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Safety and Handling of 3D Printing liquid resins


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I have been following the different posts on 3D Printing in this section and I am impressed with the good advice and thoughtful comments that have been made. For everyone now using a SLA or DLP (or inkjet) type printer that uses liquid resins, I would strongly suggest that you head over to this link (https://www.radtech.org/health-safety/proper-handling-of-uv-resins)  and download the pdf on the safety and handling of these resins. I was the principal author in writing this short, hopefully easy to use file and it was targeted for the casual user like most of us on this forum. It is also available in several other languages on this page but I have to trust the translators that they got it right!

 

I have been working with these resins since about 1983 and I can vouch that they are safe to handle when the proper precautions are used. BTW, the first demonstration of 3D Printing using liquid resins (SLA) was in 1986 so it has been around for some time. One of my proudest mementos from my career is a SLA printed dog that was made for me in 1993 by the research lab in a big company that was showing me what this new technology could do.

 

Moderator -  if you would like to have a good copy of the safety and handling guide for our section as a resource, I can supply it. 

 

Have fun modeling!

Mike

🍻

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by PhantomMJI
typo
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  • 1 month later...

Sound advice  - I'd add to it by suggesting that containers of resin, and printers, should be stood in trays of sufficient capacity that if leaks were to occur it is capable of fully containing the leaks.

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  • 3 months later...

Thank you for publishing this advice - very useful.

 

I see people are also using water-washable resins in printers - is the guidance and advice above the same? Any additional advice on disposing of the water used to wash parts created using water-washable resin?

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8 hours ago, Anthony Kesterton said:

I see people are also using water-washable resins in printers - is the guidance and advice above the same?

 

Yes.  And it's also the same for the 'eco' resins that use PLA instead of acrylic plastics.

 

Quote

Any additional advice on disposing of the water used to wash parts created using water-washable resin?

 

Expose to UV to solidify the resin, then allow the water to evaporate off, and then seal your container and dispose in the garbage.  DO NOT pour down the drain, onto the ground, etc, as the water is contaminated with toxic substances.

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  • 2 weeks later...

How long should it take for the resin residue (water washable type) to cure before I can dispose of it?  I printed my first items about a week ago and the small bath in which I washed them has been sitting in a sunny window ever since but all I've got is slightly murky water.  Can't see any solids.  The first pieces I printed went matt and appeared to be cured in a couple of days sitting right next to the bath.

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5 hours ago, Chewbacca said:

How long should it take for the resin residue (water washable type) to cure before I can dispose of it?  I printed my first items about a week ago and the small bath in which I washed them has been sitting in a sunny window ever since but all I've got is slightly murky water.  Can't see any solids.  The first pieces I printed went matt and appeared to be cured in a couple of days sitting right next to the bath.

 

Water washable resins are a scam,

your parts will be better washed with 99% IPA and the residue will cure and separate quicker and easier.

 

You must wait until the murky water separate to dispose the solid (cured) part.

It may take days, weeks or months, depending on the resin.

 

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