability to be adapted as technology advanced. The G or Gustav as it was known was one of the later variants, and is widely regarded as one of the more successful variants, with improved armament that give some variants a distinctive pair of blisters in front of the windscreen, plus mounting points for the 210mm rocket tubes used to disrupt the bomber streams in long range attacks using timed detonation. The other minor changes were targeted at defensive means, removing the mounting points and hardware for long-range tanks etc. The G-10 was fitted with the new DB605D-2 engine that was later seen on the K, and became the de facto standard Gustav once introduced, often using unfinished G-14s as the starting point, which has confused some researchers in the past. It was fitted with the sleek Erla-Haube canopy and a deeper oil cooler under the nose that sets it apart from previous issues along with some small blisters just forward and below the exhaust stacks. It also had a swept-forward installation of the radio antenna under the wing leading edge, all of which you can see on the box art, although whether it will survive the attack by the Russkis on the box art is a matter for conjecture. The Kit This boxing depicts airframes that were manufactured at the Wiener Neustädter Flugzeugwerke (WNF) and in the underground ‘Diana’ factory that was built in a disused railway tunnel in Moravia, and as you can imagine, it shares some sprues with other Gustav boxings from Eduard. With this being a ProfiPACK issue, it arrives in the gold-themed box, with four sprues of grey styrene, a clear sprue, a fret of pre-painted nickel-plated Photo-Etch (PE), a sheet of yellow kabuki-style masking material (not pictured), two decal sheets separated into markings and stencils, plus of course the instruction booklet printed in colour on glossy paper. Detail is on a par with any of Eduard's other 109 offerings, including fine surface detail, cockpit and gear bays that are up to a high standard, and accessories that will allow the modeller to personalise their model in line with their chosen decal option. Construction begins in the cockpit, with PE and styrene parts installed into the combined floor and rear bulkhead, plus a clear fuel feeder pipe so you can mask the vision port and paint the rest, tinting the clear section a suitable fuel colour. This was a simple way for the pilot to quickly check whether his engine was sucking vapours, or was faltering for some other reason. PE seatbelts are included, and a choice of PE or styrene rudder pedals, depending on which you prefer. The instrument panel is laminated from layers of pre-painted PE, with glossy, slightly domed dials already present on the rearmost layers. The sidewalls too are decorated with more painted PE parts, after which you can close the fuselage unless have some additional aftermarket to apply. The backplate for the spinner and exhaust stubs are installed with a choice of shrouded or un-shrouded exhausts by using different parts. The top cowling with separate gun trough inserts is glued into place along with the intake for the engine's supercharger, a PE hinge section on the top centre of the cowling, gun barrel muzzles, and optional PE flash-hiders for the exhausts. The G-10 had an extended wooden fin, which is a separate insert, breaking at a convenient panel line and adding the rudder behind it. The elevator fins are each two parts and fit using pins, with separate elevators and the tail-wheel on a short strut that locates in a depression under the fuselage. The wing undersides are full-span, adding main gear sidewalls and drilling out two 0.5mm holes for the central rack if you intend to use it. The upper wings have a long blister from the leading edge toward the rear to accommodate the wider wheels, and the uppers glue over the lower, incorporating the single-thickness tips and a pitot-probe in the port wingtip. Under one wingtip a clear part is inserted into a recess and masked to represent a clear insulator for an underwing antenna that will be installed later. Masks are included for this and for the wingtip lights moulded into the wings, and a jig is supplied to help you scribe a pair of small rectangular panel lines in front of the cockpit opening. With the wings mated to the fuselage, separate leading-edge slats (gravity deployed when stopped) are fitted that can be posed retracted for flight by removing the short supports from inside the slats. The ailerons slide into the trailing-edge of the wing on two slots, so can be deflected if you wish, moving on to the radiator bays, which have PE skins front and back, as does the chin-scoop under the nose. The radiator fairings and two-layer combined flaps/cooling flaps are added, a scrap diagram showing the correct positioning of the flaps when they are deployed. The main gear is the same narrow-track struts from earlier models, with separate fatter tyres and hubs, plus captive bay doors, socketing into the bay using strong parts, and with hub masks included for easy painting of the demarcation. You have a choice of styrene or PE aerial for the underwing antenna that is rooted in the clear isolator, adding horn balances to the undersides of the ailerons, and a PE appliqué panel under the belly behind the wing’s trailing edge. As the build progresses, the clear gunsight is added after being partially painted, and if you add a little translucent green/blue to the edge to simulate the thickness of the glass, it will improve the look of the finished part. The windscreen has a couple of small PE parts added to it before you can glue it to the front of the squared-off cockpit opening, and the sleek Erla-Haube canopy has a windowed head armour part that will need masking from the enclosed sheet and painting before it is fitted. If you have treated yourself to a set of Tface masks that allow painting of both interior and exterior surfaces of the canopy, the additional interior detail parts added will gel nicely with this improvement. An optional stubby aerial fits to the top rear of the canopy for one decal option, and you have a choice of PE or styrene DF loop antennae further back down the spine. The canopy can be posed open by using the thin PE restraint that's included on the fret, which allows you to set the correct angle when open. The prop is a single part, which has the two-part spinner closed around it, after which you can either glue it in place, or leave it loose for travel and impromptu spinning if you prefer. Two types of two-part drop-tanks are supplied that attach on a four-prong mount under the centre of the fuselage, inserting a small PE aerial under the belly just behind the appliqué panel placed earlier. Markings There are four marking options included in the box, with variety of late war camouflage schemes that involves heavy use of mottle. The main sheet contains all the national, unit, and theatre markings, while the smaller sheet is full of stencils, which are detailed on a separate page to avoid cluttering each full page set of profiles. You get spinner decals for one option, so you're not left wondering how on earth you're going to do them. From the box you can build one of the following: Bf.109G-10/U4, II./JG52, Brno, Protektorat Böhmen und Mähren, April 1945 Bf.109G-10/U4, W.Nr.612769, 101. Vadászezred, Neubiberg Airfield, Germany, May 1945 Bf.109G-10/U4, W.Nr.611048, II./JG52 Neubiberg Airfield, Germany, May 1945 Bf.109G-10/U4, Jasta 5 der ROA, Nemecky Brod, Protektorat Böhmen und Mähren, April 1945 The decals are printed using a digital process and have good registration, sharpness, and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut loosely around the printed areas. This means that the carrier film on their decals can be coaxed away from the printed part of the decal after they have been applied, effectively rendering them carrier film free, making the completed decals much thinner and more realistic, and obviating the need to apply successive coats of clear varnish to hide the edges of the carrier film. It’s a great step further in realism from my point of view, and saves a good quantity of precious modelling time into the bargain. Conclusion It’s an excellent kit, but you probably already know that. It comes with some quality details, and some unusual decal options that you may not have seen before – plus it’s a Gustav. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  17. Bf.108 Taifun Update Sets (for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Eduard’s Bf.108 Taifun kit was one of their earliest in 2002, and yet it is still good enough to see the inside of a new box occasionally, including 2024 as I type this. To coincide with the re-release under the classic desert-themed box art, Eduard have released a couple of upgrade sets that will increase the level of detail in the cockpit, which is often a weaker point of older kits. Seatbelts STEEL (FE1431) These belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the two sets of crew belts, you also get two pairs of lap belts for the rear bench seat to keep the passengers in position during flight. SPACE (3DL48166) The Eduard SPACE sets use new 3D printing techniques that lay down successive layers of different colour resin, creating highly realistic almost full complete panels that are supplied on a decal sheet. They can depict metallic shades, plus glossy, satin and matt colours too, which really ups the detail on everything they print. In addition, a small sheet of nickel-plated and pre-painted PE is included for the aspects of the set that lend themselves better to this medium, such as seatbelts and rudder pedals. This set contains a full set of belts for the two crew and lap belts for the rear-seat passengers as per the above belt-only set, but it also equips the instrument panel with a large curved new surface that is studded with realistic dials and is applied over the flattened original for the ultimate in detail. The angled console between the pilots is also covered with a choice of two styles of instruments, adding an extra part to the top of one option, and a raised switch to the bottom of both choices. Conclusion The addition of seatbelts brings the level of detail in an aircraft’s cockpit up immensely, and with the addition of the SPACE instrument panel and console, the detail is further enhanced beyond the level capable by most modellers. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  18. Gannet AS.1/AS.4 Upgrade Sets (for Airfix) 1:48 Eduard Airfix made a lot of British and Anglophile aviation modellers very happy when they released their complete modern tooling of the Fairey Gannet, a venerable and much-missed carrier-based Anti-Submarine Search and Strike aircraft from the deepest era of the Cold War. The 1:48 annals of modelling have been a bit short on available kits of this sea bird for the longest of times, but that’s one gap that has now been filled, and filled well. You can always improve detail on an injection-moulded model however. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Gannet AS.1 Upgrade Set (491424) Two frets are included, one nickel-plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels, sidewalls, and consoles with added levers for all the cockpits and the extensive instrument panel for the main cabin are in full colour, with additional parts in bare brass that include new rudder pedals; a drop-down crew ladder that pops out of the fuselage by the nose gear bay; more detailed baffles for the interior of the bomb bay doors; bulkhead placards and other details in the bomb bay and in the nose gear bay. Gannet AS.4 Upgrade Set (491425) This set differs slightly from the one above in the layout of the cockpit equipment, with an early/late option on one panel. Gannet AS.1 SPACE 3D Printed Cockpit Decals (3DL48162) The Eduard SPACE sets use new 3D printing techniques that lay down successive layers of different colour resin, creating highly realistic almost full complete panels that are supplied on a decal sheet. They can depict metallic shades, plus glossy, satin, and matt colours too, which really ups the detail on everything they print. In addition, a small sheet of nickel-plated and pre-painted PE is included for the aspects of the set that lend themselves better to this medium, such as seatbelts and rudder pedals. This set replaces all the instrument panels, dials and boxes with 3D printed decals throughout the cockpits, plus a full set of crew seatbelts for the two crew members, including comfort pads under the buckles. Gannet AS.4 SPACE 3D Printed Cockpit Decals (3DL48163) This set differs very slightly from the one above in the shape and size of a few boxes in the cockpits. Gannet AS.1/AS.4 Seatbelts STEEL (FE1426) These belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the two sets of crew belts, you also get comfort pads for under the buckles, as Gannets often undertook extremely long missions as part of their deployment. Gannet AS.1/AS.4 Masks (EX1916) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition, you get a set of hub/tyre masks for the wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort, plus masks for both sides of the HUD and sundry smaller clear parts, including the landing lights. Gannet AS.1/AS.4 Masks Tface (EX1017) Supplied on a larger sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with everything above, but also give you another set of canopy masks tailored to fit the inside of the glazing so that you can paint the model’s interior and give your kit that extra bit of realism. Having used these sets on my own models now, I can confirm that they are extremely accurate, and it's good practice to place the outer masks first to act as a guide for alignment of the inner masks. Gannet AS.1/AS.4 National & Aircraft Markings (EX1018) Speaking personally, it’s long been a temptation to mask off the main markings of my aircraft models, removing any issues associated with using larger decals, such as thickness of the carrier film, unintended movement before setting, and the perennial scourge of decaling – silvering - where microscopic air bubbles become trapped under the carrier film, reflecting light and giving the completed decal a silvered look. Using masks, it’s possible to paint several colours in very thin layers with an airbrush, leading to a set of markings that are more harmonious with the overall paint finish, and later appear to have been sprayed on along with the main colours. It also makes weathering the markings as simple as it is with paint. This set is tailored for the Airfix kit, and arrives in a flat-pack resealable package, backed by a thick piece of cardboard, and with a small instruction sheet held within along with a sheet of vinyl masks. Why vinyl rather than kabuki tape? Vinyl is more robust and requires more tension to deform it, lending themselves to letters, digits and shapes that require precision of size and angles to look correct. The masks include parts for the national markings, the aircraft fuselage codes, their underwing serials and the two walkways down the wingroots where the crew exit and enter. From the sheet you can paint the markings of one of the three aircraft depicted on the kit’s decal markings: Kit Scheme A - Fairey Gannet AS.4 XA460, No.849 Naval Air Squadron, HQ Training Flight, Royal Naval Air Station Culdrose, circa 1959 Kit Scheme B - Fairey Gannet AS.4 XA418, No.815 Naval Air Squadron, HMS Ark Royal, 1958 Kit Scheme C - Fairey Gannet AS.1 XA335, No.847 Naval Air Squadron, RAF Nicosia, Cyprus, 1957 Positioning the masks should be straight-forward, but if you have placement issues you could place the positive masks as a guide, then lower the negative masks into position over them, weeding out the positive masks once you are happy with their location. The roundels will require three steps and some element of adding and removal of masks, which you can keep together by adding a separate piece of tape across the group of circles to keep them aligned in between uses. It would also help keeping the groups apart from each other during use, so you don’t get the individual mask sets mixed up. A perfect opportunity to try something new with your modelling, helping to increase the realism of your work by removing the carrier film and associated issues from the equation, at least for the major markings. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  19. In August 2020, Eduard is to release in August 2020 - just in time for the 80th Anniversary of the BoB - a new tool 1/48th Supermarine Spitfire Mk.I limited kit - ref. Source: https://www.eduard.com/out/media/InfoEduard/archive/2020/info-eduard-2020-01.pdf V.P.
  20. Gustav Pt.2 Limited Edition Dual Combo (2145) Bf.109G-10 WNF/Diana ProfiPACK 1:72 Eduard With almost 34,000 examples constructed over a 10-year period, the Messerschmitt Bf.109 is one of the most widely produced aircraft in history, and saw active service in every theatre in which German armed forces were engaged. Designed in the mid-1930s, the Bf.109 shared a similar configuration to the Spitfire, utilising monocoque construction and Daimler Benz V12 engine, albeit an inverted V with fuel injection rather than a Rolls-Royce carburettor as used to power the Spitfire. Initially designed as a lightweight interceptor, like many German types during WWII, the Bf.109 evolved beyond its original brief into a bomber escort, fighter bomber, night fighter, ground-attack and reconnaissance platform. The Bf.109G series, colloquially known as the Gustav, was first produced in 1942. The airframe and wing were extensively modified to accommodate a more powerful engine, greater internal fuel capacity and additional armour. In contrast to early 109s, which were powered by engines delivering less than 700hp, some of the later Gustavs could output almost 2000hp with water injection and high-performance superchargers. The Gustav series accounted for a dizzying array of sub-variants, some of which featured a larger tail of wooden construction. Odd number suffixed aircraft had pressurised cockpits for high altitude operation, Erla Haube clear view canopy with clear rear head armour, underwing points for tanks, cannon or rockets and larger main wheels resulting in square fairings on the inner upper wings to accommodate them. The Kit This is a new boxing from Eduard of their recent tooling in this scale, and it is boxed as part two of a two-part series of Gustav kits as a Limited Edition, with two kits in the box, hence the Dual Combo tag in the top right of the lid. It arrives in a top-opening box with a dramatic painting of a brace of Gustavs in a clouded wintery sky. Inside the box are two of each of the three sprues in grey styrene, two clear sprues, four frets of Photo-Etch (PE), two in bare brass, two nickel-plated and pre-painted, a sheet of kabuki-tape pre-cut masks (not pictured), plus the instruction booklet, printed in colour on glossy paper with the ten decal option profiles on the rearmost pages. The booklet also includes a detailed discussion of the development of the Bf.109E onwards, covering all major variants separately and spanning five pages in total, with several drawings pointing out the salient changes between them, which is interesting and useful in itself. Detail on the sprues is excellent, to a similar standard as their 1:48 scale kits within limitations of size. For instance, the rudder pedals have been moulded into the cockpit floor, but they have been done using a punch-through mould that still allows them to sit at an angle to the deck without an ugly wedge behind them. It’s all very clever stuff that will result in a better model for us. Remember throughout that there are two kits in the box, and that each sprue is doubled-up, and it’s only the main decal sheet that isn’t. Construction begins with the afore mentioned cockpit floor, which has a rolled forward edge, and is detailed with a trim wheel and chain, adding the seat back, control column, replacement PE rudder pedals if you wish, the cannon breech fairing between the pedals, and a full set of crew seatbelts. The instrument panel can be made with styrene and decals or by using the pre-painted PE parts, which have an additional panel section for some decal options, and a choice of two styles of gunsight on top. The finished panel is mounted on a support that is painted cockpit colour, then is fixed to a recess on the front of the cockpit floor, putting it to one side while the fuselage is prepared. The basics for the cockpit sidewalls are moulded into the fuselage interiors, adding a large insert to the starboard that has either three PE parts or decals applied, and has the clear fuel line wrapped around it, painting the majority of the pipe interior colour, leaving a short length transparent as a visual guide for the pilot whether fuel is still flowing. The port side is upgraded with several smaller parts, cutting off one box for decal option C, which also has some changes on the opposite side. before closing the fuselage, there are some minor line filling tasks, depending on which decal option you have chosen, removing some raised portions around the cockpit opening, and filling a panel line near the front of the engine cowling. A choice of standard or extended fin inserts slides into a socket in the tail, closing the fuselage halves together and dealing with the seams once the glue is fully cured, remembering that the 109 had some panel lines top and bottom. The cockpit can then be slipped in from underneath, adding the correct rear bulkhead for your decal option, the Beule blisters in front of the cockpit, and a choice of two top engine cowling inserts, again depending on which decal option you have chosen. There is a little more filling of access panels on the aft fuselage for some decal options, then a choice of two styles of exhausts with an optional PE exhaust flare hider on both sides, plus a three-part supercharger intake trumpet on the port side. The elevators are a single span part that is slotted into the rear of your chosen tail fin, trapped in place by a suitable rudder fin, which can be adjusted to be deflected if you choose. Two decal options have the trim-tab removed from the upper trailing edge of the rudder. The lower wings are full-span out to the tip joint, and a pair of wall inserts are placed in to create the main gear bays, with a few holes drilled in the wing for some decal options. The upper wings are in halves, and have gear bay roof detail moulded-in, with separate leading-edge slat that can be retracted or deployed by removing or retaining the tab behind it. The ailerons are also separate, mounting on tabs, with the option of deflecting them, adding clear tip lights to each wing. Flipping the model over, PE radiator grilles are applied to the front and rear of the bath areas, covering them with the cowlings that have moulded-in cooling flaps that can be bent downward if you plan on posing the radiators in the open position. The chin intake is also fitted with grille inserts before the cowling is applied over it, and it is fixed in the space under the nose. Finally, flaps are inserted into the rear of the wing at the same angle as the cooling flaps. The 109’s narrow-track landing gear was the source of many a nose-over event, and they are each created from a single strut with a strong mounting-point at the top, fitting the three-part wheel, PE brake hose, and the captive bay door to each one, choosing a tail-wheel suitable for your decal option that inserts in a hole under the tail. Horn-balances are fixed in depressions under the ailerons, adding an optional aerial under the belly, and another under the port wing, removing the panel lines if it isn’t required. Some markings options have a small hole drilled under the nose, and if you intend to use the manual engine cranking handle, a 0.5mm hole will need to be drilled in the cowling to accommodate the handle as indicated on the starboard side, just in front of the Beule blisters. Many of the decal options have the later Erla-Haube canopy that has reduced framing to the canopy to improve the pilot’s situational awareness, which also reduces the number of clear parts down to two. The windscreen has a PE frame added to its rear before it is glued in, while the main canopy has the head armour and bar applied across the rear, with an optional short aerial on top at the rear. It can be glued in closed or open with a retention wire from PE, plus another choice of aerial and DF loop to keep you on your toes. A scrap diagram shows the location of the wire’s ends to give you some help. The prop is the same whichever canopy you choose, made from a single set of three blades sandwiched between the spinner and back-plate. This leads us to the traditional framed canopy, which has one of the same windscreen parts and PE frames, with a fixed aft section that has an aerial inserted into the roof. The opener has armour and cross-bar inserted in the same manner as the Erla canopy, adding a latch to the forward sill, which will require a short length of styrene rod from your stores to make the handle. It too can be posed closed or open, using the same PE retention wire as before. An actuator is attached to the rudder on the starboard side for some decal options. There is a good choice of weapons and tanks for your new model, with a choice of two external tanks on an oval pylon that is sited between the wings on the belly. Cannons in fairings can also be built from two halves plus the barrels for under the wings, just outboard of the main gear bays, but these are only appropriate for two decal options, sadly. There is also a bomb on a longer pylon with two sway-braces, with an optional level of detail. The simpler option utilises the two bomb halves, adding a perpendicular fin on a slot, and a square frame at the rear. The more complex and detailed option removes the moulded-in fin from the bomb halves, substituting it for a pair of PE fins glued to the rear, plus four PE stabilisers to the rear of the fins. The bomb is only used for decal option B though, which again is a shame. Markings There are a generous ten decal options on the large sheet, and two stencil sheets that have their locations noted separately to avoid confusion with the other decals. From the box you can build two of the following: Bf.109G-6/R6 W.Nr.160303, Hptm. Freidrich Eberle, CO of III./JG1, Volkel, The Netherlands, November 1943 – January 1944 Bf.109G-6/R1, Lt. Max-Bruno Fischer, Stab II./JG3, Evreux-Fauville, France, June 1944 Bf.109G-6, Lt. Anton Hafner, CO of 10./JG51, Tilsit-East, Soviet Union, August 1944 Bf.109G-14, Hptm. Erich Hartmann, BO of I./JG53, Veszprém, Hungary, February 1945 Bf.109G-6, W.Nr.165267, Majuri Eino Luukkanen, 1./HleLv 34, Taipalsaari, Finland, July 1944 Bf.109G-14, Oblt. Rolf Schlegel, 10./JG4, Jüterbog-Damm, Germany, March 1945 Bf.109G-14, W.Nr.465437, Hptm. Franz Dörr, CO of III./JG5, Gossen, Norway, May 1945 Bf.109G-14/U4, W.Nr.512382, Lt. Horst Schlick, 4./JG77, Schönwalde, Germany, November 1944 Bf.109G-14, W.Nr.464380, Maggiore Mario Bellagambi, CO of 5° Squadriglia, 2° Gruppo Caccia ANR, Osappo, Italy, March 1945 Bf.109G-14, W.Nr.782205, Lt. Antal Szebeni, 101/5, Vadászszázad MKHL, Börgönd, Hungary, October 1944 The decals are printed using a digital process and have good registration, sharpness, and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut loosely around the printed areas. This means that the carrier film on their decals can be coaxed away from the printed part of the decal after they have been applied, effectively rendering them carrier film free, making the completed decals much thinner and more realistic, and obviating the need to apply successive coats of clear varnish to hide the edges of the carrier film. It’s a great step further in realism from my point of view, and saves a good quantity of precious modelling time into the bargain. The set includes pre-cut kabuki-tape masks for the canopies of both models, plus masks for the main wheels and tail wheels, and extras for the pilot’s head armour and the wingtip lights. Conclusion There is excellent detail throughout, and wide choice of sub-variants that include Rüstsatz, or field modifications that personalise the aircraft to the mission in hand. What’s more, there are two of them, so if you’re having problems deciding, all you must do is narrow it down to two! Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  21. I picked up the limited edition 1/72 Eduard Bf109f dual boxing at a model show recently. It's a really impressive kit of the quality you'd expect from Eduard and provides no less than 14 decal options. There is however one flaw that could very easily catch you out. The kit provides parts to build one Bf109F-2 (or a F-1 with some effort) and one Bf109F-4. You'd think that you could build any combination of one of the F-2 schemes and one of the F-4 schemes, but no, that is not the case. Some of the F-2s use parts from the F-4 sprues that you need for the F-4, in particular the wheel wells and upper wings. You could very easily end up being unable to complete a second model from this dual box. Seems like a bit of an oversight. I still have the F-4 to build, but I chose the F-2 scheme such that it won't impact the choices of F-4 available. As a comparison with my Zvezda Bf109F-2: You can see the WIP thread here: And then this happened...
  22. Hot off the bench and a lovely build. Lots of AM used mainly Brassin Weapons and the Quinta cockpit set. Painted with MRP and Mr Hobby paints, weathered with oils and AK weathering pencils. Link to the build:- Enjoy. https://www.flickr.com/photos/158059068@N08/53763418677/in/album-72177720314321315/
  23. P-47D-30 Thunderbolt Update Sets (for MiniArt) 1:48 Eduard Brassin MiniArt knocked the still good but ageing 1:48 Tamiya kit off the top spot as de facto standard kit in this scale recently, and as they do with many of their kits, they have released a number of variants in so-called ‘Basic’ (which is hardly basic), and ‘Advanced’ flavours. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Upgrade Set (491432) Two frets are included, one nickel-plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. In the cockpit, a complete set of new layered instrument panels, copious sidewall details in full colour, and rudder pedal improvements, with a couple of dials for the floor also supplied. For the exterior, a set of grilles for the three chin-intakes within the engine cowling are added, replacement cooling doors on the sides of the fuselage with extra bracketry are mounted in the bays on the sides, a full wiring loom for the R2800 engine is fitted after removing the wiring harness tubing from the rear of the bell-housing, new PE bay doors for the tail wheel, replacement oleo scissor-links for the main gear, a pair of dive-brake spoilers that fit into the alternative kit inserts (found on the sprues) under the wings, replacement upper gear bay covers with hinges and stand-off links, plus the vestigial door at the base of the main leg, with a scrap diagram showing its orientation. SPACE 3D Printed Cockpit Decals (3DL48170) The Eduard SPACE sets use new 3D printing techniques that lay down successive layers of different colour resin, creating highly realistic almost full complete panels that are supplied on a decal sheet. They can depict metallic shades, plus glossy, satin, and matt colours too, which really ups the detail on everything they print. In addition, a small sheet of nickel-plated and pre-painted PE is included for the aspects of the set that lend themselves better to this medium, such as seatbelts and rudder pedals. # This set has a full set of four-point belts that should either be used with the kit’s alternate seat parts that has no belts moulded-in, or you could cut the belts off the other seat if you feel like making work for yourself! The belt buckle also has a comfort pad added underneath. The instrument panel consists of two main decals for the majority of the panel, plus a hanging centre console that is applied to a new PE part and attaches under the main panel. Two more decals are used on the starboard diagonal section of the panel, after removing all the moulded-in detail that is indicated on the instructions in red. The sidewalls are similarly upgraded, the starboard side also using PE parts to create supports for two of the instruments, and shaving the front off an equipment box to apply a new face. The starboard side has a stunning fourteen decals applied over moulded-in detail that is first removed, leaving an extremely well-appointed cockpit. Seatbelts STEEL (FE1433) These belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the crew belts, you also get a pad that sits under the buckles to prevent them from digging into the pilot’s lap. Masks (EX1025) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition, you get a set of hub/tyre masks for all three wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Masks Tface (EX1026) Supplied on a larger sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with everything above, but also give you another set of canopy masks tailored to fit the inside of the glazing so that you can paint the model canopy’s interior and give your kit that extra bit of realism. Having used these sets on my own models now, I can confirm that they are extremely accurate, and it's good practice to place the outer masks first to act as a guide for alignment of the inner masks. Conclusion Use some or all of these to make a good kit better, whilst reducing the amount of detailed painting and scratch-building you’ll need to do in order to even partially represent the same level of detail as is seen here. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  24. First post for a while so a new build, thought a Vietnam era A-1 would just be the ticket. Armed with a bit of aftermarket like the lovely Brassin seat and some Quinta office decals I thought why not. Not much progress so far just the basic's of the pit. The seat is a real gem and paints up really well. Enjoy folks
  25. P-51B/C Upgrade Sets (for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin We’ve just reviewed the new ‘razor-back’ Mustang in Limited Edition D-Day form here, and it’s a stunning kit, with lots of detail baked into the styrene. For those of us that want even more detail, Eduard have us covered with these new sets that include double-sided TFace masks for the two canopy styles (blown & framed), plus bronze gear legs, a seat, exhausts, wheels with a choice of tread patterns, and a comprehensive set of gun bay enhancements that will fill the spaces in the wings that are marked out on the kit parts. We have seven sets including the masks in to review, but there are plenty more available to tempt you to open your wallet, and if you pick them all up, you’ll need the bronze gear legs to cope with the additional weight! Gun Bays (648997) This largest set arrives in a large Brassin cardboard box, with the resin and Photo-Etch (PE) parts cocooned in their own Ziploc bags, protected by a pair of sheets of foam top and bottom, and the instruction booklet that is wrapped around the package during closure at the factory. There are twenty resin parts, and the fret of PE contains a few more, with sufficient parts to build a pair of handed gun bays, one for each wing. Detail is exquisite thanks to the 3D printed nature of most of the parts, requiring them to be cut away from the finger-like supports that prevent them sagging during printing, and link them to the flat print base underneath. The port bay is dealt with first, adding resin supports to the beautifully detailed bay shell, then mounting the breeches of the .50cal machine guns at an angle, wiring them to a resin actuator with some 0.2mm wire from your own supplies, totalling five in all that are picked out on the instructions in different colours to assist you with their location, while the lengths of the wires are called out on the individual drawings. The double run of ammunition that feeds the gun is printed as a single part for the narrower area of the bay, adding a separate section that curves around to orient itself with the breeches of the guns. The starboard wing is built in the same manner, only in mirror image, then the bay panels are shown being cut from the kit’s upper wing, following the thinned out lines on the interior of the parts, which is a great help. The bays are inserted into the corresponding recess in the lower wing, and the upper wing is placed over the top, adding PE strips to the forward edges of the ammo feeds, and a resin bay door in the vertical position, hinged forward, and with two PE latches sticking up that should be painted the same colour as the exterior of the wing, as should the bay doors. The other bay doors are also supplied, and are generally removed by the armourers to access the bays, then laid either on the wing or elsewhere nearby, ready to go back on once the reloading or maintenance job is complete. These parts are realistically thin, and have detail printed on both sides for realism. Colour call-outs in Gunze Sangyo paint codes are given through the build process, with acrylic and lacquer codes side-by-side. Wheels (Various Tread Patterns) Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. This 3D printed set contains two main wheels with separate outer hubs that are printed as a pair on a separate base, plus a rugged tail-wheel to fix to the kit struts. There are several sets available, but we have just the diamond treaded set that are pictured here. The other sets can be seen and/or purchased from the links below: Diamond Tread Seen Above (648986) Oval Tread (648987) Cross Tread (648988) Block Tread (648989) Diamond Tread 2 (648990) Each set also includes a sheet of pre-cut kabuki-tape masks for the wheels that allow you to cut perfect demarcations between the tyres and hubs of all the wheels with little effort. Exhaust Stacks (648992) Containing two drop-in replacements for the kit exhausts, these parts have finer detail and hollow tips that will give your model a more realistic look. As well as the parts pictured, there are also another type that has fairings around the pipes, which you can see by following the second link below: Exhaust Stacks with Fairing (648993) Undercarriage Legs BRONZE (648994) These replacement main gear legs for the Mustang offer extra strength and sharpness to your model, plus finer details such as the brake hoses and supports that can’t be moulded in injection styrene. They have minimal clean-up that will need to be done with a file due to the metal’s robust nature, and they also come with a full set of resin gear bay doors that are highly detailed and are closer to scale thickness than the kit parts. Seat Type 1 PRINT (6481002) A replacement 3D printed seat for your Mustang that provides more detail than the kit seat, plus a set of PE Steel four-point seatbelts for the pilot, complete with comfort pads under the buckles. There are two styles, the Type 2 can be seen by following the second link below: Seat Type 2 (6481003) Tface Masks Framed Canopy & Malcolm Hood (EX1036 & EX1037) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy both inside and out, with any compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition, you get a set of hub/tyre masks for the wheels and landing light, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. There is one set sold separately for each of the canopies used by the P-51B/C, known as the Framed Canopy and the Malcolm Hood, and they will give the canopies a very realistic look once completed and the masks removed. Framed Canopy (EX1036) Malcolm Hood (EX1037) Conclusion The detail is phenomenal on all the resin sets and their comparative simplicity of construction is commendable, while the masks ease the painting and preservation of the clarity of the canopy. Pick the sets that appeal to you or your budget, or go mad and get a raft of them to build the ultimate Mustang for your cabinet. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
×
×
  • Create New...