Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Russian'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Group Builds
  • Model Show Calendar

Forums

  • Site Help & Support
    • FAQs
    • Help & Support
    • New Members
    • Announcements
  • Aircraft Modelling
    • Military Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Civil Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Aircraft
    • Ready for Inspection - Aircraft
    • Aircraft Related Subjects
  • AFV Modelling (armour, military vehicles & artillery)
    • Armour Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Armour
    • Ready for Inspection - Armour
    • Armour Related Subjects
    • large Scale AFVs (1:16 and above)
  • Maritime Modelling (Ships and subs)
    • Maritime Discussion by era
    • Work in Progress - Maritime
    • Ready for Inspection - Maritime
  • Vehicle Modelling (non-military)
    • Vehicle Discussion
    • Work In Progress - Vehicles
    • Ready For Inspection - Vehicles
  • Science Fiction & RealSpace
    • Science Fiction Discussion
    • RealSpace Discussion
    • Work In Progress - SF & RealSpace
    • Ready for Inspection - SF & RealSpace
  • Figure Modelling
    • Figure Discussion
    • Figure Work In Progress
    • Figure Ready for Inspection
  • Dioramas, Vignettes & Scenery
    • Diorama Chat
    • Work In Progress - Dioramas
    • Ready For Inspection - Dioramas
  • Reviews, News & Walkarounds
    • Reviews
    • Current News
    • Build Articles
    • Tips & Tricks
    • Walkarounds
  • Modelling
    • Group Builds
    • The Rumourmonger
    • Other Modelling Genres
    • Britmodeller Yearbooks
    • Tools & Tips
  • General Discussion
    • Chat
    • Shows
    • Photography
    • Members' Wishlists
  • Shops, manufacturers & vendors
    • Aerocraft Models
    • Above & Beyond Retail
    • Air-craft.net
    • A.M.U.R. Reaver
    • Atlantic Models
    • Bearhobbies.com
    • Bernd.M Modellbau
    • BlackMike Models
    • Casemate UK
    • Copper State Models
    • Creative Models Ltd
    • DACO Products
    • Freightdog Models
    • Hannants
    • Hobby Colours & Accessories
    • fantasy Printshop
    • Hobby Paint'n'Stuff
    • Hypersonic Models
    • Iliad Design
    • MikroMir
    • Japan:Cool
    • Kagero Publishing
    • Kingkit
    • L'Arsenal 2.0
    • Modellingtools.co.uk
    • Maketar Paint Masks
    • Marmaduke Press Decals
    • MJW Models
    • NeOmega & Vector Resin
    • Parkes682Decals
    • Pheon Models
    • Pocketbond Limited
    • Precision Ice and Snow
    • Radu Brinzan Productions
    • Red Roo Models
    • RES/KIT
    • SBS Model - Hungary
    • Scale-Model-Kits.com
    • Scratchaeronautics
    • Shelf Oddity
    • Small Stuff Models
    • Sovereign Hobbies
    • Special Hobby
    • Sphere Products
    • Starling Models
    • Thunderbird Models
    • Tiger Hobbies
    • Tirydium Models
    • Topnotch - Bases and Masks for Models
    • Ultimate Modelling Products
    • Valiant Wings Publishing
    • Videoaviation Italy
    • White Ensign Models
    • Wonderland Models
  • Archive
    • 2007 Group Builds
    • 2008 Group Builds
    • 2009 Group Builds
    • 2010 Group Builds
    • 2011 Group Builds
    • 2012 Group Builds
    • 2013 Group Builds
  • Brits Abroad GB

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 96 results

  1. T-18 Light Tank Model 1927 Hobbyboss 1/35 It occurred to me recently that, what with all the Bandai Star Wars kits I've been doing recently, it's been a while since I've done an armour build on here. In fact I think the last one was the SS-23 and that was over a year ago. Time to change that then, and something Soviet and inter-war seems like a good idea. This is the new Hobbyboss T-18, which was the first all Russian tank, albeit heavily based on the French FT. It's a pretty standard Hobbyboss kit, moulded in sand coloured styrene with non-working indi links and a splash of PE. This isn't meant to be an in-box review (I'm sure Mike will be doing a proper one soon), but I'll post some sprue shots so you've got something to look at until I start cutting plastic. It all comes in a smallish box (12" x 8" if you're curious) with just four sprues for the tank and another 2 for the tracks. There's a separate lower hull, upper hull and turret, and a small sheet of PE. Sprue A's got some of the hull panels and the fenders, along with a few details including, annoyingly, a solid moulded headlight. It's not even moulded with a separate solid lens, which would at least have made swapping it for a clear replacement easier. Rather it's got the housing and lens as a single solid piece, so to replace it I'll have to drill it out. Not much on sprue B. Just the turret base and main hatch. It looks like the sprue's been designed to be modifiable to take alternate part for future releases. I seem to recall Hobbyboss having more than one version listed in the 2016 catalogue. Two sprue D's carrying duplicate parts for the running gear. Two sprue T's (T for track, get it... oh, ever mind). Indi links aren't everyone's cup of char, nor mine for that matter, but these don't look too bad. No separate guide horns or pads to add, and the runs are only 51 links long. The single piece lower hull... ... and the upper hull and turret. Last up there's the small PE sheet. Mainly the perforated shroud that will need bending to a curved profile. There's no jig provided for that, so I'll probably end up doing it round a knife handle or pencil. I don't like the look of the tiny individual bolt heads. Don't know where they go yet, but I'll more than likely substitute some Meng bolt heads for them. And that's it. No decals as there's only one scheme provided, and it carries no markings. From a cursory glance everything looks well moulded. I've not really started checking references regarding accuracy, but I'll get on to that in the build. It looks like a T-18 which is the main thing. And, just so you know, this is a tiny tank. How tiny... this tiny More soon Andy
  2. The Weathering Magazine - Special Iron Factory Ammo by Mig Jimenez We have now seen a few weathering magazines from Ammo this publication is longer at 114 pages and is in effect a book not a magazine. As the title would suggest this edition concentrates on painting & weathering techniques for tanks/AFVs. Different products are show , though as the title suggests Ammo products feature. This book deals with Soviet equipment in conflicts since WW2. The book features; 2S3 SPG from Afghanistan. BMP-2 from Donestsk. BTR-70 from Afghanistan. T-64B from Ukraine. T-80B from Chechnya. T-90A from Syria. Conclusion This looks to be a very useful publication, although in magazine format the print quality is that of book. Overall a high quality publication. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. While waiting for some scratch building materials for my Mig-3 project I decided to do this Trumpeter IS-7 kit I had laying around, because I find Trumpeter 1/72 kits are always a pleasure to work on. I did a few modifications for added detail, but overall the kit had the nice detail that I have come to expect from these 1/72 Trumpeter kits. The last one I did was an STRV-103 from Trumpeter that I loved building, so I was hoping this would be another reasonably priced gem. Although it was missing a few details that were present on the model shown on the package, it was pretty much just as good. Hope you enjoy. For those who are curious it was primed with black Stynylrez primer (same as Mig One Shot) with some pre-shading done with light grey. Colours used were XF-13 then XF-67 NATO green for some modulation, Vallejo Metal Color steel was used for the tracks with Vallejo 70.862 grey black used for the tires. I also used the grey black for the machine gun barrels after which I dry brushed them with Mr. Metal Color iron once the final flat clear was applied. My gloss coats for decals and weathering was Future (or Pledge whatever it is now) and the final matt was Microscale Micro Flat thinned 50/50. I often see people saying they have really bad results from Microscale flat and satin clear coat, but it seems like most of the time they don't thin it enough. I at least thin it 40/60 and I have always had good results, I've tried the Tamiya flat clear but I find it just doesn't do a very good job at achieving a flat finish. Anyways that's enough of my flat clear coat rant. As far as weathering goes I just used Tamiya black, dark brown and brown panel liner along with AK European earth and dark earth pigments. Then using enamel thinner for pre-fixing pigments and then enamel pigment binder or Vallejo water based binder depending on whether applying with brush or airbrush. I also had detail upgrade parts for the main gun and plethora of machine guns mounted all over this thing. The main thing I wish I had done better were the headlights. They were just molded out of one piece normal plastic, so I made it recessed with a ball engraving bit which worked well, painted the inside silver (wish I had done a slightly cleaner job or used a bit of panel liner for the edge) then put a thick dab of microscale kristal klear on for a lens. Sadly it didn't quite dry in a convex manner as I hoped, but it still look pretty good for the scale. Any recommendations on what I could use in the future? Clear epoxy maybe? I thought about shaping something out of some scrap clear sprue, but the scale was just too small to do something like that properly.
  4. Su-34 Fullback (KH80141) 1:48 Kitty Hawk The Sukhoi Su-34, known by the NATO reporting name 'Fullback' is an all-weather strike fighter, designed to replace the ageing Su-24 Fencer in Russian service. Despite being based on an existing design (the Su-27), the type endured an extremely protracted development, punctuated by the collapse of the Soviet Union. Eventually, 200 of the type are expected to enter service, replacing approximately 300 Su-24s. There are many differences between the Su-27 and the Su34, principal amongst which is a completely new nose, which accommodates the crew side-by-side, and gives it a duck-billed look that is hard to capture, plus small canards forward of the main planes, all of which has a reduced front radar signature, due to basic stealth shaping. Since September 2015, Su-34s have been involved in the conflict in Syria, dropping BETAB-500 and OFAB-500 bombs. There has already been interest in the type from overseas customers. Algeria has ordered an initial batch of 12 aircraft, while Vietnam is apparently also interested in the type. The Kit This is a complete new tool from Kitty Hawk, following on from another manufacturer's slightly flawed attempt, so a lot of people are hoping it's right. It arrives in a large box, as it is a big aircraft with 12 hardpoints for attaching munitions, of which KH are apt to include many! The boxtop art shows a Fullback climbing out after causing some chaos with some oil storage tanks, and inside the lid it quite a full box – the artwork header has also been updated from the original to a more modern, funky look to catch the eye, as you can see above. Many of these semi-blended designs are moulded with wings integral to the fuselage halves, which reduces the part count and usually means that half the box is taken up with just two parts. Not so here, as the wings are separate, and all the available space is taken up with parts. The fuselage halves still take up the full length of the box, and there is a high parts count due to the generous provision of Russian weapons. Beside the two fuselage halves there are thirteen sprues in pale grey styrene, a sprue of clear parts, four resin (yes, resin!) exhaust cans, a sheet of Photo-Etch (PE) parts, and three decal sheets of various sizes. The instruction booklet has a glossy cover with fold-out leaves that detail the box contents in front and painting of the weapons at the rear, while the full colour painting and markings guide is found in the centre of the booklet, which will be more use when removed carefully and the staples bent back so your instruction booklet doesn't fall apart, which is exactly what I've just done. First impressions are good, with a little flash around the large complex fuselage mouldings, which isn't entirely surprising, as they are complex shapes. There are slide-moulding seams behind and forward of the cockpit opening that will need a little attention before construction, and just aft of that a few panel lines have been tooled very faintly so they don't catch on the mould as the part is ejected. These would be best deepened with your favourite scribing tool before you get too far into the build. The inboard walls of the rear engine nacelles also suffer from this to a slightly lesser extent, so while you have your scriber out, fix those too. They're not defects, but necessities of production that have been present since injection moulding model kits began. The massive array of weapons provides spans six sprues, and it's best to consider them as a generic set, as there are some that won't be used and more that the Su-34 can carry. It's cheaper for KH to tool one set of weapons for all Soviet/Russian subjects than individual load-outs again and again. Construction begins with the cockp…. Nope, with the engines for a change, which KH have included for good measure, and to which are fair quantity of parts are devoted, only to be hidden away unless you're planning on opening up some panels, which will of course require some surgery to the upper fuselage, but if you flip it over, you'll see that KH have thoughtfully included two panels above each engine that can be cut out from the inside to provide access to the engines, with rivets engraved on the interior so they can be left lying about as if they are being worked on. Sure, they're a bit thick, but this is a much better option than just hiding the detail away, and if you're interested in scale fidelity, you have a shape template to base your work on. Both Saturn AL31FM1s are included, and they are set aside until later on in the build. Whether you paint them fully is entirely up to you and whether you want to cut those panels out, but I'd probably just do the front and rear faces, as they're all that will be seen eventually. Now it's the turn of the cockpit, and the first item is a pair of well-detailed Zvezda K36dm seats, which have PE seatbelts included, and are an improvement on earlier kits. The cockpit floor has the side consoles moulded in, and slots for the ejection ladders, plus control columns and decals for all panels, which are printed on a small decal sheet that has an almost photographic look to it. The rear bulkhead and access door fit to the back, and the instrument panel to the front to finish off, then this too is set aside while the gear bays and cannon bay are built up. The former are well-detailed with individual panels and additional parts to give a busy look, while the cannon bay is somewhat simpler with only a few parts in addition to the breech. The nose gear bay is more complex, and has the hatch for crew access moulded in, with a ladder built into the nose gear bay later on. This explains why you should never see a Fullback with its cockpit open, unless the crew are about to disappear on their ejection seats. Finally, the fuselage is ready to close up, after the aforementioned fettling and the removal of the residual sprue gates that can be found on the mating surfaces in places, which is an effort to avoid marring surface detail and IMHO is a great idea that is slowly creeping into kits from various manufacturers. The gear bays, two engine supports, the engines themselves and the cockpit are all added to the lower half, with the upper fuselage dropped on and glued along with the canards, which pivot on a pin, so you can set them to whatever pitch seems appropriate after checking your references. The forward facing radar is fitted to the blunt end of the fuselage, and the nose cone is popped over it, covering it up unless you do some scratching and pose it opened. The pilot's HUD is a sizeable part, and has a trough in the cockpit coaming, a PE glass support, and two part glazing, plus a horizontal lens on the clear sprue. A few probes and the refuelling probe are added, although I'd leave those until later on in case I broke them off. The twin vertical stabilisers are next, with a single thickness that is bolstered at the root, and with separate rudder, antennae and clear formation light. These are also set aside (the theme of this build!) while the exhausts and stinger are made up. You may have noticed that the exhaust cans are resin, and you can choose open or closed positions to suit your intended situation, with the tabs at the rear locking it in place on the two-part exhaust trunks. Careful painting whilst paying attention to your references will result in a good finish to this area. The Stinger is the fairing between the engines, and contains the rear radar, as well as various other equipment, and the chaff and flare dispensers that are fired to confuse and thwart incoming missiles. The body of the stinger is two part, with a recess in the top for the PE dispensers, and holes in the rear that accommodate three PE exhaust vents, which will need rolling to fit the contours of the surrounding area. These assemblies are all fitted to the rear along with some more small parts, and the tail fins attach to the sides of the fuselage with two locating pins each. Before the engine nacelles are installed, additional parts are added inside the main wheel bays that will mate with the corresponding cut-outs in the nacelles later on. Each nacelle is built up in the same manner, with a main outer skin, small PE auxiliary intakes on the sides, plus a pair of blow-in doors further back. The intake ramp attaches to the eventual roof of the intake, and a two-part trunk changes the interior profile to match the cylindrical shape of the engine front. A small elliptical insert is added to the outside of each one before they are fitted to the fuselage, along with a few more small parts hither and thither. It still needs wings, which is next and begins with the elevators, which have fairings added at their base, and when they are attached to the fuselage, another part is added, which connects them to a hinge-point in the fuselage rear. The main wings are each two parts, with slats and flaps front and rear respectively, along with a small wing fence toward the tip, and a choice of straight or curved fairing where the leading edge meets the tip rails, which you'll need to check your references to select the correct one for your airframe, as all the decal profiles show curved fairings. They fit into the fuselage on two tabs with a good mating surface, and should blend with the upper surface with a little care and test-fitting. Landing is tricky without wheels, and Russian fighters invariably have tough gear for rough field operation, and twin rear wheels on bogies are the norm. The Fullback has sturdy struts reminiscent of the Mig-31, but with both wheels on the outer face of the bogie. The legs have separate scissor-links and additional actuators, with a pair of two-part wheels each, which have decent hub and tyre detail. There should be some circumferential tread, which is absent due to moulding limitation, but as these aircraft are often seen with threadbare tyres, painting them to resemble well-used examples gets round needing to replicate this. Either that or you could treat yourself to a set of wheels from Eduard that will doubtless fit this newer tooling. The nose gear is also pretty substantial and has a high parts count, which includes a pair of clear landing lights. The crew ladder is in two parts and fits to the rear of the leg, above the mudguard that nestles behind the tyres to reduce FOD intrusion into the airframe on rough airstrip movements. The wheels are each two parts, and again there is no tread, despite it being shown on the diagrams. Happily, each gear leg can be added to a completed airframe, which is good news as it saves them from damage during handling. There are scrap diagrams of each main gear bay showing how things should look once you have installed them and the small surrounding panel at the rear of the bays. The front gear bay doors are single parts, while the rear bay doors all have additions before they can be inserted, with actuators adding a bit of realism. More scrap diagrams show their orientation after they are added, so there's little chance of making a slip-up here. Before you can load up your Fullback, you need pylons, which are all fitted with PE shackles or styrene sway-braces before they are added to the model alongside the wingtip rail. A twin rail fits between the nacelles, and either three underwing pylons, or two and a double are attached to each wing, plus the wingtip pods already mentioned. Additional single rails fit to the underside of the nacelles level with the gear legs. As already mentioned, there is a ton of weapons on those six sprues, with ten pages devoted to building them up. This is what's selected to be carried by the Su-34: 2 x FAB-500-M54 general purpose bomb 2 x BETAB-500 bunker buster 2 x OFAB-250-SZN bomb 2 x SPPU-22 gun pod 2 x U-6 pylon adapter 2 x R77 Missile Adder medium range A2A missile 2 x R73 Archer short range A2A Missile with APU-73 adapter 2 x UBK-23 gun pod 2 x GUV-8700 gun pod 2 x R27-ET/R27-ER Alamo medium range missiles with APU-470 pylon adapter 2 x R27-T Alamo medium range missiles with APU-470 pylon adapter 4 x R60 Aphid short-range A2A missile with three types of pylon adapters 2 x U-4 adapter rail 2 x UB-32 rocket pod 2 x KH-35 Kayak anti-shipping missile 2 x S-24 rocket with APU-68 pylon adapter 2 x KH-23 Kerry A2G missile with APU-68 pylon adapter 2 x KH-59 Kazoo TV guided missile 2 x KAB-250 satellite guided bomb 4 x FAB-250-M62 bomb 4 x FAB-250-TS bomb (there's a spelling mistake showing it as "F2B" on the instructions) 4 x FAB-250-M54 bomb 2 x BETAB-500-ZD penetrator bomb 4 x SAB-100 high explosive bomb 2 x S-25-A, B & C rocket 2 x RBK-500-250 cluster bomb 2 x B-8M rocket pod 2 x B-13 rocket pod 2 x KH-25-ML/MT Karen A2G Missile 2 x KH-29L Kedge laser guided A2G missile 2 x KAB-500KR TV guided bomb 2 x KAB-500L laser guided bomb 2 x KAB-1500-L/KR laser/TV guided bomb 2 x UB-16 rocket pod 2 x KH-31 A2G missile 2 x KH-58ME Kilter missile 2 x KH-58 Kilter missile with AKU-58 pylon adapter There are two pages of diagrams showing which stations the various weapons are suitable for, but if you're going for accuracy, check your references for some real-world loadouts, as with all aircraft there are limitations. The parts on the sprues are also marked by designation, with all the parts for each weapon sub-numbered within that section of the sprue. Markings The largest decal sheet is for the armament, with each weapon's stencils and markings sectioned off with a dotted line and the designation, which will make applying them a much easier proposition. Four pages of colour diagrams at the rear of the booklet show their colours and markings. Once you have unpicked the main painting guide from the centre of the booklet, you can rotate them so they're easier on the eye, where you'll discover that there are four markings options, each with four views so that there is no guesswork with the camouflaged options. Everything is a good size too, which makes reading the decal numbers and other details a lot easier than some of their first kits, proving that KH have come a long way in all departments. There is a variety of schemes available out of the box, two of which use the three shades of blue camo, one in primer, and another in dark blue over blue, and all rocking a fetching white radome. There are also large expanses of bare metal where paint wouldn't last, on the underside of the engine nacelles, and the leading edges of the elevators (hot missile exhaust?). From the box you can build one of the following rather generically described airframes: Russian Aerospace Defence Forces Red 02 in three-tone blue camo Russian Aerospace Defence Forces Red 03 in three-tone blue camo Russian Aerospace Defence Forces in primer Russian Aerospace Defence Forces in dark blue over pale blue It is unclear where and by whom the decals were printed by, but in general they are of good quality with decent sharpness and colour density except for the use of half-tones to create orange and the dielectric panel decals. On my sample, the dielectric panels also expose an element of mis-registration of the white, which is offset, giving the panels a drop-shadow effect on the sheet, which will probably disappear once applied. I would however be tempted to paint them and create some masks using the decals as templates. The white also shows up in the outlined digits as well as the tail decal BBC POCCИИ having the entire white outline projecting from the top, rather than equally spaced around the letters. Conclusion The plastic looks great, and as Kitty Hawk has stated that they want their Su-34 to be the best on the market in the scale, it shows that they have put additional effort into this model. The huge choice of weapons are also highly detailed, which are likely to be seen again as KH fill more gaps in the Soviet/Russian line-up, and we can forgive them for the little faux pas with the decals, which can be rectified fairly easily – hopefully it's an isolated case. As to shape, I've put some of the main parts together with tape to get a feeling for the overall shape of the airframe, and my first impression is that it's a good overall shape, with maybe a little more of a flare to the tip of the radome needed at the front, but it's very hard to gauge against photos of the airframe due to distortion and such, so I'll leave the final decision to you guys. If you want to discuss it further, start a thread in the main forums and link back to this thread Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of Available soon from major hobby shops
  5. Hi guys and girls, You can find the built thread here on the site. I finished this one having some issues here and there, most of my own making. The engine didnt fit too well. Needed some surgery to convince it to stick in reasonable. Lesson learned, more dryfitting even or maybe because my own scratch detailling. I had few problems with the landing gear, a first . With enourmess trembling hands I attached the antenna wires, they could be thighter but I take it. The canopy parts had disstortion and scratches otb. I was affraid to repair them, an error I will live to regret. Next time I will just try or order new ones. For the rest I tried to keep it tidy with minimal weathering. I hope you guys like it. I want to enter this one in the next IPMS Netherlands Euromilitaire show. You guys think I should do that? Tips tops are welcome. Greetings Lars
  6. Crane

    Russian Spitfire colors

    Can someone tell me what the basic colors of this aircraft would be? or where I can find more info. on this particular aircraft?
  7. This 48th scale kit is my most recent and my proudest kit. Though the icm decals discintergrated in water, i am very fond of my work and the kit. The kit overall fitted well together, the wings required a bit of sanding to get the right shape but apart from these the kit was very nice.
  8. Here are some pictures of my completed model. this was made straight out of the box. I dirtied it up as though in service, though only nice clean parade ones have been seen. Used Humbrol enamels sprayed over a base green, then a pin wash to bring up the line work and details, then used mixed W&N artisit pastels ground up to dirty it up a bit. pressed on with a stiff brush end. The ZVEZDA model goes together with little filler needed, only a bit on the flat panels at the front of the turret. Even at 1/35th there are tiny parts for the optical and radar systems. Tracks were strips of flat links, glued with superglue, not always fitting well. prefer rubber ones. Engine side grilles stand off grid panels are very difficult to fit on to the various tiny supports, I just used a lot of super glue there. T14 Tank T14 Tank T14 Tank enjoyable make. Transfers were very good but not used. Wheels were painted black for the rubber, all the rest spray painted then dirtied up. OH!, and the empty bottles on top: the crew are inside, sleeping of six bottles of wine . ZZzzzz.
  9. Here is my finished model of the topical SS26 Transporter erector and launcer kit from ZVEZDA. I have problems making small kits now, ,but wanted to include this on in my collection, so I did as best I could. The unusual digital camflage I saw on several web sites, and thought interesting. Made straight out of the box. The model transmission parts are minute and very fiddly to do all the bits! the position of the cab and other top parts are delicately mounted on the model to fit exactly the same as the real ones. where the engine fits wasn't clear, so I messed that up, but it is hidden inside. I painted the interior of the cab matt black, then took special care to paint all the sides of the transparencies with a matt black pen, as this made the very thick windows look better, without internal reflections. I do this to all kits and it helps a lot I think. I messed up the details on the rockets so I just painted them green. the digital camouflage was seen on parade pictures, and done thus: 1 felt tip for the black , 2 over: paint brush and enamel for the white bits. The model is of a topical system as the missile is supposed to be nuclear capable, and thus contravening Tactical misslile agreements. An interesting addition to any armour collection. though a very expensive kit. Added to my missile section. SS26_4 SS26_5 SS26_6 SS26_2 SS26_3 SS26_1 after seeing the enlarged pictures, I realise I have a few bits to paint: the cable, the tow hooks, the wipers...
  10. Here is my finished model of the topical SS26 Transporter erector and launcer kit from ZVEZDA. I have problems making small kits now, ,but wanted to include this on in my collection, so I did as best I could. The unusual digital camflage I saw on several web sites, and thought interesting. Made straight out of the box. The model transmission parts are minute and very fiddly to do all the bits! the position of the cab and other top parts are delicately mounted on the model to fit exactly the same as the real ones. where the engine fits wasn't clear, so I messed that up, but it is hidden inside. I painted the interior of the cab matt black, then took special care to paint all the sides of the transparencies with a matt black pen, as this made the very thick windows look better, without internal reflections. I do this to all kits and it helps a lot I think. I messed up the details on the rockets so I just painted them green. the digital camouflage was seen on parade pictures, and done thus: 1 felt tip for the black , 2 over: paint brush and enamel for the white bits. The model is of a topical system as the missile is supposed to be nuclear capable, and thus contravening Tactical misslile agreements. An interesting addition to any armour collection. though very expensive. SS26_4 SS26_5 SS26_6 SS26_2
  11. WWI Russian Maxim MG Team ICM 1:35 The set from ICM brings us a Maxim 1910 and a crew of two. 58 Maxims were purchased by the Imperial Russian Army in 1899 but then they contracted Vickers to make them in Russia. Even though the contract was signed in 1902 manufacturing only started in 1910. Due to these delays and the war with Japan in 1904 an additional 450 guns we purchased from overseas. The gun was supplied on a wheeled carriage. There is one sprue for the gun crew, two small sprues for the gun and carriage, and one sprue of Weapons & Equipment. This is one sprue from ICM 35672 WWI Russian Infantry Weapons and Equipment. Conclusion This is a good set which provides the gun and crew, it will make a nice little model/diorama in its own right, or can be used as part of a larger diorama. Its good to see ICM producing kits slightly out side the normal westen countries for WWI. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  12. ShaunJ25

    T34/85 1/35

    Hi, So this is my T-34/85. The story behind this model is the tank has been taking some heavy hits from ze Germans (seen by the deep gouges in the armour) and they were unfortunate enough hit a landmine, destroying the left track and leaving them stranded in the thick mud, leaving the crew no choice but to open the hatches and leg it. Let me know what you think - constructive feedback always welcome Tanks for looking (Pun intended, I'm sorry)
  13. Hello fellow Modellers! This "Red" 02 is a "Polish Flanker" stationed in Stargard, Poland and featured by photographer Robert Senkowski in Verlinden Lock On 17. 1992, when VVS left, there was a big fly out ceremony. I spent a lot of time to make a sleeker aft fuselage and other corrections and detailing. I made this model 2002/2003. The older pictures on tarmac were on film. I hope you like this grey stuff, Cheers!
  14. Polikarpov I-16 Type 24 Eduard 1/48 I don't often post in the aircraft section, as I'm usually an armour and SF builder, but I've been sorting through the photos of some of my older builds on Flickr, and came across this I-16 I built back in 2015. I didn't get around to posting it at the time, so I thought I may as well do so now. It's a strait OOB build of Eduard's excellent Polikarpov, and the third one I've built over the years, painted with Gunze Aqueous and weathered with various AK pigments and washes. Thanks for looking Andy
  15. Steve_farrier

    Mini art su85

    Well I think she is finished, Thanks for looking!! Steve build thread
  16. SU-76M Self-Propelled Gun with Crew 1:35 MiniArt The SU-76 was one of the most widely used AFVs of WWII by the Russians, and was based upon an enlarged version of the T-70 Light Tank chassis, adding width and an extra roadwheel to the length of the vehicle. Although the T-70 wasn't particularly effective or well liked, this much changed and improved development of its basic running gear was, because of its simple agricultural design, which made it easy to maintain, and forgiving in combat conditions. Initial problems with the drive-train were soon cured, and the SU-76M was the result, with the armoured roof of the casemate removed for ease of service and repair of the 76.2mm ZiS-3 gun. Production went on to reach almost 14,000 units before war's end, and although production of the SU-76 ceased, a further development continued production in the form of the ZSU-37, the first dedicated anti-aircraft tank in Soviet service. The Kit MiniArt are a growing force within the AFV world, and have a good reputation for their diorama bases and figure sets. Their toolings are more traditional in style, but an element of slide-moulding is starting to creep in, making for better detail on the parts. The kit arrives in a top opening grey box with a vignette painting of an SU-76M on grassy terrain. Inside are five sprues of mid-grey styrene, a single hull "tub", 16 sprue ladders of track links, a tiny sprue of clear parts, and a simple decal sheet printed by Begemot. The instruction booklet is printed in black and white on good stock, while the colour and decaling sheet is printed in full colour, and includes painting call-outs for the included figures. The first thing that is immediately apparent is that the hull of this tank is rather small. One of its nicknames was "bare a**ed Ferdinand", which referred to its similar layout but diminutive size when compared to the giant German design. The tub struggles to make 5" in length, but detail on the outer hull is good, with rivets, panel lines and raised detail in good supply. There is also detail inside the hull toward the rear where it will be visible due to its open top. Whether you will need to remove the large injection moulding lump that sits in the middle of the hull bottom is questionable, especially as there is a panel placed between it and the viewer during later construction. Unusually for a tank, the gun and its support-work are first to be built up, and there are plenty of parts to make this a well detailed section of the model. The barrel is supplied in two halves, so the more aftermarket conscious amongst us might want to source a replacement, but with some careful seam-work, the kit part should suffice, particularly as it has a 2-piece flash-hider that is added after the barrel is pushed through the mantlet, giving the impression of a hollow barrel. Careful assembly and judicious use of glue should permit you to retain the ability to traverse and raise the barrel, which is of use to retain until you have chosen the final position of the gun, at which time it can be fixed by freezing the pivot points with liquid glue. Once the gun is completed, the chassis makes an appearance, and each side takes six keyed suspension arms, onto which a roadwheel is glued. A triplet of return rollers fix further up the side of the hull on axles, and the idler wheel attaches at the very rear of the vehicle, almost as an afterthought trailing behind. The drive sprockets are mounted to the front on their final drive housings, the edge of which stand proud of the glacis plate once complete. The front of the chassis is boxed in with armour plate at this stage, and various shackles and detail parts are added to the forward and aft bulkheads. There are two hatches on the glacis plate, one for access to the gearbox and the other for the driver, which has a domed armoured surface that has a nice cast texture moulded in. The tracks are separate links that are provided on ladder-like sprues with only small stubs of sprue between each link and no outer runners. Detail is excellent throughout, and they should clip together with no glue, which is backed up by a symbol in the instruction. Each link has three sprue gates sensibly placed, and no ejector pin marks – these have been cleverly left on the sprue stubs between each link. Clean-up and construction of each track of 92 links should proceed relatively quickly as a result of these positives, and there are 8 links spare in case of broken pins. The slide-moulded fenders are then mounted with five bracing brackets on each side, along with some small details and stowage areas. A driving light is placed on the port fender, which has a clear lens piece, so the rear of the part will need painting silver to represent the reflector. On the rear of the starboard fender is a large box containing the radiator and the twin exhaust pipes. The open face of the radiator has moulded baffles that expand the surface area, which are neatly moulded, and the exhausts are made up from two halves with an exhaust pipe stub which will need drilling out to add a little realism. The upper hull is then covered with pioneer tools, while the fenders receive more stowage boxes, and the towing cable is bend into a C-shape for mounting on the glacis plate. My sample had already sheared where the two cooling wavefronts of styrene had met and cooled too quickly to mix, so the single-piece rope would be of no use. However, MiniArt have sensibly included an extra pair of towing eyes without rope moulded to them in case you want to make your own. As usual with my armour builds, I will be using a length of RB Models braided cable, because nothing looks quite like braided cable other than braided cable! At this stage the gun is installed onto a hub moulded into the rear of the top deck, and secured in place from the underside with a pin, which will take some very careful gluing to retain the ability to traverse. A basic floor piece is added, which has some treadplate detail moulded in, plus the aforementioned doors into the inner hull that blank off the moulding pip on the lower hull. A series of parts then build up into the rest of the cladding of the fighting compartment, blocking off the view into the rest of the chassis. Five palettes of shells are built up for the interior, containing a mixture of blunt nosed shells and more pointed armour piercing in each. These are sited around the crew compartment, making for a very loud bang indeed if it received a direct hit. The casemate is next to be built up, and is constructed from three individual sides, each of which is detailed up before installation. Painting the interior in stages is likely to be a necessity with this kit due to its open top and close confines. Fortunately, the casemate panels all meet the hull at an angle, so could be installed completely painted onto the model. A rear bulkhead is then added with a small door that simply eases the step over the back of the hull. Corner stiffener plates are added to the casemate, an aerial onto the starboard side, and safety "roll-cage" to the rear. Curiously, the exhaust pipes from the engine to the mufflers/silencers are almost the last parts to be added, disappearing into an angular box on the top of the hull. A set of five crew figures are included with this kit as a bonus item, and they are contained on the fifth sprue. There are three figures holding shells, one appearing to lean forward to operate the sighting mechanism of the gun, while the final figure would be the commander figure, who is looking through a pair of binoculars. The commander and one shell carrier are wearing heavy greatcoats, while the remaining three wear quilted Soviet tankers uniform. All the figures are wearing the protective leather helmets used by soviet tank crew, which are separate parts on the sprue. The figures are nicely moulded and the greatcoat wearers have separate lowers to their coats, to give a more realistic appearance to them. Some of the crew have separate hands where appropriate, while all have separate arms and legs. The legs are moulded separately and joined at the crotch to give better detail to the inseam area, and all the heads are separate parts. Some small personal items are included for the figures' belts, and eight shells are provided for the chaps to hold (the set is also sold separately as a figure set). The decals are printed by Begemot as mentioned earlier, and have a creamy tint to the white lettering. That shouldn't really notice on the dark background, but should in fact help them not to look too stark. Surprisingly from such a small sheet you can build one of five vehicles, which share the same Russian Green scheme, which is of course no surprise. SPG Artillery Division 11th Guard Army, Eastern Prussia, 1944 Unknown Slef-Propelled Regiment, Eastern Prussia, 1945 1238th SPG Regiment, Poland, March 1945 1448th SPG Artillery Regiment, 9th Krasnodar Kozak Division, Poland, 1944 1223rd SPG Artillery Regiment, 5th Guard Tank Army, 3rd Belorussian front, Vilnus, July 1944 Colour call-outs are provided from Vallejo, Testors, Tamiya, Humbrol, Revell and Mr Color. Colour names are also supplied, as well as a column of something unintelligible (to me) in Cyrillic. The same table applies to the crew figures who are surrounded by a cloud of arrows and legends. Conclusion A detailed kit of this diminutive but powerful Self-Propelled Gun, which grew from a mediocre lineage to become an important tank during WWII. The inclusion of five crew figures and individual workable track links makes it a very generous package, and should appeal to many. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  17. Hey, I was looking at the Evolution Miniatures Modern Russian Soldier figures and started wondering how these were painted for the boxart. More specifically, the digital camouflage pattern. I found a couple of ideas on another thread but wanted to pick "the community mind" about alternatives. Source: http://www.evolution-miniatures.com/ Source: http://www.evolution-miniatures.com/ Does anyone happen to know who painted these figures and what method was used? I also contacted Evolution directly in case they would care to share the method. Many thanks in advance! Cristian
  18. Sukhoi Su-34 Fullback Italeri 1/72 This is a bit of a blast from the (not to distant) past. It's the first model I built on getting back into the hobby in early 2012. At the time I hadn't really built a model in 20+ years apart from a couple of AMT Star Trek kits in the mid 90's and this build marked a number of firsts for me. 1st time using an airbrush, 1st time using acrylic paints (Vallejo in this case), 1st use of Alclad and 1st time using an after market etch set (although in the end, I hardly used any of it). I was aware that there were a few issues with the kit but I didn't want to get bogged down with trying to make corrections when this was the first aircraft I'd done in 22 years, I just wanted to get it done without making a complete pigs ear out of it. In the end I did make a few additions, mainly the door in the rear cockpit bulkhead and a crude attempt at the boarding ladder on the nose gear. The colours are pretty much approximations and far from accurate but at least it looked like a Fullback (just about) and the main thing was I enjoyed the build immensely and it hooked me back on modelling. I'd like to think I'd improved a little since then and I'd certainly do some things different if I built another but it's still one of my favorite builds and sits right in the middle of my display cabinet Hope you enjoy the shots Thanks for looking Andy
  19. AdamReith

    Fairey ? Russian kit.

    My friend sent me pic's of a kit he picked up at a flea market. Anyone recognize it?
  20. Hi, Yet another newbie question Can somebody please point me to a place where I can find more information about the name, size and construction of this antenna type used by the Russian Navy, as shown below? I would like to scratch built it for my next project. In case you have more information about how to build it, that would be even more helpful. Thanks! Cristian
  21. Nacktgeboren

    T-90 Meng, 1:35

    T-90 1/35, Meng with Masterclub tracks
  22. A wee bit of topic, but hopefully off interest 'The City Where Russia Cannot Hide Its warships' The ship spotters of Istanbul have become a key resource for diplomats and intelligence experts, alerting the world to the scale of Russia's campaign in Syria. BBC News Magazine (linky)
  23. Evening Guys Am really taken by the resin figures from the manufacturer 'Tank'. Does anyone know of a UK supplier? Thanks Andrew
  24. Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies

    Revised WW2 Russian and Japanese colours

    Today I've had some help from a friend - Stew Dapple has been the first person to sample our brand new, up to date and fully corrected WW2 Russian / VVS colours, meaning that the old WEM ACS range based on Eric Pilawskii's book is consigned to the past. The new Sovereign Hobbies Colourcoats ACS range is based on the latest understanding of the Russian colours and we trust our customers will be very pleased with them. The revamped Russian colours bring the camouflage range to: ACS01 - A.11 Blue ACS02 - AMT7 Blue ACS03 - A.11 Green ACS04 - A.11 / AMT Black ACS08 - AMT4 Olive Green ACS11 - AMT11 Blue Grey ACS12 - AMT12 Dark Grey ACS14 - AE9 Grey ACS15 - A.11 Light Brown ACS17 - 4BO Army Green ACS19 - MK7 White ACS20 - Yellow Grey ACS21 - A14 Steel Grey ACS22 - K.11 KR Red BUT WAIT! THAT'S NOT ALL! We have also revised our Japanese colour ACJ16 - the ash-grey shade used on Mitsubishi built A6M2 Zekes (Zeros). This has been matched to the research of Nick Millman, probably the most respected authority on Japanese WW2 colours in the world. ACJ16 - Mitsubishi Zero Grey-Green
  25. So after lurking on the forums for a while looking at everyones work I thought I should contribute with an attempt of my own. Normally I'm a fan of things with propellers on them but when I was a kid there was one jet that I loved and that was the Mig-25 Foxbat. So when I saw that AMK were going to be releasing one I made the error of looking at the Mig-31 As they say a fool and his money are easily parted..... Sooo. I'm hoping you guys will give me some hints along the way as this is a new subject area for me and I will be needing guidance, not least with photo etch which I optimistically purchased. Any feedback will be appreciated. In case I forget I'm a very slow builder
×