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Found 127 results

  1. Hi everyone, just finished this and thought I'd post a few pics. Had a lot of satisfaction while building this, it seemed to go well and I seemed to fly through it in a month or so which is super fast for me. I am in awe of the men who actually flew these things. As I was making it i was struck by the fragility of what the real thing must have been like. Surely one dodgy landing and the plane would crumple. This is the plane that Lanoe Hawker was killed in after a dogfight with the Red Baron. The blurb with the kit says Richthofen described his duel with Hawker as "the most difficult battle I have had" after expending 900 rounds of ammunition. As the pics show there is a lot of rigging with this kit, I had to have a lie down after each session If I had one small criticism of Wingnut Wings its that I do sometimes find the rigging diagrams a bit confusing, I know that's a bit like trying to find fault in Margot Robbie but I do wish they were a bit clearer on the intricate sections of rigging. Im still brush painting and I seem to have reached a plateau of how good I can make things look. I can never decide whether to take the plunge into getting an airbrush. Overall I am happy with it though, which is the main thing. What a very therapeutic hobby this wonderful pastime is. As usual I think I have struggled with the pics but I would love to hear any comments about what you guys think, good or bad. I'm now at my usual dilemma of trying to decide what to make next. Many thanks and best wishes to all for the new year, Martin
  2. Hi Folks, finally got the courage to upscale my old 1/72 Felixstowe decals - so they are off just now to the printers, hope they come in useful for some people here, thanks for looking.... 32D020 - Felixstowe F.2A N4283 32D021 - Felixstowe F.2A N4512
  3. Hi everyone, Sopwith Camel bracing wires for Wingnut Wings kit off to the printers for test shot. Thanks for looking
  4. FE.2b Early My next project is the FE.2b early of Wingnut Wings in 1/32. The machine will be the FE.2b with the number 6352 “Baroda 15” from 23 Squadron in March 1916. His opponent was Immelmann, with his Fokker E.II I will build it afterwards. Until now, I did not find an original photo of this machine. If someone has a photo of this machine, so please put it into the forum. That would make me very happy about it. If somebody has the book about the FE2b from Cross & Cockade, which is out of stock, and the pdf not ready yet. Maybe. One thing more: You suggestion for the top color PC8. What did you use in opposite to PC10? In Hendon, RAF museum, I only saw the black FE.2b. Happy modelling
  5. Hallo This is my Roland CII late. In contrast to the Roland CII early, it is much more colorful. My Roland CII early, you will find here. Beside this, I did two major changes. · The rigging without knots · The airscrew, now laminated. Well, I hope you enjoy it. Happy modelling
  6. Hannover Cl.II (Early) 1/32 Wingnut Wings. (32079). The Hannover CL.II was designed in 1917 as a two seat escort fighter to protect other two seat reconnaissance aircraft.Hannoversch Waggonfabrik AG were actually manufacturers of railway waggons who had branched out into license building Halberstadt, Rumpler and Aviatik aircraft. Their first indigenous design was the CL.II, which first flew in July 1917 and entered service in August 1917. Like the Roland CL.II the fuselage was a lightweight structure formed of thin plywood layers covered with fabric and doped, as were the wing centre sections. It makes an interesting comparison with the Bristol F.2b fighter as some of the design aims were the same. Most obvious was the need to give the gunner as wide a field of fire as possible. Frank Barnwell did this on the Bristol aircraft by placing the fin and rudder pretty much half and half above and below the fuselage. The CL.II achieved it by shortening the span of the tailplane but maintaining the surface area by making it a biplane unit, and locating the gunner very high in the fuselage. Also similar to the F.2b the top wing is at the crews eye level, giving them an excellent view above and below. Unlike the Bristol with its lower wing mounted below the fuselage on short struts, the Hannover simply has a much deeper fuselage to maintain the gap between the two wings. In service it was very well liked, being strong, fast, highly maneuverable and generally versatile. It also had the advantage of being smaller that most two seaters, leading allied pilots to think it was a single seater that could be sneaked up on from behind. Any pilot who did so would place himself at the mercy of the rear gunner. As the war progressed into 1918 the Hannover was also used in the ground attack role, and continued in front line service up until the November armistice. The kit. As always the artwork is beautiful, this time showing a Cl.II in the escort role fending off an SE.5a attempting to attack an Albatros C.X. Inside are eleven individually bagged sprues, three large decal sheets, a small etched brass fret, and a set of the outstanding Wingnut Wings instructions. The plastic parts are pretty much the same as in the previous release (32024), but the decal sheets are all new. Sprue A. This mostly holds the interior and tailplane parts. The main cockpit part is A42 which is the floor and fuel tank, forming the core around which much of the rest of the detail is built. It is a sobering thought that the pilot sat above the petrol tank, when the risk of fire through enemy action or accident was high. One of the interesting 'bonuses' of building Wingnut Wings kits is that they are so accurate, you get a real insight into what these machines were like. When building up an interior I can't help but drift into thoughts of what it must have been like to have been aircrew on machines like this. Great stuff! I guess it why we all enjoy this hobby so much. Enough daydreaming, and back to reality. The Observers cockpit for options B and E has the choice of fitting a '50cm Flieger Kammer' Camera, and a Telefunken Type D wireless (found on sprue G3). These are such lovely parts, that it really is very tempting to use the, both even have their own miniature decals to further detail them, the wireless alone has eight of them. Also worth mentioning here is that the etched brass fret has some bracket work that is used to further detail the Observers cockpit. The parts are beautifully moulded, with delicate frameworks, bulkheads, levers and switched that go to make up the pilots and observers cockpits. There are also the distinctive biplane tailplane, elevators and ailerons. As expected all are moulded to perfection with fine trailing edges and delicate rib detail. Also exhibiting superfine moulding are the wing mounted radiators, a choice of either a Mercedes-Daimler or a Teeves & Braun unit depending upon which of the marking options you choose. They come as upper and lower inserts that are fixed into recesses in the wing centre section. Further items are the pilots LMG 08/15 Spandau in both 'solid' or 'High detail' etched jacket form, Undercarriage legs, Observers gun ring, and engine bearers. The following 4 photos are from my build of the previous release of this kit, taken a few years ago. the give a good idea of how well this all assembles. Sprue B. The wings are moulded with beautifully sharp, lightly scalloped trailing edges. There is fine rib stitching detail and a lovely aerofoil section that cambers gently but definitely across the top and bottom. Substantial locating tabs on each wing will make their fixing very strong. Always impressive is the standard of moulding that Wingnut Wings achieve on large parts such as these. There are never any flaws such as sink marks or short shots, just precise, clean, and perfect mouldings. Sprue C. Traditionally the smallest sprue in a Wingnut Wings kit (because there isn't much glazing on aircraft from this era), the parts are still to the same uncompromising standard as the rest of the kit. Crystal clear, the pilots windshield even his tiny rivet detail along its bottom edge, where it is fixed to the fuselage. Also on this sprue is a camera lens for the observers 50cm 'Flieger Kammer'. Sprue D. There are two of these, sensibly each supplies parts that need to be duplicated, such as the main wheels.In addition to the wheels are various fine struts and brackets for the tailplanes, some tiny flares, and inspection covers for the forward lower fuselage. The inspection covers are moulded with real open louvers, and it is much appreciated that they are provided as separate parts rather than being moudled into the fuselage halves, when they would sit on the seam line and be impossible to clean up. Another smart move by Wingnut Wings. Sprue E. The Argus As.III engine is moulded with separate sump/crankcase and cylinder units, to which is added all the necessary pipework and anciliaries. Pushrods run from the crankcase to the rocker arms on the cylinder head on the left side of the engine. There area three types of propellers to choose from, Niendorf, Germania, or Reshke. You are given the option of using a set of cylinder halves with the pushrods moulded in (E14) but where moulding limitations mean that there is no gap between the rods and the cylinders, or cylinder halves with no pushrods moulded on (E13), and you provide your own 0.5mm wire to create them. Sprue F. The fuselage halves are most prominent here, along with the upper wing centre section, cabane struts, ailerons, and engine cowlings. The fuselage captures the shape of the real thing to perfection, and has very neat detail both inside and out. There are some light ejector pin circles, but they have cleverly been located in areas that will be hidden once the fuselage halves have been joined. The engine cowlings are amazing. All four of them feature delicate 'D' shaped cooling louvers, part F7 alone has thirty one of them within a small area, all perfectly formed. Alternate nose caps are provided with different cooling hole patterns, again depending upon which marking option you have chosen. One of them will require you to open a flashed over hole (part F10) for options A and B. The Upper wing centre section is made from upper and lower units, with big slots to locate the big tabs on the outer wing panels from sprue B. This will make for a very strong upper wing assembly. Three 'G' Sprues carry generic items that are applicable to several aircraft, so not all parts will be required for this kit. Sprue G1 carries the Observers armaments, a choice between a Parabellum LMG/14 or a Parabellum LMG 14/17. The main difference is in the cooling jacket for the gun barrel. The /14 has the familiar large fretted jacket (and there is the choice of a 'solid' moulded barrel, or an etched brass one), while the 14/17 was fitted with a much thinner air cooled jacket barely any wider than the barrel. Sprue G2. There two G" sprues which contain half a tail trestle each, that can be joined to make the complete article. Also present are some Granatenwerfer grenades and two types of flares, along with external racks to fit on the outside of the Observers cockpit. Wheel chocks complete the parts for use with this kit, but there are also some handy parts for the spares box such as oxygen flasks and 12.5Kg PuW bombs. Sprue G3. This is a real treasure trove of diorama accessories, with four types of reconnaissance cameras, three types of flare pistols, first aid kit, homing pigeon box, box of photographic plates, step ladder, barograph, and even a mascot Teddy bear! There are also propellers from Axial, Astra, Heine, and Wolff, which are not required for the model, but would be useful in any workshop diorama. Photo Etch As mentioned previously the etch fret holds air cooling jackets for the 'High detail' LMG 08/15 Spandau, and Parabellum LMG 14. The pilot and Observer are supplied with seat belts, there are the bracket assemblies for the Observers cockpit, and the shutter mechanism for the wing mounted radiator. A nice touch is the little embossed name plate for the aircraft, with the Wingnut Wings logo on. Decals. Three very large sheets are found in the box, only just fitting the length and width. Printed by Cartograf the first sheet covers all the individual markings for options A to E. There are also a mass of instrument, placard, stencil and other details, including those for the cameras and other diorama accessories. Two further sheets provide the lozenge decals. There are complicated combinations explained for the options, with four and/or five colour lozenge being used, sometimes with four colour on the mainplanes and five colour on the ailerons. Lozenge is also given for the tail group, up to where it blends with the fuselage. Options Hannovers often featured irregular hand painted lozenge shapes on the fuselage often over painted with a dark glaze, which is the case for options A to D here. It is not difficult to do, but in case any modeller is unsure Option D is given as simpler alternative of a pale blue machine with clear doped linen wings. There are a few minor variations within the given options, (A) can be finished as (A1) without the wing stripes and upper fuselage chevron, or (A2) with them. Likewise (B) can be done without the red comet on the side as (B1), or with it as (B2). A. Hannover Cl.II 9276/17 “White 5", H Bronner, Royal Bavarian Schusta 27b, late 1917 to early 1918 B. Hannover Cl.II 9280/17 “Comet", Grönhagen? & J Gfrör, FA (A) 282, November 1917 C. Hannover Cl.II 9301/17 “White 4", J Missfelder, Royal Prussian Schusta 12, March 1918 D. Hannover Cl.II 9398/17 “2", JKH Müller & A Zitzelsberger, Royal Bavarian Schusta 24b, March 1918 E. Hannover Cl.II (Rol) 622/18 “White 2", Bayerische-Fliegerschule 5, mid to late 1918 Conclusion. This is a welcome return of a kit that sold out rapidly in its initial release (Kit 32024) and then began to fetch large prices on the second hand market. It has all the hallmarks of Wingnut Wings kits, beautiful mouldings, excellent fit, exquisite detail, fabulous instructions, and high quality decals. It is also a very good looking aeroplane, having a tough sturdy look that was possessed by few of these early biplanes. I am able to confirm that it is a trouble free build with absolutely no pitfalls or things to watch out for, as I built the previous release when it came out a few years ago. Get one while you can, it was one of the fastest sellers last time it was available, and I wouldn't be surprised if that is the case again. Highly Reccomended. Footnote: As mentioned earlier, I have already built the previous kit of the Hannover Cl.II a few years ago, finished with markings from the aftermarket Pheon Decal sheet. I have a few photos of the completed model, showing some of the diorama ccessories that come with it.
  7. Just read an e-mail from Wingnut Wings that says there will be a new model announcement at the IPMS nationals on Sunday! No idea what that could be.
  8. UPDATE Thanks gavingav ! Three new Wingnut Wings kits in development to be announced at the All Japan Model & Hobby Show in Tokyo - 28-30 September 2018. Source: http://www.wingnutwings.com/ww/ - ref. 32043 - Avro Lancaster B.Mk.I/III : 1/32 - http://www.wingnutwings.com/ww/product?productid=3193 - ref. 32044 - Avro Lancaster B.Mk.III "Dambusters" : 1/32 - http://www.wingnutwings.com/ww/product?productid=3194 - ref. 32062 - Halberstadt Cl.II (late) - see Britmodeller thread here: link - Scale: 1/32 - http://www.wingnutwings.com/ww/product?productid=3195 V.P.
  9. Source: http://www.wingnutwings.com/ww/product?productid=3203 New Wingnut Wings model in development for 2020 to be announced at the IPMS USA National Convention in Chattanooga on 7 August 2019 - ref. 32068 - Fokker F.1/Dr.1 Dreidecker - early - ref. 32069 - Fokker Dr.1 Dreidecker - late Source: LINK Source: https://www.facebook.com/closetmodeler/posts/2570116823012499 V.P.
  10. Wingnut Wings is to release mid November 2019 1/32nd Pfalz D.IIIa special boxing - ref. 32909 - Pfalz D.IIIa 'Flying Circus part 1' - http://www.wingnutwings.com/ww/product?productid=3219 - ref. 32910 - Pfalz D.IIIa 'Flying Circus part 2' - http://www.wingnutwings.com/ww/product?productid=3220 V.P.
  11. Wingnut Wings new kit will be a 1/32nd Albatros D.V/D.Va "Jasta 5" - ref. 32701 Source: http://www.wingnutwings.com/ww/66DF289AC58A4F6229762BE994496520 V.P.
  12. Hello all, Wingnuts beautifully crafted Sopwith Triplane has been fumbled together by me over the course of the last 9 months. For anyone who knows me, that is RAPID! I can't fault the kit. It is pure New Zealand Gold. The only thing I can fault is my need to try to make everything look perfect. I'm sure I can work on that imperfection and as a result build more kits. I have one image for now, but will upload more soon. Cheers my dears Von Buckle KFC 1st Class
  13. Wingnut Wings is to release a 1/32nd Sopwith Pup (new variant with Gnome rotary engine) kit - ref. 32055 Source: https://www.facebook.com/tetramodel/photos/a.2474802349220072/2476899552343685/?type=3&theater V.P.
  14. Sopwith Pup "Gnome" 1:32 Wingnut Wings The lovely Sopwith Pup from Wingnut Wings makes a return with some new parts and decals to enable building of the ‘Gnome’ powered version. The most common powerplant was the 80hp Le Rhone 9c engine, but the 80hp & 100hp Gnome and Clerget engines were also used. The Pup itself entered service in 1916 and quickly proved to be an agile and popular machine amongst those who flew it. The name was never official, but derived from the observation that it looked like a smaller version of the twin seat Sopwith ‘One-and-a-half Strutter’, as if it were its ‘Pup’. Wingnut Wings have previously released two kits of the Pup, 32013 for the RFC version, and 32016 for the RNAS machine. Rather nicely, this new release gives you a choice of two RFC, two RNAS, or one training school machine. This kit shares most of the main sprues (A, B, C, and D) with the previous two releases, but adds three new ones. There are two sprue E's giving a choice of two different engines, and sprue G which has the cowling specific to the Gnome engine, and a full set of Le Prier rockets. As always, the silver gilt edged box features a beautiful painting of the subject in action, this time RNAS Pup N6179 squaring up to an Albatros D.II. Instructions. You can't help but be impressed by the completeness of the instructions in every single Wingnut Wings kit, they are quite simply the best that have ever been supplied with any kits, ever. These are as good as always, printed in colour on heavy glossy paper, with a parts map, detailed assembly drawings, colour and black & white photos of the real thing to show details, and five sets of Ronnie Bar illustrations to show the finishing choices. One of my favourite features is the completed sub assembly drawings, showing how things should look on the completed interior. Plus another drawing showing how all the interior control cables run from the joystick and rudder pedals. They are superb reference documents in their own right. Sprue A. This hold most of the smaller detailed parts such as the interior fittings, prop and cowling choices, struts, and other details. All mouldings are very finely done with sharp detail, no sink marks or flash, and minimal contact points where they attach to the sprue frame. The Pup had a couple of different inspection hatch shapes on the forward fuselage, and both the square and oval types are supplied here as panels to attach to the cowling area. Two types of propeller are provided, the instructions noting which one goes with which finishing option. Sprue B. Here we have the tailplane, rudder, wheels, Vickers gun, and a few other smaller parts. Again the precision of moulding is evident. particularly on the Vickers guns (only one of which is applicable to this model). Sprue C. This is the clear sprue, with a choice of windscreens and the clear inspection panels for the wings. They are all crystal clear, and the frames even have incredibly tiny little screw heads moulded in, that I can only see under a magnifying glass. Sprue D. Both wings are on this, along with the fuselage halves. The wings feature beautifully fine trailing edges and rib tapes with delicate stitching. The real wings featured a small see through panel near each tip, that allowed instant inspection of the pulley and cable that ran to each aileron.These are nicely moulded, and the clear sprue has the clear cover to go on top of them after painting. Especially impressive is the 'quilting' effect on the forward fuselage, so typical of the Pup. It was where an interior 'grid' frame was built in to smooth the transition from the round cowling area to the flat sided fuselage. Covered in fabric it gave a sort of quilted look that Wingnut Wings have captured to perfection. Sprues E x 2. There are two complete and distinct 'E' sprues that cover the 80hp and 100hp Gnome engines. The moulding is amazingly fine with the cylinder cooling fins rendered about as finely as is possible, and all the nuts and bolts are beautifully sharp. The 80hp Gnome was precisely copied by the German Oberursel company, the only differences being in the pushrods. These are contained on the sprue but obviously marked as not required. I often start my builds with the engine because they are such lovely little gems of a model in their own right. 7 cylinder Gnome 80hp: 9 cylinder Gnome 100hp The 100hp option even has tiny little decals to replicate the brass data plates on the crankcase. Whichever engine you choose you will have a complete unused one for the spares box, or even better, for use as a diorama accessory. Hows that for value!. It is typical of Wingnut Wings that they take a 'no expense spared' approach to their kits, so that you get precisely what you need to build an accurate model straight from the box. Sprue G. To my knowledge, this is the first time that a set of Le Prieur rockets have been released in 1:32 scale. Looking like giant fireworks that you might buy on November 5th, they were attached to the outboard struts. Intended for use against observation balloons, they proved to be ineffective in use due to directional instability. I.e. they didn't particularly fly to where they were aimed. They were tried on Pups, as a period photograph in the instructions show, but it is also noted that it is not thought that any of the five options in the kit actually used them. Also included is the characteristic semi cowling of the Gnome powered Pup. This only goes around two thirds of the engine, with the bottom third left uncovered, and is a good identifying feature of Pups with this engine. Etch. A neat little brass fret supplies the lap type seatbelt, foot plates for the wings, gunsights and cocking lever, along with a chute for expended ammunition links. Options. A. N6179 “Baby Mine”, TC Vernon (1 victory)& AW Carter (17 Victories) B Flight 3(N) Sqn RNAS March to April 1917. B. N6200 “Bobs”, AM Shook, B Flight 4(N) Sqn RNAS, April to May 1917 (12 victories). C. B2192, HH Balfour and EL Foot, School of Special Flying Gosport, August to September 1917. D. B5904 “A 1”, 61(HD) Sqn RFC, September 1917. E. B5906 “Impikoff 5” 44(HD) Sqn RFC/RAF 1918. Decals. A large decal sheet occupied the full width and length of the box. Printed by Cartograf, it provides all the decals for the five finishing options, plus a myriad of tiny stencils and instrument faces. If you want to read any of this fine detail you will need a good magnifying glass as the printing is incredibly small, but faultlessly done. It almost doesn't need saying, because this is Cartograf, but the printing is in perfect register, beautifully sharp, with minimal carrier film and spot on colours. Option C, the unarmed training machine with a stripy fuselage, is provided with two sets of stripes. It is notoriously difficult to distinguish black from red in old balck & white photographs, and although this machine is thought to have black stripes, they may also have been red, so you get the choice. There are no stripes for the wings as these can be simply masked at each rib. Conclusion. It is nice to see the Pup back in Wingnut Wings catalogue, as it is one of their simpler kits to build. I have already built two of the RNAS version (32016) and bought an RFC kit (32013) when it was about to go out of stock, as I couldn't bear not to have one! I have the usual indecision over which of the five options to go for, as they are all attractive in their own right. I think the striped training machine might just edge in, as I don't have anything like that in my 1:32 collection. You can have hours of fun with any Wingnut Wings kit trying to decide which one to go for. It builds up very easily and without any faults or problems. Everything fits with precision, making it a delight to put together. The rigging is very straight forward and fairly simple, and not difficult to do with either fishing line or the elastic EZ-line. Add to this the choice of attractive finishing schemes, then this is one of the best 'starter' kits to introduce you the wonderful world of Wingnut Wings. With Christmas approaching you need to get this on your list, you won't be disappointed. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of Footnote: This is one of the Pup kits I have built previously, from 32016, the RNAS Pup, which enables this 'In box' review to go a bit further and confirm that it does indeed build up beautifully without any problems.
  15. AEG G.IV Late 1:32 Wingnut Wings The AEG G.IV late first started to appear with front line units in early 1917 although it wasn’t until the summer that were available in useful numbers. Developed from an early concept of the heavily armed ‘battleplane’ which was designed to fight it’s way through enemy formations, it was the first of the line to be intended solely as a bomber. The battleplane concept was proven to be flawed after heavy losses were suffered, although it partly resurfaced in later years with the Me.110 ‘Zerstorer’. The G.IV is less well known than the Gotha series of bombers, but in fact was able to carry a heavier bomb load. It was also the most popular amongst aircrews as it was considered to be the easiest of the twin engine bombers to fly. At first it was used as day time bomber, but heavy losses soon saw it switched to night bombing raids. Another lesson that was re-learned in second world war. The kit was reviewed almost exactly 2 years ago, but deserved to be allocated sufficient time to tackle the build, which has taken until now. [Edit] Forgot to say there is a Work in Progress here.[/Edit] It is not one for begginers, but is not actually that difficult to build if you have a couple of Wingnut Wings kits under your belt. Of their bigger kits I would think it is one of the simplest to build. There are no wooden areas to depict, the rigging is actually pretty straighforward, being mostly 'X's of wires in the wings. And the fit is so spectacularly good it self aligns everything as you fit it together. The only thing to be wary of is whacking things on your workbench as it gets bigger. There are options to display the engines fully cowled or fully opened. I follwed the suggestion in the instructions to 'mix and match' to create a mostly open framework with the lower parts using elements of cowling. Almost any combination is legitimate, as period photographs will show. It is anothe winner from Wingnut Wings, as I thoroughly enkoyed the build from start to finish. It has proven to be more of a challenge to photograph, due to it's size. Hope you like it. To give an idea of its size, here it is with a WNW Albatros. Thanks for looking, John
  16. It's been a while since I posted a new project due mainly to the fact that I've been working away from home during the week so not much opportunity for model building. I've been wanting to get my teeth into something challenging so decided to have a shot at the Wingnut Wings Ship's Camel. I've quite a few WNW kits in the stash at this stage but this will be my first attempt at building one. 2018-01-03-21.37 by Martin Fay, on Flickr My first task was to experiment with wood effect finishes. I took some old, out of date business cards and gave them a blast of primer followed by a base colour. I did one each of Tamiya XF-55: Deck Tan Tamiya XF-59: Desert Yellow Mr Hobby H4: Yellow Mr Hobby H37: Wood Brown Mr Hobby H329: US Navy Yellow I then applied Raw Umber, Raw Sienna and Burnt Sienna to each giving me 15 sample colour swatches to choose from for the desired wood effect. 2018-01-03-21.24 by Martin Fay, on Flickr I know, I know; I'm worse than the missus choosing finishes for a new kitchen!
  17. DH.2 'Lanoe Hawker' 1:32 Wingnut Wings The DH.2 entered service in February 1916, putting an end to the 'Fokker Scourge' of Eindekkers that had been dominating the Western Front with their synchronized machine guns firing trough the propeller arc. Highly maneuverable, the DH.2 was a good fighter despite it's fragile looks. Lanoe Hawker was already an experienced ace and Victoria Cross holder when he took command of 24 Squadron, and led them to France in 1916. On 23 November 196, flying 5964 (the subject of this model) with 'A' flight, Hawker encountered Jasta 2 and in particular Manfred Von Richthofen flying a twin gun Albtaros D.II. A lengthy dogfight ensued, with Hawker eventually breaking off due to low fuel. Richthofen fired one last burst before his guns jammed, and Hawker was killed instantly, becoming the Red Barons 11th victim as 5964 crashed to the ground. Wingnut Wings have released some of their superb kits with equally high quality resin figures to depict famous aces and their aircraft. I just had to have the brilliantly sculptured figure of Lanoe Hawker, holding a map and with his coat slung over his arm. The figure is absolutely perfect, beautifully cast and a pleasure to assemble and paint. The DH.2 is a real beauty to build, but complicated to rig, and I was forever thinking I had finished when I spotted a bit I had missed. I think I have finished it now though, I will create a proper base and case for it, as it deserves to be properly displayed with the figure next to it. On with more photos: Weathering is subtle, I did some chipping around the cockpit area where the dark green was scuffed away to reveal the grey beneath. You may just notice the clear tube fuel gauge on the upper wing tank, showing the tank nearly full! I masked and pained the see through effect of the upper wing roundel on the under side of the wing. Sunlight from above would have created this effect as 5649 was delivered in clear doped lined, and later painted with dark green PC.10, painting around the roundels. Thanks for looking, John
  18. Hey everyone! Well, here goes for my first build & first "in progress" post on this forum=> as mentioned in my very first introduction post, I'm back into modelling after about 10 years inactivity in the hobby and i chose Wingnut Wings Fokker E.II "Max Immelmann" as my very first kit to get things started again. Quite a challenge as there are many firsts involved with this build: first 1/32 scale model, first WW1 aircraft model, first time working with EZ line, first time working with turnbuckles etc. But i love the quality of this kit and with enough time and patience, i think i'll be able to turn it into something presentable. I also bought a couple of extra's with it which i read would be a real add on: 1/48 Gaspatch Type C turnbuckles for in the cockpit (this smaller scale looked better in the cockpit based on the pictures i saw in the construction manual). 1/32 Gaspatch Type C & One end turnbuckles Albion SilverNickel tubes 1/32 Master Spandau 08 1/32 Master ammunition feeder for Spandau 08 I'm a slow builder, so please bear with me. I'll try to post new photo's when i've made some progress. First photo's below are of the kit itself with some of the extra's + the first parts i'm currently busy with. The cockpit is coming along nicely with some EZ line used for the pedals + i've tried to paint some of the "wriggly" pattern on the engine cowling parts using a combination of Humbrol matt Aluminium and Testor's Chrome Silver. I don't use an airbrush as i've always painted by hand, so the smooth transitions between colours is rather difficult to achieve. But with a combination of acrylics, enamels, oils and inks, i should be ok for a decent finish of all the parts. Best regards, Dolf
  19. Model in development - type ? - ref.32075 Source: http://www.wingnutwings.com/ww/product?productid=3207 Engine V.P.
  20. Source: http://www.wingnutwings.com/ww/productdetail?productid=3206&cat=5 - ref.32077 - Hansa-Brandenburg D.1 New model in development. Release date and subject TBA. Engine looks to be a Austro-Daimler 6 - so https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austro-Daimler_6 There's another Hansa-Brandenburg D-1 kit in 1/32nd scale in design by Copper State Models: link V.P.
  21. I was just looking through the Wingnut Wings kit listing and noticed there are a few gaps in the box numbers. 32032 and 32033 for instance are missing from the list. The 0/400 is 32039 so I wonder what may be in the pipeline. Assuming the numbers were assigned to a project we may have some larger kits on their way judging by the time the kit's have taken to reach an announcement, or lack of. The smaller kits seem to be released almost in number order, the exceptions are the bigger kits, Lancasters for instance. On a sadder note, maybe they just got canned.
  22. Hey everyone, One of the kits i currently have in my little stash is the Wingnut Wings Roland D.VIb. I plan to start on this model soon, when i've finished my current built of the WNW Fokker E.II. I'm slowly starting to gather aftermarket products for this model and one of the things i'm looking for for this kit are alternative decals / markings. I've been searching the web for a while now, but haven't been able to find any suitable 1/32 scale decals for the Roland D.VIb so far. Does anyone of you happen to know if these even exist? Also, i've been looking at several 1/32 scale WWI aircraft models of Roden. I've never actually owned one of their kits, but since they do have some very interesting models, i was wondering how the quality of these kits compare to Wingnut Wings. Are they even comparable? If any of you could share your experiences, that would be much appreciated. Thanks very much indeed! Dolf
  23. Wingnut Wings is to release in September-October 2019 a 1/32nd Hannover Cl.II early (new variant) kit - ref. 32079 Source: http://www.wingnutwings.com/ww/product?productid=3201 Released: https://shop.wingnutwings.com/ See also: https://www.themodellingnews.com/2019/09/wingnut-wings-forthcoming-new-32nd.html V.P.
  24. Gotha UWD (32053) 1:32 Wingnut Wings Developed from the Gotha G.1 landplane (Wingnut Wings kit 32045 reviewed here) designed by Oskar Ursinus, the 'Ursinus Wasser Doppeldecker' (UWD) was completed in December 1915. Only one was ever built and was given the serial number 120. It underwent trials with the German Navy in January - February 1916 during which time it was modified with balanced ailerons, extra windows, and a 'probiscus' device in the nose for dropping bombs through. Sometime during 1916 (possibly March) UWD 120 was used operationally on a raid on Dover. Little else is know of its use, until it was written off in October 1916. The low mounted engines and high fuselage was to minimise the effect of engine-out induced yaw, by keeping them as close to the centre line as possible. In turn this meant moving the fuselage up and out of the way. Another unusual feature was that the crew were located in an armoured ‘bathtub’ that formed the forward section of the fuselage. The kit. Presented in Wingnut Wings classy silver edged box, the Steve Anderson artwork shows the UWD in flight, possibly near the white cliffs of Dover. The painting shows it being escorted by a Friedrichshafen FF.33 floatplane, so I really hope that Wingnut Wings are going to release one of those at some point. As with the similar Gotha G.1, the large box is packed full to the brim with parts. It is interesting to note that although both kits appear similar, the only common parts in each box are the sprues A and B, all the others are different. Apart from the fact that the UWD is on floats rather than wheels, it is also powered by different engines. It used the 160 hp Mercedes-Daimler D.III rather than the G.1's 150hp Benz Bz.III engines. Sprue A. This large sprue only just fits the dimensions of the box, containing a variety of parts common to both the landplane and seaplane versions of this kit, mostly concerned with fuselage and some of the flying surfaces. The rear fuselage has been moulded as a three sided section, of the bottom and sides. The top section fits onto this, and at a stroke eliminates any fuselage seams. Well technically the joins are along the top corners of the fuselage, but they should be a doddle to deal with. Careful gluing with thin cement run along the join by capillary action should mean virtually no/almost no clean up will be required. Full marks to Wingnut Wings for this one, flat sided fuselages are always a pain to eliminate the seams from if they are done in the conventional manner. Some very fine items are also included, such as pilots seat, framework, pipework, the throttles, instrument panel, and gun type camera. Construction starts with the cockpit, which is where many of these items will end up. Sprue B. Here we have all four main wing panels, and the horizontal tailplane. Again all is faultlessly moulded with very fine scalloped trailing edges, and delicate sagged fabric effect. Strut mounting holes are clearly defined, as are some small holes showing where to drill for rigging attachment points. (The struts themselves are cleverly moulded with ends that will only fit into the holes they are destined for). The lower wings have large tabs on them that fit to the large single center section from Sprue A, and automatically set them at the correct dihederal Sprue C. The smallest, containing the clear parts for the windows and windscreen. A new approach to packing has these inside a heat sealed plastic bag, and inside that they are protected by a wrap around of a'cling film' type sheet. All parts are beautifully thin and clear. Sprue D. There are two of these, holding the floats, cowling parts, struts, and other duplicated parts. The floats are moulded as a single unit of three sides, with a separate top pice, in the same way as the rear fuselage has been done. Again this makes construction a simple task and practically eliminates any joining seams. What is really apparent is the sheer size of these floats. They are enormous. I had a recently completed WnW Sopwith Camel nearby when doing the photos, and couldn't resist showing a comparison. Sprue E. Again there are two of these sprues provided, for the Daimler-Mercedes D.III engines. These are different to those in the Gotha G.1 kit, which has Benz Bz.III engines. I may have mention in previous reviews that I often start building these kits with the engines. They are so beautifully moulded and everything fits precisely, so you quite quickly have a little jewel of an engine ready for fitment later in the build. Note that the magnetos are not fitted until the engines are in place, as there are new ones with long control rods attached (G33 &G34) to reach up to the top wing. The only thing you may want to add is some ignition wiring from fine fuse wire. As this is an engine used by many aircraft, the same sprue appears in many of Wingnut Wings kits. This means that than half of the parts are not needed, including a set of four beautiful propellers that can go into the spares box. Sprue G. More floatplane specific parts, notably the forward fuselage 'pod' and a lot of struttery. There are various windows and openings in the 'pod' that make it quite different to that of the Gotha G.1. Page 21 of the instructions notes the parts to use or omit if making Option A1, in the 'as delivered status. It also states that you will need to fill in two of the nose windows, so a decision needs to made early on. The mouldings are absolutely beautiful, with sharply defined detail, great delicacy/finesse with some very fine parts, free of flash or sink marks, and no distortion or warpage. I showed them to a fellow modeller who was absolutely amazed, and speculated at how much work goes into designing and producing mouldings of this quality. Etch. For once this is quite small. The model only requires a lap belt for the pilot, and a cooling jacket for the LMG 14 Parabellum. A nice touch is a little brass plaque to display with the finished model. Instructions. If you have never seen a set of Wingnut Wings assembly instructions, then these will be a real treat. Printed on twenty four pages of heavy high gloss paper, it is as much a work of reference as it is an instruction booklet. The CAD drawings of assembly stages are interspersed with period photographs (thirty seven in all) of actual machines and their details. On thing I particularly like is the CAD drawings of completed sub-assemblies in full colour, as these are a great help in understanding how everything goes together. Unusually the whole biplane wing unit complete with floats, is built as single unit to which the fuselage is attached. Marking Options. Just one, as only one was ever built, but there are small variation if you wish. By leaving off the 'probiscus' filling in some of the nose windows, and using the unbalanced ailerons, you can build it as version A1. This is shown in the instructions, and represents the machine as it was delivered for trials. Version A2 is in the same colour scheme, and represents the aircraft as used in service. A. Gotha UWD 120, See Flieger Abteilung 1, March 1916. Decals. Printed by Cartograf, the sheet is dominated by the large 'cross pattée' markings, with dozens of smaller details for things like stencils and instrument faces. There are around twenty for the cockpit alone, and another forty four to go on the twenty two 10kg Carbonit bombs stored in the nose. The fine detail is beautifully printed and readable through a magnifying glass, and given that the cockpit area is highly visible on the finished model, it should all look fabulous. Conclusion. It must have made sense to produce this model alongside the Gotha G.1, but don't make the mistake of thinking that the only difference is that one comes with wheels, and the other with floats. This is a Wingnut Wings kit, so no corners will have been cut. If some parts differed between aircraft, then you get new parts on the sprue. So much so that only two of the eight sprues are common to both kits. Personally I really like this aircraft, it has all the things I like about early aviation. It was built at a time when ideas were being tried out,and 'The Rule Book' didn't really exist. Only now, 100 years later, do we find it strange looking, because we know what a conventional aircraft should look like. It will build into a large model, and is certain to provoke questions from anyone seeing it. It is not really one for the beginner, but if you have built any of Wingnut Wings two seater kits then this one should not give you any problems. It is just bigger, not any more complicated. Highly Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  25. Wingnut Wings is to release in April-May 2019 1/32nd Gotha G.1 & Gotha UWD kits - ref 32045 - Gotha G.1 http://www.wingnutwings.com/ww/product?productid=3198 - ref 32053 - Gotha UWD http://www.wingnutwings.com/ww/product?productid=3199 V.P.
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