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  1. In an email discussion I had with him about Zero colors months ago, he mentioned that AK did not seem to follow the reference samples he provided them, so, yep, he contributed to them for Japanese colors as well.
  2. I think you'd be good with either flat aluminum or a lighter medium gray.
  3. The insides of jet intakes need to be smooth for airflow reasons, and exterior camouflage paint probably isn't quite smooth enough. Some 262s were photographed with unpainted intake shrouds in service, and the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum - which I happen to trust as they did a ground-up full disassembly and restoration of the aircraft and both its engines - has its Schwalbe's intake ducts in what appears to be dull bare aluminum. https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/messerschmitt-me-262-a-1a-schwalbe-swallow/nasm_A19600328000
  4. We should remember that this was their very first high-performance aircraft with retractable gear. The previous Model 224 fighter prototype had a fixed undercarriage. The Supermarine Walrus flying boat of the same time period had retractable wheels and a hand pump for the gear. In fact, the pump lever in the Spitfire is the one from the Walrus, bent to fit in the Spitfire's cockpit. All their prior designs had been flying boats and floatplanes.
  5. A diagram in Morgan and Shacklady (pg 60) shows the master contactor for the TR9 radio in roughly the same starboard rear window area. P9450 was equipped with the TR9D as shown by the triangular piece on the radio mast. Perhaps what we're seeing is that contactor relocated slightly due to the change in the hydraulic system?
  6. Methinks it was more than a satin sheen. Photos of the Zero that crashed at Fort Kamehameha during the attack show a distinct gloss to the camouflage paint (http://www.asisbiz.com/il2/Zero/Hirano's-Zero-AVIATION-HISTORY-Jan-2009.pdf). The same was seen on photos of a Zero recovered in China and photographed in a hangar. See page 3 of Nicholas Millman's "Combat Colours No. 9" on the A6M. The Kugisho Nr. 266 report on Zero camouflage trials that gives us the description of the standard factory color as being "J3 leaning slightly toward amber color" also says it was glossy. FWIW, I put a se
  7. I was looking in my personal copy of the book, David. However, you can look at an online facsimile and scroll down the page here: https://uploads-ssl.webflow.com/5a3134b40672a700015a5d31/5ea6cf979a5ca9e4fe65a619_Spitfire Bookbrochure.pdf
  8. R6692 was the serial of the aircraft in the videos.
  9. How about R7159 on page 35 of the Wingleader MK I book? It is factory-fresh, with no squadron markings. This one also has the IFF "cheese slicer" aerials introduced in late September of 1940. The angle the photo was taken from eliminated the glare one usually sees in photos of the area in question.
  10. Not surprised. Full scale aircraft paints are tough stuff - they have to be, given the wide range of environments and conditions the aircraft operate in - and the thinners and carriers involved are pretty gnarly!
  11. I was just perusing the photos in WingLeader's Photo Archive on the Spitfire MK I. As terrific as the pictures in that book are, very few clearly show the tank, even on the aircraft with the original two-bladed props, which were certain to have it. Most were taken from the aircraft's port side at ground level, which went far to obscure the tank. Even shots from the starboard side were mostly full of glare from the perspex, making it difficult to see the top of the tank. Sigh. My personal feeling is that this was not a common retrofit item, as it didn't enhance the aircraft's combat perfor
  12. Perhaps BS285 was also meant to be a direct replacement for BS241 in particular cases that needed IR suppression such as fighting vehicles, while things like water bowsers and GP vehicles do not and hence use the non-IRR color. Generally, if special capabilities aren't thought to be needed, they aren't provided. Even in wartime, military budgets aren't unlimited.
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