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  1. Building the British Phantoms Volume 1 Modeller’s Monograph KLP Publishing The Phantom bears a familial resemblance to the F3H Demon due to the origin of the type, which was intended to be a Super Demon with a modular nose for different mission profiles, but in typical military procurement style the world over, the specification was changed completely at the last minute, and resulted in a two-seat, two-engined beast that could carry a substantial war load, a large, effective radar in the bulbous nose, and the workload spread between two crew members to prevent confusion of an overwhelmed pilot in the heat of battle. The type was adopted by the US Navy as the F-4A, and as the F-4C by the Air Force, with a confusing (to me) allocation of letters throughout its career, with more confusion (again for me) when it came to the British airframes, and don’t even mention the engines and other equipment. During the late 50s, replacements were needed for the ageing aircraft then in service with the RAF and FAA, replacing the Canberra, the Hunter, and in the FAA’s inventory the Sea Vixen, and following the forced amalgamation of most of the British aero-industry companies into two unwieldy creations by the British Government, the situation was far from ideal. The Royal Navy took the decision first to go with an ‘off-the-shelf’ solution rather than wait for the supersonic Harrier that was in developmental purgatory, justifying in the cancellation of the type by the incoming Labour government, who also took out the potentially world-beating TSR-2 with the same axe, amongst other promising projects. The RAF wasn’t entirely convinced, but took the Phantom on the basis that it would be configured to better meet their needs than the base airframe. The newly-formed BAC took the F-4Js that had already been built with some British equipment integrated as part of the contract, replacing the GE J79 engines with home-produced Spey engines that required some serious modifications to the airframe, obliging them to re-design the entire aft portion of the fuselage to accommodate them. These modified portions and components were then shipped for final assembly in the US, and were so different that they were given the new designation F-4K and sent back across the Atlantic again where they received their FG.1 designation. The RAF and FAA wanted 400 between them, a number that was curtailed to 140 by cost factors, and two additional carriers that were commissioned to fly them from were also cancelled, with the view that the FAA would wind-down their fixed-wing aviation in due course, while further cost over-runs eventually resulted in only 50 airframes that were shared unevenly between FAA and RAF. There’s a lot more going on with the British Phantoms at this point, but as Volume 1 of the book deals with the FG.1, we’ll leave it there. The Book This is the latest issue from Australian KLP Publishing that is written by Geoff Coughlin and covers the British Phantoms as they first arrived and throughout their service before the remainder were converted to FGR.2 standard to simplify maintenance of the newer FGR.2 fleet. The book is available in digital format only, and that’s going to save an awful lot of paper and physical storage space amongst its readers around the world. Purchase is completed from their website, and will be delivered once payment is received, and it should arrive as a .PDF file, which is the de facto standard for digital documents these days, having originally been developed by Adobe back in the early days of the internet. You can find out a little more about purchasing their digital books here if you’re new to this. There’s no physical binding to prattle on about, but there are 366 pages that would be in it if there were, and it takes up about 113,000kb or 111mb of your mechanical Hard Disk Drive (HDD) or Solid-State Disk (SSD) storage space, so not too taxing on your available disk space, as you can store around 9 such books in 1GB. The pages are laid out as follows: Introduction - Page 7 About Geoff Coughlin - Page 11 Evolution Of the British Phantom Page - 13 FG.1 Key Features Page - 35 The Model Builds Page - 97 Scale Model Gallery Page - 255 Colour Profiles Page - 269 FG.1 XT864 Walkaround Page - 282 Special Markings: Something Different? - Page 345 Resource Centre Page - 361 Once the book gets up and running on page 13, there is a wealth of information about the development of the concept, then the type and the totally frustrating procurement process that saw a buy of 400 dwindle down to a meagre 50 through the various shenanigans and delays that seems to accompany virtually every single military contract the world over. The text is accompanied by a deluge of photos, some of which are more personal than most of the photos you’ve seen before, and includes a Bond Girl that happened across the deck of the Ark Royal at some point in her service with Phantoms embarked. There is also a lot of detail on the service of the FG.1, again with more photos throughout, and tables of tell-tale differences between the airframes, their equipment and antenna fits, which also includes the more numerous FGR.2 that was eventually procured, based on the F-4M and a very different aircraft. As is usual with this range of books, the photos are accompanied by informative captions that point out unusual or individual details of an airframe, discussing colour variations, how the weather and use affected various surfaces, and the colours of those pesky radomes that seem to be some sort of chameleon. If you want to get the sensor fit correct for your choice of airframe, look no further as there is much discussion of these small but important detail that will add realism and accuracy to any model if depicted accurately. The next section details the builds of six Phantom kits in 1:72 and 1:48, as follows: FG.1 Phantom XT864 ‘BJ’ No. 111 Squadron Armament Practice Camp – RAF Akrotiri 1988, Airfix 1:72 by Craig Boon FG.1 Phantom XT597, Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment (A&AEE) Airfix 1:72 by Geoff Coughlin; FG.1 Phantom XV582 ‘B’ No.111 Squadron, Hasegawa 1:48 by Biff Vivian FG.1 Phantom XT864 007 ‘R’, 892 NAS Royal Navy, Fujimi 1:72 by Adam Waistell-Brown FG.1 Phantom XT859 006 ‘R’ 892 NAS Royal Navy, Revell / Hasegawa, 1:48 by Andrew Terrell FG.1 Phantom XV574 ‘B’, No. 43 Squadron Royal Air Force, Airfix 1:72 by Mal Sleight Each build first recounts a little of the history of the airframe it is based upon, then summarises the build, with a group of photos of the finished model for your entertainment. Some of the builds are more detailed and include in-progress photos, as well as the various aftermarket parts, paints and so forth that were used to create the model. There is perhaps a little bit of product placement here and there, but it doesn’t jump in your face, so isn’t a problem. After the modelling is over, which ends with a gallery, there are pages of profiles by Simon Hill from prototype onwards, each one with a caption giving additional information on the subject matter, and they include an American F-4B that was zapped with the Omega motif from their FAA counterparts. The next section is devoted to a walk around of XT864 that can be found on display at the Ulster Aviation Society, consisting of dozens of photos broken down into aeras of the airframe, and getting into the guts of the machine, where the age of the aircraft shows in the amount of dust accumulated in areas that aren’t often seen. The penultimate section concentrates on the unusual markings that the FG.1 wore throughout its careers, and includes plenty of text to accompany the photos. The final part is a hybrid bibliography that also includes links to Facebook Groups, online magazines and model companies, some of which you will no doubt recognise. With the publication being digital, the links are as live as the URLs they lead to, but if any of them change or disappear in the future, they will give you the dreaded 404 error. Conclusion The Phantom is close to many British aviation enthusiast and/or modeller’s heart, as it served for a long period with the RAF and FAA when many of us folks of a certain age were young and enthusiastic about such things. The detail of the book is impressive, giving the modeller a massive helping hand if building an FG.1, and in Volume 2 the FGR.2 and the later third Volume covering the F-4J(UK) variant. All of this will take up zero space on your bookshelf, and can be viewed on PC or Laptop, Mac or Macbook, tablet or phone wherever you do your modelling. At time of writing, there's a special offer of purchasing Volume 1 and 2 together, with a substantial discount on the price. Volume 2 is even larger than this one! Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  2. Building the Wingnut Wings Pfalz D.IIIa in 1/32 scale By Gary Boxall KLP Publishing Received from KLP publishing is the latest in the 'Build Guide' series, covering the beautiful Wingnut Wings kit of the Pfalz D.IIIa. The book is an online publication available to download in .PDF format, rather than a physical object. It covers three builds of the Pfalz - two D.IIIa's, and a conversion to backdate one to the earlier D.III, interspersed with a couple of tutorials, and appendices covering aftermarket products and decals, masks, and reference books currently available for the kit. Contents: About the kit - Page 6 About Gary Boxall - Page 12 Build 1: Eugen Siempelkamp's Pfalz D.IIIa - Page 13 Tutorial: Rigging -Page 223 Build 2: Hans-Georg Von der Marwitz's Pfalz D.IIIa - Page 236 Tutorial: Masking over decals - Page 260 Build 3: Alois Heldmann's Pfalz D.III (Conversion) - Page 269 Appendices - Page 348 The three builds are sensibly divided, with Build 1 being by far the most detailed as it covers 210 pages of descriptive text supported with superb photographs. The idea is that the first is the most comprehensive, Build 2 dispenses with the constructional details already covered and concentrates on painting and finishing, and Build 3 shows how to tackle a conversion using some scratch building and modification of the kit parts. This is a really good idea as it allows so many useful techniques to be shown, whilst avoiding any repetition. I was genuinely impressed with some of the innovative ideas and approaches that are demonstrated. There is a lot of information, from assembling the parts in a sensible sequence to aid painting, to showing multiple steps for creating finishes for wood and leather. I particularly liked that each step is illustrated with the part being worked on, and a picture of the paint being used. So when he is using Tamiya 'Fine Surface Primer' or Vallejo 'Chocolate Brown (70.872)' we get to see exactly what they are. Brilliant! I know what to look for on my next visit to the model shop. I particularly liked the section on painting the fuselage, which is basically green. Using a mottle mask to pre-shade and small amounts of oil paints after decaling, the result is a superb natural looking green fuselage. So much better than the monotone plain green fuselage that I would likely have achieved! The engines he builds are astonishingly realistic, I've always added the ignition wiring from the magnetos to the spark plugs on my models, but Gary shows a much easier an effective method. I'm itching to try his method on my next build, as well as the weathering applied to make it all look like a real engine that has been well used. How inspirational is this: Between Builds 1 and 2 a detailed tutorial shows how to use Gaspatch turnbuckles and Modelkasten stretch rigging. The photographs are again very useful in explaining it all. It is not something I have ever tried myself, but I am now tempted to try this process as it undeniably produces a much superior result to the simple fishing line method I have been using all these years. Build 2 covers an overall burgundy with silver undersides D.IIIa of Hans-Georg van der Marwitz, this time concentrating on painting and using masks to create the markings. The results are very impressive, and far better than can be obtained with decals. Again copious amounts of photographs help to make each stage clear. Between Builds 2 and 3 there is another short tutorial showing how to mask over decals. This is something particularly useful on German lozenge covered aircraft of this period, when the 'Eisenkruez' styles of wing crosses were changed to 'Balkenkruez' according to the German Idfleig command. This often resulted in a 'shadow' of plain paint covering the old cross being visible under the new straight armed cross painted on top. Full explanation is given on how to achieve this by masking on top of the lozenge decaled wing. The final build shows how to backdate the D.IIIa to the D.III, which in simple terms means lowering and covering the machine guns so that they are fully enclosed in the fuselage, and reducing the size of the horizontal tail plane. Further work is done on the engine to create an earlier version with the aid of sets from Taurus Models covering valves, lifters, timing gear, spark plugs, and manifold nuts. Again, another astonishing ultra realistic engine is the result. Further information is given on improving other areas of the kit using solder for pipework, photo etch, thin brass sheet for making access panels etc, with some really useful ideas. The modified fuselage with guns now mounted inside: And the finished result. How fabulous is this, just look at that prop. The book concludes with appendices in 3 parts. The first covers resin, etch, white metal, and fabric seat belts available, while the second looks at decals and masks. The third part looks at reference books from publishers such as Kagero, Albatros, and Aeronaut. Conclusion. As most of us know, Wingnut Wings ceased production in early 2020, but there must be thousands of their kits in various stashes around the world. If you are fortunate enough to own any, you will want to be sure of doing a good job on these precious kits, and this guide provides a wealth of interesting and innovative techniques to get the best from them. All three models are of museum quality, and absolutely breath taking. Even if you do not have a Pfalz D.IIIa in your stash, it is still highly relevant to other Wingnut Wings and Roden WW1 kits. I am hugely impressed by the the layout and contents, and most especially by the clear explanations of how to achieve some very high quality results. It is full of ideas that will suit everyone from beginner to advanced modeller, so you can pick and choose what you would like to try on your next model, advancing your skills with each subsequent build. I know I haven't mentioned it in this review, but I'll certainly be making use of plumbers PTFE tape on my next build! Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. The FG.1 Phantom II in Royal Navy, Fleet Air Arm and A&AEE Service by Geoff Coughlin KLP Publishing KLP is an online publishing house that is run by one of our very own members, producing books of interesting subjects of relevance to us modellers. We’ve reviewed a number of their varied releases already, and this one is a new release from them that is intended to be the first in a series of books to assist you with building an accurate British Phantom FG.1, and eventually the FGR.2, detailing all the various differences between individual airframes, even between the same airframe at different stages of its career. Clearly, it’s a bit of a minefield, so this book might just be what the doctor or rivet-counter ordered. It's a digital book in .PDF format, so there’s no physical cover or pages to curl, crease or tear, and it takes up no space on your bookshelves, just a little room on your computer’s Hard Drive (HDD/SSD), device’s permanent storage, NAS or cloud account. Very modern and forward-thinking. It also means that anywhere you’ve got a device, you’ve got almost immediate access to your book, and you’ll need to access it, because it’s packed full of useful information. On my iPad, PC screen and iPhone it’s 366 pages long, although whether that would vary if you were using a different kind of device or Acrobat Reader, I have no idea but suspect it should remain constant. You can also zoom into the pictures, which to be fair are all pretty large on a decent-sized device, just in case your eyes aren’t picking up the details as they used to when you were younger. I’ve not used digital reference material much in the past, but these last few years I’ve found it incredibly convenient not to have to leave my desk if I want to look something up, and the ability to perform a full-text search of a book is an absolute boon to someone with a less-than-stellar memory like myself. The book is broken down as follows: Introduction - Page 7 About Geoff Coughlin - Page 11 The Model Builds -Page 13 Scale Model Gallery - Page 97 Colour Profiles - Page 255 FG.1 XT864 Walkaround - Page 269 Evolution Of the British Phantom - Page 282 FG.1 Key Features - Page 35 Special Markings: Something Different? - Page 345 Resource Centre - Page 361 After a brief introduction to the type and then to the author Geoff Coughlin, the book moves on to the meat of the subject with a vengeance. A number of contributors also get a mention and brief biography to explain their relevance to the subject along the way, and these folks have also contributed photos to the book as well as their anecdotes. The introduction of the type, where it was deployed, and some of its operations are discussed alongside the photos, which all have detailed captioning that are of relevance to us modellers, especially those that prefer to get the details correct, such as panel line locations, access hatches, even auxiliary exhausts that are unique to the British Phantoms that were fitted with bespoke avionics and Rolls Royce Spey engines, making them substantially different from the US airframes, and providing a lot of work for the British aviation industry, plus a lot of soot expelled into the atmosphere, as they were a bit smoky when the throttles were firewalled. There are six models of the FG.1 documented within the pages in 1:48 and 1:72 scales, including Airfix, Fujimi and Hasegawa kits, with a brief lament that there are no British Phantom models in 1:32, although there once was a conversion set available, but it is long-gone and on the rare occasion that the Wild Hare set appears, it fetches admiring glances and serious prices. Your own projects will be helped by these examples of how to build a Phantom, as will the comprehensive Walk Around pages that are distinctly targeted toward the modeller, giving the kind of detail that any modeller would struggle to find from general walk arounds. The Profile section will give you ideas of decal options, as will the Special Markings section, with side profiles showing some interesting schemes that are hopefully available on decal sheets somewhere. The last section gives you a contemporaneous list of other interesting volumes on the subject of the British Phantom that you might also be interested in to broaden your knowledge even further. We understand that the second volume of this series is intended to cover the FGR.2, so watch out for another review in due course. Conclusion This is an interesting book for the Phantom enthusiast, and will doubtless come in handy for anyone building one, whatever the scale. There are a few typos here and there, but the meaning is still clear, and the photos are too, with a lot to entertain the eyeball as well as the mind. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. Building the Wingnut Wing Albatros D.VA in 1/32 Scale Build Guide Series No.10 KLP Publishing Online publishing is now starting to find its way into the modelling community. KLP Publishing is one of the new online publishers, specialising in eBooks for the scale aircraft modelling community. Their debut title Building Brick’s Sabre in 1/32 Scale: A Scale Tribute to K.J. "Brick" Bricknell reviewed here has proved to be a success. They have since done titles on the Bird Dog, Spitfire XIVe, AEG G.IV Late, FW 189, He 219. P-51 and Ki-45 amongst others. Their latest title tackles building the Wingnut Wings Albatros D.VA. This was done by modeller Karim Bibi. Here the book looks in detail at the kit, as well as the aircraft itself. For the build itself construction and painting techniques are looked at along with some aftermarket being used such as HGW belts and the excellent looking Aviattic lozenge decals (links are provided in the pdf to all the aftermarket products used) . A mini tutorial is includes for making your own prop if you want to go that far. A large gallery of finished model pictures is included, along with photos of a real Mercedes engine. This is one area that e books do excel in as printing these pictures in a traditional format would be expensive. Conclusion This is the type of publication that the new digital format is made for. If you want a book for a specific build having a digital publication saves you space on your bookshelves. This is clearly a book written by modellers for modellers. The text is clear and concise and the great selection of crisp pictures is welcome, many more than you would get in a printed publication. Links to the various aftermarket sets is also welcome. A reminder that if you set up an account with KLP then you can download the revisioned copies of books you have already purchased to no extra cost. Very Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Building the Revell P-51D-5NA in 1/32 Scale Build Guide Series No.4 KLP Publishing Online publishing is now starting to find its way into the modelling community. KLP Publishing is one of the new online publishers, specialising in eBooks for the scale aircraft modelling community. Their debut title Building Brick’s Sabre in 1/32 Scale: A Scale Tribute to K.J. "Brick" Bricknell reviewed here has proved to be a success. They have since done titles on the Bird Dog, Spitfire XIVe, AEG G.IV Late, FW 189, and He 219. Their latest title tackles building Revell's new tool 132 P-51D. This was done by modeller Jan Gabauer. As well as the normal build it brings us a review of the kit and art work by Juanita Franzi. Also of use to the modeller is appendices covering Aftermarket, and reference work available for the kit. Conclusion This is the type of publication that the new digital format is made for. If you want a book for a specific build having a digital publication saves you space on your bookshelves. This is clearly a book written by modellers for modellers. The text is clear and concise and the great selection of crisp pictures is welcome. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. Building Large Scale SCI-FI & Fantasy Models Build Guide Series No.9 KLP Publishing Online publishing is now starting to find its way into the modelling community. KLP Publishing is one of the new online publishers, specialising in eBooks for the scale aircraft modelling community. Their debut title Building Brick’s Sabre in 1/32 Scale: A Scale Tribute to K.J. "Brick" Bricknell reviewed here has proved to be a success. They have since done titles on the Bird Dog, Spitfire XIVe, AEG G.IV Late, FW 189, He 219. P-51 and Ki-45. In a change from their previous titles this one does not concentrate on one aircraft but on 8 builds across the Sci-fi and Fantasy genre. The eight builds are; Droids Hulk Lost In Space Mars Attacks The Time Machine Moon Base Tournament Challenge The Book is a distillation of articles the Author Jason Gares wrote for the now gone Sci-fi and Fantasy Modeller Magazine. Given this book covers 8 builds it is KLPs largest to date with 473 pages. Each of the 8 builds articles details the building of the models, followed by their painting and weathering. As this is not a "sponsored" publication the author uses the products he has seen as the best fit at the time for his work. Techniques for building bases are also included with the individual builds. Conclusion This is the type of publication that the new digital format is made for, multiple builds on a single Genre packed with detail and photos. This is clearly a book written by a modeller for modellers. The text is clear and concise and the great selection of crisp pictures is welcome, many more than you would get in a printed publication. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. Building the Special Hobby Tempest Mk.V 1/32 Scale Build Guide Series No.8 KLP Publishing Online publishing is now starting to find its way into the modelling community. KLP Publishing is one of the new online publishers, specialising in eBooks for the scale aircraft modelling community. Their debut title Building Brick’s Sabre in 1/32 Scale: A Scale Tribute to K.J. "Brick" Bricknell reviewed here has proved to be a success. They have since done titles on the Bird Dog, Spitfire XIVe, AEG G.IV Late, FW 189, He 219. P-51 and Ki-45. Their latest title tackles building Special Hobby's 1/32 Tempest Mk.V. This was done by modeller Chuck Sawyer. Here the build looks at some of the aftermarket that is available for the kit . As well as this a virtual review of the different SH kits are covered. The author looks at Airscale cockpit decals, Barracuda up grades including the whole nose section. Tutorials are included for decanting aerosol paints, masking & painting markings, salt weathering, and the use of HGW wet transfers Also of use to the modeller is appendices covering Aftermarket, and reference work available for the kit. Conclusion This is the type of publication that the new digital format is made for. If you want a book for a specific build having a digital publication saves you space on your bookshelves. This is clearly a book written by modellers for modellers. The text is clear and concise and the great selection of crisp pictures is welcome, many more than you would get in a printed publication. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  8. Building the Zoukei-Mura Ta 152H in 1/32 Scale Build Guide Series No.7 KLP Publishing Online publishing is now starting to find its way into the modelling community. KLP Publishing is one of the new online publishers, specialising in eBooks for the scale aircraft modelling community. Their debut title Building Brick’s Sabre in 1/32 Scale: A Scale Tribute to K.J. "Brick" Bricknell reviewed here has proved to be a success. They have since done titles on the Bird Dog, Spitfire XIVe, AEG G.IV Late, FW 189, He 219. P-51 and Ki-45. Their latest title tackles building Zoukei-Mura's Ta 152H. This was done by modeller Jon King. Here the build looks at converting the kit from a 152H-1 to a 152H-0 as the modeller was unable to source that version. As well as this a virtual review of the kit is covered. Also of use to the modeller is appendices covering Aftermarket, and reference work available for the kit. Conclusion This is the type of publication that the new digital format is made for. If you want a book for a specific build having a digital publication saves you space on your bookshelves. This is clearly a book written by modellers for modellers. The text is clear and concise and the great selection of crisp pictures is welcome, many more than you would get in a printed publication. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. Building the Zoukei-Mura Ki-45 in 1/32 Scale Build Guide Series No.6 KLP Publishing Online publishing is now starting to find its way into the modelling community. KLP Publishing is one of the new online publishers, specialising in eBooks for the scale aircraft modelling community. Their debut title Building Brick’s Sabre in 1/32 Scale: A Scale Tribute to K.J. "Brick" Bricknell reviewed here has proved to be a success. They have since done titles on the Bird Dog, Spitfire XIVe, AEG G.IV Late, FW 189, He 219. and P-51. Their latest title tackles building Zoukei-Mura's Ki-45. This was done by modeller Jan Gabauer. Here the build is OOB without any aftermarket to show the merits of the kit. As well as the normal build it brings us a review of the kit. Also of use to the modeller is appendices covering Aftermarket, and reference work available for the kit. Conclusion This is the type of publication that the new digital format is made for. If you want a book for a specific build having a digital publication saves you space on your bookshelves. This is clearly a book written by modellers for modellers. The text is clear and concise and the great selection of crisp pictures is welcome, many more than you would get in a printed publication. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  10. Building the Fly Arado Ar 234 in 1/32 Scale Build Guide Series No.5 KLP Publishing KLP Publishing are extending their reach in digital publishing of guides for modellers. Mainly dealing with the larger scale 1/32 models. In this new 154 page e-book modeller Kent Karlson brings us not one but two builds of the Fly Models Arado Ar 234. The first features an aircraft post surrender in Denmark and Kent has gone to town with the aftermarket on this one. For the second build he converts the kit to the V6 four engined prototype. Conclusion This is the type of publication that the new digital format is made for. If you want a book for a specific build having a digital publication saves you space on your bookshelves. This is clearly a book written by modellers for modellers. The text is clear and concise and the great selection of crisp pictures is welcome. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. Howdy folks, I just wanted to announce that the latest Build Guide from KLP Publishing is now available. In this 95-page eBook, Jan Gabauer builds, paints, and weathers the new Revell 1/32 P-51D kit to produce an excellent rendition of Major Richard A. Peterson’s “Hurry Home Honey”. The book features not only Jan’s terrific build guide, but also artwork by Juanita Franzi, a review of the kit itself, and an extensive set of appendices covering applicable aftermarket products and reference works. The book can be purchased for download from our website, and is priced at 12 Australian dollars: https://www.klp.com.au/product/building-the-revell-p-51d-5na-in-1-32-scale/ Kev
  12. Building the Revell He 219 A-7 in 1/32 Scale Build Guide Series No.3 KLP Publishing Online publishing is now starting to find its way into the modelling community. KLP Publishing is one of the new online publishers, specialising in eBooks for the scale aircraft modelling community. Their debut title Building Brick’s Sabre in 1/32 Scale: A Scale Tribute to K.J. "Brick" Bricknell reviewed here has proved to be a success. They have since done titles on the Bird Dog, Spitfire XIVe, AEG G.IV Late, & FW 189/ There latest title tackles building Revell's large scale He 219. This was done by UK modeller Iain Ogilvie. As well as the normal build it looks at correcting the engine nacelles which are a major problem with the kit. Also of note are some photographs of the only surviving airframe in the US. Conclusion This is the type of publication that the new digital format is made for. The subject is not main stream enough for a traditional publication. This is clearly a book written by modellers for modellers. The text is clear and concise and the great selection of crisp pictures is welcome. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. Building Race #80 in 1/18 Scale Conversion of the Hph 1/18 Seafire KLP Publishing Online publishing is now starting to find its way into the modelling community. KLP Publishing is one of the new online publishers, specialising in eBooks for the scale aircraft modelling community. Their debut title Building Brick’s Sabre in 1/32 Scale: A Scale Tribute to K.J. "Brick" Bricknell reviewed here has proved to be a success. This This 565-page eBook details Peter Castle‘s award-winning conversion of the HpH Models 1/18 Seafire 47 to represent a Spitfire XIVe—specifically, Race #80, as flown by James McArthur in the Tinnerman Air Races at Cleveland, Ohio, on September 4th 1949 One of the great aspects of digital publishing is the inclusion of a huge amount of pictures. Peter took this model to Scale Model World 2017 where he walked away with the top honour of Best In Show. Those of us who saw the model would have to agree with this. Conclusion This is the type of publication that the new digital format will embrace. The subject is not main stream enough for a traditional publication. This is clearly a book written by modellers for modellers. The text is clear and concise and the great selection of crisp pictures is welcome. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  14. Building The Wingnut Wings AEG G.IV late in 1.32 KLP Publishing Online publishing is now starting to find its way into the modelling community. KLP Publishing is one of the new online publishers, specialising in eBooks for the scale aircraft modelling community. Following on from their first two Special Build series of books this is now their first Build Guide. Written by expert modeller Karim Bibi, this 167-page digital book takes you through building the impressive WNW 1/32 scale AEG G.IV Late kit. The book shows you the building, painting, decalling, and weathering techniques used to produce this stunning model. The book also includes a 29-page special tutorial on painting wood-grain effects on propellers, and includes a 12-page tutorial on the rigging. The book features a 12-page walkaround of the Mercedes D.IVa engine used on the AEG G.IV, and a bonus chapter features some documentation on the engine. Conclusion This is the type of publication that the new digital publishing will embrace. The subject is not main stream enough for a traditional publication. This is clearly a book written by modellers for modellers. The text is clear and concise and the great selection of walkaround pictures crisp. The build photos are first class and unlike a traditional publication they are not limited by size or the number they can include. I was able to enlarge the pictures up to 300% without loosing any clarity at all in them. Even if you are building other WNW kits then its worth considering this guide for the hints, tips and tutorials it contains. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  15. Building MAC's Birddog in 1/32 Scale KLP Publishing Online publishing is now starting to find its way into the modelling community. KLP Publishing is one of the new online publishers, specialising in eBooks for the scale aircraft modelling community. Their debut title Building Brick’s Sabre in 1/32 Scale: A Scale Tribute to K.J. "Brick" Bricknell reviewed here has proved to be a success, and they are now following this up with Building Mac's Briddog in 1/32, a scale tribute to Macaulay "MAC" Cotterell. The book again by Eric Galliers also includes anecdotes from MAC who flew the FAC in Vietnam in 1968. Here he was recommended for the Silver Star, but was awarded the DFC. One of the great aspects of digital publishing is the inclusion of 95 walkaround images from Rob Fox Photography. Conclusion This is the type of publication that the new digital format will embrace. The subject is not main stream enough for a traditional publication. This is clearly a book written by modellers for modellers. The text is clear and concise and the great selection of walkaround pictures crisp. The words from the pilot really do add to the story. It is worth mentioning that the two titles to date focus on the RAAF and this is something again worthy of praise as well. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  16. Building Brick’s Sabre in 1/32 Scale KLP Publishing Online publishing is now starting to find its way into the modelling community with a few new & existing publishers. KLP Publishing is one of the new online publishers, specialising in eBooks for the scale aircraft modelling community. Their debut title is, Building Brick’s Sabre in 1/32 Scale: A Scale Tribute to K.J. "Brick" Bricknell. Written by master modeller Eric Galliers, this 104-page digital book shows you how he built his award-winning 1/32 scale model of K.J. “Brick” Bricknell’s CAC Sabre. There is currently no available conversion for the CAC Sabre in 1.32 so this is old fashioned scratch building work brought to us in the latest digital format. The book also includes anecdotes from Brick himself, from his time flying the CAC Sabre with the RAAF. One of the great aspects of digital publishing is the inclusion of 37 walkaround images. Conclusion This is the type of publication that the new digital format will embrace. The subject is not main stream enough for a traditional publication, but should generate enough interest for the company. This is a book written by modeller for modeller and it shows. The text is clear and concise and the pictures crisp. The additional history and words from the pilot really do add to the story of the aircraft. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
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