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Ant

Trumpeter Scriber and Riveter

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Hi folks. I found these in my local model shop today, and decided they should join the tool box …

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They were £2.99 each which is pretty cheap for modelling tools. I did think it funny that people winge about Trumpeter’s rivets on the kits, and they release a riveting tool to add even more!!

The riveter is a glorified pounce wheel with four interchangeable wheels with differing numbers of spikes. The wheels are pretty robust and easy to change over and are much thinner than the pounce wheel I currently own which is meant to be used on paper.

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To demonstrate the wheels, my victim tonight is a spare upper wing from a 1:48 arfix spitfire.

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I made a line of each size of rivet, parallel to the gun bay

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Not very easy to see, but with a splash of Promodeller black wash …

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The riveter was easy enough to use, some pressure was needed to get a good ‘dot’, but not excessive to feel out of control. The dots are neater squares than the bigger rectangles that my existing pounce wheel produced. Just like my other wheel, the Trumpeter riveter does l create a raised ridge around the rivets as the tool isn’t removing any plastic, just pushing it around. This could be easily removed with a quick sand, but it wasn’t very pronounced and I didn’t bother for this test. The biggest problem with this (and other wheels) is that it’s difficult to follow a straight line (I used a sanding sponge as my ruler!) and it’s difficult to see precisely where you are starting and stopping.

Was it worth £2.99? I think so.

Next, the scriber …

This is very similar to the hasegawa scriber, in that it has the same sort of hooked blade. It’s to be used in a similar fashion to the Tamiya scriber (Olfa P-cutter) in that you draw it backwards making light passes until you’re happy with the line.

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My victim for this demonstration is the spare underside of the airfix 1:48 spitfire

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For comparison purposes, I have scribed four lines using four different scribing tools. These being … the Trumpeter scriber, the Tamiya (Olfa) scriber, the bare metal foil (BMF) scriber and a needle in a pin vise. I made three passes with each scriber, using gentle pressure. I used least pressure with the BMF scriber as it removed the most plastic most quickly.

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So here are the results …

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And again with a splash of promodeller black wash …

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The scriber was also easy enough to use, but as the blade was brand new and ultra sharp, I had to be very careful making the passes as you could feel that it could easily slip and gouge out unwanted lines. This is no different to brand new blades on the tamiya scriber. I think they need to be broken in slightly before they’re just right to use reliably. Like the Tamiya and BMF scribers, the Trumpeter scribe removes plastic and leaves only a minimal ridge that needs removing. Like the Tamiya scriber The line is V shaped rather than the flat channel made by the BMF scriber. I feels a bit cheap and nasty (it is however only £2.99), but it is lighter and thinner than the tamiya job which is nice, and more substantial than the BMF scribe, which is also nice.

Worth £2.99? I think so, but as a Tamiya scriber can be had for only a pound more, and has changeable blades, I would probably make that my first choice. However, the hooked blade means you can get into spots the Tamiya scriber can’t reach.

Hope this was of interest. Let me know if you want any more pics or information.

Edited by Ant

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Cheers for that Ant. For £2.99 I might and pick up one of those riveters.

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Good review Ant... curiously enough I was talking to Dan about the new Trumpy rivetter. He seems to rate it quite highly. btw - you'll get a better straight line with the rivetter if you follow along a metal ruler or summit :)

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Good review Ant... curiously enough I was talking to Dan about the new Trumpy rivetter. He seems to rate it quite highly. btw - you'll get a better straight line with the rivetter if you follow along a metal ruler or summit :)

Thanks Mike. I have tried various methods for following a straight line; Steel rulers, scribing templates, dymo tape. I find all of them too thin, which makes it too easy for the riveter to ride over them. Additionally, the steel rulers are too rigid and don't follow curves too well. The small mastercaster sponge sanders worked really well as they are flexible and have a non-slip surface to grip the plastic. The test examples I did were very slap-dash - I can do better!

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which model shop provides them mate?

I am temping for the rivet one!!!!! and only £2.99!!!!!!

I got both of these from my local model shop in Swindon. I'm sure they'll be available from anyone that stocks trumpeter and is prepared to get them in. They're bound to be available online also.

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Sold out at hannant's :fraidnot::crying:

Christian

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Thanks Mike. I have tried various methods for following a straight line; Steel rulers, scribing templates, dymo tape. I find all of them too thin, which makes it too easy for the riveter to ride over them. Additionally, the steel rulers are too rigid and don't follow curves too well. The small mastercaster sponge sanders worked really well as they are flexible and have a non-slip surface to grip the plastic. The test examples I did were very slap-dash - I can do better!

Have you not got a flexible steel ruler then? I picked one up at Telford year before last, and they're good for using on curved surfaces, because they're so skinny it makes following lines much easier. I'm sure mine has Military Modeller or something etched into the surface. :)

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Hmmm :hmmm: that riveter sounds very interesting at that price... might just have to take a look at those when I get a chance!

Thanks for the reviews Ant!

Karl.

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Agree with Ant. I have the Trumpeter scribing tool and am in the middle of rescribing the Airfix Vulcan with it and finding it great. Might have to try the riveter too after reading this thread.

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I'll concur with the review. A buddy of mine has one and let me use it. I have used the Bare Metal Foil scriber, the pin vise, and the Mission Models scriber. For straight lines, the Trumpeter scriber is the best I have used.

Stew

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From looking at the pics, I would reckon the Trumpeter scriber was the neatest job.

However- I DO have a trumpeter rivet wheel- and I think it is total garbage! That is IMHO.

However- will look to pick up a scriber- looks good.

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To reduce overuns why not put a bit of masking tape at either end that you intend to rivet / scribe too, you them can see when it has got there and have some resistance. indeed you could put it there as a guide line to get it square then add a pencil line.

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Just been messing around with the trumpeter rivet wheel on some old 1/72 stuff. It is very hard to see where you are actually starting and -so far- I have not found a great template having used a small metal eraser tool and some dymo tape. The rivet impression I eventually achieved look very good and in this scale really give the plastic a riveted metal sheet look. Maybe this tool can be best used after the painting has been done? as the indentations are very shallow (which is good) but of course this will meen NO ERRORS!

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The biggest problem with this (and other wheels) is that it’s difficult to follow a straight line (I used a sanding sponge as my ruler!) and it’s difficult to see precisely where you are starting and stopping.

Just been messing around with the trumpeter rivet wheel on some old 1/72 stuff. It is very hard to see where you are actually starting and -so far- I have not found a great template having used a small metal eraser tool and some dymo tape.

I bought the Trumpeter rivet maker & was looking for tips on how to use this when I stumbled across this old thread. I too have encountered the problem of not being able to see WHERE I am rivetting and it really is difficult to follow a straight line ( even if you drew one on the surface of the kit fuselage). This is a pity because the rivets it makes are pretty good and sharp.

So has anyone done any modifications to the rivet maker to improve the accuracy or at the very least enable the user to see where he is riveting? Any tips?

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