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Sabrejet

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About Sabrejet

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  1. MFH Alfa Romeo 159M

    I'd have to agree: I do no pre-cleaning, just straight in with files/wet & dry etc then Scotchbrite and prime. If I did do any pre-cleaning then I'd plump for an overnight soak in MEK and then air dry. But it's easy to get carried away with bright, shiny gizmos which cost a lot but don't really add anything. It's only when you don't use them that you realise they have minimal or no effect on the finished item.
  2. MFH Alfa Romeo 159M

    Great to see another MFH build: I have a 1/43 Alfa TZ in progress and the 1/12 Mazda 787B waiting in the wings. IMHO they are the best kits money can buy. parryj: my process for white metal is to clean up the parts in exactly the same way as you would for plastic or resin (files, sanding boards, wet & dry etc) and then always finish off with Scotchbrite to get a 'key'. Prime using rattle can Halford's black/grey/white primer and topcoat anything you want. Recently I've used Mr Color Surfacer/Primer and had no problems. I built my first white metal kit back in 1986 and never had any issues with paint lifting, chipping etc. Back then my mindset was, "OK it's metal, so how would I paint metal?" - hence the Halfords primer etc. For me, the prep of white metal was the same process as I'd use to repair my rust-bucket Humber Sceptre!
  3. MFH 1/12 Ferrari 126C4

    I too had a part missing in my 1/12 787B: emailed MFH with the part details and they sent it straight away by Airmail. Deeply impressed with this company all round. However I'd recommend having a good look because there are sooooo many bags and bits in these kits!!!
  4. Identify this Sabre?

    Well I guess you're both right: extended-span, but not 6-3, so a cross between the two.
  5. Profil 24 1/24 Maserati 450S

    I heat it over a gas ring on our cooker top: gloves are helpful. Heat is a must and the bigger the sheet the better: more heat in a larger area gives you more chance of getting the whole thing to drape.
  6. Identify this Sabre?

    It's an NAA-built (rather than FIAT) F-86K with the retrofit 12-inch wingtip extension. All F-86Ks except 56-4116 thru -4160 came out of the factory with the short-span wing but many were later retrofitted.
  7. Profil 24 1/24 Maserati 450S

    Great to see a nice model of a kit in the only real medium: there's too much plastic on this forum! I'd suggest a quick bit of plunge moulding/vac-forming for the screen. I use Milliput as a starting point (you can use existing screen or the car itself to make the mould), then when it's cured, I file it to the final 'straight' shape and then start with 240-grade wet 'n' dry and get down to the finest Micromesh for a mirror finish. Acetate sheet from any bubble pack will do and if you dip the finished, trimmed screen in Kristal Kleer you'll get the clearest, shiniest screen you could ever dream of! I've used this method for double-curvature screens, headlight covers and even engine cowlings etc. I think your screen should be pretty straightforward because it's a single-curvature piece. Go on - I would love to see this finished!
  8. 216 Sqn records at The National Archives would be my first port of call.
  9. Dan-Air Comet conundrum

    Any photos?
  10. Sorry to hijack the thread but here's a photo and the full story:
  11. Iran operated around 52 F-86Fs, independently of the Canadair Sabre 6s which went from the Luftwaffe through Iran to Pakistan. But some (by no means all) of the Pakistan AF Sabre 6s were returned to Iran temporarily but I can't recall why. I have a file on this in the garage and will hook it out this weekend. I do remember a British Embassy Air Attache's report that stated the return of some also.
  12. 1/12 Ferrari SF70-H

    I don't think the Lola used (Hercules?) for its composites as did McLaren. For some reason Dupont rings a bell. Carbon is fine for weight/strength but isn't very impact-resistant: hence use of Kevlar/aramid for leading edges etc. But Kevlar is a b1tch to work with. Carbon is also a lot more labour-intensive to manufacture than, say, a similar pressed-steel panel. Automated manufacture of carbon fibre can be done on a mass-produced scale (e.g. filament-wound fishing rods), but there's a big difference between that and uniquely-shaped vehicle panels or monocoques. So it's still the preserve of relatively low-production vehicles (I think the Alfa 4C is the highest-volume carbon-fibre chassis car) and aerospace etc. I also suspect that repair of automotive carbon fibre scares people away (it is possible, but thus far the expertise is limited for road cars); to do it properly you need controlled air purity, humidity and temperature. That's easy if you have an autoclave; less easy to achieve in a high-street garage. Another the one that really hasn't been tackled is the disposal of carbon fibre. Finally if you've ever been to the site of a carbon-fibre aircraft crash (e.g Harrier GR.5/7/9 back in the day), you'll see that they often take the topsoil away because carbon in its burnt or fibrous state is an environmental disaster: ditto working cured CF. So I guess the answer is, "...because it's a pain in the butt".
  13. 1/12 Ferrari SF70-H

    Carbon first used (IIRC) on the Lola T70 in the '60s. I think it was common in the Can-Am long before F1 discovered it.
  14. F-86 Buzz Numbers

    This is the only other one I have of '625: scanned from a mag/book + my over-written rendition of the nose art:
  15. F-86 Buzz Numbers

    Sadly I don't. However I imagine it's depicted in one of the books. Let me know if you don't find anything and I'll take a look. I dare say you have this shot of Horowitz (Salter) at left, with Jim Low (hand round Salter's shoulder) and Casey Colman at right, with "Mach Busters of the Sky" patch on his shirt. Also another of 50-625 but from the RH side:
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