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    • Mike

      PhotoBucket are no longer permitting 3rd party hosting   01/07/17

      As most of you are now painfully aware, Photobucket (PB) are stopping/have stopped allowing their members to link their accumulated years of photos into forums and the like, which they call 3rd party linking.  You can give them a non-refundable $399 a year to allow links, but I doubt that many will be rushing to take them up on that offer.  If you've previously paid them for the Pro account, it looks like you've got until your renewal to find another place to host your files, but you too will be subject to this ban unless you fork over a lot of cash.   PB seem to be making a concerted move to another type of customer, having been the butt of much displeasure over the years of a constantly worsening user interface, sloth and advertising pop-ups, with the result that they clearly don't give a hoot about the free members anymore.  If you don't have web space included in your internet package, you need to start looking for another photo host, but choose carefully, as some may follow suit and ditch their "free" members at some point.  The lesson there is keep local backups on your hard drive of everything you upload, so you can walk away if the same thing happens.   There's a thread on the subject here, so please use that to curse them, look for solutions or generall grouse about their mental capacity.   Not a nice situation for the forum users that hosted all their photos there, and there will now be a host of useless threads that relied heavily on photos from PB, but as there's not much we can do other than petition for a more equitable solution, I suggest we make the best of what we have and move on.  One thing is for certain.  It won't win them any friends, but they may not care at this point.    Mike.

Kuro Nezumi

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About Kuro Nezumi

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  • Birthday 26/12/94

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  1. Lovely, clean build! Well done!
  2. Yes, it is resin, with a bit of PE for the wheel arches, gun shield, straps, hooks and windscreen. Some brass rod was also included with the kit to make parts of the chassis, handles and other bits, though it wasn't a lot so quite a bit of extra was needed.
  3. Cracking little floatplane! Well done!
  4. Thank you, gentlemen! Much appreciated!
  5. Great diorama! Well done!
  6. Good afternoon. The Renault AM 1914 Armoured Car: From Tanks-Encyclopaedia: This first model was accepted and fifty units were built until early 1915, as 4×2 AA vehicles with an open air rear compartment, armed with a single 8 mm (0.31 in) St Etienne light machine gun. It was relatively lightly armored, with vertical plates between 4 and 6 mm (0.16-0.24 in) in thickness. These enclosed the closed driving compartment (with a single wide armored shutter), while the rear compartment was open, large enough for two operators (loader and gunner). Access for all crewmen provided through this open compartment. The machine gun was protected by a large frontal shield, with a mounting providing full vertical manual elevation (90°) and traverse. It had ammunition supplied in 8 mm/24 cartridge strips. This model had a ground clearance of 24 cm (9.5 in), 3.35 m wheelbase (132 in), with a 4×2 front steering with manual transmission, and a Renault water cooled petrol engine. The axles rested on leaf spring suspensions. Although a hundred were originally ordered, only 50 were built before their limitations were discovered. The AA mount was problematic, and the rate of fire and range were not sufficient for their intended rôle. Also, the armor was too light to protect against shrapnel and machine-gun rounds, while the open compartment left the crew vulnerable. But, probably worst of all, the front wheel drive proved ill-suited in operations. In 1916, all 50 were taken over to be rebuilt to the mle 1915 standard, which resembled thePeugeot armored car, with a short barrel 37 mm (1.46 in) gun or Hotchkiss LMG behind a shield. After a long and frustrating build (and waiting for the right camera, lens and set-up), I have finally completed and photographed this 1/35 resin model of the Renault AM 1914 from DaMo. Parts kept coming off and/or getting lost, but it all worked out in the end. One of the lamps has been whisked away to whatever fantasy realm lost parts go to. Paints used were Vallejo Model Air Dark Green as a base then mixed with black for the shaded areas and Mig Ammo Cremeweiss for highlights, various Citadel paints for the interior parts, Vallejo Model Air grey (of some form), Mr Hobby Tyre Black, Humbrol Gunmetal Metalcote for the Hotchkiss gun and Van Dyke Brown oil paint for the wooden parts. Weathered with dark and light rust oil paint for rusty streaks and the exhaust system, the chipped paint is Citadel Skavenblight Dinge dabbed on with a bit of sponge, bare metal is dry brushed Citadel Leadbelcher, and Mig Ammo Washable Dust was used to represent dust and dried mud on the wheels and chassis.
  7. Good evening. My rendition of the X-wing flown by Poe Dameron from Star Wars: The Force Awakens, one of the most beautiful sci-fi craft ever designed (in my opinion). This is the Bandai kit with the annoying multi-coloured plastic parts moulded in the colour scheme, making painting both a tad easier and more complicated. I had to glue the wings in the combat deployment to stop me from closing them in temptation and accidentally chip off the paint. The stand is also glued as I broke it while trying to change its position. This was easily the most irritatingly fiddly paint scheme to mask, but it came out 'OK' in the end. It was also my first time using MIG Ammo washes (brown for German yellow on the orange and grey, and stone grey for black on the black); I will now almost exclusively use these due to their quality. I'm still getting used to my new camera, and I can't seem to work out how to get the whole model in the picture to not get blurry. Enjoy!
  8. Great finish! Well done!
  9. For those interested in pre-WW1 warships and/or the Russo-Japanese War, Combrig are to release some destroyers and cruisers (minus the ones they have) from said time period in 1/350. I believe these will be the first kits of Japanese destroyers that were built before the First World War! Finally, Hasegawa's Mikasa will have other ships of both her era and nation!
  10. Sublime finish! And in 1/72 scale! Well done!
  11. I never thought about improvements in resin durability, thanks for the clear-up! A large model like the 0/400 would need stronger materials just to stay together.
  12. An interesting choice, but why resin? Wouldn't plastic be a more suitable option for something so big and fragile?
  13. From what I remember there was something wrong with her No.1 cylinder spark plugs, so fuel leaked into the exhaust system, hence the pops and smoke. Then during and after an engine run yesterday, one of the engineers heard something in the same cylinder, so that one is being looked at in the engineering hanger and cylinders No.2 and 3 are being investigated as a precaution.
  14. Soldering is probably recommended as the masts are solid turned brass. And yes, there are, possibly, about a few dozen photo-etch pieces on those masts. Even the rigging is photo-etch.
  15. Fantastic tonal variation on the paint scheme! Great work!