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Found 1,636 results

  1. Airbus A350-900 Lufthansa new livery 1:144 Revell (03881) In service since 2015, the A350 is the newest of the Airbus family of wide bodied long haul airliners. The fuselage is built from carbon-fibre reinforced plastic, making it lighter, stronger, and easier to maintain than traditional aluminium bodied aircraft. It is one of the modern ultra fuel efficient machines, with ranges from 8,000 nautical miles up to 9,700 nm depending upon version. Sectors over 20 hours have been introduced by Singapore Airlines flying to the west coast of America The first time I saw one I was surprised at how big it was, somehow photographs make it look a lot smaller. It is in fact very similar in size to the Boeing 777 and 787, with which is competes. With nearly 1,000 on order it looks like it will be around for many years yet. This is not a new kit, but a re-boxing of the original released in 2013, updated with the the latest Lufthansa markings. Moulded in white plastic it features lightly engraved detail, free from flash or sink marks. It comes in a tightly packed box, there are so many parts that in fact I had trouble packing it all back in once I had done the review photographs. This is no 'small kit rattling around in a big box', you certainly get your money's worth. The two fuselage halves are almost as long as the box, and feature the same belly cut out in the wing area that will be familiar to builders of Revells' other wide bodied airliners. All windows are cut out with a separate sprue holding strips of glazing. The wings are very nicely moulded with the upward curved tips, and recesses for the separate flap tracks. The two part tailplanes are also on the wing sprues. Having already built the earlier release of this kit, I can confirm that the fit of the wing to the fuselage is perfect. So much so that I have never glued them on to my model, as they lock in securely, and can be removed for storage/transportation. Next up is the previously mentioned 'belly plate', the flap track halves, undercarriage legs, and parts for the stand. The belly plate is a very good fit, and nowhere near as troublesome as on some of the other kits with this feature. Detailing on the undercarriage legs is sharp, all you really need to do is add some of the hydraulic lines from fine wire. Undercarriage doors, nacelle halves, and a complete cockpit feature on the next sprue. I always like it when a cockpit interior is included as it saves me scratchbuilding one. It is worth taking time over painting this as it can be seen through those large cockpit windows. The only thing I might add would be a couple of 'N' gauge figures painted up as crew. The engines are real works of art, the mouldings for the fan blades are amazing. A front and back set join together to form a complete fan disk. Again, having built this kit I can say that it is possible to rotate the fans in the completed and painted engine by gently blowing on them. The base of the stand, some undercarriage parts, and the wheels are all on the final sprue. The hub/tyre interface is neatly defined, which is a great help when painting them. I usually do hubs first, and then brush paint tyres with Humbrol 67 Panzer grey. (Tip - Tyres are almost always dark grey rather than black. And in any case in 1:144 the 'scale effect' of pure black is way too harsh). The decals are designed by DACO which is a sure sign of quality, and beautifully printed with a full range of stencils and walkways. There are optional solid windows if you choose to paint over all the glazing, or silver frames if you like to keep them clear. My only reservation is personal, and that is that I find the current Lufthansa livery a bit lifeless and bland. It is not a problem as there are several aftermarket decal sheets covering other operators of the A350. Of course, if you like the new look Lufthansa, then this sheet will do a superb job of re-creating it on your model. Conclusion. This is one of the best airliner kits available, taking advantage of the latest moulding techniques to produce a model with incredibly good fit, and those amazing engines. It is also quite big, dwarfing something like an A320, and even making a 747 look average. The ease with which it can be built, and the simplicity of the livery would make it a suitable kit the beginner, while the sheer quality of it will appeal to the more serious modeller. I love it, and have already purchased another. Highly Recommended Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit Footnote: My build of a previous release of this kit, using aftermarket 'Thai' decals from 26Decals. See what I mean about how big it is alongside a 747? And the wing fit is so good, they can be popped out for storage.
  2. I built this kit using Part photoetched for detailing, OKB Grigorov's tracks, RB Models gun and some scratchbuilding. I hope you like it
  3. I've had this kicking around the stash many years. I really like the Revell Luftwaffe '46 kits and wish they'd have done more of them. I just like how absurd this thing is, two seats, twin 30mm in the cockpit, 20mm barrettes and a forward firing 20mm in a mini turret thing. It's great lol I lost the decals to it, but that doesn't really matter, hell I might even make it Hungarian or something. I've also gotten rid of the box as it;s one of those horrid side opening things that get crushed in the stash, although the artwork is cool, fighting B-29's and all. I'll build this in between my larger project which is a 1/32 Su 25.
  4. Airbus A320neo Lufthansa new livery 1:144 Revell (03942) The A320 neo is the most recent development of the highly successful Airbus range of narrow bodied airliners. Available as the A319, A320, and A321,'neo' stands for new engine option' as the aircraft can be fitted with the very fuel efficient Pratt & Whitney PW1000G or the CFM International LEAP (Leading Edge Aviation Propulsion) engines. The other noticeable change is the wingtip 'sharklets', similar in appearance to those used on Boeing aircraft, which replace the smaller winglets previously used. With 95% commonality with the earlier A319-A321 range (now known as the 'eco',engine current option), it is an obvious choice for airlines operating the older machine. Entering service in 2016, the A319-321 neo family has become the worlds fastest selling airliner, although production delays with engines initially slowed down deliveries. For many years to come, they will be seen at airports all around the world, probably in a vast number of different liveries. The Kit. This is an all new tooling from Revell that has no commonality with it previous range of the A320 family. Moulded in Revells standard white plastic, everything is crisply moulded and flash free with no sign of sink marks or other flaws. The fuselage has a large cut out where a clear cockpit glazing section is fitted. This far better then the old kit which had a 'letterbox' slot into which the clear part had to be inserted, not an easy job. Cabin windows are moulded open, with clear plastic window strips to fitted from the inside. All the blade aerials are moulded along one fuselage half, but personally I cut these off for later re-attachment as they make cleaning up the fuselage seam very awkward. Rather than alignment holes and pins, Revell have gone for interlocking tabs along the fuselage halves. A neat little cockpit is provided, complete with separate instrument panel. I often scratch build my own airliner cockpit interiors, so here is one job saved. I normally put a flight crew in though, using 'N' gauge figures, and will do so on this kit as it can only be built 'in flight'. It will therefore need at least a captain and co-pilot in attendance. The wings are very nicely moulded with inbuilt dihederal and broad, thin sprue attachment point which make removal from the sprue much easier. On the old A320 kit you had to remove a number of flap track fairings and fill panel lines, as the kit shared the same wing mouldings as Revell's A321. No such problem here, this is a dedicated A320 wing ready to use 'as is'. The wingtip Sharklets are on their own sprue along with the nose cap. Also nice to see is the SAT antenna that fits on top of the fuselage, possibly this is the first time one had been included in a mainstream kit. Now, the big talking point about this kit. It does not come with any undercarriage, you can only build it 'in flight' and attach it to the included stand. I believe that the reasoning for this was to keep it as a simpler 'Level 3' kit for the inexperienced modeller. The similar A321 kit is Level 4' and does include the undercarriage, which apparently will fit this kit as it has the nose wheel bay and wing mountings for the main legs, notwithstanding the subtle differences in main wheel size. The engines option used by Lufthansa is the Pratt & Whitney PW1000G, so this is what the kit provides. The fine detail is superb, particularly on the fan blades, which fit inside the nacelle to give a seamless intake. The intake ring are separate parts, which makes painting them silver much easier. (Tip - attach them after the nacelles are painted, using white glue so as not to risk messing up your nice finish). Options. Only one livery is supplied, the current Lufthansa scheme. The decal sheet has been designed by DACO, and is superb, covering all sorts of fine stencil detail and giving a choice of four differnt Lufthansa aircraft. Printing is faultless with minimal carrier film and in perfect registration. Personally I find the new Lufthansa livery to be rather bland, but I'm sure that it won't be long before there are plenty of aftermarket decal sheets if you would like to build this kit in a more colourful livery. Conclusion. New release of airliner kits are few and far between, even less so when a manufacturer decides to produce a new tool of a model they already have in their range. Revell are to be applauded for this, and have produced a very lovely model of the A320. The decision to leave the undercarriage out strikes me as odd, as although it may attract the inexperienced modeller, it also runs the risk of putting off the experienced modeller. It is possible that Revell may re-issue this kit in other liveries in the future, and also include the undercarriage in those boxings. You could also use the parts from the A321 kit, if you plan to build one of those in flight. That said, the rest of this kit is a high quality product, the mouldings are superb, and it is far superior to the old A320 eco kit. It's simpler colour scheme will also probably appeal to the inexperienced builder, and construction also looks to be very straightforward. If, as it should, it encourages more people into airliner modelling, then I'm all for it. Recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit
  5. Revell is to release 1/144th new tool Airbus kits - ref. 03942 - Airbus A320 neo Lufthansa New Livery - ref. 04952 - Airbus A321 neo Sprues on display at Shizuoka 2019 Sources: https://www.facebook.com/tetramodel/photos/a.2474802349220072/2475722535794720/?type=3&theater https://www.facebook.com/hobbyland.osaka/photos/a.2253464838073537/2253472751406079/?type=3&theater V.P.
  6. The beginning of an xmas present. 1/32 revell tornado gr1 gulf war. 10 hours in so far.
  7. Airbus A380-800 Emirates Wildlife Livery (03882) 1:144 Revell The A380 is a wide bodied super-heavy airliner from the European consortium Airbus, and its entry into service took the crown away from the venerable Boeing 747 as the largest passenger aircraft in the world by a significant margin. It has recently announced that they will cease production in 2021 due to changes in the aviation world, and as the wings are made down the road from me I wonder how that will affect them. Not too badly I'd hope. It first flew in 2005 from the Airbus HQ in Toulouse, and over 200 airframes have been delivered so far with the final total nudging 300 by the time the lines close. Unfortunately for Airbus, the airlines have become more interested in smaller aircraft to reduce their losses when flying less than capacity as well as the flexibility that comes with it. Emirates have been their largest customer with almost half the production flying under their banner, and BA have been the second largest. There have been a few non-fatal incidents during its service so far, which has probably affected its sales, and Airbus don't expect to break even on their £25bn development costs by the time production finishes. Having seen it in flight it is a true behemoth of the skies, and the huge sweeping wing-root and forest of landing gear makes it an impressive sight. It didn't just pip the Boeing 747 past the post in terms of size – it's 40% larger than the old Jumbo Jet, but with even the 747 under threat of ending production, the A380 is and will remain a much rarer sight. The Kit This is a re-release of their 2002 original kit, following on from the Technik edition with sound and lights earlier this year. It's the new Lufthansa livery which we've seen before, but it's a welcome re-release all the same. It arrives in a top-opening box for a change, and inside are lots of large white sprues – eight in total, plus a small sprue of clear plastic for the transparencies, a super-long decal sheet and the instructions in the new style with three pages of profiles showing the decal placement and painting instructions. The size of the sprues is the first thing of note, but that's hardly surprising given the size of the real thing, moulded in some really shiny white plastic with fine engraved panel-lines and raised detail where appropriate plus twin rows of windows running down each side. Construction begins with the cockpit, which is still fairly rare in airliner kits, and it has a moulded in coaming, three crew seats and rear bulkhead with access door moulded-in. Parts are included to model the kit in flight or on the ground, with the former involving a long jump to the end of the instructions for the fitting of the closed gear bay doors. If you're deploying the gear, you start with a well-detailed nose gear leg with twin wheels that fits into a bay with moulded-in sidewall details. The inside main gear legs are equally detailed with three wheels per side to spread the weight, and separate brake calliper parts behind each of the six wheels. These too have their own bays and when complete are set aside for a little while for the wings to be built-up with wingroot and tip lights added before gluing the whole 12" long halves together. The fuselage is then brought together after populating the sides with gear bays, the cockpit, and a pair of additional bays that will receive the outer main gear later. You're advised to add 40g to the nose to prevent it tail-sitting, and there's a ton of room in there so siting it won't be an issue, just remember to glue it down well so it doesn't come loose while you're Neowwwwming! it around the room… sorry, I mean transporting it. The fuselage joins will need to be strong, so consider adding a few extra tabs along the top line that will make hiding the seam an easier job with less risk of cracking the new join. The majority of the wing weight will pull down in the top seam, so a strong join in that area is key to your model's long term health, so bear that in mind. The wings fit using the usual tab and slot method, which might benefit from the addition of a couple of spars through the middle to take some of the strain from the top seam. A couple of brass rods with easily drilled holes would be my choice, but you may well have better ideas (it's highly likely). The fuselage between the wings is a separate insert that joins the two halves and includes cut-outs for the gear bays. Careful test-fitting and fettling will make the task an easier one, and at the same time the inner doors of the outer main bays (what?) are put into position, as these are usually closed on the ground unless there's maintenance going on. The outer main gear legs are then made up in the same manner as the others with their captive gear door attached as it goes into place. Again, there's a separate brake part that fits between the wheels and the axles, with only four wheels per assembly, with one under each wing root. The wings that were made up earlier are simply the aerofoil shapes to which all the detail is added, and need the aerodynamic cowlings around the flap actuators that are made up from two halves, and you'll need to keep a note of which construction step they relate to, possibly by marking the inside with a pen or paint. These little chaps will be glued into the recesses under the wings later on. The elevators are next, with two parts each making up the flying surfaces, which also fit using the slot and tab method, and even these are larger than some 1:72 fighter wings. These are fitted along with the flap track fairings before you begin working on the engines. The engines in the Lufthansa fleet are the Rolls-Royce Trent, and they hang four of them under the wings on custom pylons, which necessitates four separate build-steps due to the difference in shape and handing of the cowlings and their moulded-in pylons. The core of the engine is the same throughout, consisting of a front fan and a five-part rear assembly with another fan visible around the bullet-fairing at the rear. Each one is trapped between the cowling halves and a single piece intake lip is inserted at the front that makes for a nice smooth lip with no ugly seamlines to deal with. Each one has a small additional fairing inserted at the rear to complete construction of the engines. They are each pinned in place under the wing according to their construction step number, so again – keep a note. The airframe is ostensibly complete, but some details are yet to be added, such as the windscreen that you may want to install earlier so that you can fill any gaps around it to give it that overall sleek, smooth look that most airliners have. The new fuel-saving scimitar wingtip fairings are also glued in place, as are numerous antennae, pitot probes and the fuel-dump fairing at the rear of the fuselage. The remainder of the gear bay doors are supplied as pre-engraved single pieces that you can fit as a single part for in-flight models, or cut apart to use with wheels deployed. The nose gear door is cut into three parts, the larger front one posed closed with the other two to each side of the bay. The inner main bays are both attached to the sides of the bay in the open position, while the outer main gear doors have separate parts if they're to be posed closed. Markings Just the three main options in this boxing, but that's why you bought it, right? The new Emirates United for Wildlife livery, however the standard Emirates Titles are on the sheet as well. It's a massive sheet and there are a lot of decals which just fits in the boxand a choice of clear windows with silver surrounds, or darkened ones, depending on how you like your windows. The same option is provided for the windscreen, there are decals for all the doors, access panels and even some decals around the engines. Then of course there are the wing walkways, which are super-fine, and even the spinner decals for the engines so you can see when they're going round. The decals have been designed by Daco Products for Revell, and are printed by Cartograf, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, plus a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion It's always good to see the A380 re-released, and although it wasn't a massive commercial success at 1:1, I think Revell have done rather better as they have reboxed it a number of times now. The detail is good, the decals are excellent,. Highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  8. My latest kit is finished the name come from the use of gundam parts from the 1/100 MG Strike Gundam. A good number of other kits were used to make this flying car. I have also changed the inside of the car to a 2 seater and the there are a few other small changes to the car other than all the jet engines. I really enjoyed this one, there were plenty of challenges but it end up being ok. Comments wellcome. Cheers Brian.
  9. I want to start a second build. It will be the 1/2700 Revell Imperial Star destroyer. It is from origin a Zvesda kit that Revell has reboxed. It will be straight from the box. I think that the most work will go into the painting. Here are the pictures. The box and content. I have already made a first start, with mating the front and back hull parts. It is massive. The length is 60 centimeters. This now kneeds to dry before I can go further. Cheers,
  10. Hi, About 40 years ago I've built the Revell USS Hornet +3. In the age of the Apollo project this was an fun kit to build with the Apollo capsule and Sea King helicopters. Today those old memorys and the 50 years that has gone since the moon landing made me want to build that kit again. But nowdays I knew norr about the Revell kits and the fact that the Hornet kit originated from the USS Essex kit. During those years that kit has been reissues with new parts several times. Now I wonder what those new parts consisted of and if there is spare aircrafts to get to those Revell USS Essex / Hornet kits. Which aircraft types could one find in the box? Cheers / André https://www.scalemates.com/kits/revell-h353-uss-essex-cva-9--237725
  11. MH-47E Chinook (03876) 1:72 Revell The CH-47 Chinook is a tandem rotor heavy lift helicopter, developed by Vertol and manufactured by Boeing Vertol since 1962. Its incredible longevity is testament to the quality, flexibility and robustness of the design. Over 1,200 examples have been produced and the type has seen frontline service in conflicts such as the Vietnam War, the Falklands Conflict, both Gulf Wars and Afghanistan. In its capacious loading area, the Chinook can lift a 24,000lb payload or carry anywhere between 33 and 55 troops. The MH-47E is a dedicated special operations variant and a development of the earlie MH-47D. It is equiped with in-flight refuelling, fast rope-rappelling system, terrain following radar and increased fuel capacity. The UK ordered eight CH-47Es (known as the HC3) but the type famously never entered service due to bungled procurement arrangements that were subsequently highlighted in a National Audit Office report. The airframes eventually entered service with avionics reverted to Mk2 specification at great and uneccesary cost. Keen-eyed modellers will realise that Revell's Chinook is actually Italeri's Chinook (the same kit has previously been released by Airfix too). No matter however, as the Italeri kit is really rather good and pretty much the only modern-ish kit other than the Trumpeter effort. It is broadly comparable to Revell's own kits of the same era. Inside the large boxvelope are three large frames of grey plastic and a smaller frame of clear plastic, as well as decals and full colour instructions. Assembly begins with the interior - more specifically the flight deck. As well as the instrument panel and centre console, there are two seats, pedals, cyclic and collective controls. Decals are provided for the instrument panel and centre console, even though these parts actually have rather nice detail moulded in place. Aft of the cockpit the rest of the interior is fairly plain, but you can finish the model with the loading ramp open if you wish to do so and dedicated parts are provided for this purpose. If building the US Army version, you will need to cut away both of the fuselage side fairings and replace them with the alternative parts supplied with the kit. It's a little surprising to see such major surgery is required in order to build what is, after all, a very mainstream kit. Thankfully the British version requires no such work. Once the interior sub-assembly has been sandwiched between the fuselage halves, the engine pods can be assembled. These are each composed of six parts and are reasonably detailed. Athough the interior isn't overly detailed, the loading ramp is pretty nice. Optional parts are provided to finish it with the ramp down and it looks as though it could be moveable once fixed in place. The undercarriage is pretty good for the scale, while there are dozens of antennae blades, lumps and bumps included and these naturally differ between the US and British versions. Both versions make use of a rather nicely detailed minigun and of course the prominent in-flight refuelling probe is included too. The rotor heads are pretty nicely detailed and the blades are nicely represented too. The clear parts are nicely rendered and of course the nose of the aircraft is also moulded with the cockpit windows. Two different options are provides for on the decal sheet. The first is and MH-47E of the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment "Night Stalkers", Fort Campbell, Kentucky, USA, 1998. The second option is for Chinook HC Mk.3 ZH903, Royal Air Force, 2004. The decal sheet is nicely printed and a decent amount of stencils are included. Conclusion Although starting to show its age, this is still a pretty decent model. Perhaps the fact that it has endured for over twenty years with only Trumpeter producing a Chinook in this scale in the meantime is testament to its merits. Detail is solid without being stellar, while panel lines are good enough to stand up to comparison with more modern kits. Overall this is a nice model and a good replica of a Chinook can be built from what you get in the box. Revell model kits are also available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  12. A question for those more familiar with the various F-16 kits out there, specifically ESCI's F-16A as compared against the Revell kit. I wanted to get a Revell F-16A kit and as the only ones currently available are the MLU versions, I picked up an ESCI F-16A kit. It is very well done with respect to surface details. There are a few areas that I will tweak with some aftermarket bits, but overall a well done kit, especially when you consider how long ago it was when the kit was issued. That brings me to my question. Does the ESCI kit represent a very, very early A? Particularly when it comes to the area that is directly behind the cockpit and including the rear portion of the canopy? I ask as when compared to the Revell kit, ESCI in this area is flat and there is no "step", while Revell (and other kits) has a "step": ESCI Revell If someone could clear this up for me that would be most helpful.
  13. Hello all, Here's my last build of the year. It's the 2002 Revell rebox of the Hasegawa Harrier GR.7 in 1/72. As it turned out it's more like an AV-8B with a new nose part, which doesn't make it quite a GR.7. I added an aftermarket (undersized, sadly) seat from Pavla, Aires exhausts, and Air Graphics BOL rails. I also scratchbuilt the ECM/RWR/whatever things they are at the tail fairing. Painted with Hataka lacquers, which was a nice experiment, and used the kits decals. I decided to paint some bits in the older green colours after finding these nice photos of a base visit in 1997 http://www.hottail.nl/basevisits/1997/1117-Laarbruch/Index.html I hope you like it. Thanks for watching, merry Christmas and best wishes for the new year.
  14. Hello all! Here are 15 photos of my most recently completed kit, Revell/Monogram's 45 year old Dornier Do 335. This kit was from the most recent boxing of the kit, released in 2010.
  15. Hi all, So after my last Revell flying boat adventure, going to take the plunge with this one which I think is a rebox of a Heller kit. Thanks for looking and good luck with your builds. Cheers, Dermot
  16. Hi folks, Well, as a not exactly even keeled singer from Boston used to sing, I'm back in saddle again. New home away from Paris, and a very nice 20 sq meter room in the basement just for me and my models. After a 10 month hiatus in modelling, I decided to tackle something I knew before going for stronger stuff. And I think I kinda know Revell's Tornado quite well. So : - one Revell IDS Tornado: check - one Mission Mark Decals "AMI Tornado before turnig grey" decal sheet: check - HARM missiles and pylons from Kinetic Hornet kit: check Let's roll. As usual, I carefully ignored the instructions (they are often wrong and induce an overuse of putty I'm totally not interested in). First things first: the air intake veins with the auxiliary intake doors fairings: Intake veins assembled and glued to the fuselage bottom: Quite a bit of flash on the wing glove seals parts: The wing gloves are glued to their fuselage sides and the sides are glued to the fuselage bottom: Wing pivots are glued in place (instruction are wrong there about which part goes where, something you'll have to get used to on Revell Tornadoes). Wings are assembled and glued on their pivot. There was a melted hole on the fuselage top I don't know the origin of. Well, it happens. The airbrake are glued to the fuselage top. With a bit of caution, no putty will be needed. And the fuselage top is glued in place. A bit of persuasion will be needed, but nothing much. The intakes are built (this is the messiest part so far, I used cyanoacrylate and accelerant as a putty for the joint lines under the intakes) and glued to the fuselage. The joints are rather clean so far: The airbrakes region will need some work, but nothing serious: The front end is quite good: I ground away the bits inside the upper fixed part of the wing: Then I glued them in place and added the fin: To be continued ith the cockpit. Cheers, S.
  17. So here she is, my first Shackleton, an aircraft I've loved since childhood when they used to clatter over into Woodford occasionally, the highlight of any schoolday when that happened! Built straight OOB with just a few little aerial additions after reading Chally71's Shack thread on here - many thanks for the info! No wires yet though, I'll get round to sprue melting another day. I was going to do WL756, but having seen that 795 is now preserved at St Mawgan (albeit as an MR2 again) I thought I'd honour her instead. I hope I've done this beautiful Avro justice ...
  18. .....the RED ARROWS would have had the phantom as there display aircraft, imaging the noise as they tore across the sky in formation. Just a bit of a fun build to use seasonal colours! BIG thanks to stevej60 who interupted his holiday to send me decals for the fin and RAF lettering, top man. Good kit, any mistakes down to me, main colour is Xtra color red arrows red with everything else either humrol or vallejo. Stencils all from the kit. Merry Christmas everybody!. Red Arrows what if! by peter crossman, on Flickr Red Arrows what if! by peter crossman, on Flickr Red Arrows what if! by peter crossman, on Flickr Red Arrows what if! by peter crossman, on Flickr Red Arrows what if! by peter crossman, on Flickr
  19. This one almost defeated me. Lots of filler, problems with painting and finishing, bits breaking off, cracked canopy.... sigh. In the end it looks ok from a distance. Finished in brush painted Tamiya Acrylics, with a finish of semigloss clear from a Tamiya rattle can. Straight out of the box. Thanks for looking.
  20. With my Airfix Wildcat approaching completion, I thought I would dig out another naval subject. Picked this up cheap late last year. Haven't made a Revell model in years so it will be an interesting change for me. Straight out of the box as I really like the gloss sea blue look. First time I have seen a black Revell box. Sprue shot. Looks Ok. Couple of nasty sink marks on the drop tanks, but I don't intend to use them. The wing tips for the FAA aircraft on the box. Canopy parts - which I gather are very thin and fragile. Neat decal sheet (that's just a bit of dust by the way - markings are fine). Instruction booklet - which os quite a difference from the old Revell standard printed on very poor recycled paper. Confusingly there are variations between the marking scheme in the instructions and the completed kit on the front of the instructions...... Instructions look nice and clear, with plenty of colour call outs. So from my reading around, the markings in the kit are for a Corsair Mk IV which is a Goodyear built FG-1. In terms of painting it should have an interior green cockpit and inside of the engine cowling, gloss sea blue wheel wells, undercarriage and wheel hubs and overall gloss sea blue for the main colour. So relatively straight forward. Lets see if I can mess it up!
  21. F/A-18 Super Hornet (04994) 1:32 Revell The Boeing F/A-18E Super Hornet is the second generation F/A-18 following on the the F/A-18C. The F/A-18E was developed from the original Hornet and while it may look alike its very much a new aircraft which is 25% bigger. The US Navy managed to keep the F/A-18 designation partly to make the US Congress believe it would be a low risk development from the original aircraft (not the first time in US Aviation this has happened). The new aircraft was ordered in 1992 with a first flight in 1995. The aircraft introduced a new era in electronics including an active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, bigger displays and a helmet mounted sighting system. To date the Super Hornet has replaced the legacy Hornet in all US Navy operations apart from the USN Aerobatic Team The Blue Angels, and even they will have transitioned by 2021. As well as the E model there is the two seat F model, and the latest development the G or "Growler" Electronic Warfare Aircraft. The Kit This is a new tool kit from Revell for 2019. It arrives in a rather large box which is packed with mainly rather large sprues. The bigger ones being 60 cms across! The first job on the build is to construct the full length intake and exhaust trunking. Fan fronts and exhaust ends are placed in the trunking and its all buttoned up. The underside of this trunking forms the topside of the main wheels wells and they are built up onto the trunking. The lower main fuselage and lower parts of the intakes are then attached, followed by the fuselage sides (which also contain the top of the intakes). The exhaust nozzles can then be placed on the back of the fuselage, a choice between open and closed nozzles is provided. The lower parts of the main wings (left & right) are then attached to the main fuselage. Once these are on the large single part top wing/body part can be attached but only after first putting in the inserts for the topside airbrakes. We can now move onto the cockpit (normally where we start!) The bottom of the cockpit section forms the roof of the front wheel well and the sides for the well are attached first followed by the front bulkhead. The cockpit tub can then be placed on the top. To this is added the instrument panel and the control column. The ejection seat is then built up and added, The seat is a mulitpart affair, however the belts are moulded in, and in this scale the seat would really benefit PE belts. Once the seat is in the instrument coaming can also be fitted and the cockpit placed into the forward fuselage halves. The nose cone can be fitted and then the forward fuselage joined to the main body. A main top spine part behind the cockpit is then added. The vertical tails with their separate rudders are then made up and added to the main fuselage with a scrap diagram showing the correct angles for these. Once on the arrestor hook parts can be fitted under the main body. We now move to the undercarriage which is quite complex for the Hornet. The front unit and its wheels are built up and fitted to the front bay, the doors and their retraction struts are then fitted. Both sets of main gear get the same treatment. The main gear doors are supplied as one part and must be cut up into their components for the gear down. The outer wings can either be down or folded up as they would be parked. For these the correct hinge assembly needs to be selected. The outer wings can then be built up and added. The main wings are then finished off. While the centre sections are already there the leading edge slats and trailing edge flaps are fitted. The exhaust nozzles are then fitted to the back. Up at the front the glazing is added. For the main canopy the clear parts fit into a normal plastic frame, An integral boarding ladder is provided if wanted in the lowered position. To finish of the tail planes are added along with a few aerials. Revell provide us with a whole host of things to hang under the wings. As well as the pylons a centre line tank, and wing fuel tanks are in the box. Wing tip missile rails are included as well as AIM-9M and AIM-9X missiles for them. AIM-120C missiles are also provided. In term of things which go bang when dropped 2 x GBU-12, 2 x GBU-31-3B, and 2 x GBU-38s are provided. An AN-ASQ-228 ATFLIR sensor pod is also included. Decals The decal sheet from cartograf (so no issues there) provides markings for two aircraft. F/A-18E Bu No.166957 - "Vampires 111" Test & Evaluation Sqn VX-9, NAWS China Lake. F/A-18E Bu No.166651 - "Gunslingers 401" strike Fighter Sqn VFA-105. USS Harry s Truman 2010 Conclusion This should make up to a good looking if rather large model, highly recommended for those who like to go big! Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  22. This is representation of Erla-built Bf 109G-14 "Black 13" from15./JG5 at Kjevik, Norway in 1945. All A.M.U.R. Reaver sets, such as spinner & airscrew, cowling and oil cooler fairing with radiator mesh were used. The plane had late-war finish with several shades of RLM76 on lower surfaces and 75/82 on top.
  23. Patrol Torpedo Boat PT-579 / PT-588 (05165) 1:72 Revell PT Boats by their very name are Patrol Torpedo Boats. They are smaller fast attack craft designed primarily to launch torpedoes at enemy vessels using their fast speed as a their primary advantage. Elco were the makers of the longest, and most produced of these PT Boats made for the US Navy. Even though the main armament was four torpedoes later towards the end of the war some boats received two eight cell Mark 50 rocket launchers. These launched 5" spin stabilised Mark 7 and Mark 10 rockets. These had a range of upto 11,000 yards. These were equivalent to a 5" shell from a destroyer and the PT Boats carried 16 in their tubes with 16 reloads. This gave these Boats quite a punch. The Kit This is re-issue of Revell's new tool kit from 2018 with new parts to reflect the different armament of these boats, namely the rocket launchers and the 37mm M4/M9 autocannon which was not in the previous kit. In addition this kit features the lightweight 22.5" Mark 13 torpedoes on lightweight roll-off type racks, over the Mark 8 21" torpedoes in Mark 18 tubes which again were on the earlier release. As well as the main hull parts there are a further 11 sprues of grey plastic and a clear sprue. Construction begins with the hull. The left and right parts are joined with a centre bulkhead being added to stiffen things up. A small insert is added into the bow. The lower hull part at the back is separate and this needs to be added in. The transom will need to be added in, though or some reason this is not mentioned in the instructions! its not there in step 3 but appears in place in step 7? The inside parts of the deck houses must be added to the main deck and this can then be joined to the lower hull. The upperdeck is then fitted out with a myriad of deck fittings, hatches and other parts. Moving to the bottom of the hull the prop shafts and rudder are added. The stand for the boat can then be made up and used if need. Finally on the transom the exhausts are added. Moving to the top the model the superstructure is made up along with its internal parts. The side gun mountings are also made up and added at this time. For the aft deck the 40m Bofors and its mount are built up and added on. On the foredeck both the 37mm auto cannon and 20mm Oerlikon are completed and mounted. Next up the main armament of the 22.5" Mark 13 torpedoes are added along with their roll off racks. The radar mast is made up and mounted to the main deckhouse roof which can then be added to the model. The double machine gun units can then be added to the mounts previously installed. Last up the 5" rocket launchers are made up and mounted to the deck. Markings The decal sheet has markings for PT-588 & PT-579 from Engine Torpedo Boat Squadron THIRTY NINE (PTRon 39), Pacific Fleet, Samar, P.I., July 1945. Conclusion Its good to see this out representing the later model of the PT boat with the increased firepower. Highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  24. M48 A2CG Patton (03287) 1:35 Revell Despite the fact it share the name Patton with the M46/M47 the M48 was designed as a replacement for these tanks, plus the M4 and the M26. The M48 was truly the first generation Main Battle Tank for the US Army. Designed by Chrysler over 12000 were built and the type went though many upgrades and changes over its life time. The Tank was also sold to many friendly nations inside and outside NATO. The German Army made considerable use of these tanks until they were replaced by the Leopard 1. The M48 A2 brought about an improved powerpack & transmission, along with improved turret control. In German service the A2GA2 replaced the gun with the 105mm L7 cannon and a different MG3 mount. Over 650 M48s were upgraded to this configuration. The A2CG version added a Raumbi rangefinder and smoke grenade dischargers to the turret. With the introduction of the Leopards these tanks were sent to Territorial units. A mine clearing version of the M48 remains in German service. The Kit This is re-issue of Revell's kit from 2014 with new parts to reflect the latest tank. The kit arrives on 6 sprues of grey plastic, a set of rubber tracks and a length of aerial wire (not shown). Construction starts with the lower hull, the sides are added to the main base along with the rear lower part. The engine grills are added along the the drive sprocket transmission parts. The suspension parts are added along with main wheels, idler wheels and return rollers. The drive sprockets can then be added along with the rubber tracks. The top hull can then be added and the engine intakes placed in. The front fenders are added along with the parts which hold the track covers up, and the tool boxes on them. To finish the lower hull off the lights are added along with tow cables and a myriad of smaller parts & fixings. Lastly the drivers hatch is added which can be open or closed (however there is no interior in the kit). Now for the turret. The upper and lower halves are joined with the gun movement added in between. The exterior mantlet cover is then added along with the gun barrel. Antenna housings and hatches are then added to the turret. Exterior fuel cans are added along with stowage boxes. The large commanders hatch with its machine gun is then made up and added tot he turret. The searchlight is added to the top of the gun, and the smoke dischargers are added to the side of the turret. It can then be fitted. If you want to model the tank in travelling mode with the gun to the rear then the rear mounted gun carrier can be used. Markings The decal sheet is pretty small, but provides three options; Panzer Battalion 354, Hammelburg 1974 Panzer Battalion 363, Kuhlsheim 1974 Panzer Battalion 364, Kuhlsheim 1974 Conclusion The tank is a true cold war warrior and a good edition to any Post WWII German Army collection. Recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  25. Bf109G-10 (Erla) set is intended for Revell 1/32 kit. The kit allows to solve major nose section shape problems such as slim, narrow appearance, incorrect spacing between MG troughs, strange “dent” under supercharger intake, oil cooler fairing shape and other small details visible on nose surface. Basic set RC3214 consist of four resin details and will be available also in bundle as RP3214 with our PE sets (exhaust pipes shrouds and steel oil cooler meshes). RC3214 parts list: Cowling for Bf109G-10 – 2 pieces Supercharger intake – 1 piece Oil cooler – 1 piece. RP3214 parts list: Cowling for Bf109G-10 – 2 pieces Supercharger intake – 1 piece Oil cooler – 1 piece PE parts fret – 2 piece.
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