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JackG

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  1. There's a page by page visual review on youtube. In my opinion if new to figures it could be a great source, but if you are looking to just improve one aspect of figure painting, then you could just as easily find a specific demonstration on youtube. regards, Jack
  2. Nicely done! Model colours are a personal choice, while historically Tigers of the 501 independent heavy battalion (not an actual DAK unit) were low contrast colours as displayed by the Bovington Tiger. regards, Jack
  3. During July 1940, Germany was already entertaining the possibilities of operations in North Africa. This became a necessity to prevent a total collapse of the region. By late 1940, the Army would have tropical wear ready for issue, with Luftwaffe and Kriegsmarine would follow soon after with their own designs. My reference library also mentions that tropical clothing could also be sourced from the Italians and later, captured British booty -the two prime alternate sources. No initial purchase orders have been uncovered to pin point an exact date. In a huge compendium of tropical uniforms by Robert Kurtz, he mentions the Luftwaffe pith helmet only began to be available mid-1941, but it's distribution was phased out by early 1942 as it was considered unsuitable. In the photo I had linked earlier, the individual facing the camera with his hands behind his back, looks to be sporting Italian headgear, goggles and shorts - or maybe the person is actually Italian too? As to why not everyone was issued tropical clothing and in every suitable region, well initially these was intended only for the DAK. It was only later that other areas of similar climate (and usually just during summer months) did they become standard issue. Priorities and availability also factor in. regards, Jack
  4. Roundel diameters were fairly consistent (accept when the outer yellow ring was reintroduced mid 1940). In this case the 25 inch fuselage is certain, then just blowing up the image so the roundel fits this measurement gives a good benchmark to measure other details - of course a decent profile photo makes calculations more accurate. The posted measurements are what I arrive at, with code height being a guesstimate that takes in consideration the fuselage curvature. regards, Jack
  5. Was reading on another forum that an underlined code letter meant there was a 2nd aircraft in the squadron that contained the same individual code letter. If a third aircraft had the same letter, then the bar was placed above the letter. https://ww2aircraft.net/forum/threads/underlined-code-letters-numbers.38224/ Also confusing is 115 Squadron also used the same A4 codes? Another good front on view of the codes, albeit 115 Sqn. https://aircrewremembered.com/atkin-samuel.html regards, Jack
  6. Ground crew would of been issued the Luftwaffe version tropical clothing. Their colour was more desert appropriate than the olive tropical clothing of ground troops. https://www.gettyimages.ca/detail/news-photo/north-africa-war-theater-german-luftwaffe-feb-41-may43-a-news-photo/543820453?language=fr regards, Jack
  7. I'll go sit in the corner, that's what I get for multi tasking while in front of the comp. So it's either perspective or just sloppy mark 1 eyeball drawing the D taller than the 4? regards, Jack
  8. Hello Andy, I took one additional set of measurements for the code letter D, which would be the location for your O? Compared to the A, this one is narrower at 22 inches, and taller by about 1.5 to 2 inches. There could be some perspective at play, or if the artist was knowledgeable about letters, he may have extended the top and bottom of the letter O slightly? regards, Jack
  9. According to a past thread, Lancaster fuselage roundel diameter is 54 inches ; Armed with that measurement, I took the photo and enlarged it so the roundel matches 54 inches width wise. Results are (length by width): - letter A is 40 x 30 inches, with 6 inch brushstroke - number 4 is 17.5 x 15.5 inches with 2.5 inch brush stroke Font/typeface is irrelevant and will need to be hand drawn in vector format. Any sans serif closed top 4 will do as a starting point. regards, Jack
  10. Peddinghouse must of designed those decals while partying heavily during Oktoberfest... According to this write up, Beurling scored his 20th 'Malta' kill on October 10th. Actually he downed two 109's that day, bringing his tally to 21 while flying a Vb tropical EP706 T-L. https://www.emedals.com/flying-officer-george-frederick-beurling-dso-dfc-dfm-bar-raf-rcaf-autograph regards, Jack
  11. Take your pick, Beurling flew ten different serials while stationed on Malta. There are a couple Vb listed as not tropical according to the Spifire Production page, but in the Brian Cauchi publication he has them labelled as tropical. He also has two letter codes for the following aircraft, so maybe the linked chart was just abbreviated: EN973, T-T EP135, T-Z EP706, T-L BR173, T-D regards, Jack
  12. Every now and then when discussing paints for American built aircraft for British use, there is mention of paint chips found in the Monogram publication. Would anyone know if this is the book, or maybe it's an updated version containing those same WW2 chips? https://daviddoylebooks.com/piston-engine-aircraft/official-united-states-aircraft-colors-1908-1993 regards, Jack
  13. Have you tried emailing Hunor directly about their figures, their email is listed here: https://henk.fox3000.com/hunor.htm Martola online shop in Poland (I've had no problems ordering from them), do list their vehicles, but will probably be a delay of several weeks as they order them for you. One listing at Scalemates not mentioned is D-Day Studios, but just have the one set: Other than that, only other option is to continue converting other nationalities figures. Their khaki uniform dates back to 1922, and both German style helmets of 1915 and 1935 were utilized. regards, Jack
  14. Maybe a brand called 'Dinky Toys". but these were die cast metal. https://www.warrelics.eu/forum/collections-display/dinky-spitfire-719-a-678967/ regards, Jack
  15. Hi @eagledocf15 - unfortunately still in mothballs, but might get back to it next year. When it happens, I'll be sure to link this thread to the appropriate 'Work in Progress' section. regards, Jack
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