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Found 524 results

  1. Mark Hoffmanly

    Trumpeter King Tiger

    I have had this beast on my bench for months now and I have been taking pictures of the progression I have been making on it. The only problem is that I haven't uploaded them so I have over 100 pictures that need to be shared. I have been doing my best to make the tank as historically accurate as possible thanks to the book.
  2. Trumpeter is to release in 2017-2018 a 1/72nd Tupolev Tu-128M "Fiddler" kit - ref.01687 Source: https://www.facebook.com/md11mdster/posts/1578854138797554 V.P.
  3. Inspired by Etienne´s amazing Challengers I thougt it was time to get some of the old Trumpeter kits out of my stash. This is one of them, it is a cheap kit, but easy an fun to build. Great Project for a few days, and it gives you a good impression of the worlds coolest tank of our times (not the best...) . I really love the Chally... hope you like it cheers Tobby
  4. Hi All Here's the Trumpeter T62 in Iraqi service with ERA. Easy and pleasant kit to build and came with a metal barrel. Painted with a cocktail of Vallejo acrylics as they seem to have a million derivatives of sand colour. The figure (badly painted) came from the Tamiya T55 Enigma; he's looking out for A-10s. Any comments and criticisms welcome Cheers David
  5. DeHavilland Sea Hornet NF.21 Trumpeter 1:48 History The Hornet was designed with the possibility of naval service in carriers firmly in mind. To this end good low speed handling was required, along with good all-round visibility for the pilot. The basic Hornet design excelled at meeting these requirements. Shortly after the first Hornet prototype flew, Specification N.5/44 was issued to de Havilland covering the modification of the Hornet for naval service. The Heston Aircraft Company was contracted to carry out the conversion work on three early production F.Is. The work entailed altering the wings to incorporate folding mechanisms so that each outer wing panel, from the aileron/flap line outboard could be folded upwards and inwards at an angle. The hinges were part of the upper wing skin structure while the lower wing skins incorporated securing latches. Lockheed hydraulic jacks were used to actuate the wing panels. Slotted flaps were introduced to improve low speed "flaps down" control. The lower rear fuselage was reinforced with two additional spruce longerons designed to take the stresses imposed by the external "vee" framed arrestor hook, which was flush-mounted below the fuselage. The frame was made up of steel tubing with a forged-steel hook and was held against the fuselage by a "snap gear". Because the Hornet used the American "3-point" system of catapult-assisted takeoff, two forged steel catapult bridle hooks were fitted, one below each wing, close to the fuselage. The de Havilland rubber-in-compression undercarriage legs could not absorb the rebound energies imposed by carrier landings. They were replaced by more conventional hydraulic oleos which embodied torque links. Merlin 133/134s (de-rated from 2,070 hp/1,543 kW to 2,030 hp/1,535 kW) were fitted to all Sea Hornets. Other specialised naval equipment (mainly different radio gear), was fitted and provision was made for three camera ports, one on each side of the rear fuselage and one pointing down. Sea Hornet F 20s also incorporated the modifications of the Hornet F 3, although the internal fuel capacity was 347 Imp gal (1,557 l), slightly reduced from that of the F I. In total, all of the modifications added some 550 lb (249 kg) to the weight of the aircraft. Maximum speed was decreased by 11 mph (18 km/h). The Hornet NF 21 was designed to fill a need for a naval night fighter. Special flame dampening exhausts were installed, and a second basic cockpit was added to the rear fuselage, just above the wing trailing edges. ASH radar equipment was placed in the rear of this cockpit; with the radar operator/navigator seated facing aft. To gain access, a small trap door was provided in the lower fuselage; a fixed, teardrop shaped bubble canopy, which could be jettisoned in an emergency, provided a good field of view. At the front of the aircraft, the nose underwent a transformation with the small rotating ASH radar dish being housed under an elongated "thimble" radome. The horizontal tail units were increased in span. The effect of these modifications on performance was minimal; about 4 mph (6 km/h) The Sea Hornet PR 22 was a dedicated photo reconnaissance aircraft version of the F 20. The cannon were removed and the apertures faired over. Three cameras were installed in the rear fuselage; two F 52s for night time use and one K.19B for daytime use. A total of 23 PR 22s were built, interspersed with F.20s being built at Hatfield. The Model Trumpeter do have a penchant for producing very nice boxart for their kits and this one is no exception, painted directly from a period photograph showing a Sea Hornet on deck with wings folded. Unfortunately the same can’t be said for the styrene inside. Whilst the parts are all beautifully moulded, with no sign of flash or other imperfections, the faults that were noted in their previously released Hornets have been reproduce with this kit. Shame really as the artwork shows how it should look. The nose appears a little too deep, which has then caused problems with the windscreen, the lower edge of which should be pretty much horizontal, whereas the kit has a sharp incline from the fuselage to the upper nose panel. The rudder, ailerons and elevators also have quite pronounced ribbing effects, when they should be flat as they were metal skinned, not fabric. Without building it I cannot say whether the undercarriage position is correct, but I believe the kit of the land based version was wrong, so wouldn’t have though that Trumpeter would have corrected it since they hadn’t with the nose. There also appears to something very wrong woth the ailerons, in that they don't match the shape or even reach the wing tips, it's like they're short shot, but it looks like they're moulded that way. Ok, that’s the accuracy and perhaps slight negativity sorted, what do you actually get in the box? There are six sprues of medium grey styrene, one sprue of clear styrene and a decal sheet. Going by the thickness of the instruction booklet and parts count, this won’t be a complicated build, and if you aren’t too bothered about accuracy it does sort of look like a Sea Hornet, if you squint a bit, but will probably go together without too many problems. The build begins with the front cockpit, with the seat and seat armour being fitted to the cockpit tub. The joystick, instrument panel, with decal instruments, gunsight, gunsight glass and the rear cockpit tray. Now this tray doesn’t look quite right. It seems to be fitted with a tank of some sort, and two boxes positioned fore and aft. Now I’m happy to be corrected, but I presumed these would be the ammunition boxes and positioned athwartships, but I’m only going on what a BM member is doing with his magnificent 1:32 detailing of the HpH kit, as I cannot find a good photograph of the area even in the David Collins’ superb book on the type. Anyway, with the tray in place the spring like rod is fitted between the aft end of the try and the seat, followed by the two cockpit side panels. The rear cockpit is made up from front and rear bulkheads, seat and side panels. The two cockpits are then fitted to one half of the fuselage, after which the fuselage can be closed up, and the 20mm cannon troughs, radome, rear cockpit access door, and tailcone are fitted. Each of the two nacelles and undercarriage are assembled next. Each one comprising of the two nacelle halves, front and rear bulkheads, gear bay roof and sides, main gear leg, single piece main wheel and exhaust stubs. The propellers are each assembled from the backplate, four individual blades and spinner. Make sure you use the correct blades per side as they are handed. The nacelles are finished off with the fitting of the main gear doors and exhaust shrouds. The inner wing sections are split horizontally and once the two halves are joined the radiator intakes are fitted as well as the rib at the fold point. The outer wing sections are built in the same way, and have a clear part fitted to represent the navigation lights; the port wing is fitted with a pitot probe. The tail fin, with rudder moulded together and the horizontal tailplanes, are also moulded in two halves, which once assembled can be fitted to the fuselage, followed by the inner wing panels, windscreen, canopy and rear dome. Now, the instructions call for the outer wing panels to be fitted before the nacelle assemblies. In my view it would be better the other way round. As it is, the modeller has the option to display the outer wing panels folded or extended by way of different adjoining parts which when folded represent the main hinge point. Once the wings have been fitted and the nacelles attached the model is completed with the fitting of the tail hook, tail wheel/oleo, and optionally positioned flaps. Decals The smallish decal sheet provides markings for two aircraft, both in dark sea grey over sky. Although neither marking option is provided with any information of the aircraft squadrons or bases, a bit of detective work shows that they are:- DeHavilland Sea Hornet NF-21, VZ672 of 809NAS based on HMS Vengeance DeHavilland Sea Hornet NF-21, VW967, Probably of the Airwork Fleet Requirements Unit, but with spurious 424 codes, although the BY tail code seems correct. The decals are well printed, in registers with good opacity and with nicely thin carrier film. The only problem I can see is that, although glossy, some of that gloss appears to have come away with the protective sheet, which shouldn’t cause too many problems once they’ve been sealed in with a gloss coat and finished with matt varnish. Conclusion The Hornet has got to be one to them ost beautiful piston fighters ever built, and whilst the modifications needed to build the NF-21 didn’t help matters, it’s still a handsome aircraft. This is a very nice kit, spoiled by some poor research, heck, they could have just looked at the box cover to see where they went wrong with the nose and windscreen, but no, they’ve once again snatched defeat from the jaws of victory. Shame really as it could have been a cracker of a weekend build. I guess it still can be if you’re either ignore the faults or for the purists, go to town on the modifications. Recommended with the above caveats. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
  6. beefy66

    HMS Eskimo

    Starting another build now I have a clear slipway after Abercrombie is done. HMS Eskimo a tribal class destroyer built on the Tyne now this kit has a few issues so i will attempt to correct them. I will be using the WEM Tribal PE set and also the ships boat set from WEM and the North Star 4 barrel pom-pom but first I have to re-shape the shear on the Bow and re-locate the hawser pipes for the anchors As you can see the bow shear on the kit is flat this needs to be raised by 3mm back to about the breakwater It should look like this as with the Atlantic Models HMS Scorpion kit but why do all this work So I can build up my skills with the PE and all the other stuff I do not want to make a mess of an expensive resin kit so this is another practice build and the plastic kit was only £20 So will start to pack out the rise in the shear with various size plastic rods then fill in the gaps and hawser holes Wish me luck beefy
  7. Trumpeter is to release 1/32nd Curtiss P-40 Kitty Hawk kits in 2016-2019 Source: http://www.themodellingnews.com/2015/12/trumpeter-catalogue-2016-2017-lets-see.html#more - ref. 02211 - Curtiss P-40M Kitty Hawk - ref. 02212 - Curtiss P-40N Kitty Hawk - ref. 02228 - Curtiss P-40B Warhawk (Tomahawk Mk.II) - ref. 02269 - Curtiss P-40E Kitty Hawk - ref. 03227 - Curtiss P-40F Kitty Hawk V.P.
  8. The Corsair is still in-the-works (You can follow it here Corsair build log) but its time to start the next one. This is another simple, get-to-be-a-better-builder-before-we-tackle-the-complex/expensive-kits-in-the-stash, so it should be a low-count, good-fit kit and hope fully will not entice to much of detailing and will allow me to horn my skills. Some images first: I was so frustrated with my other build - I had to build something - so I stated with the camera. Image is awful. That's it for now. Ran
  9. Hello guy, some picts of a project beginning in 2016 a Voroshilovets but in german army. i find this pict on the net for inspiration Some pict from the beginning and work on the photoedges Some photoedge and friul tracks Cleaning sprue with toothbrush and soap Working on PE
  10. M1120 HEMTT Load Handling System (LHS) (01053) 1:35 Trumpeter Based upon the almost ubiquitous (in US military circles at least) HEMTT, which has been in service in its original form since the 80s, the M1120 is a reinvigorated take on the design, eschewing the lifting crane and instead installing an MPH165-LHS system for load handling instead. Some were built new at the factory, while many others were remanufactured and zero-houred from existing vehicles, so that all new variants share the same basic chassis, with a cab that can be up-armoured with bolt-on units for operations in more dangerous situations such as the long empty roads in the Middle East where ambushes and IEDs are common. This is why floor armour is consistently fitted throughout the range. With eight wheels on four axles, all of which are powered, it is capable of handling most terrain from metalled roads to dirt tracks and worse, making it a useful tactical tool to provide operational units with supplies of all kinds. The lifting system is based on commercial systems, and excels at handling large ISO standardised palettes known as flatracks, which can be prepared with all manner of payload for fast pick-up, transportation and delivery, with a quick turnaround. Even light vehicles can be palettised and transported in this manner, as can shipping containers as you may have guessed from the box art. The Kit While a kit of the HEMTT isn't news in itself, this is Trumpeter's latest reboxing of their basic HEMTT kit that was originally released in 2015, making it by far the newest kid (and kit) on the block. There have been two other new releases of the same basic tractor unit from Trumpeter this year, one with a trailer and dozer (01055) and the other with a rather quirky-looking AN/TPY-2 X-band radar unit that is used with missile defence systems. The kit arrives in a large black-themed box with a painting of a container being loaded onto the back of the vehicle, and inside the box is divided by a piece of card to protect the more delicate parts from the weight of the sprues in transit. There's a lot of plastic and other parts in the box, so let's have a bullet-pointed list for a change: 20 x sprues in light grey styrene 1 x slide-moulded cab part 1 x sprue in clear styrene 9 x black rubbery plastic tyres 1 x Photo-Etch (PE) brass fret 4 x metal tubes (axles) in two different lengths 1 x decal sheet 1 x mask sheet There is also the instruction booklet and separate painting guide, which is printed on glossy paper and has Gunze paint codes with a chart converting to Acrysion, Vallejo, Model Master, Tamiya and Humbrol colours. In case you were unaware, Acrysion is another brand of Mr Hobby, which seems to have a fairly limited line-up of colours at present, and even uses the same codes for their colours, but is supposed to have enhanced gloss and self-levelling properties that lends itself to easier brush painting. Detail is good, and it's a full chassis and interior model, due to the fact that the engine is situated mid-chassis under a loose-fitting cowling that is open-ended. There is also a flatrack and even a container to sit atop that in case you wanted to mirror the box art and take up more room on your shelves. Construction begins with the chassis, which is made up from the two main runs, with lots of cross-members, equipment and transfer boxes in between, all fixed on with high-tensile bolts in the real thing, the heads of which are replicated on both sides of the main beams. The axles are built up in pairs on sub-assemblies, using leaf-springs, the axles coupled by drive-shafts, and movable wheels captured by carefully gluing a cap over the stub axle before closing up the outer part of the hub. Brake detail is included on both units, plus steering for the front pairing, after which both are fitted to the rail by their spring mount-points and coupled to the central(ish) transfer box by more drive-shafts and steering linkages for the front axles. Next up is the engine, which although it isn't a highly detailed replica, will definitely pass muster once the cowling is in place. It would benefit from some additional wiring and a sympathetic paintjob though, which will be worthwhile as some elements of it will be seen on the finished model. It also has a short drive-shaft into the transfer box in order to put power to the front and rear axle pairings. The steering is then finally linked to the cab area, with an additional bar between front and rear wheels on the forward pairing, after which the front fenders are built up with the air intake can on one, and other equipment around, with mudflaps extending down to the rear. Because the engine is behind the two-seat crew cab, the exhaust is just a short pipe leading to the muffler, which has a perforated heat shield made from PE, and attaches to the top of the engine on a small bracket. At this point the eight road wheels are given their tyres, which simply push onto the hubs. The spare tyre is placed in a box and hemmed in by a rail at the front and rear, plus a PE strap that goes through the centre of the hub. An aircon unit is built up, as are a number of stowage boxes and receivers for the various fluids, plus a huge fuel tank and the one piece cowl, all of which are later fitted to the chassis in clearly marked diagrams, with lugs and depressions making for an accurate location. The crew cab is quite small, and the majority of it is slide-moulded as a single part, with an underside on its own sprue that receives the driver's pedals, steering wheel, plus instruments and dashboard, which has a decal for the individual dials. The highly adjustable, suspended seats are identical, and are made up from a base, adjustment/suspension element, and the seat pads, which install in the footwells, with more instruments in between the two crew stations. The upper cab has the product code in raised lettering in the ceiling, plus ten ejector-pin marks that you might want to consider removing before you add the sun visors and glazing, the latter having a set of pre-cut masks provided in the box which is nice. The doors are separate, and have two glazing panels each, and again have their own masks, but masks for the exterior only in case you were planning on airbrushing the base coat on the interior. Light clusters and headlamps in the front are installed along with windscreen wipers, and the angled lower front panel with PE grille is fixed to the front once the cab is safely attached to the chassis. The large wing mirrors and aerial bases are fitted last to avoid being knocked off during handling, and you'll need to find your own aerial material, either from stretched sprue or fine carbon fibre rod. The Multi-Purpose Handler (MPH) system is next to be built up, starting with the L-shaped lifting arm and A-frame, with the metal tubes acting as the hydraulic ram sleeves that allow the parts to slide past each other so that the arm can be moved once completed. A 1:1 scale ruler is printed on the page to allow you to select the correct length tube in case you're confused by numbers and sizes like Father Dougal. The base frame fits to the sides of the A-frame and at the other end the longer hydraulic rams fit on a cross-rail. The whole assembly is then attached to the frame along with a set of rollers at the far aft of the chassis, and a couple of mudflaps hanging off the rear. Three of the sprues consist of parts for the ISO container, with five sides covered with ribbing for strength (the floor being flat inside as you'd expect), plus the door frame, which has a nicely detailed rendition of the double-doors and locking mechanism depicted separately. The underside has four steady-pads added, and Trumpeter have managed to limit any ejector-pin marks to the inside bottom rails, which won't be seen once it's built up. The flatrack is made up from a rectangular floor piece with two rails running down its length, and lots of small attachment points fitted to the sides, with the "bed head" upstand fitted to the front for grabbing by the MPH arm. The flatrack has four cones moulded into its corners that fit into recesses under the ISO container, with locks, holding it in place. A final page in the instructions shows how to pose the finished model in travel and loading positions. Markings In Trumpeter's usual manner there's nothing accompanying the two decal options to explain where and when these markings were seen, so you're on your own there! The desert scheme is predictably painted all over sand yellow, while the other option is painted in a NATO European Green/Brown/Black scheme, with the container in a red brown colour and a Florens logo down the front corners, the well-known container leasing company. The decal sheet consists mostly of number plates, stencils and a branding decal for the crane, as well as the aforementioned Florens logos, plus the instruments for the cab. The printing is good, with decent sharpness and clarity, but on my example, the instrument decals were slightly offset on their black background, but this doesn't seem to affect the rest of the sheet. In truth, little will be seen of these once it is finished, unless you leave all the doors open and have very good eyesight. Conclusion Although this isn't a front-line vehicle, it does have a certain appeal, and Trumpeter have given us lots of detail out of the box, plus some useful features such as the movable MPH, and an ISO container to put on it. It's quite a large model, but like a lot of AFV and softskin models, they're surprisingly compact and make for a cabinet friendly carpark. The kit is indeed proving popular, as between us receiving this and writing the review (about a week), Creative have gone out of stock. Check back later, as I'm sure they'll be ordering more. Highly recommended. Out of stock at time of writing Review sample courtesy of
  11. Trumpeter is to release in 2018-2019 a 1/72nd Tu-22K "Blinder-B" kit - ref. 01695 Source: https://www.facebook.com/TrumpeterModel/photos/ms.c.eJw9UtmNRVEI6mhy3LX~;xiYX5X0SBRUceRYRoh5plX~;z4RQdUZ2Ww9lRPTF6uPTr14jFpYm6OfkNfl090kfUng75sfzTi9r5cfPD5dMruf6IAN~_a~;Q0s1O~;Fj9gTer~;9~_2G~;frcv~_Nrk19jXL9y~;UlC326~_eg8~;9qgv9Tj1r4B7y5~_v3~_c3fe516sv5xfpoDj7FeWz~;99AfcRT~_gX4~;6b~;1T5qebXwnz2XuK89ffoL85CpxNvVo9zo8HPed~_XtBz~_rF5CvOsGWA9vQrcJ2XUA3~_M~;L1feH8m8tC8PEI332S~_ihcoIzb4aUM~;Ff~_apv9w7JUi.bps.a.910355045789756.1073742119.103526326472636/910355559123038/?type=3&theater V.P.
  12. Well this is the first plane I've build since I was about 11. Its supposed to get me back into the Wokka. Its Pacific Fleet, and they got hammered by the elements. Cant decide if I overdid it, but here you go
  13. Su-9 Fishpot 16 Red PVO Soviet Air Defence Force Trumpeter 1/48 Eduard Brassin Seat Master Pitot Wolfpack Exhaust Decals: kit numbers,. Iliad Design Stars Eduard plastic RS-2US missiles/ decals (MiG-21 series kits ) lots of BM help WIP to be found in the fantastic 60s NATO v Warsaw Pact in Europe group build! and with its contemporary smaller cousin: some more color soon! cheers, Werner
  14. Time for a new project; The 1/350 HMS Hood with some aftermarket add-ons; Artworx wooden deck; Flyhawk PE and Trumpeter after market set (mainly for the barrels; Eduard PE along with Northstar secondary guns mounts, Vickers MGs, searchlights and bridge equipment and White Ensign replacement turrets; It's going to be a long project and it's a bit hard to know where to start really - so started on the hull; Removed the moulded degausing cable and drilled the scuttles to give a bit more depth - some where filled and replaced using various photos as references along with the hawse pipe hull openings; Scrapped away the moulded chain and drilled the deck hawse pipe openings; Fore deck fitted with the bow full of filler - when it's dry I'll try and drill the hawse pipes to connect hull and deck openings. Never tried it before but if it doesn't work the anchors and gratings will cover it, so worth a go; Thanks for looking. Cheers Nick
  15. Hello, built oob. Painted with Revell Auqa Color. cheers Peter
  16. Hi all, Having rested a day or two from my previous endeavors, I have decided to begin another project, hopefully a smidge easier, and pray God a little easier! I have decided to tackle the 1/72 scale F-100C quandary. I have read that some of the older kits are quite accurate, but lack modern detail. I have been told that the Trumpeter offering of the F-100C has detail, but is not accurate. Perhaps we can combine them for a better outcome. We shall see: My candidate materials for this effort are shown below: Model-wise, we have the Esci F-100D Thunderbirds marking kit (I have three in the stash, so there was really no other older kit choice for me), and the Trumpeter F-100C. Other potentially useful pieces are the Obscureco F-100C conversion kit, and the Aires F-100 wheel set and the F-100D cockpit set. (The latter is not really needed for the entire cockpit, as the Trumpeter's offer isn't bad, but the Aires set has one critically needed iitem -- secret for now.) In addition, "The F-100 Super Sabre In Detail & Scale" Part 1 by Bert Kinzey, features drawings direct from North American Rockwell, with a right-side view added by Mr Ed Moore. These drawing are accurate enough for me. This book only contains drawings for the F-100A and C models, with the D-F models covered in D & S Vol 33. The latter also has drawings for the A and C models, but fewer pics of these are in the later book. Now, for the background. There seems to be four major complaints about the Trumpeter kit: The too-shallow and flattened nose shape; the incorrectly shaped vertical stabilizer, the wing and the wrong ejection seat. These is also a complaint about the wheels being too large, which is easily corrected by sanding down the kit wheels, or easier yet, the Aires resin set. There is one other issue, the fact that the wings are too shallow, which leads to the wheel wells also being too shallow, I will ignore this problem, because my models will not get picked for examination, after they are complete. I also have read that the afterburner can (the original style, not the F-102 type) is too short front to back. The one in the kit measures pretty close to the drawings, so I will also ignore that concern. Now to begin sorting the rest, we have a comparison of the Esci F-100D wing to the drawings: A dead fit, except for the tiny area at the tips. Kudos to the older kit! By cutting back to the C-type wing outline, and filling the flap lines, and re-scribing a few lines here and there, you could have pretty much a nice C wing. You would not, however, have the open leading edge slats, de riguer for any Hun on the ground, whose crew hadn't taped up the slats. You can, however, chop up the wings and do your own slats, which I started on one of my stashed Esci kits. Next the Obscureco solution to the wing problem: It solves the problem, but the shape is a little off -- at least compared to these drawings -- but, they are also short, just under 3/8" short in real life. Now the Trumpeter offering: Except for being a bit wide, chord-wise, it's pretty much bang on. It is interesting to note that all of these possibilities have differing views on where the aileron and flap lines should be, They don't agree with the drawings, nor with each other. If this is a problem for you -- have fun. Next, we look at the Trumpeter vertical stabilizer: Here we can see that the shape is too tall, and not seen here, the chord is too broad, at the "kink". The model is not fully aligned with the drawing in this photo, to show the former. Next, the Obscureco tail: Pretty much an exact fit. And, for the final determining factor: The Trumpeter tail has too many segments in the area under the ECM pod down toward the fuse. This was pointed out in someone else's blog, but I couldn't find it again to give credit. My apologies. There is however, one bit of fairly good news concerning the Trumpeter F-100C tail -- It wouldn't take much carving (but a lot of scribing) to turn it into the earlier X and A style short tails: For me at least, the above information tells me that I'm going to build the Trumpeter F-100C, but use the Obscureco tail. Also, to be fair to Oscureco, my example was one of their very earliest copies, and they may be more accurate today, which might sway someone else's choice. Well, that's it to start with, as my brain is burnt out and it's almost time for the Super Bowl -- Yeah Falcons! When next we meet, we'll look into the nose issues, and my solution. Later, Ed .
  17. I will start at the beginning,bought this model at a model show with parts missing,for only £10.The trader had tried everything.I tried one of my sellers on eBay,bingo, he was able to get the part.That was 2yrs ago.Bought extra aircraft cheap,yes like cheap.One of the boxes were SB2U scout bomber,the first monoplane aircraft to serve on Saratoga. The research started,first the etching from Eduard ,the bridge is upgraded to 1940,which mean I could put more modern aircraft on board. Sb2U-1 Vindicator x12 TBD-1 Devastators x20 F2A-2 Buffalos x12 F3F-1 x12 the biplanes are tiny when, compare to the modern aircraft. VS-3SBC x12 Next problem was a display box ,most were showing to be £200.Fainted .At another show in Aberdeen.there is a trader who will make then much cheaper.The catch he will not post any(too many were getting damaged),or bring to shows,not enough space in his van.I,m in luck because he lives in Glasgow, which is only an hour for me each way.Same price as postage,which would have been,when he did post.That's why it's taken two yrs to get round to making this monster 90cm in length,height 23cm and width 20cm.
  18. The good news is that today - the announcement was made that HMS Exeter Item No.: 05350 in Scale: 1:350 was released - so in a couple of months it should be on the shelves in the West ( I believe the new kits get released first in the far East , for a few months ) note confirmation is visible of this fact on the Official Trumpeter of China website kind regards
  19. Junkers Ju-87G-2 Stuka Trumpeter 1:32 History Even before the Battle of Stalingrad, German concern about the large quantity of Soviet mobile armour on the Eastern Front during 1942 resulted in the formation of an experimental air-to-ground anti-tank unit. Tests showed that arming the Junkers Ju87 Stuka with a 37mm cannon under each wing promised the optimal tank-busting weapon. This Ju87 variant was designated the Junkers Ju87G Kanonenvogel (cannon-bird). The Ju87G-2 was developed from the long-wing Ju87D-5 Stuka dive bomber. It was a rugged design powered by a single Junkers Jumo 211J-1 twelve-cylinder liquid-cooled engine. The type displayed outstanding qualities as a tool for precision ground attack. However, in the air the Ju87G-2 was both cumbersome and slow. Defensive armament was limited to 7.9 mm Mauser MG 81Z twin-mounted machine guns at the rear of the large glasshouse canopy. A total of 174 G-2s were built before production of all Ju 87 variants ceased in October 1944. The Ju87G began its career in February 1943 in the battles for the Kuban peninsula in Southern Russia. It was at this time that Oberstleutnant Hans-Ulrich Rudel began tank-busting operations, having recently become the first Luftwaffe pilot to fly 1000 operational missions. Later, in July 1943, Rudel took part in the epic tank battle for the Kursk salient. More than 350 Ju87's participated in these operations, including a handful of production Ju87Gs. Rudel went on to fly no fewer than 2,530 sorties and notched up a total of 2,000 targets destroyed; including 800 vehicles, 519 tanks, 150 artillery pieces, a destroyer, 2 cruisers, the Soviet battleship Marat, 70 landing craft, 4 armoured trains, several bridges and 9 aircraft. Given the shortcomings of the Ju87G in terms of its speed, agility and defensive capability this speaks volumes for the piloting skills of Rudel himself and the marksmanship of his rear gunners. Hans-Ulrich Rudel was the most decorated serviceman of all the fighting arms of the German forces. He was the only recipient of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Golden Oak Leaves, Swords, and Diamonds. Unswervingly dedicated to waging war against the enemies of the Third Reich, Rudel continued in active service following injuries sustained in February 1945 that resulted in a leg amputation. Such was his prowess and notoriety, that the Soviets placed a significant bounty on his head. Wisely deciding to evade capture at Russian hands, in a final act Rudel led three Ju87s and four Focke-Wulf FW 190s westward from Bohemia. He surrendered to U.S. forces, on 8 May 1945. The Model This is probably my favourite variant of the Stuka, what with the rakish lines of the canopy and the huge cannon in their winged pods, it just looks the business. So, it was with great news on hearing that Trumpeter where going to release one. The kit comes in one of Trumpeters standard top opening boxes with a very attractive piece of artwork on the front showing the aircraft in action over the Eastern Front. Inside there are fourteen sprues of medium grey styrene, two of clear, two small sheets of etched brass, three rubber tyres and the decal sheet. All the parts are well moulded with no sign of flash or other imperfections and only a few moulding pips, so cleaning up should be nice and easy once the parts are removed from the sprues. The kit comes with lots of lovely detail along with options for various weapons loads to be fitted in addition to the cannon pods. Construction begins with the assembly of the Junkers Jumo engine. This consists of the three piece engine block to which the sump, crankcase, propshaft, rocker covers, oil tank, exhaust and intake manifolds, coolant tank and the four part fuel unit. The rear of the engine is fitted with the auxiliary pack with ancillaries such as the generators, pulleys, fuel pump and turbo intake. Once the exhaust plates have been added the two engine bearers can be fitted. The completed engine is then attached to the firewall, along with four other fittings before the two halves of the cowling are fitted around the engine with the large radiator sandwiched between them. Since there are no loose panels you will see very little, if anything of the completed engine unless the modeller carries out a bit of surgery, which is a bit of a shame as it looks very nice. The front fuselage is completed with the addition of the radiator grille, exhausts and propeller, which is made up of the backplate, three separate blades, hub and spinner. This section can now be places to one side as construction moves to the cockpit. The nicely detailed cockpit consists of a single piece floor to which the pilots seat, (made up of three parts, six if you include the headrest and armour), gunners seat, (made up of three base supports and the seat itself), are fitted. The radio sets are fitted to the mid mounted dwarf bulkhead and fitted just forward of the gunners seat. Beneath the bulkhead mounted radios another set, made up from two parts is glued to the floor. Additional parts, such as the rudder bar, joystick, two oxygen regulators and the rear gun mount, with its two ammunition tanks, are also fitted. The cockpit sidewalls are fitted out with various control boxes, throttle quadrant and trim wheels before being glued to the cockpit floor, producing a nice sturdy tub. The completed cockpit is then sandwiched between the two fuselage halves, followed by the fitting of the rear cockpit panel, complete with clear circular cover and the pilots coaming, with added instrument panel and crash bar. At this point the horizontal tailplanes are fitted, along with the elevators, associated control horns and the end caps, followed by the rudder with separate tail light. The construction of the wings begins with the assembly of the centre section. The centre panel is fitted with the lower viewing tunnel with clear parts at each end, followed by the front and rear spars, and completed with the two upper panels. Each outer wing panel is fitted with a machine gun bay. Each bay consists of four parts into which the three part machine gun, complete with ammunition feed, is mounted and covered with the optionally posed door. Before gluing the upper and lower wing halves together, ensure you have opened the correct holes for the weapons option you have chosen. With the wings closed up they are finished off with the separate wing tips and navigation lights. At this point, the instructions call for the fitting of the cockpit windscreen and canopies. There is a choice of windscreen and pilots canopy depending on the model being built, along with a couple of panels that can be posed open or closed on the sliding section. The windscreen, no matter which type is fitted with two grab handles, a clinometer and aiming bar. The rearmost canopy is fitted with the twin machine gun mount, which comes with separate barrels and a two part hanger mechanism. The wing centre section is then glued to the fuselage, before being fitted with the two outer wing panels, followed by the front fuselage/engine section. On the undersides of the wings the prominent flaps are fitted to the trailing along with the actuator rods. There is no option to display them in drooped, unless surgery is carried out. Whilst the model is upside down the two radiators are glued into position along with their covers. The main undercarriage is also attached, each made up of a two part wheel, two part oleo all sandwiched between the two halves of the spats. The tailwheel comes as a four part sub-assembly, including the two part wheel, the oleo and yoke half. Now it’s on to the weaponry build. The main 37mm cannon are used in all options and consist of six part mount, including separate crutches, to which the cannon fairing is attached, followed by the barrel. Each of the two “wings” are made up from folded PE, which are then glued to the fairing sides. Each wing has two blocks of shells slid into them, although since you won’t be able to see much of them you could just display them separately. The completed cannon are then glued into position just outboard of the wheel spats. The other weapons included in the kit are the centre mounted 500kg bomb, made up form two halves with two parts to complete the fins, plus the separate fin cross members and the bomb cradle/swing arm. The mountings are the same for the twin 50kg bombs, (each bomb comes as four parts and can be fitted with optional fuse extenders), drop tanks, Each from two halves, four mounting bolts and a PE strap), or what I can only describe as a six barrelled machine gun pod, (with four parts to each pod, plus three twin barrels. There is also the option of mounting two sets of five smaller bombs all mounted on a single cradle, making up what could be construed as a cluster bomb. I wish Trumpeter would label what things were. With the various weapons loaded the build is complete. Decals The single decal sheet provides options for two aircraft, and comes complete with stencils for one. The decals are very nicely printed, with good colour density, in register and with very little in the way of carrier film, and what there is, is very thin. The Balkenkreuz do appear to have a bit of mottling on them as if they had stuck slightly to something. I would have thought that once on and covered in gloss/matt varnish this will disappear. The swastikas are each cut in half at the centre, and should cause too many problems when positioning them. The two aircraft options are:- Junkers Ju-87G-2, Stab/SG 2 <-+-, W.Nr. 484110 Junkers Ju-87G-2, Stab/SG 2 <-+-, W.Nr. 494193 Conclusion As I said above, this has to be my favourite version of the Ju-87, with perhaps the slightly odd looking Ju-87A being a close second. The kit does come with quite a lot of detail, and should build nicely straight out of the box, but there is quite a bit of room, particularly in the cockpit to add more, so it should appeal to those who like to take to the next level. It’s a bit of shame to have a well detailed engine covered up and not even have the option to show it off, but I’m sure the aftermarket companies will be all over this soon. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
  20. Trumpeter is to release in 2017-2018 a 1/48th Aero L-59 Albatros kit - ref. 05806 Source: https://www.facebook.com/TrumpeterModel/photos/pcb.718760784949184/718760501615879/?type=3&theater V.P.
  21. Hi All, Looks like I've got about a month off work and doctor's orders to take it easy, so it's time I started this behemoth of a kit! It seems like a good subject for a WIP thread as I'll be doing a bit each day for the next month or so - this is a BIG kit and I'll be throwing the kitchen sink at it. I've got a proper digital camera instead of my phone for pictures, so hopefully I will be able to keep a record that is visually explanatory as well as detailed in words. Trumpeter's by now familiar 1/32 Su-27 Flanker-B kit. I bought it seven years ago on my first visit to China - it cost me about £40 at the time when it was double that in the shops at home. Since then I've gradually accumulated practically every aftermarket item worth having, with still some more on the way! The main purpose of the aftermarket stuff is to deal with some of the well-documented shortcomings of this kit. I'll outline those in this post and tackle them as I go. As far as the kit goes, it was among Trumpeter's first forays into the 1/32 jet world in the early 2000s, which brought us several very popular subjects that had never been released in this scale before. No-one really expected to see large aircraft like the F-105, A-10 and Su-27 in 1/32, but Trumpeter surprised us all with their efforts. Unfortunately for all these early kits, though very nicely produced, they were blighted with some fundamental shape problems, and the Flanker was arguably the worst offender. From studying drawings, I think the shape of the Trumpeter kit is based on drawings of the earlier development airframes (T-10-10/11), rather than the production model T-10-S. That said, there isn't a kit in any scale out there that captures the correct shape of the Flanker's fore section (except, I'm told, the new Zvezda 1/72 version), and this kit is very finely detailed in good quality plastic, nicely produced with minimal flash, and fits together well. And it is seriously HUGE! The three Aires sets for the kit - cockpit, wheelwells and exhaust/nozzles: Superb quality - I haven't used many of these Aires add-ons, but they are amazingly detailed: These items are luxuries to upgrade the kit detail - out of the box the kit versions are very much acceptable! Now for the corrective items - all from Zactomodels. These are the intakes and new nose. The kit intakes are too narrow and curved along the bottom profile. The kit nose is much too short and conical and these replacements are spot on. The other problem shape is the canopy - the kit windshield is too sloped and the overall shape is too short and bulbous looking. I did get Zactomodels' canopy set as part of the combo, but since I'll be posing the canopy open, it's less apparent that the shape of the canopy is wrong. I've test fitted the canopy and Aires instrument panel coaming and there is likely to be an interference fit with the HUD as well, so I've decided only to use the canopy accessories from the Zacto set and keep the vac canopy for another day. I can't overstate how very, very good these items are. The quality is the best I've ever seen in resin. The surface is almost creamy, perfect fidelity and very finely detailed. They also fit the kit exactly. This stuff is by no means cheap, but it is good value for what you get. It's also sufficiently accurate to throw suspicion on later releases of the Trumpeter kit which mysteriously "fixed" the intake and nose problems within a year or so of Chris' (Zactomodels) release. Make of that what you will! I also have the obligatory Eduard etch sets for the ejector seat and airframe exterior - some of the exterior is for the FOD guards, but as they are based on the kit intakes, which are quite dimensionally different to the Zacto ones, I won't be using them :'( Decals - I have Linden Hill's stencil set and Guardians of the North decal sets - I've also got some leftover Begemot MiG-29 decals, so who knows what I will end up with?? I'm leaning towards one of these two at the moment - 03 Red or 41 Blue. On the other hand, it would be nice to do a bang-up-to-date 2014 version seeing as these may be becoming very relevant in the coming months! If that were not enough, I also have MasterCasters' replacement wheel set, and the seated pilot figure. The wheels are pretty much exact copies of the kit wheels but without the need to use the rubber. Personally, I have no problems with rubber wheels, and have several completed kits going back eight years with rubber wheels that have suffered no ill-effects. So I may not use the MasterCasters wheels unless I have trouble reshaping the rubber ones. The last aftermarket items (still on their way) are some wingtip Sorbitsya ECM pods courtesy of Wolfpack Designs. I could have also got these from Zactomodels, but I could buy the Wolfpack ones here in the UK. This solves the problem of the kit's mis-shapen wingtip missile rails which are conspicuously wrong and very visible. I intend to build this as a modern-day Su-27 interceptor with R-73, R-77AE and R-27(E)T missiles, so two less R-73s won't make a huge difference. The missiles will come from the Trumpeter 1/32 Russian Weapons Set which I bought years ago and luckily have all the required missiles included. They are not spot on but perfectly acceptable, as I used several for my MiG-29UB built two years ago: Well, that's that little introductory thesis over - the casting blocks are cut off, the resin is drying off after a marathon washing and scrubbing session, the parts are cut to shape - we begin at dawn tomorrow, Comrades! 8) Hope you enjoy following the build, I'll try to be as detailed and explanatory as I can, tell me if it gets too boring or tedious with minutiae!
  22. Quietstorm7

    1/32 Corsair F4U-1D

    Good Afternoon chaps, Right ho ! Seeing as building is slowing down on the Swordfish and its in to painting, weathering and final assembly my mind has begun to wonder onto what's next..... Cue fanfair !!!!!!!! Yes I know its hopelessly ambitious and it might all end as a horrible disaster but either way I'm determined to have fun and hopefully learn a few things. Not sure how long this will take or how much of the extras will find their way into the final model as its all new ground to me. Hope you'll follow an idiot on his intrepid adventure !, if you do be warned lol Toodle Pip ! Alan
  23. Hi all, I have finally summoned the courage to embark on the first of what I hope will be three Thud builds over the coming weeks. I'll send out my previous caveat that it will take a while as I have to fit it around many other things and time is short generally. None of that will dampen my enthusiasm, although I am impatient by nature and you may need to hold me back if I am rushing for the sake of finishing. The goal is a representative build and not a half-way copy. Many of you will have seen and been a part of my recent deliberations on WIP about this first machine, which is different to say the very least. As always she is being built in the Gentleman's scale - 1/72. Is there really anything else? I grew up with 1/72 and will stick with it. The follow on builds will be F-105D 59-1749 "Mr Toad/Marilee E" and then F-105B 54-0107 in her Phase 5 colours. So, 58-1155 looked like this: She was a test airframe that went on to operate with the USAF and then the Air National Guard and now resides in USAF Armaments Museum at Eglin AFB, marked erroneously as 59-1771/JV "Ohio Express". The debate on WIP has mainly been about the fin/rudder and nose "balloon" colour. A poor (in my view) image that is available shows this to be a pale yellow, like something you'd get from Dulux for your bathroom in the 1970s. It isn't my cup of tea but, of course, if that is what it was then it will be painted that way. My challenge is to prove this to myself. Other than that she was natural metal, International Red flashes outlined in black, (silver)-outlined lettering and Star-and-Bar, Olive/Green spine and a black anti-flash panel behind and in front of the canopy. You can see that she had a longer pitot with some test vanes and a ventral fins without arrestor hook. She also pre-dated the wire duct along the spine and the rear fuselage scoops normally seen on later Thuds. I have a couple more rewfernce shots but if anyone out there has more I'd love to see them, especially anything that confirms (or otherwise) those yellow areas ;). So far I am in the "gathering" stage - getting my bits together and starting to make a work plan. This is what I have so far: This includes an Aires cockpit for each, pitot (for Mr Toad), wheels, canopy masks, and more. Well wish me luck! I need it!!!!!! Martin
  24. Hello Gents, Im starting my first large build project this week and thought I'd do an online build to maybe get some feedback. I purchased a Trumpeter 1/48 scale VIIc sub and plan to do some changes. The Trumpeter kit is modeled as U-552 with the standard Turm 0 conning tower. Personally, I prefer the look of subs with the late war Turm IV installed. The version with the twin wintergarten and 3.7 cm Flak 42/twin 2.0 cm Flak 38. I've been doing some research and will convert my sub to U-380 as she looked when commanded by Albrecht Brandi, returning from a 33 day patrol Jan 21, 1944. Brandi was one of only 2 Kriegsmarine members awarded the Knights Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds. The following parts will be used: Complete photo etch from Rcsubs.cz 3D printed parts from Shapeways, designed by Sasa Drobac/DeStefan 3D Designs Brass access hatches and FuMO30 radar from Boris Nakropin www.smallrivetsstudio.com Photos to follow U-380 leaving for patrol
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