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  1. IsraCast is to release a 1/48th Cessna 206 Skywagon/Stationair multimedia kit - ref. IC48069 Source: https://www.facebook.com/isradecal/posts/pfbid02KU3XahroeA49zc7vnrd2HZa4zTDGytd4dEGDqiifgaEguvZNdu9D99ZBp9aX6kZkl V.P.
  2. LiftHere! (https://lifthereserbia.wordpress.com/category/lh-models-in-72/) is to release a 1/72 Cessna 310A/U-3A Blue Canoe resin kit ref. LHM 021 Source : http://www.aviationmegastore.com/cessna-310au3a-blue-canoe-lhm021-lift-here-decals-lhm021-scale-modelling/product/?shopid=LM519a29e05a8ea6464308c55d2a&action=prodinfo&parent_id=212&art=118208 Aircraft in Miniature Ltd is also to release a 1/72nd Cessna 310 "Blue Canoe" resin kit in 2014 : http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234953068-148th-172th-cessna-310b-du-3a-blue-canoe-resin-kits-by-aircraft-in-miniature-ltd-aim-in-2014/?hl=canoe V.P.
  3. Here is a very popular aircraft for hauling freight or dropping parachutists. The 6-place powerful aircraft has been produced in large numbers. I built this model from the 3D-printed kit by VFRmodels. I like unusual aircraft, the ones you don`t see at every model show, so I tried this kit. As I have got some experience with resin kits, the encountered challenges were not new to me. The interior didn`t fit into the fuselage, but with a cut with a razor saw this problem was solved. The tail decoration is provided as decal, so the colour for the fuselage had to match that. I used Revell Aqua colours for that and Gunze White. Hope you like the little bird. cheers, Norbert
  4. In the just under a month remaining of this GB, I'm going to try and get my Airfix Bird Dog built! It's a tiny kit with not a huge amount of parts, so hopefully should be fine! Fair to say, probably never before was such a tiny, little plane so feared by the enemy, with the knowledge that it could, often within minutes, call down bombs, missiles, napalm and strafing if anything remotely suspicious was spotted. The Bird Dog had a long service life with the US military, it being the first fixed wing aircraft acquired by the US Army following their separation from the Air Force in 1947. It saw action in Korea, but the dangerous skies above the Vietnamese jungle were where it really earned its stripes in the hands of Forward Air Controllers. Cruising at tree top height, looking for signs of the North Vietnamese, the first indication of which would usually be gunfire aimed in the O-1's direction, in a plane armed with nothing more than phosphorus marker rockets, it was not a job for the faint of heart. Indeed, during the course of the war, 469 Bird Dogs were lost to all causes. Bought this kit off Ebay a couple of years ago for less than £10 including postage. 4 small sprues of parts, plus one of clear parts, which look nicely moulded especially the pilot, although there are some annoying ejector pin marks around the tail area. One page of instructions; Nice looking decals; And this is the scheme I will be doing; Picked this up from a local model show earlier this year to help me along; First bit of research required, what colour should the interior be? The instructions are somewhat vague, just giving details for the seats and cockpit floor.
  5. I have decided to go with a civil subject, the Skymaster. I found a nice local scheme I will try and replicate. The kit Interesting slip added to the instructions Parts still sealed
  6. VFR Models is to release 1/72nd Cessna 172 3D printed kits Source: https://www.facebook.com/vfrmodels/posts/pfbid0DjBdZfEzpkzXASn7Sy6VJNDwseSQ77NPH1pfhENatLSXn4ccT6FPYmq84NTeqdj5l V.P.
  7. VFR Models is to release 1/72nd Cessna 210 Centurion 3D printed kits Source: https://www.facebook.com/vfrmodels/posts/pfbid09z2quPHQkLeGhoLW4D7QCqbBeFHTsTcWAkAudQKCkUYGENp4UTrkmLL9wr2DJZbAl V.P.
  8. VFR Models is to release 1/72nd Cessna 150 & 152 3D printed kits. Design in progress. Source: https://www.facebook.com/vfrmodels/posts/368524901852317 V.P.
  9. LiftHere! (http://lifthereserbia.wordpress.com/lh-models/) has released a 1/72nd Cessna 195 /LC-126A resin kit - ref.LHM020. Source: http://lifthereserbia.wordpress.com/2014/03/25/lhm020-cessna-195-lc-126a/#more-4169 V.P.
  10. Flushed with my completion rate in GBs this year (we'll draw a veil over my complete fail in the Bristol GB), I'm feeling positive about entering one I didn't mean to line up for. Not least because it clears out one of the longest residents of the stash. I'm up for the High Wire High Wing GB with the mass produced and massively overlooked Cessna 172 Although it's been in the stash a long time, I'm sure I didn't buy it when first released in 1972! https://www.scalemates.com/kits/eidai-005-100-cessna-172-skyhawk--239238 Remarkably, even after all this time no parts have absented themselves It's in that remarkable plastic of its day which probably renders it unworkable to anything short of an arc-welder- we'll find out soon enough. Also they have that curious translucent, slightly flouerscent (I've no idea how that's spelt really) hint that I find slightly unnerving so a grey primer on everything to start things off. The instructions are suitably entertaining Though I'm not sure how much I'll be referring to them. I'll try referring to my memory and see if I can dredge up what I originally had in mind. I think it was something to do with making it as a tail-dragger, but who knows what'll happen... time will be tell.
  11. Cessna O-2A Skymaster (Late Production) (48292) 1:48 ICM via Hannants Ltd. The O-2A Skymaster replaced the equally well-loved O-1 Bird-dog in the Observation role, adding Psy-Ops and light attack by the fitting additional equipment. It was developed from Cessna’s Type 337 Super Skymaster, and had additional windows in the pilot's side added to improve vision, the superfluous rear seats were replaced with racks of equipment including military radio gear, and hard-points were added under the wings. The twin props at either end of the stubby airframe gave it an element of redundancy in case of enemy fire, which also necessitated the installation of foam into the fuel tanks to help reduce the likelihood of leaks and subsequent fires bringing down the aircraft. With all the extra weight it was slower than the civilian version, but that was considered acceptable due to the crew and airframe protections it afforded. Like the Bird-dog it replaced, it spent a lot of time in Vietnam where it was used extensively in the role of Forward Air Control (FAC) and designated O-2B (31 converted Type 337 airframes) with the installation of loudspeakers to attempt to psychologically batter the enemy with recorded messages and leaflet drops that clearly didn’t have much effect other than supplying them with toilet paper in hindsight. Less than 200 were made in military form straight from the production line, and they continued service after Vietnam until the 80s, when some were sold on and others used in firefighting duties in the US, while others were flown in the war against drugs in central America. The Kit This is a new boxing following the original new tool with extra parts for the later production aircraft with the main feature the pilots window being unbroken on the left hand side, for this a new sprue gives us the left side of the fuselage and a new top wing; also included is a new clear part for this window. It arrives in a modest-sized top-opening box with ICM’s usual captive inner flap, with two large sprues that fit snugly within the tray in their foil bag. Within that bag is a set of clear parts, and hidden inside the instruction booklet (which has a new more modern design) is the smallish decal sheet for the four decal options. Construction begins with the equipment racks in the aft fuselage, which are built up onto the bulkhead, then the fuselage halves are prepped with clear windows from the inside, plus an insert at the rear. The top surface of the engine is made up with exhausts and the front fairing that supports the prop axle, which is inserted but not glued. Under this the nose landing-gear bay is fitted with a firewall bulkhead that has the twin rudder pedals inserted before it is mounted into the starboard fuselage half. With those assemblies out of the way, the cockpit fittings are begun. The seats for the pilots have two U-shaped supports and a single piece back each, then the seats and instrument panel (with decals for instruments) with moulded-in centre console and control yokes added are offered up to the spartan cockpit floor, which slides under the already inserted electronics rack. The port fuselage half is decorated with a couple of M16 rifles and an arm-rest, then is joined with the other half taking care to insert at least 10 grams of nose-weight before you do. The aft fuselage has a complex shape that is moulded as a separate insert and is ready for a two-blade prop thanks to its axle and backstop part, and has two moulded-in exhausts under it. The nose gear leg was trapped in the wheel bay during assembly, and the two out-rigger main legs are a single C-shaped part that is trapped in a groove in the fuselage with a set of additional panels over it, making for a strong join, although some enterprising soul will probably make a metal one. Up front the big curved windscreen has a small instrument fitted into a hole in the middle, then is glued in place and the front prop is glued carefully to the axle if you want to leave it spinning. The wings are a single-span part on the top, and has the majority of the roof of the fuselage moulded-in, plus two top windows inserted from inside before fitting. The engine intake is made up from three parts including a separate lip, and fits to the aft of the roof, butting up against the rest of the fairing moulded into the fuselage, with a towel-rail and a small forest of blade antennae attached to the various depressions left for them. The wing undersides are attached after the booms are made up, and you should drill out the flashed-over holes for the pylons if you plan on fitting them. The booms are joined by the wide elevator that is made up of three parts including a poseable flying surface. The two booms are also two parts, and also have separate rudders, which are each single mouldings and can be posed as you see fit. The instructions show the elevator glued to the booms before they are attached to the wings, but this is probably best done at the same time to ensure a good fit and correct alignment, then the lower wing panels mentioned earlier are glued in, trapping the sponson ends between the surfaces. Front gear door, ailerons and wing bracing struts with their fairings are next, then the main wheels, more antennae, and two raised trunks that run along the main fuselage underside are all fitted in place, plus the four identical pylons if you wish, along with their anti-sway braces. You have a choice of using four rocket pods on all pylons, or rocket pods on the outer stations and SUU-11/A Minigun Pods on the inner pylons. The last page of the instructions show the placement of the masks that you are given a printed template for on the page, so you can make masks by placing the tape over the relevant template and either marking the tape and cut it later, or cut it in situ. It’s up to you whether you use the templates, but they’re there if you do. Markings There are three decal options from the box, all the usual white/grey scheme that most people know. From the box you can build one of the following: 68-11067 - FAC, Laos 1970 68-10999 Flown by Flt Lt David Robson RAAF, 19th TAAS USAF, Vung Tau, Vietnam 1969 68-11013 USAF - No details given The upper wing is shown as Grey on this aircraft not white. The decal printers are anonymous, but they are in good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. The instrument panel decals are also very crisp and clear. Conclusion Finally a modern tooling of this important little aircraft with crisp detail, restrained panel lines, some good decal options and quality clear parts. It should prompt a number of decal options from the aftermarket arena very soon, and I wouldn’t doubt that they’ve started working on that already. Very highly recommended. Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  12. Hi This is a little build from the ICM Cessna O2 Skymaster The build requier some attention but with the help of Mr Putty, you can build it. The only problem that I seen too late is the main gear bars too thin. It give a angle to the wheels. If you don't have the same problem, buy a metal gear legs or reinforce it Another view Cessna O2 Skymaster
  13. Hi all For this new build, I choosed a ICM kit of a little plane : the Cessna O2 Skymaster. This plane was used by the US Air Force in Viet Nam War. It was popularised by the movie "BAT 21" with Gene Hackman and Dany Glover This twin engine plane has the particularity having a push pull configuration with a engine in the front and an engine in the rear The ICM kit has only 3 sprue : two in the grey plastic for the plane and one for the clear parts. I start the build with the cockpit/engine ICM give some instructions for the paint, but I preferred to follow the walk around given in this forum at this address : The engine : The engine is well detailled but we show nothing when it is in the fuselage. The cockpit The instrument pannel is very well engraved. I paint it in black with some button in red. ICM choose a instereting approach for the instruments panels. It looks like in one part when you see on the decals sheet but all instruments is an individual decal. It is easy to set it but it spent more time that a "one decal instruments" The radio rack. The radio rack is little complex. It need to be paint seperatly before to glue some box. Unless that, your airbrush has the risk to didn't paint all the box. Now I paint the interior ICM propose to paint all the interieur in "interior green" but the walkaround show two green tone. I follow the walkaround and paint some part in interior green and some part in a dark green (I have in my stock an Tamiya JN green and use it) An finaly a little pic with a global view of thep lane
  14. Cessna O-2A US Navy Service (48291) 1:48 ICM via Hannants Ltd. The O-2A Skymaster replaced the equally well-loved O-1 Bird-dog in the Observation role, adding Psy-Ops and light attack by the fitting additional equipment. It was developed from Cessna’s Type 337 Super Skymaster, and had additional windows in the pilot's side added to improve vision, the superfluous rear seats were replaced with racks of equipment including military radio gear, and hard-points were added under the wings. The twin props at either end of the stubby airframe gave it an element of redundancy in case of enemy fire, which also necessitated the installation of foam into the fuel tanks to help reduce the likelihood of leaks and subsequent fires bringing down the aircraft. With all the extra weight it was slower than the civilian version, but that was considered acceptable due to the crew and airframe protections it afforded. Like the Bird-dog it replaced, it spent a lot of time in Vietnam where it was used extensively in the role of Forward Air Control (FAC) and designated O-2B (31 converted Type 337 airframes) with the installation of loudspeakers to attempt to psychologically batter the enemy with recorded messages and leaflet drops that clearly didn’t have much effect other than supplying them with toilet paper in hindsight. Less than 200 were made in military form straight from the production line, and they continued service after Vietnam until the 80s, when some were sold on and others used in firefighting duties in the US, while others were flown in the nascent war against drugs in central America. The Kit This is a re-boxing of the new tool from ICM. It arrives in a modest-sized top-opening box with ICM’s usual captive inner flap, with two large sprues that fit snugly within the tray in their foil bag. Within that bag is a set of clear parts, and hidden inside the instruction booklet (which has a new more modern design) is the smallish decal sheet for the one option. Construction begins with the equipment racks in the aft fuselage, which are built up onto the bulkhead, then the fuselage halves are prepped with clear windows from the inside, plus an insert at the rear. The top surface of the engine is made up with exhausts and the front fairing that supports the prop axle, which is inserted but not glued. Under this the nose landing-gear bay is fitted with a firewall bulkhead that has the twin rudder pedals inserted before it is mounted into the starboard fuselage half. With those assemblies out of the way, the cockpit fittings are begun. The seats for the pilots have two U-shaped supports and a single piece back each, then the seats and instrument panel (with decals for instruments) with moulded-in centre console and control yokes added are offered up to the spartan cockpit floor, which slides under the already inserted electronics rack. The port fuselage half is decorated with a couple of M16 rifles and an arm-rest, then is joined with the other half taking care to insert at least 10 grams of nose-weight before you do. The aft fuselage has a complex shape that is moulded as a separate insert and is ready for a two-blade prop thanks to its axle and backstop part, and has two moulded-in exhausts under it. The nose gear leg was trapped in the wheel bay during assembly, and the two out-rigger main legs are a single C-shaped part that is trapped in a groove in the fuselage with a set of additional panels over it, making for a strong join, although some enterprising soul will probably make a metal one. Up front the big curved windscreen has a small instrument fitted into a hole in the middle, then is glued in place and the front prop is glued carefully to the axle if you want to leave it spinning. The wings are a single-span part on the top, and has the majority of the roof of the fuselage moulded-in, plus two top windows inserted from inside before fitting. The engine intake is made up from three parts including a separate lip, and fits to the aft of the roof, butting up against the rest of the fairing moulded into the fuselage, with a towel-rail and a small forest of blade antennae attached to the various depressions left for them. The wing undersides are attached after the booms are made up, and you should drill out the flashed-over holes for the pylons if you plan on fitting them. The booms are joined by the wide elevator that is made up of three parts including a poseable flying surface. The two booms are also two parts, and also have separate rudders, which are each single mouldings and can be posed as you see fit. The instructions show the elevator glued to the booms before they are attached to the wings, but this is probably best done at the same time to ensure a good fit and correct alignment, then the lower wing panels mentioned earlier are glued in, trapping the sponson ends between the surfaces. Front gear door, ailerons and wing bracing struts with their fairings are next, then the main wheels, more antennae, and two raised trunks that run along the main fuselage underside are all fitted in place, plus the four identical pylons if you wish, along with their anti-sway braces. You have a choice of using four rocket pods on all pylons, or rocket pods on the outer stations and SUU-11/A Minigun Pods on the inner pylons. The last page of the instructions show the placement of the masks that you are given a printed template for on the page, so you can make masks by placing the tape over the relevant template and either marking the tape and cut it later, or cut it in situ. It’s up to you whether you use the templates, but they’re there if you do. Markings There is only one decal option for this boxing that of VF-122 from NAS Lemoore. 6 aircraft were tranferred from the USAF to be used as range control aircraft by the USN hence the fairly conspicuous paint scheme. The modeller will have to paint both the blue and yellow with only the white lines between the two being in the sheet. The decal printers are anonymous, but they are in good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. The instrument panel decals are also very crisp and clear. Conclusion It is good to see a modern tooling of this important little aircraft with crisp detail, restrained panel lines, some good decal options and quality clear parts. It is also good to see a decal option away from the USAF norm. Very highly recommended. Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  15. Dear fellow Britmodellers, here's my 1/72 KP Cessna UC-78A in USAAF Colors, representing an aircraft of 405th Fighter Group in 1944. The KP kit seems to be a re-box of the Pavla moulds, originally released in the late 1990s. Fit is generally good, but I noticed some surface irregularities, especially on the wings. These are easily corrected with sanding sticks. The clear parts are relatively thick, which resulted in unpleasant light fames around the side windows - I should have painted the fames in a dark color before attaching the clear parts! I've added brake lines from stretched sprue. The model was painted with Gunze/Mr.Hobby acrylics, all photographs by Wolfgang Rabel. Thank you for your interest in this topic. Best greetings from Vienna, Roman
  16. Civilized Models is to release 1/72nd Cessna 150 II resin kits - ref. 720010civ - Cessna 150 II Source: https://www.scalemates.com/kits/civilized-models-720010civ-cessna-150-ii-152--1216462 - ref. 720011civ - Cessna 150 II Source: https://www.scalemates.com/kits/civilized-models-720011civ-cessna-150-ii--1216468 V.P.
  17. Cessna L-19/O-1 Bird Dog "Asian Service" 1:32 Roden The Cessna Bird Dog was a military version of the Cessna 170, called the Model 305A by them. It was developed to a US Army requirement for a two seat observation and liaison aircraft. The design featured a single engine high wing monoplane with a tail wheel configuration. This was the first all metal fixed wing aircraft ordered by the US Army after aviation was split on the formation of the Air Force in 1947. As well as the US Army the aircraft would be operated by the US Marine Corps, and the US Air Force famously in the Forward Air Control role in Vietnam. US Forces would lose 469 aircraft in the conflict in total. The aircraft would also serve in many other militaries around the world including Australia, Canada, Japan, Spain, and South Vietnam to name a few. Over 3000 were built and there are still some 300 on the US civil register today. The Kit The kit arrives on 7 sprues of plastic, a clear spure, a sheets of decals, and 3 lengths of wire for the aerials (not shown). The parts rattle around in a large box, and as the clear sprue was not individually bagged one part was off the sprue and others have been marked. The parts generally are well moulded, and the surface detail is very good, especially on the control surfaces. However there is some flash evident on the clear parts. This contains the same plastic as the initial USAF boxing so a USAF / US Army aircraft can be made if the modeller sources alternative decals. Construction starts with the engine which looks to be a detailed one. The main undercarriage units are then made up. Pilots seat is made up along with its bracing struts. and the rear seat is also built up at this time. The completed engine is mounted to the engine frame and then to the firewall. To the other side of the firewall the instrument panel is added. Care will need to be taken with the engine and mounts as the tolerances with Roden kits can be tight and if not assembled correctly then they maybe be a fit issue with the cowling. The completed seat can then be attached to the cockpit floor along with other flight controls. The rear seat should probably be put in at this time though is gone AWOL in the instructions! Next up the instructions have you build the tailplanes. These have antennas on the front held on by a front cap. Even though these are wire they are probably best left unto the end of the build. The final parts of the exhausts are now built up and attached to the engine. The clear parts and doors now need to be placed into the fuselage halves along with the tail wheel. The tailplanes and landing gear are then attached to the fuselage halves. The fuselage can the be joined together placing the cockpit in and the engine. The move-able tail elevators are also added now. We then move to the main wing. The top side is one part with left and right lowers. The observation windows need to be placed into the wing at this stage. Flaps & ailerons are separate but only shown in the neural positions. The main wing is then added to the fuselage and the bracing struts are added. The engine front and cowlings can then be added. The model is finished with the main top whip antenna and a couple of blade antennas. Decals Markings are provided for 3 aircraft, they are printed in house and look to have no issues on the sheet. Japanese Self Defence Air Force, JG-1043, unknown base, 1950s South Vietnamese Air Force, April 1975, flown by MAJ Boung. Royal Thai Navy, s/n 22860 (51-16973), No 1302, 103 Sqn, RTNB U-Tapao, ca. 1982 Conclusion This looks to be a good kit in the box, however care will be needed as Roden kits do need it when putting them together. Even in 1.32 this is not a massive model and should build up to look good. Highly recomended for a Big Bird Dog. Review sample courtesy of
  18. Cessna 208 Caravan. G-LAUD floatplane operated by Loch Lomand Seaplanes, pics thanks to Richard.
  19. Kiwi Models has a 1/72nd Cessna T-37 Tweet conversion set in project. Source: http://www.kiwiresin.com/_p/prd1/4633861621/product/in-preparation V.P.
  20. Exactly one year after my last model, Cessna O-2A Oscar Deuce in 1:48 scale, I’m here again with its older cousin Cessna O-1E Bird Dog in the same scale. Coming from Hasegawa (ModelUsa), it requested a lot of improvements summarized as follow: • Eduard PE set for O-1 (just partly usable); • True Details resin set for O-1 (just partly usable); • Old Airwaves white metal and Plus Model resin figures; • AOA + AeroMaster decals; • Reheat & Eduard PE, copper, brass & styrene for various details; • Rivets & panels remade from ‘positive’ to ‘negative’. Approximately 320 hours of work, from June 2017 to April 2018. Picture of real aircraft taken in Lai Khe (Vietnam) 1966 and found on-line. WiP is here: Cheers, Alex Rome (Italy)
  21. Hi all. Anybody aware if a Cessna 182T kit exists? Thanks. Robin
  22. I think something's adrift before we even start... Here is my first, and if all goes to plan only entry to this GB. Come what may I intend to have a Cessna floatplane by the end of it and this is plan A, there's also plan B and if all else fails a scramble to get Plan C to the jetty come early January Now, the eagle eyed amongst you (everyone except me in other words) will see a fundamental flaw - it'll never fly float, but... Hang on lads, I've got a great idea I'll copy the original and convert it to a floatplane. For those you want to make an original wipaire.com (no commission in it for me) make the original floats. According to Scalemates, my boxing dates to 1970, but the moulds go back to 1957 and it shows with amazing rivets, panel lines and a hinged doors. It (re)occurs to me That Monogram's boxing only describes it as a 'scale model', but Scalemates is bold enough to say it is 1:41 and I don't know why such a useful scale didn't go on to be a commercial standard. But Scalemates are right and measuring it out it is as good as 1:41 as I can measure to all good. Oh except that scaling the 3 view drawing from Joe Christy's Complete Guide to Single-Engine Cessnas you end up with a gruesome recurring decimal which the copier can't cope with. Purists look away now, sorry that should always be fist with any of my builds. Still it's not far out, except.. Honeybun, we've all got our faults... Some lines aren't angled enough Oh and the dorsal needs some bulking out to cope with those tricky crosswinds on the lakes And yet some places are far too curvey Good Lord, just seen the camera shake on this, but concentrate on the wingtip like I did and I'll be back after I've taken my meds.
  23. Aircraft in Miniature Ltd. (http://www.aim72.co.uk/index.html) has announced 1/48th & 1/72nd Cessna 310B & D/ U-3A "Blue Canoe" resin kits in 2014. Source: http://www.aim72.co.uk/page5.html Lift Here is also to release a 1/72nd Cessna 310 Blue Canoe resin kit in 2014 http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234951239-172nd-cessna-310au-3a-blue-canoe-resin-kit-by-lift-here/?hl=canoe V.P.
  24. In project by Kiwi Models a 1/72nd Cessna C-208 Caravan kit Source: http://www.kiwiresin.com/172-plastic-models V.P.
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