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Found 15 results

  1. Porsche 356 Coupe and Cabriolet Revell 1:16 The Porsche 356 range first hit the roads in 1948, with early examples built in Austria. The 356 has an aircooled engine in the back driving the rear wheels and is known as being a lightweight nimble performer. The 356 was built in coupe or cabriolet body style and Revell have given us 2 large scale kits in 1:16 scale. The Coupe kit is a B series, launched in 1959, with improvements and re-styleing over the first A series. The cabriolet is a later C series launched in 1965 this was the final facelift of the 356 range and had a larger engine and disc brakes. The Dutch Police took the final 10 cabriolet models in 1966 before the 911/912 models took their place in the range. Both kits are very similar so I look at them both together pointing out the similarities and differences. The kits come in large boxes with a lift off lid, colourful artwork adorns the top and sides to tempt the casual browser in the shop. Both kits have a large body shell moulding needing the doors, bonnet and boot adding. Although they are coloured (red for the coupe, black for the cabby) they will need painting. I feel the part count is low for this size car, and some details are very basic, the engine being one example being to my mind over simplified, the bonnet (or boot?) is a working part so a well detailed engine that the modeller could add to would have been fantastic. I understand the cost vrs parts argument but at this scale it should be better. I also note that the Coupe is an ‘Easy-click’ model and this has an impact on the build and parts count. Right moan over lets look at some plastic. The bodies are well proportioned to my eye and capture the curves and lines of the 356 they are well moulded with no imperfections or misalignment on my review kits. There is a large web of plastic to be removed from the Cabriolet, this is to help add strength to the shell especially around the windscreen and door openings while in the box. The bars over the door openings on the red coupe stay as the doors don't open on this simplified kit, some parts are there in the box, but not all, you could make up the missing parts if you wish to. The main parts are over 9 further sprues, and they are cast in the correct basic colours, body colour, black and silver grey, so they would only need some detail painting. The light grey interior sprue is for the cabriolet, and black for the coupe, other than that the other sprues are the same. As I said before some detail is disappointing and simplified but saying that they are well cast with no flaws. The build starts with the engine and transmission, the model mirrors the real 356 where the engine and transmission sit in a subframe with the rear axle and suspension as a single unit, this is then added to the body-shell as a unit. This will allow you to build and detail this section before attaching it into the complete and painted body. The front axle is the same with all steering and suspension that can be assembled, painted then added to the of the body-shell and it has the option of having the wheels turned with some steering added. The interior is nice, the seats look good with the stitched pattern copied nicely and handbrake, and gear stick detail along with foot pedals. The doors have window winder, handle and arm rests on the inside and a separate chrome door handle for outside. The convertible has a cream and tan interior, with black and grey inside the coupe. There is no Right-hand drive dashboard, so for a British car you will have to do some work, shouldn’t be too hard as it is a simple flat dashboard. You get the option of a raised roof, or a cover for a folded top on the cabriolet, both have nice textured surfaces and realistic creases and seams on the parts. There are 2 chrome sprues in the kit. The chrome is done well and not over shiny and toy like, but most of us will strip it and re-do with our choice of paint. The gates are well placed so not to be obvious on the finished build if you choose to keep the kit plating. There are 4 rubber tyres (5 in the cabriolet) and the detail is nice on the tread. Both kits come with a decal sheet including some nice small data plates and vin plates, badges and a selection of number plates, the coupe has a simplified sticker set (as part of its ‘Easy-click’ title) but thankfully includes the waterslide also! As expected from Revell they are superbly printed and the dash dials have to be seen close up, you can make out the numbers on the speedometer, and rev-counter. Ill pop my anorak on now, the British plates both are A suffix (so 1963) so unsuitable for the later C series model unless it’s a personal plate, PO shows a West Sussex car. These are a nice pair of Porches, and will be cracking models with a little work. The Coupe is over simplified with non-opening doors and bonnet, while the cabriolet has these features. Only some of the parts needed are there on the coupe? Why not have all the bits, and instructions to give the modeller the option? Nice models but for me, with some work will be cracking big car models. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  2. RCMP Female Officer ICM 1:16 ICM continue their theme of World Guards, with this model of a Female Royal Canadian Mounted Police Officer, which also includes her dog. The kit comes on two sprues of grey styrene and one of black, with a separate black pedestal. The parts are very well moulded with no sign of flash or other imperfections, and while the build is relatively simple, the painting, although one of the easiest in the series, is still a challenge to get the look right, both with the figure and the dog. Being 1:16 scale it’s large enough for the detail to be seen and painted, yet small enough to have a nice collection in a display cabinet. As with the other kits in this series the instructions are not very clear. They consist of a colour drawing of the completed and painted model, with the parts numbered and arrowed. AT least ICM have included some detail drawings on the painting guide this time, rather than having to squint and guess. Seeing that the kit is fairly straightforward it probably won’t worry the seasoned figure builder, but it might put off the beginner. The two legs are glued together as the waist, and then the two part torso is glued together and attached to the legs. The front of eh jacket comes as two separate parts and are glued on once the torso and legs have been joined. The separate arms, hands, one of which includes the end of the lead, two piece head, separate hair bun, separate epaulettes and three piece hat are the glued into place. Smaller items, such as the holster, ammunition pouch and a small unidentified pouch are affixed to the belt. The dog consists of a four part body, two piece head and separate tail. The lead is not provided though and it will be up to the modeller how best to address this. The kit comes with a nicely moulded pedestal, large enough for both figures with just single option of top. Alternatively the figure can be presented on a plain flat base. Conclusion If you’re a figure modeller then this will be a great way to pass the time. The painting will require a great deal patience to get right, particularly the shading, and the dog even more so. This is really nicely made though and although quite small, (you will need an optivisor to paint the finer details), and it will look really nice in the display cabinet. Review sample courtesy of
  3. Yeoman Warder ICM 1:16 ICM continue their theme of World Guards, with this model of a Yeoman Warder, also known as a Beefeater. The kit comes on two sprues of grey styrene and one of black, with a separate black pedestal. The parts are very well moulded with no sign of flash or other imperfections, and while the build is relatively simple, the painting is not one for the feint hearted. Being 1:16 scale it’s large enough for the detail to be seen and painted, yet small enough to have a nice collection in a display cabinet. As with the other kits in this series the instructions are not very clear. They consist of a colour drawing of the completed and painted model, with the parts numbered and arrowed. Seeing that the kit is fairly straightforward it probably won’t worry the seasoned figure builder, but it might put off the beginner. The two legs are glued together as the waist, and then the two part torso is glued together and attached to the legs. The bottom of the tunic is made up from four parts, two rear and two front pieces. These are joined to the waist area, under the belt, which has a separate buckle. The head is moulded as a single piece. The ruff is also a single piece and should be attached before the head, the hat, made up of the rim, upper part and three sections to the ribbons around it. There are separate rosettes for the sides of the knees and the front of the ankles. The separate arms are posed in such a way as they should just sit nicely, one is down the Wardens side, the other holding the pike, both of which have separate fingers. The pike itself is a single piece part, and there is also a sword with separate hand. The kit comes with a nicely moulded pedestal, the top of which has a selection of different finishes, plain, curved cobbles, straight cobbles or flag stones. Alternatively the figure can be presented on a plain flat base. Painting is going to be a case of patience and a very small brush as mainly of the really fine details are moulded to the uniform. But with care the model should come out looking rather splendid. Conclusion If you’re a figure modeller then this will be a great way to pass the time. The painting will require a great deal of finesse and patience but the having seen what can be done when I visited ICM in September then the results can be amazing. This is really nicely made though and although quite small, (you will need an optivisor to paint the finer details), and it will look really nice in the display cabinet. As with the previously reviewed US Marine would have liked to have seen more of the details moulded separately. Review sample courtesy of
  4. US Marine Guard ICM 1:16 ICM are continuing to release kits, in their World Guards series. The fifth to be issued is that of a US Marine Sergeant if full dress uniform. The two sprues of grey styrene are very well moulded with no sign of flash or other imperfections, and while the build is relatively simple, the painting is certainly not. Being 1:16 scale it’s large enough for the detail to be seen and painted, yet small enough to have a nice collection in a display cabinet. I have to say, first of all, is that the instructions are not very clear. They consist of a colour drawing of the completed and painted model, with the parts numbered and arrowed. Seeing that the kit is fairly straightforward it probably won’t worry the seasoned figure builder, but it might put off the beginner. The two legs are glued together as the waist, then the two part torso is glued together and attached to the legs. The bottom of the tunic is made up from threes parts, rear and two front pieces. These are joined to the waist area, under the belt. The two separate epaulettes are then glued to the shoulders. The head is also in two halves, front and rear. Since most of the join is behind the ears, there shouldn’t be too much problem cleaning it up. The hat is also in two parts, the lower section, which includes the brim and the upper section. The separate arms are posed in such a way as they should just sit nicely, one are behind the Marines back, the other, with separate fingers, holding the rifle. The main section of the rifle itself is a single piece part, with separate grip area where the Marines right hand holds it, and taut sling. The kit comes with a separate scabbard, which is glued to the kits belt on the left hand side, using the joining piece included. The kit comes with a nicely moulded pedestal, the top of which has a selection of different finishes, plain, curved cobbles, straight cobbles or flag stones. Alternatively the figure can be presented on a plain flat base. Painting is going to be a case of patience and a very small brush as mainly of the really fine details are moulded to the uniform. But with care the model should come out looking rather splendid. Conclusion This is not my normal fare when it comes to modelling, what figures I have built have been in 1:6 scale and more fantasy based. This is really nicely made though and although quite small, (you will need an optivisor to paint the finer details), and it will look really nice in the display cabinet. I would have liked to have seen more of the details moulded separately, but that’s just me. Review sample courtesy of
  5. While I have a load of partially built kits on, around, and under the bench, I've recently been suffering from a lack of mojo. So I figured I'd pull the Revell 1:16 Model T Ford (1912) out of my stash. Despite it being a larger scale kit (1:16) it is lacking in detail. There is no engine included, but looking at the chassis mouldings there appears to be space for an electric motor / gears and drive shaft. So perhaps the original release was a motorised kit, as per the original Airfix 1:12 Blower Bentley? Anyway, it should build up to be a nice model. Obligatory Box and Sprue Shot: Dry fitting a few bits together: (lol, the doors are inside out in the photo above!) Looking almost like a Model T Ford! Hopefully I'll get my airbrush back in action and give this kit a decent paint job. Only thing is I need suggestions for repainting the gold chromed part, as by the time you remove them off the sprues, there are obvious marks on the gold chrome...
  6. NOTE: Given Photobucket's recent block on 3rd party hosting, all the images in this thread are currently unavailable. I will look to host the photos elsewhere and rebuild the thread but this will obviously take some time. However, the completed build can be found HERE Hi all, With my build of HMS Warspite stalled, I decided to get started on the big King Tiger. As you can see the box is brimming with parts, 1800 or so including the tracks. I won't bore you all with the ins and outs of the kit so I'll get straight to it. Starting with the lower hull. Trumpeter provide a nicely moulded 1 piece lower hull. Detail is good and well defined but there are a couple of issues. Firstly is the numerous knock out marks littered all over the hull floor and sponsons. I decided to only fill the knock out marks at the front of the hull floor. Once all the hull equipment is in these will be the only ones that can be seen. I didn't fill the marks on the sponsons as I have a different plan to deal with them later. The second issue is a little more problematic. On close inspection of the sponsons it becomes clear that they are warped and bow downwards. I've dry fitted the main bulkhead to show the problem. It may not look like much but I can assure you from past experience that if they are left as they are, it will cause headaches later. So, I decided to tackle the issue now. Firstly I cut into the join between the sponson and the hull to thin out and weaken the plastic. Next I bent the sponsons upwards and glued some plastic rod into the join Once dry I sanded down the join. It's not perfect but it's done the job. I'm not too worried that the join isn't perfect as the weathering will cover it later anyway. Well that's all for now. Next up ill be dealing with the inner hull side walls. I hope you will find this build log interesting and informative and of course, any pointers or constructive criticism is always welcome Cheers Matt
  7. I'm in the process of upgrading this Heng Long R/C "toy", which is actually a rather nice piece of kit. So far I've done the following to it: Added track tensioner device to the rear idler wheels. Metal drive sprocket & idler wheels added to interface with the track tensioner. New metal final drive housing. Added return roller to reduce track slap - this still needs work to put it in-line with the inner edge of the track. Replace BB unit with recoil unit & strobe flash. Recoil unit doesn't work with this barrel, sadly. BB unit adapted to accept strobe wiring tidied up & zip-tied into place kit 0.5w speaker replaced by 3w Taigen unit - huge improvement in sound quality & volume. Velcro fastening of speaker and Rx18 control unit into lower chassis, strobe unit velcroed into upper hull. Headlamp replaced with a more accurate metal unit - wiring still to be completed. Crew heater unit replaced with more accurate metal part, Schumo resin counterpart on the right side. Brass mesh for engine decks partially installed. Metal crew hatches installed for longevity. The plastic parts were a little weak, and would have broken over time. Rear bulkhead stripped of parts for later upgrade Exhausts sanded smooth & textured. weld-beads added to the armoured protector & rolled steel texture added to those. Spare track mounts on rear hull sides filled & puttied ready for new rack & track links to be scratch-built. Here's a pic of the exhausts and the engine deck to give you an idea what it's looking like at present. Sorry about the dust & crap all over the hull in this pic. Didn't spot it until I was back at the computer There's still a LOT to do, including: weld-beads around the whole hull Rolled steel texturing and torch-cut texturing on the panel edges. Upgrade & replace tool stowage racks. Replace barrel cleaner stowage tube. Cast texture to mantlet and surrounds General detailing & adding of small parts such as lifting lugs, track bump-stops, fixtures and fittings. Internal antenna - need to source a few Nerf bullets
  8. German Pz.Kpfw IV Ausf J Medium Tank Trumpeter 1:16 History The Panzerkampfwagen IV Ausf J was the last version of the Panzer IV medium tank to enter production before the end of the Second World War. By the time it entered production in the summer of 1944 the Panzer IV had declined in importance as a battle tank, and so of the three factories that had produced the Ausf H only Nibelungenwerke produced the Ausf J, while Krupp concentrated on the StuG IV and Vomag on the JadgPanzer IV. Despite this a total of 1,758 Panzer IV Ausf Js were produced, along with 278 chassis for the Panzer IV/70(A) and 142 for the Brummbär. The main change made to the Ausf J was the removal of the electric turret traverse and its associated auxiliary engine. To compensate for this a dual speed hand-traverse was installed. The space saved was used to fit an auxiliary fuel tank, which added 30 miles to the Panzer IV’s cross country range. The Ausf J also saw the addition of a Nahverteidigungswaffe (Close defence weapon), capable of firing either smoke or high explosive grenades to defend the tank against very short range infantry attacks. During the production run of the Ausf J the pistol ports were removed from the turret rear and side doors, thicker armour was added to the turret and superstructure roof, on some tanks wire-mesh skirting replaced the solid armour skirts on the sides of the tank (to save weight), and in December 1944 the number of return rollers was reduced from four to three (to speed up production). By the time the Ausf J entered production the Panzer IV had passed its heyday. The Panther had replaced it as the best German medium tank, and Nibelungenwerke’s production of the Panzer IV Ausf J was not enough to replace combat losses. As a result in November 1944 the number of Panzer IVs in each company was cut down to 17, 14 or even to 10. By the end of the year the eight panzer divisions involved in the Ardennes offensive had 259 Panzer IVs but 399 Panthers. Despite this the Panzer IV fought on to the end of the war. The Model Naturally, being a 1:16 scale kit, you’d expect it to come in quite a big box, and although not quite as big as Trumpeters King Tiger of the same scale, the box is still the size of medium suitcase, complete with carrying handle. Inside the hinged lid you’ll come across four other boxes, each one filled with sprues of styrene and other media. In total, (including all the smaller sprues), there are seventy five sprues, plus the separate inner floor, upper hull, lower hull, turret, turret side screens and bustle storage bin, all of medium grey styrene, three of which have aluminium panels integral to the moulded parts, one sprue of clear styrene, five sheets of etched brass, four metal springs, two metal axles, a turned aluminium barrel a length of brass wire, 228 individual track links and two quite large decal sheets. The large number of sprues, and consequently, the number of parts is due to the fact that this kit includes a full, and I mean FULL interior. The mouldings are superb, with crisp, clear detail throughout, no sign of flash or other imperfections, but there are a lot of moulding pips which will impede cleaning the parts up a bit. There doesn’t appear to be much that the aftermarket can add, unless they can find a kitchen sink to throw at it. In fact the only parts I can see that do need to be added are the ancillary drive belt and the pipework around the engine bay. The idea of the aluminium mesh for the Schürzen being added to the moulds so that their frames are moulded to the metal parts is genius and really looks the part. Even with a cursory eye, this looks like it will be a superb kit to while away the winter months, it may take you that long just to go through all the parts, (did I say that there is a lot in this kit?). So, where the heck do you start with one of these monster kits, well, in this case it’s with the engine. The block, which is moulded in two halves is joined together, and then fitted out with the two heads, each of which is made up from eight parts, followed by several brackets and fittings. The three piece supercharger is fitted to the right hand side whilst on the left is the generator unit also made up from three parts, followed by the two piece magneto fitted to the top of the engine along with a hoisting eye. There as a toothed flywheel attached to the rear of the engine, and fitted with a universal joint. The three piece air inlet is fitted to the top of the engine and connected by a pipe to the supercharger. The ancillary drives are then attached followed by the eight piece exhaust manifold. Before the gearbox assembly can begin, the fuel tank is built up from the base section, which is moulded such that includes the front and rear faces, to which the end plates, top plate and two support brackets are fitted. The gear box is moulded in two halves, which when joined together is fitted with the gear links, end plate and cooling fan. Now this is where my knowledge of tank engine systems comes unstuck, to the end of the gearbox, a six piece unit that looks like a turbocharger and includes a long pipe is fitted. The gearbox assembly is then fitted out with the instrument box, with the instrument supplied as a decal, the gear stick, front end plate, which has a two piece fan unit attached and finished off with a small bracket at the front. The single piece floor is fitted with the box like turret base unit on which the turret pinion and chequer plate floor is attached. The batteries fit onto the floor, in the cut-out section of the box structure. The rear cross beam is then fitted, followed by the drivers steering columns and three ammunition lockers. Each locker consists of a single piece section, which is moulded to include the back, base and sides of the locker. Into this part three shelves of PE are fitted, each with their edges bent to shape. There is a full complement of shells included and each shell/cartridge is moulded as a single part, onto which the PE base is glued. Each locker contains eight shells, which when fitted the locker lid and front are attached, although these may be left off or open to show off the shells. The firewall between the fighting compartment and the engine bay is fitted out with a number of brackets and fittings before being glued into place. The drivers and front machine gunners seats, each made from three parts are glued to the front cross beam, whilst the drivers pedals are also glued into their respective positions. Behind them a low end plate is glued to the turret mounting structure, followed by the fuel tank assembly to the left hand side of the engine bay. The engine assembly can now be fitted to the engine bay, whilst the gearbox assembly is fitted to the front of the vehicle, between the driver and machine gunner via to support rails. The engine and gearbox are then connected by the drive shaft which needs to be slid through the turret support structure. Before fitting the floor assembly to the lower hull, the then tabs on the top of the hull sides need to be trimmed off and the floor glued into place. Work now begins on the idler wheels and their fittings with each of the four wheels being fitted with their inner rims. Each of their axles are made up from five parts before the inner wheel is attached, along with its associated hub cap and outer wheel. The completed assembly is then attached to the separate rear hull panel. The two exhausts are then assembled, each from five styrene parts and one PE part. These are then also attached to the rear panel along with two cross plates the five piece towing hitch, and two angled brackets. The completed rear plate is then attached to the lower hull, followed by three return roller axles per side. Returning to the interior for a bit, the two brake drums for the sprocket wheels are assembled. Each brake drum consists of seventeen parts which includes the pads, drive shafts, cooling ducts and control levers. Back to the external parts, on the left hand side, either side of the middle return roller, the two small refuelling hatches are glued into place. There are four bump stops fitted to each side, each unit consisting of four parts. The build then turns to the road wheels, with each of the sixteen wheels made up from inner and outer hubs and a separate tyre, the completed wheels are then paired up. Each of the twin axles are made up from eight parts, after which they are fitted with two of the road wheels and their central hubs, making eight units in total. The completed units are then attached to the lower hull. Whilst another ammunition locker, made up from six styrene parts and two PE parts, not including the twenty three styrene shells and their PE bases, and fitted to the interior just aft of the drivers seat. And the build goes on. The inner section of the drive wheel is fitted to the gear box cover via a centrally mounted pin, after which the outer sprocket is attached. With two of these assembled the can be fitted to the front of the lower hull. The front upper glacis plate is fitted with three hatches, plus their associated hinges and handles from the outside, whilst inside there are the drive and gunner hatch locking levers and the three piece accelerator pedal. The plate is then attached to the lower hull and fitted with seven spare track links, their connecting pins, plus the lockdown brackets and pins. The front plate that is sited beneath the glacis is also assembled, with two locking bars, latches and handle internally, whilst on the outside there is a support bar for another length of spare track, this time ten links long. When complete this is also added to the hull, followed by the three two part return rollers and the idler wheel mud scrapers. The main tracks can then be assembled, each of ninety-nine links and their connecting pins, and fitted to the model. We now move the track guards. The right hand guard is fitted with the front and rear mud flaps, the front one being fitted with one of the metal springs included in the kit, a support bracket, an axe, with PE clamps, a long pry bar, what looks like a starting handle, also with PE straps, four wing nuts and two five piece ammunition lockers, complete with three rounds apiece. These will actually be on the inside of the tank once the upper hull has been fitted over them. The large jack is assembled from eight parts and fitted to the guard with two clamps, whilst the large nut wrench is glued to the rear of the track guard, along with a larger spring which is affixed to the rear mudguard. Two more ammunition lockers are now assembled, each of five parts and filled with nine rounds each. These are then fitted to the left hand track guard, which is also fitted out with front and rear mud flaps and their associated springs, the wire cutters, plus its clamps, four piece fire extinguisher, two track clamps and their support cage, plus the six piece headlight. Each track guard is also fitted with six Schürzen brackets and a grab handle. The completed guards are then attached to the lower hull assembly. The large radiator unit is fitted to the engine bay and fitted with its filler cap, before construction moves to the upper front panels, (inner and outer), which includes the machine gun ball and outer cover, drivers three piece viewing port and the 12 piece MG-34 machine gun and mount. This is put to one side whilst the build moves to the engine cooling fan unit. The fan support structure is made up from five parts, whilst each of the fans consists of three parts. The two fans, one fitted to their support are joined by two multi part shafts. The front plate and fan unit are then fitted to the upper hull, along with the gun cleaning rods with their PE brackets, aerial base on the left rear quarter and a storage box, with its bracket and handle to the front left quarter. The two metal shafts in the kit are used to mount three spare track links each. These are then joined together vertically by to brackets. The radio sub-assemblies are then constructed, and these include plenty of PE and styrene parts to construct the frames before the three radio sets are added and finished off with a comprehensive set of decals. The upper hull section is now kitted out with the drivers and gunners hatches, complete with separate locking mechanisms, followed by the engine deck hatches, rear panel, completed with brass wire tow rope and associated clamps, a shovel, side lights, and the spare track links made earlier. Inside the upper hull the radio sub-assembly is fitted to the machine gunners side whilst at the rear, over what will be the engine bay, the two large vent structures are fitted along with their access doors. The upper hull can now be joined to the lower hull and it’s finally beginning to look like a tank. The outside of the hull is finished off with the fitting of the aerial, spare wheel rack, complete with two spare road wheels, which are made in the same way as the others constructed earlier in the build. The Schürzen support poles and associated braces are glued into position, followed by the Schürzen plates, (made in a similar fashion as the track guards), themselves, once they have been separated and fitted with their fixtures and fittings. The panels that fill the gaps between the large vertical panels and the hull are then attached. The hull assembly can be put to one side whilst the build moves onto the turret. The turret consists of a single piece upper section which is kitted out with the various lifting eyes, bracket plates, side hatches, their hinges and internal frame, grab handles, and internally mounted vent. The 75mm main gun can either be built using the styrene halves or the turned aluminium barrel Trumpeter have kindly provided. The barrel is fitted to the nine piece breech and slide through the three piece trunnion mount and two piece front plate. The breech is then further detailed with the fitting of the breech guard elevation arms and gears, plus the cartridge basket. The three piece mantlet is then slid over the barrel and glued to the internal section of the trunnion mount, followed by the four piece muzzle brake. Alongside the main gun is seven piece machine gun mounted co-axially on the right hand side, whilst on the left the four piece sight is attached. The lower turret section is the then fitted with the turret ring and both this and the gun sub-assembly is put to one side whilst construction moves to the turret floor. The turret floor is fitted with the three four piece support frames, one with the gunners seat, one with the loaders seat and one with the commanders seat. Three equipment boxes, a ready use ammunition box, made entirely form PE parts, and filled with four shells, are also fitted to the floor along with an odd pump like unit. The floor structure is then fitted to the lower turret section, whilst the gun assembly is fitted to the upper turret. Before joining the two, the turret rotating gear box, made up from eight parts, a secondary turret rotating unit, complete with handle, commanders upper seat, ranging instrument unit and two spare machine gun magazines need to be fitted around the turret ring. The outside of the turret is then fitted with the rear bustle stowage box, with two part lid, Schürzen support brackets, Schürzen panels, outer vent mushroom, and cupola ring are attached. The large commanders cupola is then assembled from upper and lower sections, five, two piece outer viewing ports and five six piece inner viewing ports, plus two head pads. The cupola is finished off with the fitting of the hatch surround, hatch and another MG34 complete with five piece mount, before being attached to the turret roof, after which the Schürzen doors, cupola mounted armour plate and turret mounted periscope are fitted , before the finished turret can be mounted onto the hull, completing the build. Decals The two, moderately sized decal sheets, one for the vehicle markings and one for the placards, instruments and stencils for both inside and outside of the vehicle plus the ammunition. They are very nicely printed. They appear to be in register, with good colour density and whilst the carrier film is respectably thin, you will need to prepare the surface well especially for the vehicle identification numbers. The colour chart provides schemes for four vehicles, three in standard dark green, red brown and sandy brown paint, whilst the fourth would have been the same before it was whitewashed. Unfortunately Trumpeter don’t give and information on which unit and where these vehicles fought, but I guess with a little bit of research the modeller should be able to find out. As it si the vehicle identification numbers are:- Black 615 Red 515 White 433 White 431 Conclusion Well, what can I say? This is a an amazing kit, with so much detail it will take many weeks if not months to build in a fashion it deserves. Now, being a premium kit, it does command a premium price, but if you break it down to pounds per hour, then I’m sure you will be getting your monies worth. I admit to not being an expert on the Panzer IV, but with the rather limited research I’ve done it does appear to be pretty accurate, although there are bound to be some more knowledgeable modeller out there who would be able to point out the finer faults. To me though it really looks the business and with a nice paint job, will look fantastic in any collection. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
  9. M-ATV MRAP Trumpeter 1:16 History In the summer of 2008, the U.S. Department of Defence (DoD) began to examine the possibility of developing and procuring a lighter-weight, all-terrain capable MRAP variant to address the poor roads and extreme terrain of Afghanistan. Source selection activity considered responses from more than 20 companies to a Request for Information (RfI)/Market Survey dated 21 August 2008 and in mid-November 2008 the U.S. government issued a pre-solicitation for an M-ATV. In early December 2008 the M-ATV formal Request for Proposals (RFP) was issued. The original M-ATV program requirement was for between 372 and 10,000 vehicles, with the most probable production quantity stated as 2,080. In March 2009, it became known that two each of six different vehicle types (from five manufacturers) had been delivered to the U.S. Army for two months of evaluation, at the conclusion of which up to five ID/IQ (Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity) contracts would be awarded. In addition to Oshkosh's proposal, BAE Systems submitted two proposals, these being a Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) derived design and an FMTV-based Caiman derivative. Force Dynamics (a Force Protection/General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS) joint venture) offered Cheetah, GDLS-C (Canada) offered an RG-31 MRAP derivative, and Navistar offered an MXT-based solution. After GDLS-C's RG-31 was eliminated from the competition in May 2009, it was announced that the five remaining bidders had been awarded ID/IQ contracts, and were each to deliver three production-ready test vehicles for the next stage of the competition. At the completion of testing, the U.S. DoD stated that it planned to select a single M-ATV producer but could, at its discretion, place production orders with multiple producers as it had done with the initial MRAP procurement. On 30 June 2009, the M-ATV contract award was announced with a single ID/IQ contract award to Oshkosh. Brigadier General Michael Brogan, United States Marine Corps program officer for MRAP, stated that the Oshkosh M-ATV was chosen because it had the best survivability and Oshkosh had the best technical and manufacturing capabilities of all the competitors. The Oshkosh bid was also the second cheapest. The initial M-ATV delivery order was valued at over $1 billion and included 2,244 M-ATVs. The overall M-ATV requirement had increased in early June from 2,080 to 5,244 M-ATVs, these split 2,598 (Army), 1,565 (Marines), 643 (U.S. Special Operations Command), 280 (Air Force), 65 (Navy), and 93 for testing. In July 2009, the first 46 M-ATVs were delivered, and in November the 1,000th M-ATV was handed over. Oshkosh reached its contractual obligation to produce 1,000 M-ATVs per month ahead of schedule in December 2009, and by using its existing manufacturing facilities in Oshkosh, WI (50%), and making use of its recession-hit JLG telescopic handler facility in McConnellsburg, PA (50%). The first vehicles arrived in Afghanistan in October 2009 and were to be all delivered by March 2010. In total 8,722 M-ATVs were delivered to the U.S. Army, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) for use in Afghanistan. M-ATVs were delivered in two main variants. The base model is designated M1240 with the Objective Gunner Protection Kit [OGPK] manned turret); it is designated M1240A1 when fitted with the Under-body Improvement Kit (UIK). The second main variant is designated M1277 and is fitted with M153 CROWS remote-controlled weapon station (RCWS). Produced in smaller numbers, the SOCOM-specific variant is designated M1245; M1245A1 with UIK fitted. As part of the overall divestiture of the wartime MRAP fleet, the U.S. Government will keep about 80% (around 7,000) of the M-ATV fleet, 5,651 of these (inc. 250 for SOCOM) to be retained by the Army. Work is currently underway at Oshkosh's Wisconsin facility and the Red River Army Depot to reset the around 7,000 M-ATVs retained to a common build standard. Oshkosh was awarded an initial 500-vehicle M-ATV Reset contract in August 2014. Three additional contract options for 100 vehicles each were awarded in December 2014. Total contract value is in excess of US$77 million. Deliveries are under way and will continue through September 2015. Reset work centres on returning vehicles to Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) 22 standard: essentially the build standard for the final M-ATV production batch. LRIP 22 includes upgrades such as the UIK and enhanced Automatic Fire Extinguishing System (AFES). Reset work also adds Engineering Change Proposals (ECPs) that include acoustic signature reduction (muffler), Modular Ammunition Restraint System (MARS) ammunition storage, and some Government Furnished Equipment (GFE) relocation. On 28 May 2015, Oshkosh announced the U.S. Army had awarded it a contract modification for the reset of 360 additional M-ATVs. The modification includes options for the reset of up to 1,440 additional M-ATVs. Deliveries for this latest modification are to start is October 2015. Oshkosh is on contract to reset a combined 1,160 M-ATVs with a total value of over $115 million. The Model The first thing you will notice about this kit is that it comes in a very big box with an artists impression of the vehicle on the front. Originally released as a ready built model by Merit International, sister company Trumpeter have now released it as a kit. On lifting the lid of the box off, you are confronted with a sea of plastic and a second box which contains both the larger single piece items and the small parts, to keep them safe. In total there are ten sprues of grey styrene, two of clear styrene, eight separate parts, also in grey styrene, one small sheet of etched brass, four metal springs, eight metal shafts, one metal link shaft, twenty three screws of various sizes/types, five large vinyl tyres, each three inches in diameter, and a smallish decal sheet. The moulding of all the parts is superb, particularly on the large separate parts that make up the chassis and body parts, with crisp details, such as bolt heads. There is no sign of flash or other imperfections, such as sink marks on even the largest parts. Although it appears to be quite a small vehicle, the completed model measures out at 386.3mm long and 159mm wide so will take up quite a lot of display space. Construction begins with the with the wheels with the four central hubs being fitted with two inner hub parts before having the large vinyl tyres slipped over them. The inner hubs and brake accumulators are then attached. The wheels are then put aside whilst construction concentrates on the chassis. The large single piece chassis is fitted with the four suspension mounts, each pair fitted with two piece differentials which include the drive shafts for each wheel. Each suspension mount is then fitted with upper and lower wishbones and ball joint. Between the two wishbones a metal sprint is fitted, before the whole assembly is fitted to the mount, followed by the shock absorber and wheel assembly. The steering rack is then attached to the front axle and the large transfer box is fitted on the centreline, attached to the rear cross-member and the drive shaft fitted between the transfer box and rear differential. The front bumper is fitted with two uprights and attached to the front of the chassis. On the underside of the bumper there is a large crossbeam which is attached via two brackets. Whilst on the underside, the two scuff plates are fitted over the front and rear differentials. The build moves onto the cab, with the firewall being fitted with the two foot pedals, followed by the instrument binnacle, to which the instrument panel is attached and detailed with the appropriate decals. The steering column is added next, followed by the navigation screen which has a map represented by a decal, on view. The cab floor is fitted by the two racks that make up the centre console between the seats. The three passenger seats are each made up of a squab and backrest, whilst the drivers seat is mostly moulded in one piece, with just the base frame and headrest to be fitted. With the seats in place the front bulkhead/instrument panel is fitted, along with the door frame uprights and metal steering link shaft and put to one side. The next major component to be assembled is the CROWS II gunners/commander cupola. The upper, armoured section of which is moulded in one piece, to which the lower section, which has been fitted with the access hatch, is added, along with the clear parts that represent the armoured glass. The 50cal heavy machine gun is a super bit of moulding and only requires the fitting of the pintle mount, two piece ammunition box, breech to plate and shield attachment fitted before it can be added to the cupola. The splinter shield is then fitted with the two armoured glass parts before being fitted to its mount on the machine gun pintle. The instructions now tell you to add the cupola to the single piece main body section, but it may be possible to leave this off till you’ve finished painting, although it does require a fixing ring to be fitted from the inside. The armoured windscreen parts are then fitted from the inside to the body section, along with the PE grille screen, and three boxes associated with the cupola rotation. The cab assembly is then fitted from underneath the body, along with the inner wings and the door hinges fitted to the door posts. Each of the four doors are fitted with their associated armoured glass parts, door cards and hinges. Each of the doors can then be hung on the opposite hinges allowing them to be opening if so desired. The front doors are then fitted with large wing mirrors. The main cab/body section is then fitted to the chassis assembly, along with the large single piece under chassis angled plate. The next stage is the fitting of the rear mud flaps and large equipment frame/truck bed. The upper beams of the frame are closed off with a single part that covers the three sides, whilst the storage lockers are fitted to the single piece wheel are section. The upper frame is then attached and is fitted with the three aerial bases. The assembly is then attached to the rear of the chassis and fitted with mudflaps, radio box with another aerial base, grab handle and reflectors. The three piece towing hitch is then attached, as is the spare wheel mounting frame, and step frame. The large exhaust is also fitted, along the right hand side of the vehicle. The thick DUKE aerial is fitted to the right hand side rear wheel arch, whilst to the rear the spare wheel, with two part hub is attached to its mounting frame. At the front the two piece headlights are attached, along with the two reflectors. Finishing off the build the modeller just needs to fit the roof mounted floodlights over the drivers and co-drivers positions, rear door mounted floodlights, two more aerial bases, one on each side of the scuttle, with the right hand one fitted with a two piece flat plate aerial. There is a two piece camera unit fitted on the centreline of the scuttle, between the two windscreens, whilst at the front the flag shaped anti-IED device is fitted to the mounting plate on the bumper. Finally the two three piece access steps are added to each side. Decals There is only one colour scheme provided, that of overall sandy brown. Most of the decals provided on the sheet are for the various instruments and placards inside the vehicle, with just the vehicle ID numbers on the front, rear and sides and a couple of caution/tie down markings on the sides. Only one vehicles ID marks are provided. Conclusion Having seen the built model at Telford in November, I wasn’t sure what to expect from this kit. But from what I’ve seen in the box I really like it and it actually screams, BUILD ME, so it could end up jumping to the top of my build pile. Although quite large, the model doesn’t seem overly complicated, but with enough detail provided to make an out of the box build worthwhile. For those who wish to go the extra mile there is plenty of scope to add further details, such as maps, bottles, ration packs, personal kit and weapons. It’s certainly a good size to display, either at home or at a show. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
  10. Hi all, I'm not big into Armour, don't know my tanks well so would like some advise and what you think to this idea. Firstly, I would like an R/C Tiger tank, on a budget, I know this does not bode well, but hear me out.... The R/C is not to go blasting everywhere but more as a novelty (it will sit in my display case most of the time), the Tiger has to look like a Tiger (so long as it looks OK, it does not have to be rivit correct), It HAS to be a Tiger, early or mid. King etc is no good, it's an Tiger early or mid or nothing. But most importantly I do not have an endless budget, less than £200 is my total budget. Soooo, my thoughts.... Purchase a Heng Long Pro Tiger 1 (with the metal tracks), more for sturdiness, then purchase a Taigen Tiger 1 upper hull. Add or rework any areas that I can, add a few scratch built bits Re-Spray the whole thing. Total purchase price will be in the order of... £109 for the Tiger £59.49 for the upper works. What are your thoughts? Can I make a decent looking Tiger out of this? As I say it is novelty factor for the R/c so it's not the biggest part of the project so the fact it is not scale speed etc is no matter, not that the gears clank etc etc.
  11. . . In this case , one dead Heng Long KV 1 hull , and wave some tools about - . - Can you tell what it is yet ?
  12. Does anyone know what the accuracy issues are with this one? I've heard from a reliable source that it has problems compared to the old WSN/Torro kit in terms of shape, but other than that I don't know. At £50, it's a really cheap way to get into R/C AFVs, so I was interested to see whether the errors/issues are fixable, or whether an old WSN/Torro kit would be a better idea. I believe that the new HB Tiger I is based on the WSN moulds, so that kit could be a good source of spares for an otherwise OOP kit.
  13. If any of you chaps are posting WIPs on the forums, and want the 1:16 tag at the front of them so that we can spot them (it's an admin only function), just let me know by PM with a link to the thread. You can see it on Blimp's thread here.
  14. Just seen this on various websites. It may be small, even in 1:16, but with a full interior it looks like a nice model. http://www.perthmilitarymodelling.com/newkitnews/takom.html
  15. Hobbyboss are now showing a 1:16 Tiger I amongst their december releases. http://www.hobbyboss.com/a/en/Preview/2012/1012/914.html It will be interesting to see the reaction. How many people here will have it on their wishlist?
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