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Codger

A BIG Rolls-Royce Version II 1-7-2020

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1 hour ago, Noel Smith said:

Anyone contemplating building a Pocher Rolls should look at John Horrocks website where he describes a lot of engine detailing that can be done complete with many dimensioned drawings to make scratch built parts.

His site has a number of PDF's of the detailing that can be downloaded and should be of great help to any Pocher Rolls builder.

You mean John Haddock, and his work can also be seen on the ModelMotorcars site.

He builds beautiful models and many chassis-only, highly detailed ones as well. He is an expert machinist which allows him to scratch build many parts that are beyond most of us.

He has been mentioned here before.

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The very wild side........

I present for your amusement and hoped-for inspiration the exact opposite type vehicle to the above-shown Gentleman's Express. Each came from the bench of David Cox but could not be further apart, offering clues to the Cox mental state.

I know that like me, there are a small cadre of aero-engined vehicle nuts here. Mephistopheles has been a modeling subject often seen here. But here in an unprecedented scale, is a more 'modern' interpretation of the theme.

Disclaimer; the power unit seen here is no longer available in model form. Which distresses me greatly because I always wanted one. A beautiful, cast resin kit from the '90's, now gone. But it is an accurate depiction of the 28 liter, 1710 cubic inch, Allison V-12 of 1250 HP at 3200 RPM (!). Oh and 1595 pounds.  Powering P-38's and all manner of US fighters, it was a staple of WW II. As you will see, David's has no super or turbocharger, which was vital at high altitudes. But 1250 HP and un-godly torque on a huge carburetor is just fine for cafe-hopping or country lanes in a cut-down classic.

Prepare yourselves - this is not a one trick pony:

A-106-2.jpg

Starting with the familiar Pocher Rolls Sedanca, a staggering amount of model engineering was employed to make this as viable as a 1:1 counterpart. Indeed, a browse of youtube will reveal one or two such denizens among the very wealthy and crazy.

Such a power unit will need much special ancillary equipment so fabricated auxiliary tanks for coolant and especially oil we're stuffed everywhere Cox could fit the. Then plumbed.

B-3-A.jpg

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Now also needed are a battery of instruments to monitor such mechanical mayhem 12" from your right foot. Here is the IP, and the sharp eyed will note a deviation from standard English Rolls practice; LHD. Oh and a huge tachometer attached by a connecting rod. And the beginnings of wiring for the operating lights from dash switches. Sturdy and ummm.. brilliant.

D-DSCN1945.jpg

Plaid and leather, wooden wheel, relocated brake and shifter - why not?

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Why LHD? A. - Because he could and B. - The Allison would not permit a conventional steering column because it would have to go through the headers. So David designed a chain drive complete with tensioners, to drop down to a jackshaft inside the frame rail, connecting to the steering box, tucked out of Big Al's way. Then through the frame to the steering arm and drag link in conventional style.

F-DSCN1079.jpg

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Pocher Rolls builders will see that the cowl completely covers the firewall - necessary because the body is already shoved way back on the standard length chassis. This next shows how radical a set-back was needed to accommodate the engine. A very small driver space results - but I'd sure try it.

A full transmission and shortened driveshaft resulted. The longevity of the rear axle assembly has not been discussed..........
H-DSCN1019.jpg

Cox touches abound; chromed window frames, shortened body, new beltline, leather roll-back top, exposed larger fuel tank, working lights -the work list is amazing:

I-DSC01045.jpg

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Close-coupled and as subtle as a sawn-off 12 gauge, I have an immature,  deep love of this sort of thing. Years ago I was drawn to David's site by seeing this exact car - and discovered there are more - all different from each other, and was captivated by his imagination. And they are all perfectly executed in functional form.

K-40.jpg

Too extreme for many here I'm sure but I'd love to hear opinions or be pelted with bricks.

I just hope this kind of work inspires viewers to alter Pochers to their dreams;

L-IMG-1227.jpg

 

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10 minutes ago, Shawn M said:

my god, just went through this whole thread....

DAMN thats impressive.

Thank you Shawn and look below your post- just added this minute...:devil:

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oh wow

as an avid WW2 aviation AND car nut that tickles me in allllll the right ways

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A celebrity endorsement.....!

While traveling on her way to party in the fabulous Hamptons on a lovely day in 1932, no less than the international star Marlene Dietrich passed through my little hamlet. There, at the coachworks for a change of fluids, her attention was captured by my then-new Sedanca. She was charming, and complimentary, captivated by its stylish elegance. So I offered to drive the pleasant 25 miles to South Hampton with her as my passenger, which she graciously accepted.

Suffice to say, a good time was had by all. :devil:

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Well, once again I force you to endure more of my silliness. But I have a more sincere point for this, one which I've stated before.

The fun of these large scale classic builds can go far beyond the building phase. I have enjoyed building a 1/8 backdrop, photographing both and dabbling in computer graphics (which I have no sophisticated equipment or skills for) and childish storytelling.

When building the model, I saved every single bill and receipt for the costs of it and glues, paints, aftermarket parts and tools by the ton. I have steadfastly refused to look at that folder.

I have far exceeded those costs in the satisfaction all these activities have rendered.

I hope you discover these rewards with your builds.

 

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Posted (edited)

checking out a new way to host pictures and wanted to share this picture. I took a while back and I thought you might like it. If you don't see it, please let me know.

 

818d2093792073.5e6e921d0d5e4.jpg

 

Edited by Schwarz-Brot
smaller version of Picture reposted

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37 minutes ago, Schwarz-Brot said:

checking out a new way to host pictures and wanted to share this picture. I took a while back and I thought you might like it. If you don't see it, please let me know.

 

81423c93792073.5e6e15587f3e1.jpg

 

Got it, loved it, copied and saved it !

Now where's the rest of what she's standing on?? :whip:

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Posted (edited)

I lost most pictures of that time in a harddrive crash. The picture dates back to 2006... This version got saved as my retouched pictures rested on a different hard drive. IIRC it was a phantom or a phantom II in silver.

 

 

Edit: To clarify: It was a real car I stumbled over at an oldtimer event. 😅

Edited by Schwarz-Brot

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More silliness....

In these most stressful times I wish safety and health to you all and your families and friends. We are all in this together and the navigation is difficult both medically and financially. I find myself trying to divert from the dire daily news and rest my anxieties. To that end, I turn once again to my Rolls- a symbol of better times- both in 1932 and when I built it starting in 2014.

I have said that my enjoyment (and the kit's value) extend far beyond the build. Having photographed it extensively over the years, my latest enjoyment has been in placing it in real-world and imagined situations.

Herewith another example; a warm sunny day on a lovely country lane, perhaps with a picnic basket for two. A mental escape from our current reality. Accomplished by means of a simple graphics program and a real world backdrop, chosen near my home. I am far from expert with graphics and my camera of choice is a decades-old Canon which has never failed me.

P8120047-MASTER-3.jpg

Here are tips for your own fun.

Photo your models (any scale) outdoors in various light conditions. You built them so obviously you like looking at them. Photo them extensively. Shoot them against simple backgrounds. Minimize reflections.

Then photo some scenic areas; sure you can lift sites like Buckingham Palace from the web but your own choices can be highly effective. Keep them as uncluttered as possible - meaning no factory buildings with equipment everywhere. City streets are tough but the seashore, racetracks and countryside are fine.

Then visually match a chosen pose with the backdrop chosen; the angle of the model and most importantly, scale the car to the background using the software.

All Windows based computers have simplified graphics programs and noodling around in one teaches the tools and how to use them. I have zero P/S skills and that's how I do these. It also makes time and troubles diminish as you embrace the task.

Plus, you can get additional satisfaction beyond the model's build. Sure, many of you just build more models which is fine. But extending that increases your money's-worth of

enjoyment.

Stay safe and healthy all...

C

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That is a great build u doing here

I can learn a lot  from this

Great job i love it

 

Mark

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Hi Chas, you are really having fun with your Roller. 
I like the pictures you presented here.

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1 hour ago, Pouln said:

Hi Chas, you are really having fun with your Roller. 
I like the pictures you presented here.

The exciting stuff is largely the work of Dave Cox as noted.

After the Elegant, bring out one of your Rollers and we'll put it here - sort of 'Rolls Central'. :winkgrin:

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Wow! Thank You so much for reposting this build, Codger! Spent a week reading through. What an adventure! I greatly admire your skills, patience and dedication put down to complete this model. So nice to see modifications work out. A true inspiration! 
 

Terje

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19 hours ago, Codger said:

The exciting stuff is largely the work of Dave Cox as noted.

After the Elegant, bring out one of your Rollers and we'll put it here - sort of 'Rolls Central'. :winkgrin:

Not sure about the next model. I was actually thinking about a rebuild of the Testarossa cabrio. It’s currently the standard red one. Factory only built one cabrio for Enzo himself. metallic silver with blue striping and dark blue leather interior. It was on auction a few years back and I saved all pictures that were released back then.

Plan to bring it to those specs.

Having said that, who knows what plans will develop before the Alfa is finished.

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Since this is the one and only Phantom II reference build thread, I thought that this would be a good place to show where and how linkages on the carburettor side of the engine go.

Maybe some of you have seen it.

Engine looks terrible btw

 

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26 minutes ago, Pouln said:

Since this is the one and only Phantom II reference build thread, I thought that this would be a good place to show where and how linkages on the carburettor side of the engine go.

Maybe some of you have seen it.

Engine looks terrible btw

 

BRILLIANT! Huge thank you for this Poul. Amazing but brilliant Rube Goldberg machine of levers, bellcranks, rods and links. Now I have to build another whole RR !:frantic:

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See, Chas. There's your next project. Good luck!

 

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More hoped-for inspiration...

In an effort to bring some closet Pocher Rolls owners into the light of day, I again present the work of D. Cox because there's no better Rolls builder to inspire you. Certainly not a fan favorite but none-the-less an excellent early motorcar and a symbol of elegant quality. Named 'best car in the world' in 1932 in fact.

This is an early 4 door phaeton build of his, and the one where Dave started some of his advanced techniques. The body has been lowered and set back to correct wheel placement in the rear fender. It has his first full fabric top and lowered windscreen:

IMG-1180.jpg

Note the kit plated parts are used; this is before the MMC chromed bronze jewels were made. He had not yet developed the chromed brass window frame idea. But Dave had loved the look of steerable driving lights on the front apron and outlandish cowl searchlights. It has the traditional conservative paint work and many of the standard touches of Thrupp & Maberly coachwork, like the previously seen Star of India Phantom. He also began making his own Lalique-like grille mascots.

The simple and elegant lines of the prototype are evident and make an impressive model:

IMG-1188-3.jpg

Dave was always a believer that his cars should be driven so a tour of the area on a lovely spring day is customary for all his cars:

HOME-4500-5-7-3.jpg

And lo and behold, who should arrive at maintenance time other than a certain snazzy Sedanca?

GARAGE-2-RR.jpg

There is more than building fun on tap with Pocher classics. I urge any reluctant kit owners to assemble here as I'm fortunate that the admins left my thread here to browse.

I hope to keep it an enjoyable place to visit.

C

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A beautiful model and an amazing build story to get there. And even though I should have known, the Marlene Dietrich photo had me fooled for a bit.

 

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1 hour ago, peekay said:

A beautiful model and an amazing build story to get there. And even though I should have known, the Marlene Dietrich photo had me fooled for a bit.

 

Well I appreciate your determination in reading the whole saga PK ! And thank you. I should have had Ms Dietrich autograph the photo I guess...:clown:

I have long admired your work as well. Won't you step up in scale and present a big classic Pocher?

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On 15/04/2020 at 16:09, Codger said:

Won't you step up in scale and present a big classic Pocher?

I wouldn't have the courage to even open the box of a Pocher. I'll leave that to brave souls like yourself.

 

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37 minutes ago, peekay said:

I wouldn't have the courage to even open the box of a Pocher. I'll leave that to brave souls like yourself.

 

That's a nice compliment PK but - Excuse me, I beg to differ. :nono:

ANY MFH, kit is incredibly and accurately detailed, complex and labor-intensive compared to virtually any classic Pocher. And even their 1/12 kits pack all that into a smaller scale than Pocher. Without the compromises for manufacturing purposes which cause inaccuracy.

Now I have seen and admired your work here and know you have skills to do right justice to a Pocher classic. It may not however, be to your taste which is perfectly acceptable.

My whole reason for posting this soap opera here was to say to the membership - 'if I could do it, so could you. Here's how I happened to do it'. 

Adapting a fearless attitude about hacking one up as I did takes the fortitude to rely on your skills and the willingness to learn as you go. Besides there's tons of qualified help on board here. But building an extreme one such as mine or Dave's is not necessary - unless you have a burning vision that a stock kit won't satisfy. But many stock builds are very beautiful models.

I had hoped that more members would have wished to discuss the issue but again, I know not all are fans of this type work. I was hoping my enthusiasm would create a convert or two - at least to discuss or question such a project. I do apologize to all for being a tireless Pocher Crusader - I'm sure it gets tiresome. :mg:

But they sure are good to look at.................:devil:

 

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