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  1. Next LemKits is a 1/32nd Sukhoi Su-2 Source: https://www.facebook.com/groups/695711033832473/permalink/5354417037961826 V.P.
  2. y I had originally started this as a WIP thread, but after my first few posts I stumbled across Haneto's brilliant WIP thread, which is quite frankly the be-all-and-end-all of this particular model, making any of my attempts to be helpful completely worthless! But more usefully it gave me just about everything I needed to make the most out of this kit, as well as setting the standard ridiculously high... I didn't quite emulate Haneto's awe-inspiring work. Not even near in some cases. But now its complete I can appreciate it more. This is my third ever aircraft (my paint skills come from painting GW minis) and this has been my biggest project to date. Painted with acrylics (including the metal parts) from Vallejo, Citadel & Scale 75. I used the 'Russian aircraft' air paint set from Vallejo for the main base colours, although I used different colours from the set instead of the recommended 'flanker' paints, as I found them too dull and similar to one another. Weathering was done mostly via acrylic washes (the Vallejo washes are very good for manipulation with a wet brush/cloth for a good hour afterwards, despite being acrylic water based), although some enamel washes were used on the smaller parts. The exhaust and tail fins colour patina was partly done with the use of Tamiya weathering powders. Watercolour pencils were also used on various parts on the body. The 'lines' painted on the engine exhausts were done using inks (with the occasional help of a ruler!) A Molotow chrome marker was used on the brightest metal parts. I ended up using the Begemot decals with the set provided, as I had a few concerns over the GWH decals being a bit thick. Overall, this wasn't the case, and if you are considering the Begemot decals, be aware they are not a complete replacement, and you'll still need both. There is also a few errors in the Begemot decal guide, where the GWH one is by and large spot-on. The Begemot decals are generally much nicer and more detailed however. As far as the kit goes, it is great and generally fits together very well, but a few issues to watch out for; firstly consider scribing over the panel lines, as some of them are very faint and can easily be lost durng the priming and painting stages. Part of the reason why this kit looks so weathered is due to having to repeat washes where the wash just wouldn't stick in the panel lines. I also had to re-draw all the lines on the metalic parts of the rear fins, which was a hassle and why those parts may look a bit odd. Secondly, be aware that there are some very tiny parts on the main body that can easily be broken when handling it. There is a missing antenna thing from each side of the wing where they've got caught somewhere and subsequently disappeared, most likely inside the vacumn cleaner. Haneto did suggest in his thread to replace them with brass rod, but that's a bit out of my comfort zone. Next, you will need to shave off a good couple of minimetres of the main body around the insertion of the engine nozzles as that is not a good fit if left untouched. Finally, be very very careful with the landing gear assembly. I made a very annoying balls-up, but thankfully it's barely noticeable due to everything else going on with the craft. Once again this has come out more weathered than I originally intended, as I was going for a cleaner build. It's something for me to work on. My next couple of planned projects are to do a couple of scale 1/24 cars, which I am definatley not planning to weather! After that it should be an F-15e, also by GWH. Well done if you made it this far and thanks for looking. Huge shout out to Haneto for all the help and inspiration his WIP thread provided me (if you have no idea of what I'm talking about, go and look for it NOW - also to see what a SU-35 should really look like!) Any questions feel free to ask!
  3. Stencil Decals for Su-27 (D48082) 1:48 Eduard Decals Eduard’s stencil range has been growing steadily of late, providing sharp, detailed stencilling for numerous types, some of which are lacking from the originating manufacturer’s box. The latter can come in handy for your average modeller, as sometimes the kit doesn’t include a complete set of stencils for expediency or whatever reason. Some folks, myself included, think that the inclusion of a full suite of stencils adds extra realism to a model, although there is of course the time element and the extra carrier film edges to hide. Eduard have been busy of late and have released this comprehensive set we have to review. It arrives in a clear foil re-sealable envelope with a card stiffener, a cover page with instructions, plus the decals with wax paper protecting the delicate printed surface. This set arrives on two sheets, and will fit any of the Academy, Kitty Hawk, Hobby Boss or Great Wall Hobby kits, and over the course of six profiles from overhead, underneath, and the sides, plus a page of pylon profiles, the locations of all the many stencils are shown clearly on coloured line drawings. There are also scrap diagrams detailing the placement of decals on the inside faces of the engine nacelles, fins, gear bay doors and the air-brake for ultimate detail. The decals are printed in-house by Eduard and have good register, sharpness and colour density, with a glossy carrier film printed close to the edges of the printed areas. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. Su-33 Flanker-D (8001) Russian Navy Carrier-Borne Fighter 1:48 Minibase via Albion Alloys The SU-33 is a carrier-based development of the SU-27 that has suffered from the dearth of finances following the break-up of the Soviet Union at the end of the last millennium. Soon after it was taken into service by the Soviet Navy, funding was reduced to the military as a whole, and as a result only 24 airframes were built. Overseas sales were attempted, but none came to fruition for various reasons, and further sales to the Russian Navy weren't an option, as in 2009 they decided on the smaller navalised Mig-29K going forward. The Su-33 refuses to die however, and in 2016 they were optioned to be upgraded again to a higher standard in order to tempt offshore sales, although the airframe’s size has led to a loss of some potential orders. Beginning with the basic SU-27 airframe, the internal structure and landing gear were beefed up to cope with the additional stresses of hard carrier landings, the wings were enlarged to provide additional lift, small canards were added forward of the newly enlarged wings, and both the wings and stabs were fitted with folding mechanisms for storage below decks. The first aircraft embarked on the Admiral Kuznetsov in 1995 after substantial testing, but the cancellation of other carriers led to the projected buy of 72 airframes being cut back to the aforementioned 24. They were being drawn down in favour of the Mig-29K, and were refurbished to replace their outdated avionics for future use elsewhere, leading to an additional squadron consisting of Su-33s since being stood up in addition to the Migs to offer enhanced air power and airframe availability. The Kit This kit has arrived somewhat suddenly from new company Minibase out of the blue, and it has just started to turn up in the Far Eastern shops, with its arrival in the UK coming soon thanks to their importers Albion Alloys, who have thoughtfully supplied us with a finished kit to show to you lovely folks. It is a 100% new tool, and not to be confused with the offerings from other manufacturers. I have looked in the box and can confirm that this is entirely correct, as it has many different features to the other brands, plus lots of extras that aren’t included with others. The box is similar in size to the other Russian fighters in this scale, but it is jammed almost solid with sprues that are well-packaged for shipping with bubble-wrap, resealable clear foil bags and even sheets of card in some bags. The slide-moulded weapons are all enveloped in long narrow cardboard boxes that have the mini-sprues firmly secured by cardboard flaps to stop them rattling around. Over the top of the box is a full-size card insert that has glossy profiles on one side and a frivolous cartoon of an Su-33 being “sprayed” by little men on a cherry-picker while a bee takes pictures with a DSLR. A very unusual inclusion, but it raised a smile and some folks might like to keep it for their wall – either side of the page is attractive to be honest. OK, enough whittering about the packaging. What’s IN the box is a lot more exciting. All the plastic is a grey colour, and there are fourteen main sprues, two separate intakes wrapped in bubblewrap, twelve mini-sprues of weapons, three sheets of Photo-Etch (PE) of various sizes, a turned aluminium pilot probe, a tiny slip of coloured acetate sheet, four clear sprues on a cruciform frame (one of which fell off), three sheets of decals plus a tiny one I almost missed, a very thick instruction booklet with painting and decaling guide in colour, plus an addendum sheet to replace page 50 of the booklet. Going back to that little piece of coloured acetate, it was inside one of the PE bags on my sample, which was open to the air at one end but was being held in by static cling. It is only a few millimetres across so would be easy to lose, especially if you don’t notice it in your excitement. Put it somewhere safe immediately, or you’ll be scratching around for a replacement. Detail is bordering on the unbelievable, with a huge part count and detail everywhere thanks to intelligent use of slide-moulds throughout to produce vents, detailed pylon under-surfaces, all of it as crisp as a fresh packet of Walkers. The finesse of the exhausts and other parts are also impressive, as is the sheer volume of decals, a weighty quantity of PE parts and a metal pitot that would be aftermarket with the majority of the kits out there. This makes the price look very much more attractive to anyone sucking air through their teeth at the price tag. Let’s see some of that detail now, eh? Construction begins with the ejection seat, which is a K-36DM Series 2 and is incredibly well-detailed, taking up two pages of the instruction booklet to complete and beginning with a two-piece shell into which the cushions, PE parts and masses of small details are fitted. The belts will require your full attention, as they are somewhat akin to macramé, weaving through, under and over each other. The cockpit tub is relatively small, but is covered with highly detailed dual-faceted side consoles plus sidewall inserts, a rear bulkhead and a choice of two incredible instrument panels as you can see from the photos. Even the control column has two profiles for correct painting, and the detail there is just as good, with numerous small parts there and added to the sidewalls. This kit isn’t going to take 10 minutes. The nose gear bay is below the cockpit, and this too is made up from a multi-part shell with detail everywhere, some moulded-in, and others added from the masses of small parts included in this kit. Colour call-outs are given to allow you to pick out the details afterwards. The bay is capped at either end with more parts, which have small decals applied to improve the detail even further, then the nose strut is begun, and it too takes well over a page of the instructions, adding struts, landing light lenses and other complex shapes that would have been milled into the full-scale part, plus some PE parts, a multi-part oleo-scissor link, the typical slatted mudguard that is made up from PE slats fixed to a central former. The wheels are put together in an odd manner, fixing the rear hubs to the axles first, then layering the inner tyre surface, then the outer tyre, and finally the outer hub for each one. Incidentally, the tyres are also exceptionally well detailed with makers’ mark and statistics on the wall and a circumferential tread around the contat surface. Careful assembly should minimise any clean-up and allow you to preserve the detail on both wheels. There are more decals placed on the leg as well as some useful colour call-outs, all of which use Gunze paint codes. The engines are hung under the fuselage in separate compartments on most Soviet/Russian jets, and the Su-33 is one of those, with this kit having separate tunnels rather than the more common moulded-in trunks on other kits. Even these areas are detailed with additional parts of PE and styrene, plus either open or closed internal FOD guards, plus more details that will eventually form part of the main gear bays. The internal trunking is formed by a roof slotted into the forward sloped intake part of the nacelle, and a two-part trunk with sensor and gear bay former in the rear. It is closed over at the rear by a pair of engine face parts that have tiny sensors fixed to the outer rim, with a scrap diagram showing the correct location. Another bay insert and detail panel with PE parts is fitted around the half-way mark on the outer face, with the task repeated in mirror-image for the other nacelle. A teardrop fairing is glued to the outside with the mechanism for the landing gear lock at its heart, one added to each nacelle. The main gear legs run on a single large tyre each, which is made up similarly to the nose gear wheel, but with an additional brake housing part that has three tiny parts fitted to them. You also have a choice of weighted or unweighted tyres, whichever suits your mindset, but be careful to put the same type on both sides. The gear legs are sturdy vertical structures that have various lugs, eyes and struts installed along with separate oleo-scissor links and the steering linkage, as well as decals and painting call-outs. The opposing wheel gets the same high part-count in mirror-image, and all three legs are put to one side while their bays are made up. The lower fuselage begins as a cruciform(ish) flat(ish) shape, with the nose bay added inside, and the main bays made up in situ from individual walls, which have additional parts and copious colour call-outs along the way. The detail is again fabulous. Flipping over the underside allows the addition of the central pylon details, as well as a few small parts that might be better off left until after painting. An insert goes under the nose, and is supplied with a decal that is best left off until after painting too. The nacelles can then be mated with the newly joined airframe, securing on a number of lugs that snug down into holes in the underside. There now follows a brief interlude while we build the vertical stabilisers, both following a similar path and beginning with the two main fin halves to which a single rudder surface is fitted at an angle to suit yourself and/or your references. They diverge slightly with the addition of the sensors in the fin’s trailing edge, which aren’t symmetrical. These too are put to one side, so get yourself a tray or a Tupperware box or you’ll be losing things. With the interlude over, there are inserts added to either side of the underside that portray various grilles and panels that are peculiar to each side, then the main gear bays are detailed with the top of the main gear leg, which is made up from a number of parts, and more parts are fitted into the front of the side inserts, which also form part of the gear bay detail. Yet more detail is applied from the inside, including a large trunk and some other small pipes etc., leaving the competition in its wake when it comes to realism. Two more inserts are added inside the aft fuselage, and even those have an addition part within. The Su-33 is a carrier-based aircraft, so has folding wings that add a little complication to control surfaces. The flaps are the first aspects of the wings to be made up, and they are complex, with two sections to each flap segment that can either be built up retracted or “clean”, or in two modes of deployment with increased deflection in the latter option depicting a “dirty” airframe. Each of the two sections are linked by actuators, and the edges have PE inspection hatches glued in place as directed by a scrap diagram, and there are two flap segments per side, so plenty to do. Depicting the wings in their folded state requires the flaps to be clean, and the assembly is trapped between the top and bottom wing surfaces, with visible ribs and folding mechanisms at the inner edge, and more colour call-outs are present here. The leading-edge slats have actuators added if you are deploying those too, or are attached to the leading edge, with both options having a PE end-cap, and as you’d expect the folded wings have those too in the retracted position. Each wing has a tip sensor suite in a tubular fairing with a small wingtip light and a slot that keys into the wing. If you’re going for wings down, the same parts are used, but with straight pins inserted into the fold area, and omitting the rib details. Again, there’s a left and right wing, so it’s all done twice. At last the upper fuselage gets a look in. it is prepared with an insert at the rear of the cockpit, the cannon barrel with a tiny imaginary bay that holds the barrel in place, a bay for the in-flight refuelling probe, and a small bulkhead at the rear between the engine humps. The main bay roofs are moulded into the upper fuselage, and should be painted at the same time as the rest of the bay parts to avoid forgetting and feeling silly later. The cockpit coaming has its own page in the instructions, and is made up from a substantial number of parts, with a highly detailed HUD frame from PE, and the dark acetate piece inserted into the projector section of it. Two clear lenses slide inside the PE HUD frame, and other equipment is arrayed around it, far ahead of anything you’ll find in your usual kit box. The refuelling probe pops into its bay while in the neighbourhood, and there is an alternative coaming layout for one of the options. As you would probably expect by now, the canopy is similarly complex and detailed, with a separate set of glazing for open and closed options. A frame fits into the bottom of the canopy after being decked out with demisting pipes, stiffeners and the open/close mechanism, which is again detailed with decals and plenty of colour call-outs. The cockpit is inserted from below and the seat launch ramp, equipment and other details are applied behind the pilot, then the windscreen with clear hoop and PE side-details for the coaming are glued in place along with the big hemispherical sensor and its fairing on the right of the screen, plus a partial door on the fuel probe. The closed canopy option is similarly detailed, but small sections of some of the parts are removed as per the instructions to get a better fit, and of course the alternative clear parts. Both the canopies are of the modern blown type, so are made in a three-part mould that leaves a faint seamline down the centre on the outer face. This should be sanded off extremely carefully and polished back to clarity with successively finer grades of abrasive, then polish to a shine with some polishing compound. The upper fuselage houses the air brake bay in the spine behind the canopy, which has some detail parts added with a decal (add that after painting), and if you are folding the wings, some very detailed inserts are fitted to the wing stubs with dozens of small parts added along the way. The un-folded wings have a simplified insert and some hinge parts fitted before it is put to the side while the horizontal stabs are made up in either folded or deployed positions. The same parts are used for both forms, with detailed fairings, PE stiffening plates and fold details in PE too. The outer section is placed perpendicular to the inner for folded, and if deploying them, the very tips of the hinges need removing as per the diagram, and the PE fold ribs are omitted. The exhausts can be made in the open or closed positions, which gives you plenty of choice, and these two are… highly detailed! It’s no longer a surprise now, is it? The afterburner ring is a styrene part that has a delicate PE ring rolled and laminated to it, then it is slipped inside the forward trunking, which has some fine ribbing moulded into it. The aft face of the engine closes the forward trunk off, then the aft trunk and exhaust petals are made up from more trunk, outer petals and inner ring with PE detail within, then the two sub-assemblies are joined together. For the closed nozzles, different parts are used, and you should check your references for the most appropriate position for your proposed pose. The fuselage can finally be joined now, choosing one of the three inner flap positions, trapping those, the horizontal stabs and the canards in position before you begin gluing it together. You’ll need to be sensible with the quantity of glue around the moving parts if you want to keep them that way, that is. The inner wing’s slats are of similar construction to the outer pair, and can be posed open or closed, and you can even pose the parapack housing in the tail stinger by adding a bulkhead in the front of the slide-moulded tip, which has a triple antenna in PE added to the top, and a retraction jack to hold it in place. The “unfolded” fairing just glues straight into the rear of the stinger. An open airbrake is achieved by laminating an inner and outer panel and fleshing out the hinges with more parts, then attaching it with a jack holding it to the correct angle, and two tiny parts removed from the bay edge for the hinges. A closed brake uses a small spacer in the very rear of the bay to keep the outer skin flush with the rest of the surface and no extra parts. The exhausts are slotted into their tunnels, the vertical stabs slide onto their pegs, and if you are deploying the wings for flight, the straight pegs hold the wings to the correct angle. The gear can be fitted onto their bases in the bays, and the sturdy arrestor hook has two tiny PE bolts glued to the top before it too is attached to the underside. No gear bay is complete without bay doors, and these are on another level too, having detail parts and jacks fitted to each one for the main and nose gear bays. More painting instructions are included here too. The folded wings are a more complex matter to install, having the main hinges already glued into the outer wing, but a lot of extra connectors and cabling included, with scrap diagrams showing the correct location for these delicate parts. Your tweezer fu will need to be on-point for this. The ejection seat and a host of aerials, probes and antennae finish off the basic airframe, with the turned metal pitot probe used, or replaced by a styrene one if you prefer, or even a folded styrene one for those who choose the stowed option. Minibase have generously included a boarding ladder for your model, which is made up from two side rails and seven separate steps, plus a few more parts to complete the frame. Weapons Some companies include weapons with their kits, some don’t, and you can never please everyone. This kit provides you with slide-moulded weapons of two types, with two sub-types for the short-range missiles, and four for the longer range options, depending on its seeker head type and range. As mentioned, they are secured in a pair of card boxes, and each one has its own mini-sprue with the name of the weapon in raised letters to help you identify it. I’ve been mildly disappointed by slide-moulded weapons before, as they suffered a little from excessive seamlines that took about as long to remove as would a traditional “two-part plus fins” weapon. This kit is somewhat better, and has very fine seams to remove that shouldn’t take long at all. All the fins are moulded-in, and apart from exhausts and seriously small antennae in the noses of the R-73s, they’re ready to go once you’ve scraped the seams and sanded away the sprue gates. Detail is of course excellent throughout. Detail is also exceptional on the pylons, which have either slide-moulded mounting surfaces or separate inserts, depending on the size of the pylon. There are various pylons with adapter rails, and they have addition parts to fill the role of attachment points, which will be of use if you plan on a peacetime load-out with empty pylons for your model. A full-page diagram shows which pylon goes where, and another page gives you options for weapons locations, but if you want ultimate accuracy, check your references before you get too far. In the box are the following: 2 x R-73E AA-11 Archer export version 2 x R-73L AA-11 Archer with optical laser fuse 2 x R-27T AA-10 Alamo-B, infrared homing 2 x R-27R AA-10 Alamo-A, semi-active radar homing 2 x R-27ET AA-10 Alamo-D, infrared-homing extended-range version 2 x R-27ER AA-10 Alamo-C, semi-active-radar homing extended-range version There are extensive stencils for every missile and pylon included on the decal sheets. Markings The decals are designed by Galaxy Decals and printed in China, with three airframes included in the box, and the stencils alone take up seven pages of the instructions, with profiles of the top, bottom, both sides of the nacelles, all of the pylons on both sides, and of course the missiles themselves. The colour profiles for the individual airframes are large enough to be of use, and the replacement of pages 50/51 are to fix a printing issue that has placed a big chunk of pale blue up the side of the port vertical stab. From the box you can build one of the following: 279th Shipborne Fighter Aviation Regiment 1st Aviation Squadron, Bort #68 279th Shipborne Fighter Aviation Regiment 2nd Aviation Squadron, Bort #80 279th Shipborne Fighter Aviation Regiment 2nd Aviation Squadron, Bort #86 The decals have good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. One of my decals (one iteration of 154) was slightly smudged, but it is so small it shouldn’t notice, especially if you put it on the bottom of the missile it is intended for. Your sheet probably won’t even have this issue. Conclusion Phrases like “Oh Wow!” repeated several times over sprung to mind initially, but I’ll try to be a bit more erudite. This kit includes so much detail that it is difficult to take it all in initially, and poring over the instructions with the sprues in front of you is the only way to understand the level of plastic engineering that has gone into the creation of it. There will be some that feel it is over-engineered due to the high parts count, but it is exactly this high part count that brings the detail, along with slide-moulded parts and plain old-fashioned intelligent design. If it goes together half as well as it looks, it will merit inclusion at the top of kit of the year list, and we’ll find out pretty soon. The inclusion of three sheets of PE and a metal pitot probe, slide-moulded weapons, lashings of stencils to further detail the painted surface, and an instruction booklet that holds your hand through the complex sections of the build, and you have a package that is excellent value and worth every penny of the asking price, which we generally don’t talk about here, as we’re more interested in the kits in the boxes than anything else. We’ll break the rule this once though, and it has an RRP of £99 and change here in the UK, which when you add up the inclusions, the quality of the tooling and the amount of modelling time you’re going to expend on this treasure, makes it a very reasonable price. Exceptionally highly recommended. Available in the UK in most good model shops. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for the Brand
  5. Su-30MKK Family Interior 3D Decal (QD48047 for Hobby Boss Kits) 1:48 Quinta Studios When Quinta’s innovative products first came to our attention recently they caused quite a stir, as well they should. The replacement Instrument Panels and internal details are mind-boggling to look at, because we’re used to seeing simplified styrene instrument panels, or Photo-Etch brass panels with either two steps of etching, or laminated parts that can be tricky to glue together, even though they are pre-painted for your ease. But decals? These aren’t your run-of-the-mill decals though, they’re 3D printed in many layers and colours on a flat carrier film, having as much in the way of relief as is needed to complete a realistic panel printed in the correct colours, complete with shiny dial faces, MFDs and metallic-effect hardware, often also including cushions and seat belts in the set. Each set arrives in a ziplok bag with two folded instruction booklets protecting the decals, which are also separately bagged, so they should reach you in good condition. The pictorial instructions are printed on glossy paper, and are shown in full colour as befits the detailed nature of the sets, showing exactly where each part should go on the actual model, so there’s no confusion due to the truism that pictures speak a thousand words. Additional hints and instructions for the uninitiated are also included, marking out parts needing bases, kit part numbers and other useful tips. The technical instructions in the text-based sheet give additional tips to the new user about maximising adhesion and preventing lift at the edges by wicking in super glue. Application is much the same as your standard decal, but you will need to remove any raised detail that would be underneath the location depicted in the instructions, and some new parts will need small backing panels or bases on which to apply the decal. A slim piece of sheet styrene would fit the bill, and painting the edges a matching colour should minimise its appearance or turn it completely invisible. This set is patterned for the Hobby Boss kits of the Su-30MK, MK2, M2, MKV, MK2V and MKK. The set comprises one large sheet, containing instrument panel sections, multiple large MFD panels surrounded by buttons, dials and other instruments, the former having a deep green shiny finish, just like the real displays when switched off. The panels are in the more modern brighter bluish shade, and includes the side consoles plus the side wall framing and insulation that have flat-spots on them to accept other parts on the sheet for the ultimate in relief. Conclusion The detail on the parts is incredible, even down to the infinitesimal switches, the texture of the insulation and impressive crispness of the set. Any Quinta outfitted cockpit really needs a crystal-clear or opened canopy to show off the details. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. Su-27UB Interior 3D Decal (QD72020 for Zvezda) 1:72 Quinta Studios When Quinta’s innovative products first came to our attention recently, they caused quite a stir, as well they should. The replacement Instrument Panels and internal details are mind-boggling to look at, because we’re used to seeing simplified styrene instrument panels, or pre-painted Photo-Etch Brass panels with either two layers of etch, or laminated parts that can be tricky to glue together, even though they are pre-painted for your ease. But decals? These aren’t your run-of-the-mill decals though, they’re 3D printed in many layers and colours on a flat carrier film, having as much in the way of relief as is needed to complete a realistic panel printed in the correct colours, complete with shiny dial faces, MFDs and metallic-effect hardware, often also including cushions and seat belts in the set. Each set arrives in a ziploc bag with two folded instruction booklets protecting the decals, which are also separately bagged, so they should reach you in good condition. The pictorial instructions are printed on glossy paper, and are shown in full colour as befits the detailed nature of the sets, showing exactly where each part should go on the actual model, so there’s no confusion due to pictures speaking a thousand words, as they say. Additional hints and instructions for the uninitiated are also included, marking out parts needing bases, kit parts and other useful tips. The technical instructions in the text-based sheet give additional tips to the new user about maximising adhesion and preventing lift at the edges by wicking in super glue. Application is much the same as your standard decal, but you will need to remove any raised detail that would be underneath the location depicted in the instructions, and some new parts will need small backing panels or bases on which to apply the decal. A slim piece of sheet styrene would perform that task, and painting the edges a matching colour should minimise its appearance or turn it completely invisible. This set is patterned for the 1:72 Zvezda kit of the two-seater Sukhoi Su-27UB, so you get two of pretty much everything. The set comprises two sheets of decals, containing instrument panels; multiple large glossy instrument dials and a couple of small MFD panels on inserts, having a deep green shiny finish, just like the real displays when switched off. Side consoles and cockpit sidewalls are covered in new panels with quilted insulation, and the seats are decked out with new belts, cushions and leg harnesses to replace the kit parts, the cushions having a realistic crinkled finish to the vertically stitched surface and side-panels. The interior is in the more modern bluish grey shade, and you will of course have to remove the moulded-in detail to the cockpit surfaces. The detail is still impressive in 1:72, and includes sections of the bulkheads behind each ejection seat. Conclusion The detail on the parts is impressive for the scale, especially in the seat department. Any Quinta outfitted cockpit really needs a crystal-clear of opened canopy to show off the details. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. SU-30SM Updates & Masks (for Kittyhawk) 1:48 Eduard Kittyhawk have been releasing all kinds of Flankers since around 2017, with the SU-30SM hitting the shelves 2020. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Su-30SM Upgrades (491150)b] Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels and side consoles are the primary parts on the painted set requiring the removal of the moulded-in detail, with new rudder pedals; HUD box front; ejection seat and headbox details; coaming instrumentation and a complete skin for the canopy sill structure and canopy hoops for the clear parts with rear-view mirrors also supplied. The intakes have new PE auxiliary doors folded up, with build-in FOD guards made from laminated parts; curved main gear bay skins; a set of parts to completely skin out the air-brake bay; a raft of blade antennae with bases; AoA probes; more detailed antennae on the trailing edge of the tail fins, and a set of static discharge wicks for the tails and flying surfaces. Zoom! Set (FE1150) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts STEEL (FE1151) These belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the two sets of crew belts and harnesses, you also get a set of bunny-ear handles between the pilot's knees that gets him out of there in case of an emergency. Masks (EX743) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition, you get a set of hub/tyre masks for the wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Masks Tface (EX744) Supplied on a larger sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with everything above, but also give you another set of canopy masks tailored to fit the interior of the glazing so that you can paint the interior and give your model that extra bit of realism. Review sample courtesy of
  8. Su-57 Felon Interior 3D Decals (QD48082 for Zvezda 4824) 1:48 Quinta Studios When Quinta’s innovative products first came to our attention they caused quite a stir, as well they should. The replacement Instrument Panels and internal details are mind-boggling to look at, because we’re used to seeing simplified styrene instrument panels, or Photo-Etch Brass panels with either two layers of etch, or laminated parts that can be tricky to glue together, even though they are pre-painted for your ease. But decals? These aren’t your run-of-the-mill decals though, they’re 3D printed in many layers and colours on a flat carrier film, having as much in the way of elevation as is needed to complete a realistic panel printed in the correct colours, complete with shiny dial faces and metallic-effect hardware, and often including cushions and seat belts in the set. Each set arrives in a ziplok bag with a folded instruction booklet protecting the decals, which are also separately bagged, so they should reach you in good condition. The pictorial instructions are printed on glossy paper, and are shown in full colour as befits the awesomeness of the sets, showing exactly where each part should go on the actual model, so there’s no confusion due to the “pictures speak a thousand words” maxim. Additional hints and instructions are also included, marking out parts needing bases, kit parts and other useful tips. The technical instructions are text-based, giving additional tips to the new user about maximising adhesion and preventing lift at the edges by wicking in super glue. Application is much the same as your standard decal, but you will need to remove any raised detail that would be underneath the location depicted in the instructions, and some new parts will need small backing panels or bases made, on which to apply the decal. A slim piece of sheet styrene would perform that task, and painting the edges a matching colour should minimise its appearance or turn it completely invisible. This set is patterned for the new Zvezda kit of the final evolution of the Pak-Fa, Russia’s response to the 5th Generation Fighter battle, a kit that I’ve personally been looking forward to for ages now. The set comprises two small sheet of decals, containing instrument panel sections with two huge glossy MFDs dominating the main panel and a smaller one on the right, side consoles, an additional instrumented front for the HUD and under the main panel, metallic rudder pedals and a full set of seatbelts and cushions for the pilot’s comfort and safety, including the leg straps that replace the slightly chunky kit representation moulded into the kit seat. The panels are surrounded by the more recent lighter blue shade that is seen in modern Russian fighters. Conclusion The detail on the parts is incredible, even down to the infinitesimal switches and impressive crispness of the seat cushions and seatbelts. This cockpit now really needs a crystal-clear or better yet, an opened canopy to show off the details. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. Hello Friends, This is a Build of the HobbyBoss Sukhoi-30 MKK in 1:48 size. I build this kit into a Su-30MKI in service with the Indian Air Force. The build is OOB with required additions or modifications. The mods include : 1. Making the LERX - Leading Edge Extensions alongwith the canards. I make this using plastic card and epoxy putty. Once the putty dried I sanded the thing to shape. The panel lines were rescribed with reference to the line drawings which are available on the internet. 2. I modify the tails as the ones used by the MKI are different to those on the MKK. I add wedge shaped sections to the tops and I make new wide chord rudders. I also add plastic card to the bottom to increase the height of these fins. Horizontal stabilizer actuator fairings are also scratchbuilt. 3. I chose a Bomb Truck Loadout for this build as it is really intimidating. However the kit doesn't include any OFAB Bombs. So I dig my spares box and I use the OFAB 250 and OFAB 100 Bombs supplied in the Trumpeter MIG-27BN and MIG-27 kits. I further modify these bombs as they have really funny noses. So I cut the nose and attach flat plastic. To this I add a drop of resin to get an acceptable nose shape. Also I add stabilizing fins to these. A total of 24 OFAB 250 and 12 OFAB 100 bombs were modified. 4. The Sukhoi's when parked have their engines pointed down and inwards. So I modify the engine nozzles to give them the correct stance or angle. The Mod is to add plastic to the inner nozzle which acts as a flange for the install and I add plastic cut at an angle to the outside nozzle which represents the swivel mechanism for thrust vectoring. The rest of the build is pretty straight forward. I detail the ejection seats with seatbelts made from masking tape, hydraulic lines on the landing gear were added using stretched sprue. Paints used are locally available acrylics. The engine panels are brush painted to show the brushed burnt metal effect. Overall the kit is a good place to start with if you want a Su-30 SM, MKI or a MKM in your collection, but the kits needs some work. Only KittyHawk has a Su-30SM but it comes at a price and with less plastic inside the box. Hope you like the Build . . . Best Adi
  10. Good evening. I am starting a new thread to present my latest build. It's a Su-25K in 1/48th from Kovozávody Prostějov. There is going to be a blog post about that very build on my blog, which means that most of the text and photos in this thread will be the same as in the blog. Any discussions, questions and answers will obviously only be available here, I will not copy them to the blog. Usually before I buy a kit, I look for reviews and builds online, to get an idea about what I should be expecting. This time, however, I wasn't able to find much information about this particular kit, so I decided to do a build review instead of just a build. So, the kit is this one (click on the image to go to Scalemates where they present the kit) It comprises 5 sprues in grey plastic with decent surface detail on the wings and fuselage, one tree with clear parts, a fret of photo-etched metal and decals. At the moment I have no clue about how the several parts go together, we’ll figure that out further down the way. Right now I can only say that the smaller parts (ejection seat, cockpit tub etc) aren’t very rich in detail. I apologise by the way for posting pictures of some parts already off their sprues, but I decided to write this review only after I began building the kit. I recon that the instructions leaflet isn't very widely available on the net, which is why I scanned it. You can download it here: KPM4805_Su-25K_Frogfoot. The construction begins with the seat. KP’s representation of the NPP Zvezda K-36 ejection seat is very… conceptual, to say the least. Sure, they’ve made an effort, including photo-etched parts, but there’s still plenty of room for improvement. At first I thought about giving it a shot but my patience is limited, so I opted for a resin replacement instead. Leaving it aside, I moved on to the cockpit itself. It is built up by a total of 10 parts (if I count correctly): One for the floor, one for the back, two for the side consoles and the floor walls, two for the insides of the fuselage walls with some switches and other controls, the main instrument panel in PE, the stick column and the pedals. Quite an impressive break-down of parts, in theory. In practice, very few parts fit well together and to make matters worse, the shape of the parts differs a lot between the drawing and the actual plastic. The floor has etched outlines marking where the seat and the cockpit walls should go. If you glue these carefully, they almost match the outlines. Then you’d assume that the back panel would be a simple fit. But you’d be mistaken. There’s a slope on the right side that almost follows the same angle as the back should have. But the left side is totally perpendicular to the floor, leaving a trapezoid gap between itself, the floor and the back. Now, I haven’t exactly checked my references on Su-25 (I have none), but I am guessing that it shouldn’t look like this. Then again, it can be so in the real plane as well. Might be an opening for the cat to go out and play, for example, just like some suburban houses have small openings at the lower panel of the backdoor to the garden. What do I know? But this kit’s irony doesn’t end there. Try to glue the instrument side walls and you’ll notice that there is only one way to do it: Glue them on the detail of the side consoles. And if that isn’t enough, the right wall doesn’t even fit. Not even close. So, at this point I simply gave up and ordered a resin cockpit. This is why I wrote that I thought that the kit was inexpensive. But if you add the cost for the aftermarket parts, which in a way are necessary, if you want to build a decent model, then the price tab is a bit higher. But it still costs less than ⅓ of a Tamiya F-14 in same scale. While waiting for the resin parts, I decide to tackle the rest of the steps that I could, without closing the fuselage halves. There’s still a lot of work to do, most of which is preparations, since the parts comprising the model are few. But all of them require careful removing from the sprue trees, cleaning and filing and at times removing the flash. I joined the wing halves, vertical stabiliser, nose gear strut (yes, it comes also in two parts, unknown why) and prepared the fuselage halves and the engine pods. A dry fit shows that the parts go together quite well. It’s true though that the recessed panel lines don’t exactly align when the fuselage halves come together. And that can be a pain to fix. But we’ll cross that bridge when we get there. I also prepared the main landing gear. Filling and sanding was required there too. Each strut of the main gear consists of 6 parts and gluing them together is a really exciting challenge, because there are no location guides whatsoever and the instructions are a bit… liberal, to say the least. I did my best there, we’ll see how it will go when it’s time to glue them in place. The landing gear was painted in Tamiya XF-19 Sky grey, which is most probably the wrong colour, but I couldn’t be bothered more. In the meantime I was also working on the “engines”, which consist of 5 parts each. There’s not much to be said here really, apart from the fact that the green paint (Tamiya XF-58 Olive green) which I used for the cones is also wrong. It’s the same colour that I used to paint the wheel rims. I also decided to add a bit of detail on the landing gear bay doors. This didn't exactly turned out the way I had hoped it would, but who cares, really? :) In the mean time, the resin parts arrived: It was a complete cockpit set from Pavla Models (PAVC48002) and the control column and pedals from QuickBoost (QB48722) Because Pavla's is totally horrible, worse than the kit's. Generally I have to say that Pavla's set left me with a mixed impression. The cockpit back is clearly much better than the kit's but the side consoles and the cockpit walls aren't really better. I decided to use the kit's cockpit walls and photo-etched instrument panel and everything else from Pavla. Last but not least, the armament. KP's weapons aren't very elegant in their representation. But I had kept the weapon sprues from KittyHawk's Su-17 and I think I will use them instead: This is it for tonight. Thank you all for your interest. I will try to continue posting detailed (and possibly boring) messages here, to make a thorough presentation. I hope I won't bore you too much. Until the next post, take care of yourselves!
  11. Hi Brit and other modelers! Recently I finished working on another one of my Sukhoi projects. This time I chose my first two-seater, technology demonstrator for the Chinese PLAAF. The reason why I chose simple gray paint scheme instead of more attractive colorful schemes is because this two-color scheme better showcases the aircrafts beautiful shape. My next project will be a Su-35S and the paint scheme will be very similar. This particular aircraft has the blue "372" number on side of both intakes, and it got that number during the Paris airshow. I think that Trumpeter did a great job but some corrections were needed, together with some detailing. Also I added a fuel bowser (ICM - ATZ-5-4320), and I 100% scratch built the fire extinguisher as the last finishing detail. I hope you will enjoy the photos of this beautiful plane in real life, and I hope you will enjoy my recreation of it. The real deal: My take: 1) Pilots with ground crew are waiting for "502 white" to land. The finished cockpit, it's pretty hard to see when the canopy is mounted:
  12. Sukjoi Su-24 Fencer. Pics taken at The Ukraine State Aviation Museum Zhulyany, Kiev. Pics thanks to Dave Haskell.
  13. Pics thanks to Jozef Horvath who worked on thee aircraft in the Czechoslovak then Slovakian Air Force. The Su-25UB, UBK, UTG and Su-28 are identical except for a few details. Su-25UB and UTG they have a rear canopy with a periscope. Su-25UTG and Su-28 are unarmed and have only 4 racks for drop tanks. Su-25 horizontal stabilizers. At the top is UBK. It has a negative profile and is larger than a single seater.
  14. Any idea how much work is involved in turning a normal SU-35 into the aforementioned? go t yearling to do the splinter Camo version which I believe was the 10BM according to Begemot? Thanks ,Chris
  15. Announced about a year ago, the new tool Zvezda's 1/48th Sukhoï Su-2 kit (ref.4805) should be soon in the shops as it is now already proposed on pre-order at Lucky Model for GBP +/- 15.70, P&P incl. Su-2: http://en.wikipedia....iki/Sukhoi_Su-2 Source: http://www.luckymode...tem_no=ZVE-4805 V.P.
  16. Hi everyone This is my second su-30sm by Zvezda. I thought I would do a second one so I could correct the mistakes I did on the last one. The kit had nice details and Shallow panel line. I was going to add rivets but I could not find blueprints which h showed them so I only applied some on the metal bit in front of the gun as I could see them clearly in pictures. The kit did not need much filler and went together easily. I saw this camo online and thought that it would be fun to try and recreate. is first sprayed the engine colours before painting the whole model as it was easier than doing it after like I did last time. Then I sprayed the whole plane in AK's Blue Grey. I then masked the white camouflage using blue tac and then the same for the gunship grey part. I then sealed it in a gloss varnish as the plane in the pictures looked gloss. I kept the plane clean as I think it was a prototype which didn’t see much action. Thanks for looking.
  17. Finally completed the flapship flighter of the Indian Air Force after years of it being on the wishlist. Built mostly OOB with some custom riveting, and IAF decals from spares. A big deviation from the norm is building it wheels up- So much fun flying it around the house with my son while making jet sounds and my wife rolling her eyes in the background :D Waited for a perfect spring evening to finally click photos in the golden sunshine at the park. Natural light makes for perfect photos! Thanks for watching! :) Cheers, Alex.
  18. Hi everyone this is my 1/72 Zvezda Su-57. The kit had a lot of great detail and had the option to have the flaps at the front and elevators down. I used Rc251 Dark ghost grey and Rc234 aggressor blue as the instructions weren't clear on the colours. For the camo, i printed of a picture which i resized to be the same size as the aircraft. I then placed masking tape over the picture to make a mask. The kit fitted well together without the need for a lot of filler. The only problem that i had was tht some of the panel lines needed rescribed as they were very hard to see. I found this a very challenging kit as i had never attempted a camoflage like this but i think it came out well. Thanks for looking
  19. Hello to all.Here is my latest 1:72 SU-25UB model.If you want to know more you can watch the full build process on the following link https://youtu.be/GRhZYxBl9Zc
  20. Not a bad model from Trumpeter, but definitely one that can be improved upon. The nice things about the kit are; adequate detail in the cockpit with photo etch seat belts, lots of weapons with clear inserts for guided weapons seeker heads, plenty of detail if you want to leave panels open and a nice decal sheet. Metal undercarriage legs are also included along with plastic. Shortcoming of the kit are; difficult to eliminate seam in the engine air intakes and exhaust (unless you use covers like me). Trumpeter completely forgot to include the outer hard points for the air to air missiles despite drawing them into the box art and having the locating holes for them. It is also meant to be built with slats, flaps and all undercarriage doors down, which is incorrect for the Su 25 when on the ground. I have fixed all but the two main gear doors which would take extensive modification to correct. It also pays to drill out the locating tab holes as the fit of the parts is sometimes just too tight and test fitting can rip off the locating pins when you try to separate the parts again. Along with the slats and flaps, I also closed the gun bay, the engine access compartment, the cockpit ladder and speed brakes. These however were easy to do with minimal cutting. All up, it does make into an impressive model, I may still buy the aftermarket outer hard points to mount the K60 aphid missiles as it doesn't look complete without them.
  21. In 1972 the Sukhoi design bureau began work on another variant of the Su-17, it was known only by its in-house designation S-32MK "гибридный" or hybrid, this mated the wings of the Su-7BMK to the fuselage of the Su-17M. The aircraft first flew in February 1973 piloted by Vladimir Krechetov. The only known photo of the S-32MK to exist in the west, note the large bomb load able to be carried. Also note how the gun blast plates are still installed but the twin NR-30 cannons are not. The S-32MK's fuselage was taken from the new into production Su-17M, for the S-32MK the uprated AL-21F-3 engine was fitted which provided more thrust compared to the standard Fitters then in production. During tests the performance of the Hybrid was better than the Su-17 then in service, the S-32 reached a height of 1800M, 1500M higher than the standard Su-17M. The fitting of the Su-7BMK wing had positives and negatives, the removal of the complicated and heavy Su-17 swing wing system allowed for not only a lighter airframe but a Increase in the fuel capacity (400kg extra fuel) the removal of the swing wing also allowed for maintenance to be much easier. However a drawback of the wing was a return to the Su-7s high landing and takeoff speeds, poor agility at low speeds and a high stall speed, however the more powerful engine helped to improve the handling. The test machine also had a 100mph higher top speed compared to the Su-17M due to all the weight saving. A side view of the aircraft, again showing the large number of pylons, and highly swept wing. The aircraft was planned to be armed with the standard twin NR-30, 30mm cannons in the wing roots with 80 rounds per gun, the standard six Su-7 pylons (two under each wing and two under the fuselage) were joined by two inner pylons from the standard Su-17 creating a total of eight pylons, two more compared to standard Su-17s, the weight saving allowed for the increase in weapons. The soviet Airforce although interested in the design favoured the Mig-27 and Su-17M, therefore Sukhoi offered the jet on export. It was given the export name Su-20, Egypt was the first country to show interest in the new Sukhoi. However Egypt opted for the Su-17M, as it had bad past experiences with the Su-7 and saw the swept wing Su-20 as a throwback to past experiences, Syria also showed interest however they soon withdrew interest. With the lack of interest by both Soviet and overseas airforces finally meant to a scrapping of the project and in mid 1975 the aircraft was withdrawn from tests and sent to Tula and used as a mechanic practise aircraft until the 1990s, the airframes existence after 1990 is unknown however it is rumoured that it was more than likely scrapped. Artwork of the S-32MK during tests. The 17 red was only applied for later flights.
  22. Khibiny ECM Pods for Su-34 (Hobby Boss & Kitty Hawk) 1:48 Zactomodels Some of you may have heard of Zactomodels before, especially if you're into Soviet/Russian jets in 1:32, but if you haven't already, now you have. The owner, Chris Wilson is a perfectionist, and strives for the ultimate in detail, with little things meaning a lot to him, but he doesn't let that get in the way of the enjoyment of his hobby, which is always nice! Based in the US of A, he has decided that the ECM pods that are attached to the wingtips of every 1:48 Su-34 needed to be more accurate, and off he went. The set arrives in two thick Ziplok bags, one of which has a heat-sealed partition to prevent the parts from getting damaged, and accompanying them is a Photo-Etch (PE) brass fret, a slip of pre-cut vinyl masking material, and small sheet of very detailed instructions. There are four resin parts, comprising two pods (one for each wing), and two nose cones if you want to depict your Fullback with the new nose cones that were rolled out in 2018 (check your refs, as always). That means you'll need to cut the noses off the pods, but Chris has you covered with a dotted line on the diagrams guiding the way. The PE parts are fences that were added to the pods in 2015/16 to prevent/reduce flutter. They need to be folded to right-angles before they are glued onto the pods with CA, and again the location is shown from two angles for your convenience. The rest of the instructions detail the alterations to the kits that will be needed for the two kits. The Hobby Boss kit needs the wings thinning a little, a section removing from the tip to accommodate the radiused fillet, the attachment tabs removing, and the vinyl stickers adding to the wingtip. For the Kitty Hawk kit it's a little more simple – you just need to shorten the pins a little. That makes me glad I'm building (or trying to find time to at least) the KH kit. Engage smug mode For the HB kit you might want to add some brass pins to the wingtip to line up with the holes in the resin, which will strengthen the joint no end. As usual with resin, take the precaution of wearing a mask when cutting or sanding resin, as the tiny particles are harmful to your health if breathed in. Washing the parts in warm water will also improve the adhesion of paint, as there may still be some moulding release agent on the parts when you receive them. Conclusion A simply lovely set from Zactomodels, and the first time I've seen their stuff in the flesh after many years of admiring from afar. Needless to say it's totally in line with expectations, and will look great when applied to the model – whenever that might be on my part at least. The shame of it! Happily he's now got a website, and accepts PayPal payments, so what's keeping you? Review sample courtesy of
  23. HobbyBoss is to release a 1/48th Sukhoi Su-34 "Fullback" kit in 2016-2017 - ref.81756 Source: https://www.facebook.com/TrumpeterModel/photos/a.103538733138062.8169.103526326472636/537476479744283/?type=3&theater V.P.
  24. 17 years ago I emailed Flankerman and asked if he had any pictures of the 1988 Su-27M/Su-35 prototype that was later left at Monino. He very kindly got back to me with a goldmine. The reference photos he sent me were a game changer as he had discovered the disruptive scheme was mirrored underneath and had a bundle of photos to illustrate it. I loved the Ferris like camouflage but also the new Su-27M nose profile with the traditional cropped fins as later Su-27Ms had the squared tips. I did all the hard work expected of an Academy and Sol conversion way back then and put it away; it sat in the box (with the occasional peeks) until this year. I've made a real effort to finish unfinished projects and clear the stash a bit. I'm pleased to say it's the last 1/48 Academy for me (7 built)! I'm now looking forward to all the newer companies much improved kits. Colors were mostly AKAN mixes, Neomega cockpit, Eduard etched details, DANmodels intake covers, Armory wheels and one of Haneto's (Fairy-Hobby) beautiful corrected canopies. The decals were from Begemot except for the stars which were hand made. I s I spent the last few days repairing my Su-37 Terminator so I could take a photo similar to this one of 711 and 701 together. i And finish with a hat trick.
  25. So I have a general question for the group and those that know... I have some of the Hobby boss 1/48 flanker series, Su-34, Su-27 Flanker B I am going to order the Su-30MKK and I was wondering what options for other than PLAAF variants are buildable from the kit. I don't want to make a Chinese version or at least paint scheme, I could cannibalize the decals from my Academy Su-30 kit but I have plans for that kit. also is anyone coming out with any upgrades for this series? and lastly is HB planning to release an Su-35/37 with canards series? I have the SOL conversion kit for academy but that's a lot of work thanks A~
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