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jimmaas

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About jimmaas

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    New Member
  • Birthday 28/08/1947

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    jimmaas
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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Clifton Park New York USA
  • Interests
    Serious fanatic about the Brewster Buffalo.<br /><br />Also fluent in WW I, USN interwar, Netherlands East Indies, early PBY's and the Martin B-10

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  1. Four Brewster Buffalo's

    I mean the cockpit and the flat bit behind the cockpit, although the liferaft tube would be black.
  2. Four Brewster Buffalo's

    Alan, I'm not sure that's always the case. Brewster has a (rubber? canvass?) glare shield that fitted over the instrument panel coaming. Many factory photos were taken with this removed, which shows the instrument panel flush with the coaming. But it looks like some of the British aircraft had the glare shield fitted, with a cutout for the reflector sight.
  3. Four Brewster Buffalo's

    Hi! If you mean the aircraft from VS-201, it is a toss-up. These aircraft were rebuilt F2A-1's brought up to F2A-2 standards, which forward of the firewall meant a pretty complete rebuild. They were back at the Brewster factory around the same time as the F2A-3 order was under construction and the repainted exterior camouflage matches that of the F2A-3's: overall Non-Specular Light Gray, 24 inch fuselage roundel, etc. It would make sense that if the cockpit was reworked, it would be painted like the F2A-3's - Dull Dark Green overall. But the only good photo we have of these F2A-1/2 rebuilds is of 201-S-13, and it looks like the turnover pylon struts are still in aluminium lacquer, like the yellow-wing aircraft. So at this point I am starting to lean towards the 'rebuild' aircraft still having the original aluminium lacquer (with black sidewalls) interior. That would have been cheaper, and remember we're dealing with Brewster, not a philanthropic institution.
  4. Four Brewster Buffalo's

    The cockpit colors for both USN yellow wing and Dutch are the same - aluminum paint, but with black upper sidewalls forward of the raised boxes on each side. And the instrument panels, of course.
  5. Four Brewster Buffalo's

    ....and the camouflage pattern was different, and the insignia placement was different, and the cockpit layout was ( a bit) different. But no, they were not painted in Dark Slate Grey/Extra Dark Sea Grey.
  6. Four Brewster Buffalo's

    Yes, as in "FS 595 wasn't around then but Dutch vets say those colors are close to the Dutch aircraft colors in the NEI". Actually, the In Action book I did is getting rather long in the tooth and there are some errors (like, the F2A-3 didn't have the ventral window, though the 339-23 did). You might want to grab the new book by Rich Dann in the Ginter series, much good stuff in there.
  7. Four Brewster Buffalo's

    You could always do your spare Tamiya kit as USAAF. Yes, they had them. You'd build using the same parts as the Dutch 339C/D. The camouflage is two shades of green (close match, the two green shades from Vietnam era USAAF tactical aircraft) over either aluminium paint or light blue (disputed issue). Star on blue disc upper left, lower right wing, "U.S. ARMY" in black under the wings. If you want to get really fancy, there's a reflector gunsight in the cockpit.
  8. Glass panels in lower fuselage on Grumman Wildcats?

    Bomb-aiming ventral windows were present on the F4F, F2A-1 and 2 (and all export versions, but not the F2A-3), early F4U-1's and the Grumman XF5F. Then the problems (keeping clean, repairing broken glass, need for the space for tankage, etc.) caused the enthusiasm for the idea to wane.
  9. WWII Curtis SOC-3 interior Colour?

    Whoops, I was away from my references when I initially replied. The interior would depend on the period involved. SOC-1's and SOC-2's had fabric surfaces in silver enamel, but metal surfaces in gray enamel (around FS 595a color 16473). So the interior metal surfaces would be gray. By the time the SOC-3 was in production, the Navy had discovered the joys of aluminium lacquer, and both exterior and interior finish would be in that 'silver' finish.
  10. WWII Curtis SOC-3 interior Colour?

    "Unpainted" is unlikely. Metal on USN aircraft was routinely given a coating (enamel or lacquer depending on period) to prevent corrosion. Sea air can be unforgiving. Remember that some areas of interior may have shown the inside of fabric areas, which gets into a whole other question.
  11. WWII Curtis SOC-3 interior Colour?

    Curtiss SOC's were built in the mid 1930's, the "yellow wing" era. Interiors would have been aluminum lacquer. The Naval Aircraft Factory also built some as SON's, and production lagged behind Curtiss so the interior factory finish might be affected, I don't know. And the aircraft may have been overhauled later so completely that an interior repaint is possible. But the default interior is probably silver. Interiors are much harder to repaint than exteriors.
  12. I think it shall come in three months. The number of the counting shall be three. Four shalt thou not count, neither count thou two, excepting that thou then proceed to three. Five is right out. Once the number three, being the third number, be reached, then lobbest thou thy Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch towards thy foe, who, being naughty in My sight, shall snuff it.
  13. There is a lengthy article on the subject of B-O-B wing/tail stripes in Model Aircraft Monthly Vol. 3 No. 10, October 2004. The article is by Paul Lucas and has several rabbit holes, but there is enough photographic/report justification to show that: - stripes appeared on some He-111's, Do-17's and Ju-88's - the stripes were in three colors, white, yellow and pink - the color of stripes did not appear to be related to Staffel or Gruppe - in some cases the stipes appeared on only one wing uppersurface and only the corresponding tail side; that would suggest (but not prove) a relation to formation flying.
  14. P-40B/C Hawaii Early 1942 markings

    It would not be the first time that a profile was created on very little information, or wrong information. Or rank speculation, as followers of Sidney Chivers may know! With respect to 'Squirt', there may not have been any large white fuselage numbers. The first photo, although not (evidently) of 'Squirt', was taken at Mokuleia Field in February 1942, according to http://www.airfields-freeman.com/HI/Airfields_HI_Oahu_N.htm (you'll have to scroll WAY down). No numbers, unless there is a yellow number on the fin top. I suspect that post-Pearl Harbor the large white numbers may have been considered kind of conspicuous (which is silly, since you are adding red-white stripes, but....)
  15. P40C Tomahawk

    You may have already seen it but this 360 degree panorama (while a bit dizzying) shows the forward interior of the sliding canopy. I do not know of any hinged window on the port side - do you mean something like the 'clear vision port' as seen on the Spitfire and Buffalo?
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