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Found 82 results

  1. Horch 108 Type 40 with German Infantry 1:35 ICM The original 108 was a design that dated from 1937 for a light 4x4 vehicle for the Wehrmacht, which was updated in 1940 to include an internally mounted spare wheel. Due to reliability issues they were retired from production in 1942 to be replaced by the new Kubelwagen that was not only cheaper, but more robust and reliable too. The remaining vehicles were used until they could no-longer be repaired, but many made it to the end of WWII. The Kit This is a relatively new tooling from ICM, dating from 2015, but adding in a set of figures to improve the overall value. The box art has been redone to show a Panzer Grey example with a group of four figures, although the instruction booklet is from the earlier boxing and has a Sand Yellow vehicle stood alone. The instructions for the figures are given on the two additional sheets that have been slipped inside the main booklet, which makes a lot of sense from a layout and cost point of view. Inside the usual box-within-a-lid that ICM favour are nine sprues in sand yellow styrene, plus a clear sprue, a floppy sprue of black rubberised tyres, a small decal sheet and the aforementioned instruction booklet. The model is built up on its ladder chassis, including the engine, transmission, suspension with nicely moulded springs, plus body supports, brake hoses and exhaust system. Overall it's a very neatly detailed underside, with the engine being the focal-point. The hubs are split between inner and outer halves, which facilitates easy painting of the wheels and tyres separately, and installation of the tyres on the hubs without stuggle. The coachwork is assembled on the floor plate, which has the rear wheel arches moulded in and stops at the firewall, with spaces for the driver's pedals in the left footwell. The body sides are added, with moulded-in framework, and the dashboard is fitted between them to stabilise the assembly. The dash has a decal for the instruments, a handgrip for the co-driver, heater ducting and a lever beneath the steering column, which is added later. The front inner arches are glued to the underside of the body, and a rear load cover with moulded-in seatback is applied over the rear arches, after which the two rear doors and their handles are installed. A delicate (in this scale) framework is fitted between the rear seats and the driver's area, with the fifth wheel behind the driver, and two bench seats facing each other in the rear compartment, which also have delicate framework under their cushions. The front seats are individual, but of similar construction, and have space for the supplied KAR98 rifles between them, with two more pairs fitted in the rear compartment. The windscreen is of the flip-down type, and has two separate panes added to the frame, with no windows supplied for the sides, as it is modelled with the hood down. The doors can be fitted opened or closed, with their own separate handles inside and out. Once the chassis and body are mated, more of the underpinnings are added, and the radiator with cooling fan are attached along with the louvered bonnet and front bumper irons. At the rear the hood is constructed from four parts, sitting on top of the load cover in a folded state, as there isn't an option for a raised hood on this variant. Wing mirrors, pioneer tools, front headlights with clear lenses, and number plates are dotted around to finish off the build. Figures Two medium sized and one small sprue are devoted to the figure included in this boxing, depicting an officer discussing directions or tactics with one solider, while a machine-gunner carrying his MG34 and his ammo-man walk past, the latter laden down with two spare ammo cans, and the former draped with a length of ammo around his neck. The ammo is on the small sprue, and is so thin that it is flexible enough to form to shape, then tack with a trace of glue. All figures have gas mask containers, canteen, entrenching tool, daysack, pistol, MP40 pouches, binoculars (for the officer) and even bayonets included, which are all given detailed painting instructions on one sheet, while the main painting guide fills the other sheet with full colour printing. Markings Four decal options are supplied on the small sheet, with unit, number plate and tyre pressure stencils being about all that is to be seen. All options are from the Eastern front, with three shown in Panzer Grey, and one in the Sand Yellow scheme used later in the war. From the box you can build one of the following: 8.Pz.Div, Soviet Baltic, 1941 – grey Russia, Summer 2942 – grey Russian, Autumn, 1942 – grey KG 51, Russia, Summer 1943 – Dark Yellow '43 Conclusion A nice detailed model that benefits from the addition of the figures. A driver figure would have been nice to see, but as you're getting four well-sculpted chaps already, that feels a bit churlish. You can build it buttoned up, or with the bonnet, doors and tail-gate all hanging open, so it lends itself to inclusion in a diorama. Review sample courtesy of
  2. ICM

    Ju-88A-11 1:48 ICM (48235) The Ju-88 was designed as a schnellbomber in the mid 30s, and at the time it was faster than current fighter designs, so it was projected that it could infiltrate, bomb and exfiltrate without being intercepted. That was the theory anyway. By the time WWII began in the west, fighters had caught up with the previously untouchable speed of the 88, and it needed escorting to protect it from its Merlin equipped opponents. It turned out to be a jack of all trades however, and was as competent as a night fighter, dive bomber or doing reconnaissance as it was bombing Britain. They even popped a big gun on the nose and sent it against tanks and bombers, with variable success. The A series sported a pair of Jumo 211 engines in cylindrical cowlings producing over 1,000hp each, and was improved gradually up until the A-17, with the A-11 being the official designation for the factory produced tropicalized version. It was fitted with filters to protect the engine from dust and dirt, as well as a rescue kit for ditching and forced landings. The Kit This is a new variation on the original tooling of an A-5 that was release recently by ICM, with new parts added to make it version specific. There are new engine nacelles and props; new fin and rudder; changes to the cockpit mounted machine-guns, and different glazing options are chosen from the same clear sprue. The box is the usual top-opening with an inner lid style, and inside you will find eight sprues in grey styrene, one in clear, decal sheet and a glossy covered instruction booklet with spot colour inside, and the decal options in full colour on the back cover. If you have been lucky enough to see the A-5, you'll know that detail is right up there in terms of quality and crispness, with ICM really improving over the last few years, which has to be great news for modellers, as they aren't frightened of tackling what to us may seem niche subject matters. With the sprue-related excitement out of the way, work on the fuselage begins with the addition of sidewall details in the capacious cockpit area. Rear bulkhead, side consoles and seats are all added to the cockpit sides for a change, with an insert in the fuselage for the circular antenna and tail wheel added into the starboard side. The instrument panel is supplied with decals, and fits into the fuselage during joining. The missing floor is added to the lower fuselage panel that includes the lower parts of the inner wings and gives the structure some strength. It also receives the rudder pedals, control column, and the two remaining crew seats before being joined to the fuselage. The tail plane has articulated flying surfaces, and the wings are supplied as top and bottom, with the flaps and ailerons separate from the box, and neat curved fairings so they look good when fitted at an angle. The flaps include the rear section of the soon-to-be-fitted nacelles, which are added as separate parts to avoid sink-marks, and these and the ailerons run full-span, terminating just as the wingtip begins. This variant was fitted with the under-fuselage gondola, and each side has separate glazing panels inserted from inside, and a seam running vertically through its length. It is added to the hole in the underside of the fuselage, with the front and rear glazing plus zwilling mounted machine guns later in the build. At this time the landing gear is made up on a pair of upstands that are added to the underwing in preparation for the installation of the nacelle cowlings. The engines have to be built up first though, consisting of a high part count with plenty of detail, and a rear firewall that securely fits inside the cowling. Even though this is an in-line engine with a V-shaped piston layout, the addition of the annular radiators gives it the look of a radial, with their representation added to the front of the cowling, obscuring much of the engine detail. The side panels can be left off to show all that detail however, and I'm sure Eduard will be along with some in-scale opened panels in due course (there might be some in my inbox, thinking about it!). The cooling flaps around the cowling are separate, and the exhausts have separate stacks, which aren't hollow but are large enough to make boring them out with a drill a possibility. The completed nacelle fit to the underwing over the top of the main gear installation, securing in place with four pegs, two on each side of each nacelle. The props are made from spinner, backplate and a single piece containing all three blades, sliding onto a pin projecting from the engine front, which will require some glue if you want to keep them on. At this point the instructions recommend adding the canopy glazing, which consists of a choice of two faceted nose cones, and the main greenhouse for the cockpit aperture. The rear portion is made from two additional parts due to its double "blown" shape to accommodate the two rearward gun positions, so that the gunner's head isn't pressed against the canopy. The guns are fitted through the windscreen and the two circular ports on the rear, although no ammo feed is supplied. Under the wings the dive spoilers are added with four bomb crutches on aerodynamic mounts, with bombs supplied that have two of their fins moulded separately, along with the stabilising struts that fit into notches in the fins. While the airframe is flipped over, the two-part wheels and twin main gear bay doors are added, both having good detail and the former a radial tread. Addition of the canopy mounted antenna completes the build, but this is likely to be done long after main painting for safety's sake! Markings The kit includes two markings options from the relevant theatre, and the first page of the painting section details the application of the numerous stencils that are supplied in the kit. There are no Swastikas on the sheet, but the Balkenkreuz are included, with a portion separated into narrow sections to ease decaling the dive spoilers. From the box you can build one of the following: Junkers Ju.88A-11 3./LG 1, North Afrika, 1942 – Afrika Brown over Hellblau RLM 65 Junkers Ju.88A-11 I./LG 1, North Afrika, 1942 – Afrika Brown with Dunkelgrun RLM 71 patches over Hellblau RLM 65 The colours are picked out using letters that correspond to a table on the front page, which gives the names and paint codes in Revell and Tamiya ranges, so should be easy to convert to your paint system of choice. The decals are printed in-house and have good register, colour density and sharpness, with additional instrument dials included on a clear carrier film to help with cockpit painting. All of the stencils are legible, and overall they inspire confidence, with a thin carrier film cut close to the printing, with a few exceptions where lettering has film that could have been dispensed with to reduce the menace of silvering. Conclusion ICM's range of Ju.88s and Do.17s are a good example of how far they have come in recent years, adding value to their brand, and improving their reputation with each release. The kit is well-detailed and comprehensive in what it includes, and with a nice pair of decal options it says "build me". Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. This is my entry, I picked it up at the Middle Wallop show before Christmas. Not build an Eduard kit before, the box is has everything I will need, canopy masks, a selection of PE bits including instrument panel and seat belts. I'm going to Montex masks for the insignia as I did like how it all came out on my Mozzie, I'm going to do the Bf 109G-6, 2/JG 52, Zilistea, Romania, April 1944. The kit will be painted in the various grey colours the using the hairspray method apply a white wash. I'm looking out for an Airfix motor, as the kits @PlaStix has done with them look really good. I've also got some figures to go with it hopefully on a base I will pick up along the way. V-P hope you don't mind, I did a bit of photobucket stalking to find your banner.
  4. My dad´s next project, gonna build it together with the ICM I-16
  5. My dad´s newest project, stay tuned..
  6. ICM is to release in 2016 two new variants from its Junkers Ju-88 kit. Already released: Ju-88A-5 kit http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234975682-148-junkers-ju-88a-5-by-icm-released/ - ref.48233 - Junkers Ju-88A-4 WWII German Bomber NEW - Q2 2016 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48233 - ref.48234 - Junkers Ju-88A-14 WWII German Bomber NEW - Q3 2016 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48234 V.P.
  7. Hi all. With my Grizzly finished I decided to move to next project. This time I wanted to change something in my way of building models. Up to this point my modelling was pretty straight forward. Bulding, painting, filters, washes, oils, chippings, streakings, pigments. In the end I had a nice looking model, but it is not what I desire. I wanna do a little bit of storytelling with my work. I wanna build a vehicle (scaled) that has been somewhere. I also want to be more aware of what I'm doing and how that affects the whole project. That said, I wanna break down my weathering to smaller sections rather than do it on a whole model. That way I'll see the difference and possibly understand the WHY of using some method. Also, with every new model I want to try something new or do something old differently. The main topic of this project will be: WOOD. Painting and weathering wooden structures. To do this, I chose ICM's Opel Blitz type 2,5-32. Here's some pictures. The boxart. First of all, I'm not gonna use shelter as my Opel will be a little bit post-war. That's what's inside the box. Not too many parts and rubber tyres. There will be some additions. Let's get to work. The plastic is rather soft, so work goes nicely. There are a lot of small or thin parts though, so pay extra attention to cutting it. Chassis is quite detailed. I also started with interior. I broke down building stage to four stages and I do the separatly: engine, chassis, shelter's floor and cabin. Engine is quite hard to build as it consists of 21 parts. Interior is the first thing that's gonna see paint. First: the primer. Door with details. Pretty neat. Floor. Interior is quite simple. The seat needed to be roughened up a bit in my opinion, so I did some folded tarps. That's paper towels soaked in PVA glue and water mixture. First layer of paint: steel. After that I put some chipping fluid on which was followed by some dark grey colour. Next stage was chipping with a brush dipped in water. The same happened with the door. OK, that will be it for now. Thanks for watching. Dawid
  8. ICM is to release in 2016 new tool Focke-Wulf Fw.189 Uhu kits - ref. 72291 - Focke-Wulf Fw.189A-1 Uhu WWII German Reconnaissance Plane (100% new molds) - Q2 2016 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM72291 - ref. 72292 - Focke-Wulf Fw.189A-2 Uhu WWII German Reconnaissance Plane (100% new molds) - Q3 2016 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM72292 V.P.
  9. ICM

    US Marine Guard ICM 1:16 ICM are continuing to release kits, in their World Guards series. The fifth to be issued is that of a US Marine Sergeant if full dress uniform. The two sprues of grey styrene are very well moulded with no sign of flash or other imperfections, and while the build is relatively simple, the painting is certainly not. Being 1:16 scale it’s large enough for the detail to be seen and painted, yet small enough to have a nice collection in a display cabinet. I have to say, first of all, is that the instructions are not very clear. They consist of a colour drawing of the completed and painted model, with the parts numbered and arrowed. Seeing that the kit is fairly straightforward it probably won’t worry the seasoned figure builder, but it might put off the beginner. The two legs are glued together as the waist, then the two part torso is glued together and attached to the legs. The bottom of the tunic is made up from threes parts, rear and two front pieces. These are joined to the waist area, under the belt. The two separate epaulettes are then glued to the shoulders. The head is also in two halves, front and rear. Since most of the join is behind the ears, there shouldn’t be too much problem cleaning it up. The hat is also in two parts, the lower section, which includes the brim and the upper section. The separate arms are posed in such a way as they should just sit nicely, one are behind the Marines back, the other, with separate fingers, holding the rifle. The main section of the rifle itself is a single piece part, with separate grip area where the Marines right hand holds it, and taut sling. The kit comes with a separate scabbard, which is glued to the kits belt on the left hand side, using the joining piece included. The kit comes with a nicely moulded pedestal, the top of which has a selection of different finishes, plain, curved cobbles, straight cobbles or flag stones. Alternatively the figure can be presented on a plain flat base. Painting is going to be a case of patience and a very small brush as mainly of the really fine details are moulded to the uniform. But with care the model should come out looking rather splendid. Conclusion This is not my normal fare when it comes to modelling, what figures I have built have been in 1:6 scale and more fantasy based. This is really nicely made though and although quite small, (you will need an optivisor to paint the finer details), and it will look really nice in the display cabinet. I would have liked to have seen more of the details moulded separately, but that’s just me. Review sample courtesy of
  10. FW 189A-1 Night Fighter 1:72 ICM The Fw189 was created by legendary Focke Wulf designer Kurt Tank prior to WWII. Its intended role was as a short range observation and reconnaissance aircraft, with the requirement for excellent all-round visibility giving rise to the distinctive shape and extensive cockpit glazing. It won the contract by beating off competition from Arado and Blohm & Voss (the latter with their asymmetrical Bv. 141). It entered service in 1940, and production continued until 1944. The aircraft was popular with crews due to its manoeuvrability; it could often out turn fighters to escape destruction. It was tough as well, and there are stories of 189s returning from missions with parts of the tail and boom blown away. The Fw 189 is an all-new tooling from Kiev-based outfit ICM. This is the second version of the kit to hit the shelves of model shops, and it includes new decals and an extra sprue to allow the night fighter version of the Fw189 to be built. Inside the very sturdy top-opening box are two largish sprues of light grey plastic, one small sprue which holds the parts for the radar, exhaust shrouds and the 20mm MG 151 and one clear sprue. Together they hold a total of 170 parts. The airframe is covered in crisp, recessed panel lines which look very good indeed, and the mouldings are crisp and clean. The instructions are an A4 stapled booklet which has been printed in colour and the decal sheet is clear and well printed. The overall impression is of a well-executed kit which looks as though it should be enjoyable to build. Construction begins with the central wing section and cockpit. The lower part of the central wing is moulded as a single span, complete with recesses for the main landing gear bays. Onto this part, the flaps, cockpit floor and fuselage sidewalls can all be added. The cockpit itself is nicely detailed, which is just as well as a lot of it will be on show under that greenhouse canopy. Interior detail includes the crew seats, rudder pedals, control column (moulded in two parts), radio and radar gear and a large number of spare magazines for the defensive machine guns. The instrument panel fits to the top of the frontal canopy glazing, which is itself made up of four parts. It's inevitable with a model like this, but great care will need to be taken when assembling both this and the remaining eight parts of the canopy so as not to get messy glue smears over the clear plastic. Your patience will be tested to the limit when it comes to masking the expansive canopy, but Eduard have released a set of pre-cut masks for this kit, so you can breath easy. Once cockpit/fuselage has been assembled, the upper panels for the inner wing can be fitted. The remaining steps in the construction process are essentially a sequence of sub-assemblies, starting with the landing gear bays. These areas behind the engine nacelles but ahead of the tail booms are separate parts, which makes for more complex construction but better detail. The tail booms themselves are split vertically and benefit from separately moulded rudders, while the tailplane has a separately moulded elevator and a neat tail wheel assembly. The engine nacelles are another sub-assembly, and are made up of two main parts, split vertically, with a separate radiator face, shrouded exhausts, frontal cowling, propeller and hub. As with the rest of the flying surfaces, the outer wings feature separate control surfaces. The landing gear is next, and is just as nicely detailed as the rest of the model. Each of the main gear legs is comprised four parts, while the wheels are split vertically and have separate mud guards. Step 63 in the instructions brings the fuselage/centre wing section together with the engine nacelles, tail booms and outer wings, leaving you with a more-or-less complete Fw189. All that remains to do then is add the finishing touches, such as the landing gear doors and the radar antenna. Two options are provided on the decal sheet: • Fw 189A-1 'standard camouflage' • Fw 189A-1, Stab I/NJG 100, 1944; and The decals look excellent and include a smattering of stencils. Conclusion There haven't been all that many kits of the distinctive FW189 over the years, but ICM's new effort is the best of them by quite some way. The mouldings are high quality, there is plenty of detail and surface structures are fine and crisp. Overall this is a well executed and carefully designed kit which is rich in detail. The only real drawback is the complexity of the clear parts, but there is no way around this if the desired outcome is an accurate and well detailed model. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. Hi all here are some pics of my latest project ICM's excellent new Mig-25RBT built as an RB from the 931st OGRAP (Guards Independent Reconnaissance Aviation Regiment) based at Werneuchen East Germany in the 1970's. This model has been built as part of the 1970's NATO/WARPAC GB which is well worth checking out if you haven't had a look already as there are some cracking builds on there. The kit has been built out of the box with the exception of a pitot probe by Master (which is a must have for this kit) and some Eduard seat belts. Despite the size and complexity of the kit (it really is big!) it goes together very well and only needs a small amount of filler in a couple of places and I highly recommend it, anyway here are some pics. I used decals by Begemot which worked very well indeed and I will be using more of theirs in the future, they looked like a better size than the kit decals and they settled down nicely into position. If you want to have a read of the WIP then here is a link; Hope you like it and please feel free to comment and criticise. Thanks for looking in. Craig.
  12. ICM

    Panzerspahwagen P204(f) ICM 1:35 The Panhard 178 (officially designated as Automitrailleuse de Découverte Panhard modèle 1935, 178 being the internal project number at Panhard) or "Pan-Pan" was an advanced French reconnaissance 4x4 armoured car that was designed for the French Cavalry before World War II. It had a crew of four and was equipped with an effective 25 mm main armament and a 7.5 mm coaxial machine gun. A number of these vehicles were in 1940 taken over by the Germans after the Fall of France and employed as the Panzerspähwagen P204 (f); for some months after the armistice of June production continued for the benefit of Germany. After the war a derived version, the Panhard 178B, was again taken into production by France. The first unit which was given the new armoured car was the 6e Cuirassiers, in April 1937. By 1939 there were eleven squadrons using 218 vehicles. By the spring of 1940, the 21e Escadron (later 4e GRDI) saw action in Norway. By May-June 1940, the 370+ vehicles were allocated to reconnaissance squadrons organic to mechanized and armoured divisions. The Divisions Légères Mécaniques (DLM) in particular had 40 vehicles each, plus 4 radio and 4 reserve. In Divisions Légères de Cavalerie (DLC), complement was 12+1+4. Mechanized Infantry divisions (GRDI) also used the type with sixteen vehicles each. By May 1940, one of these units conducted skirmishes with advanced elements of the Wehrmacht in Holland, near Hertogenbosch. They also engaged German elements in Belgium, conducting a successful fighting retreat, then engaged with reconnaissance columns at the Battle of Hannut. German vehicles were similarly equipped with 20 mm (0.79 in) gun, but did little damage to the Panhard’s armour. After the fall of France, the German army captured or obtained 190 vehicles, some brand new, as Panzerspähwagen P204 (f). They saw heavy action during Operation Barbarossa, 107 being lost in 1941, as well as converted to Panzerspähwagen (Funk) P204 (f) (with a bed frame antenna), still soldiering by 1943 on the Eastern Front. By that time, many received spaced armour. 43 more were converted in 1941 as railway patrollers (Schienenpanzer). The Vichy regime used 64 vehicles for police duties (with the gun replaced by a machine-gun), later captured by the Germans in November 1942. 34 of these were converted as open-top carriers for 50 mm (1.97 in) L/42 or L/60 guns by 1944, staying in France. None of the vehicles planned in 1939 for North African service were sent. Instead, the bulk was absorbed by De Gaulle’s 10e cuirassiers, 4e DCR. However, four modified colonial vehicles with the smaller ZT-2 turret were sent to Indo-China (Vietnam). One was captured by the Japanese. After the war, Panhard 178B were sent in French Indo-China for counter-insurgency operations. Others saw service until the early 1960s at Djibouti or with the Syrians. These vehicles were generally considered fast, reliable, easy to drive and with a quiet engine, but at the same time suffered from several issues: a weak clutch, slow turret rotation, cramped interior, unreliable radio sets, poor cross-country drive and very noisy brakes. The Model Originally issued by ICM in 2015, they have now re-released it with new parts to build a railway mounted vehicle. Inside the top opening box, with a nice representation of the vehicle on tracks, there are eight sprues of beige, (Caramac), coloured styrene, and a small decal sheet. All the parts are very nicely moulded, with no sign of flash or other imperfections and very few moulding pips. Since the kit has a full interior there are quite a few parts, also the fact that there are a few versions of this kit there are also quite a few parts that will end up in the spares box. Construction begins with the fighting compartment floor being glued to the lower hull, followed by the rear driver’s bulkhead and both drivers seats. The longitudinal bulkhead between the rear driver’s compartment and engine compartment is then glued into position, followed by the eleven piece engine. The drivers steering columns and steering wheels are next, along with the gear sticks and foot pedals. The rear drivers transverse bulkhead is then fitted as is the rack of shells for the main gun, which is glued to the fighting compartment bulkhead. Each of the two sides of the hull has a door that can be posed either open of closed. On the inside of each side there is a plethora of ammunition drums, for the machine gun, to be glued into position, along with the driver’s instruments and a spare machine gun. The large two piece radio set is then fitted to the left hand side of the fighting compartment. The sides are then glued to the lower hull, followed by the front and read bulkheads and front glacis plate. The rear mounted engine deck is then attached, along with the fighting compartment roof. The engine louvers and rear mid-bulkhead hatch are then attached, and can all be posed open should the modeller wishes. The rear wheel arch mounted storage boxes are then fitted and finished off with their respective doors. Fortunately, the running gear and suspension on this kit is really simple, just the two axles with two piece differentials and drive shafts are assembled, the four suspension spring units are then fitted to the underside of the hull, followed by the axles/drive shafts. The steering linkages are then attached, along with the brake accumulators, drop links, horn and towing hooks. The rail wheel with two additional rings fitted to the outer hub area. Once assembled the four wheels are glued onto their respective axles. The rest of the hull is then detailed with grab handles, door handles, pioneer tools, headlights and a rack on the rear bulkhead. The turret is then assembled; beginning with the co-axial machine gun, which is assembled from three parts before being fitted to the left hand front of the turret. The main gun comes in two halves, which once joined together are fitted with the trunnion mounts and elevation wheel. This is fitted to the turret ring along with the turret traverse mechanism. The turret ring and turret are then joined and the commanders and gunners seats are assembled and glued into position. The commander’s hatch is fitted with a handle and vent before being fitted into position. The two rear hatches on the turret can be posed open or closed. There are two, two piece periscopes fitted forward on the turret roof, and two lifting eyes on the rear sides. The completed turret is then fitted to the turret ring on the hull, and more parts added. These include the two, two piece drivers viewing ports, which can also be posed open, the two piece exhaust silencer, wing mirrors and four miscellaneous panels. Finally the large radio aerial bedstead is fitted to the two piece turret mounted swivel support and the two, two piece rear mount fixed supports. For display the kit includes a length of track which is made up from ten sleepers and two lengths of rail. Decals There are two decal options, the decals look pretty good, they have good opacity and are in register, printed by ICM themselves. The options are:- P204(f) Panzerdraisine, Russia 1943 – 1944 in overall yellow with red and green splotches. P204(f) Panzerdraisine, Panzer Zug No.64 armoured train, Eastern Front, 1943. Conclusion This is a great little kit and would certainly make a good talking point in your collection or on your clubs display table. With the interior, all the hatches and panels can be left open and maybe fitted with a small LED light to really look the business. It’s also a good basis for a diorama with the rails on a nicely made up base and some figures. Review sample courtesy of
  13. My first entry into this excellent GB is one from the "other side" of the Iron Curtain and a very iconic Cold War beast it is, ICM's new 1/48 Mig-25 RBT. Now I have been watching a couple of excellent WIP's of this beast and it seems that OOTB it is more akin to the RB version, that suits me fine as both RB's and RBT's were used by GSFG during the 1970's. Equipped for very high speed bombing missions (it's where the "B" comes from in it's version) as well as the usual reconnaissance missions they formed a vital part of the the WARPAC military machine. An excellent overview of their operations can be found here; http://www.16va.be/3.4_la_reco_part4_eng.html . This website is excellent for info and photo's of Soviet aircraft in Germany during the Cold War. Here are the ubiquitous box + contents pictures. The box. It's contents. And the only extras I have for it (so far!), the excellent decal sheets by Begemot. I was very tempted by the Bulgarian option but I don't think they started using them until the 80's, so Soviet it shall be. I'm not sure exactly when I shall start this as I'm in the middle of an F-16 for the STGB at the minute but I can't see me holding off for long. Craig.
  14. Hi everyone! My new finish work from the ICM. Paints - gunze sangyo hobby color. Thank you for your attention !
  15. Confirmed as new tool with ref.48261. Release expected for Q3 2017 https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48261 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Not mentioned in the 2016 catalogue (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234995418-icm-catalog-2016-programme/), dixit scalemodels.ru ICM is to release in 2017 a new tool 1/48th Heinkel He.111H-3 kit - ref.48261 Source: http://scalemodels.ru/news/10678-anons-ICM-1-48-He-111H3.html A new family of 1/48th He.111 in view? Would make sense after the 1/48th Do.17/Do.215 & Ju-88 ICM kits but wait and see. Scalemodel.ru info also show a box art... Dubious as it's the Revell 1/32nd He.111H-6 one! V.P.
  16. Photo Etch detail sets for ICM Fw 189A-1 1:72 Eduard With the ink (pixels?) barely dry on our review of ICM's all-new Focke Wulf Fw 189A-1, it's both surprising and encouraging to see Eduard have been so quick off the mark with some upgrade parts for what looks to be an already very good kit. Eduard have released two sets of photo etched parts – one general set and one for the landing flaps – as well as a set of pre-cut masks. I imagine the latter will sell very well indeed, given the intimidating nature of the Uhu's glazing. Fw 189A-1 1:72 Eduard This first set comprises two frets of parts. In the usual Eduard style, one fret is pre-painted while the other is plain. Included on the pre-painted fret are harnesses for the crew seats, a new multi-layered instrument panel, console and parts for the control column. Also on the fret is a whole host of parts for the cockpit sidewalls. Turning to second fret, Eduard have provided replacement magazines for the defensive machine guns, as well as ring and bead gun sights. A fairly modest number of extra details are provided for the rest of the airframe, but the landing gear legs and bays benefit from a handful of extra parts, and the elevator control linkage is replicated in brass too. Fw 189A-1 Landing Flaps 1:72 Eduard In typical Eduard style, these flaps make extensive use of folds rather than lots of parts, which helps make construction relatively painless. You'll need to pay close attention to the instructions though, particularly when it comes to cutting away the corresponding parts of the kit's wings as Eduard's instructions are less than precise. You'll also need to provide a plentiful supply of plastic rod in order to finish these off. Fw 189A-1 Pre-Cut Masks 1:72 Eduard In keeping with their other pre-cut mask sets, this set contains masks for all of the transparent parts, as well as the main and tail landing gear wheels. For a model with a huge amount of complex glazing like this one, they are a great time (and stress) saver. Conclusion ICM's Uhu looks great in the box and I can imagine a fair number will appear in the Ready for Inspection forum over the coming year. It's handy therefore that Eduard have been so quick to market with these upgrade sets. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  17. In 2017, ICM is two release new molds: - ref. 72305 - Do.215B-4, WWII Reconnaissance Plane NEW - Q1 quarter - https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM72305 - ref. 72306 - Do.215B-5, WWII German Night Fighter NEW - Q3 quarter - https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM72306 Source: http://scalemodels.ru/news/11036-katalog-ICM-2017-god.html V.P.
  18. ICM is to release a new tool 1/72nd Polikarpov I-153 Chaika (Russian Чайка, "Seagull") kit - ref. 72074. Source: http://www.icm.com.ua/news/370-i-153-chaika-wwii-soviet-biplane-fighter.html V.P.
  19. ICM is to release in Q4 2016 a new tool 1/48th Polikarpov I-16 Type 24 kit - ref. 48097 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48097 Box art V.P.
  20. Hi! I'd like to present the ICM 1/72 Zil-157 depicted here crossing a stream. My first attempt at a detailed natural landscape with resin water. Everything other than the truck was scratch built. The tree was created from twisted wire, masking tape and clump foliage. Stones, pebbles and gravel picked up from riverbeds during treks. I used pastels on the terrain and the truck to blend the weathering of the truck into the landscape. The resin water acts as a perfect adhesive to tie the scene together. Ripples added as a second layer using fast drying clear resin dabbed on with a brush. Cheers, Alex.
  21. I've been lurking for so many years that I thought I'd better contribute something. I'm a bit of a hack but it's good to share... right?! My latest finished model is the lovely ICM Junkers Ju-88 A5. I've built it straight from the box, warts and all. If I built another I would definitely fix the rear canopy frame and do something about the blank radiator faces and air intakes. Apart from that I think it's a great kit. The hardest part was sticking the Eduard gun sights on! I'm also half way through the old Monogram He-111 but I'd like to ask if anyone has some spare transfers from the night-bomber version - is that allowed here or do I have to wait until I have 100 posts and place an advert? I'll post details only if it's OK. Excuse the dodgy photos, it's the last day of summer here in NZ and the nights are drawing in. The first photo was taken before the gun sights went on but at least it was daylight. The colours definitely look more realistic in that one, I used Tamiya Primer (can't get Vallejo to stick), Vallejo Air paints, Klear gloss, and Vallejo Satin Varnish. Oh, and Eduard Masks.
  22. Jumped straight into the kit on Thursday evening after getting it. Like the kit! At a glance there are some very fine details in it, like cockpit side walls, instrument panel, nice panel lines . . . I was not sure about the engine exhaust when the first photos of the sprues came out but when you start to assemble the plastic parts. It is complex, but also very simple and straight forward! Excellent design with some unconventional ideas fitted into it. Perfect location and positioning of parts but what is far more important they all fall in place and there are virtually no seams anywhere!!!!! If only they would have added a bit more fine detail to the exhaust petals on the outside like on the instrument panel. Still it is great, resulting in a very complex exhaust!!! To go with the kit the fantastic Master pitots have also arrived. Brass and 3D printed antennas make a perfect combination for a superb and what is far more important an authentic pitot! More on this later. Without going so far ahead, let’s see what we get from the Ukrainian ICM company. Instead of a fancy soft box we receive something else. OK, there is a fancy and very attractive box art showing one of the last operational Foxbats in Russia. It was the well documented MiG-25RBT red 46 with lots of colourful markings on its nose. It will be difficult to say No to this marking. So there is a perfectly printed box art but in reality it is only a cover with an open bottom. It goes over the very sturdy cardboard box which contains the kit part. I like this far more than the overall very soft colour boxes of other manufacturers. The cardboard box is a welcome response to todays changing times when postal delivery from different internet shops takes over the over the counter buying of kits in dedicated model shops. Times have changed and now a good protection is required from the possible hazards of postal delivery. My example has arrived to me doing a round trip around Europe with lots of stop on the way and still there was no visible damage to any of the parts. So it seems that the hard cardboard box is working as well as the tight packing of the sprues! Inside the sturdy box is a one single plastic bag jammed full with sprues. OK it would have been better if the individual sprues were in separate bags but then a far bigger box would have been required. But here all the sprues are together and the fact is that the bag is so full that there is not a chance for the plastic parts to move around and cause damage to other parts. Of course the transparent parts are in a separate plastic bag and so a perfect protection is provide to canopy parts. First look at the instruction sheet gives a good impression with clear guidance for the assembly. There are two decal sheets. One for the in-hand RBT examples with the other providing some stencilling which I would imagine will be a common decal for future releases. More soon, just as weather improves and I have a chance to take some photos of the kit parts. For the moment it is all grey and there is some form of snow coming down from above so after some 15 or so years it will be a whitish X Mas here (not real deep snow but at least the countryside is a sort of white). It is a good opportunity on this day to wish everyone a Merry X Mas no matter where in the world you are and what you believe in! (I most certainly envy those who are somewhere down under are at this moment and have an excess of sunshine and pleasant warm weather!!! ) Best regards Gabor
  23. ICM

    FW 189A-1 1:72 ICM The Fw189 was created by legendary Focke Wulf designer Kurt Tank prior to WWII. Its intended role was as a short range observation and reconnaissance aircraft, with the requirement for excellent all-round visibility giving rise to the distinctive shape and extensive cockpit glazing. It won the contract by beating off competition from Arado and Blohm & Voss (the latter with their asymmetrical Bv. 141). It entered service in 1940, and production continued until 1944. The aircraft was popular with crews due to its manoeuvrability; it could often out turn fighters to escape destruction. It was tough as well, and there are stories of 189s returning from missions with parts of the tail and boom blown away. The Fw 189 is the latest all-new tooling from Kiev-based outfit ICM. Inside the very sturdy top-opening box are two largish sprues of light grey plastic and one clear sprue which together hold a total of 170 parts. The airframe is covered in crisp, recessed panel lines which look very good indeed, and the mouldings are crisp and clean. The instructions are an A4 stapled booklet which has been printed in colour and the decal sheet is clear and well printed. The overall impression is of a well-executed kit which looks as though it should be enjoyable to build. Construction begins with the central wing section and cockpit. The lower part of the central wing is moulded as a single span, complete with recesses for the main landing gear bays. Onto this part, the flaps, cockpit floor and fuselage sidewalls can all be added. The cockpit itself is nicely detailed, which is just as well as a lot of it will be on show under that greenhouse canopy. Interior detail includes the crew seats, rudder pedals, control column (moulded in two parts), radio gear and a large number of spare magazines for the defensive machine guns. The instrument panel fits to the top of the frontal canopy glazing, which is itself made up of four parts. It's inevitable with a model like this, but great care will need to be taken when assembling both this and the remaining eight parts of the canopy so as not to get messy glue smears over the clear plastic. Your patience will be tested to the limit when it comes to masking the expansive canopy, but there is good news in the form of a set of pre-cut masks on the way from Eduard. Look out for our review soon. Once cockpit/fuselage has been assembled, the upper panels for the inner wing can be fitted. The remaining steps in the construction process are essentially a sequence of sub-assemblies, starting with the landing gear bays. These areas behind the engine nacelles but ahead of the tail booms are separate parts, which makes for more complex construction but better detail. The tail booms themselves are split vertically and benefit from separately moulded rudders, while the tailplane has a separately moulded elevator and a neat tail wheel assembly. The engine nacelles are another sub-assembly, and are made up of two main parts, split vertically, with a separate radiator face, exhaust, frontal cowling, propeller and hub. As with the rest of the flying surfaces, the outer wings feature separate control surfaces. The landing gear is next, and is just as nicely detailed as the rest of the model. Each of the main gear legs is comprised four parts, while the wheels are split vertically and have separate mud guards. Step 63 in the instructions brings the fuselage/centre wing section together with the engine nacelles, tail booms and outer wings, leaving you with a more-or-less complete Fw189. All that remains to do then is add the finishing touches, such as the landing gear doors, the odd antenna mast or pitot tube and the four bombs and bomb shackles that fit under the outer wings. Three options are provided on the decal sheet: • Fw 189A-1 5(H)/12, Poltava, June 1942; • Fw 189A-1 11(H)/12, Russia, Summer 1942; and • Fw 189A-1 1(H)32, Finland, March 1943 All three aircraft are finished in RLM 70/71 over RLM 65, with the third aircraft finished in a temporary winter distemper over the top of the camouflage. The decals look excellent and include a smattering of stencils. Conclusion There haven't been all that many kits of the distinctive FW189 over the years, but ICM's new effort looks to be the best of them by quite some way. The mouldings are high quality, there is plenty of detail and surface structures are fine and crisp. Overall this is a well executed and carefully designed kit which is rich in detail. The only real drawback is the complexity of the clear parts, but there is no way around this if the desired outcome is an accurate and well detailed model. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  24. As already announced in a ICM general thread (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234974439-icm-148-junkers-ju-88a5dornier-do-17z/), the Ukrainian brand is to release new tool 1/72nd Dornier Do.17 kits. Source - ICM 2015 catalogue : http://www.icm.com.ua/katalog/ - ref. 72303 - Do.17Z-10, WWII German Night Fighter - 100% new molds Box art (provisionnal) - ref. 72304 - Do.17Z-2, WWII German Bomber V.P.
  25. As already announced in a ICM general thread ( http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234974439-icm-148-junkers-ju-88a5dornier-do-17z/), the Ukrainian brand is to release a new tool 1/48th Junkers Ju-88A-5 kit in 2015 - ref.48232. Source - ICM 2015 catalogue : http://www.icm.com.ua/katalog/ Box art V.P.