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Found 151 results

  1. Hi! Here are the photos of my latest work. It`s the ICM kit,which despite having received a lot of "flack" builds up into a beautifull model. It has several issues, mainly with the cockpit, but, after the glass work was installed, this modeller can live very well with it. paints utilised: Vallejo Model Air e acrílicos Mig. detailing sets: Eduard interior and exterior set If you have interest, you can find in my blog around 90 fotos with all the building and painting process explained. http://josepiresmodelismo.blogspot.pt/ This model was part of Airfix Model World mag, December 2017 issue.
  2. Model T 1913 Speedster ICM 1:24 The Ford Model T car has gone down in history as the worlds first mass produced car. As early as 1909 the model T competed in the transcontinental race from New York to Spokane in Washington State. Seeing the potential for racing bodies were stripped of heavy items and bucket type seats installed. Glazing was reduced and most additional items removed. Stripped down the car was more than just a mass transportation vehicle but a fun Speedster. The Model The model arrives in the usual sturdy box with a separate top sleeve with a nice artist’s representation of the vehicle on the front. Inside, within a large poly bag, are four sprues of light grey styrene and, in a separate poly bag, two clear sprues, and four natural rubber tyres. As with the previously released Model T kits from ICM, the parts are really well moulded, with no sign of flash or other imperfections. There are a number of moulding pips, some of which are on quite fragile looking parts, so care should be taken when removing. The sprue gates attaching items like the exhaust are also quite heavy and I can see these parts breaking if you’re not careful. The build starts with the nicely detailed engine with the block and gearbox halves glued together followed by the addition of the rocker covers, fan belt, dynamo, exhaust manifold, cooling fan, cooling pipes, and other sundry items. The radiator is attached to the front axle and just needs the radiator grille glued to it to complete the assembly. The radiator/axle is then glued to the front of the floor pan/chassis. The rear axle, drive shaft and differential are built up from only three parts and fitted to the underside of the chassis along with the two piece exhaust/silencer unit. The front and rear axle support frames are then added, as is the steering rack. The four wheels, rubber tyres are added to the spoke wheels and are glued to the axles, the construction moves to the body work. The rear engine wall (not a firewall as its not solid) is made up and added, the engine covers are then added. The seat frames are added to the floor pan an then the two seats are made up and added in. The four part fuel tank is then made up and added directly behind the seats (an early safety feature NOT) this is then followed by a tool box behind the fuel tank. Up front the hand brake and foot controls are added. The steering column is then made up and the steering wheel added. On the speedster there is no windscreen on the body, but a small oval screen is fitted directly to the steering column. If carrying a passenger they have to fend for themselves! The last items to be made up are the head lights, lights and the motormeter for the radiator. Decals There are no decals included in this kit. Conclusion This is another great addition to the Model T series that ICM have been releasing. As with the other versions, it looks like it wont be a difficult kit to make, but will look great once painted. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. Turkish Infantry 1915-1918 ICM 1:35 This set brings us four figures. Two troops running, with one kneeling firing his rifle, and one officer kneeling with his pistol out. In the period leading up to WWI the Ottoman Empire decided to modernise its Army, but did so by buying equipment in, instead of arranging for domestic suppliers to do this. A German Army mission was invited to advise on this, and surprisingly they favoured German Army weapons, and German manufacturers. The standard infantry front line rifle was the M1903 Mauser bolt-action rifle, and the side arm the Mauser C96. This set from ICM brings us two sprues of caramac coloured plastic one for the figures, and one for the equipment with a selection of the the M1903 with and without a bayonet. The C96 holstered, and out of the holster with the holster separate. Other items on the sprues are Helmets, Bayonets, ammunition pouches, water bottles, grenades, a map case, and even binoculars and their case. A box with two sets of the equipment is also available here from ICM. Conclusion This is a good set which provides for any WWI Turkish diorama, or even a small stand alone vignette. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. S.W.A.T Team Fighter #2 ICM 1:24 With the current world situation armed Police officers and SWAT (Special Weapons and Tactics) Officers are seen all too frequently on the news. ICM have now brought us a 1/24 scale SWAT Figure. The figure is well sculpted and comes in a traditional format to build up. The main torso is on two parts with a join seam at the side, this should be covered in the build by added on equipment pouches. The left and right legs are one part each and are added to the torso. There is a mould seam on both sides of the leg to clean up. The arms are added and again these have mould seam to clean up, the shield then attached to one arm. The head is then fitted and a choice of three tactical helmets is offered for the top. Goggles are provided for the helmet with a separate clear part. Additional tactical equipment pouches are provided as are a selection of weapons. Different type of pistol (holstered and drawn) are provided. While these are not shown as being used for the figure it does provide many different possibilities for the modeller to use these if they wish to alter the figure in some way. Conclusion This is a new kit of a modern law enforcement figure in a large enough scale for the detail to pop out. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Kronprinz WWI German Battleship 1:700 ICM The SMS Kronprinz was the last of four König Class battleships, all of which served in the Imperial German Navy during the First World War. Laid down in 1911, the Kronprinz was launched in February 1914 and commissioned just nine months later. She was armed with ten 30.5cm (12 inch) guns and was capable of 21.2 knots. She participated in a number of engagements during the War, most notably the great battle of Jutland, which she survived without damage. In common with most other capital ships of the High Seas Fleet, she was interned at Scapa Flow following the signing of the armistice in November 1918 and scuttled on the orders of Admiral Ludwig von Reuter. Unlike most of the other ships at Scapa, she was never raised for salvage and remains submerged, although she occassionally yields her radiation-free steel for scientific purposes This is the third of ICM's König Class battleships, following König and Großer Kurfürst. This injection moulded kit is a welcome and affordable alternative to the Combrig resin kit, which up until now was the only game in town. The kit represents another addition to the small surge of WWI-era models we've seen released during the 100th anniversary of that conflict, a surprisingly high proportion of which have been warships. Inside ICM's typically robust box are five frames of grey plastic, as well as a couple of red plastic components, a black display stand, full colour instructions, decals and self-adhesive name lables. Moulding is clean and crisp, with plenty of fine detail. Construction begins with the lower hull. The instructions suggest that the outermost propeller shafts and the trio of propellers be added to the lower hull prior to joining it with the upper hull. Personally I would add the propellors at the end, as they are bound to get damaged during the build, but of course it's your choice. You can omit this stage altogether if you want to finish the model in waterline configuration. Once the hull is complete, construction moves on to the deck. The casemate for the secondary armament, along with the fourteen gun turrets, has to be fitted to the underside of the forecastle, before the forecastle can, in turn, be joined to the main deck. The decks themselves are nicely detailed, with chains and planking moulded in place. Construction of the turrets is fairly straightforward, with each of the ten 12 inch guns independently poseable. The squat superstructures are fairly straightforward too, although you'll need to remember to add the tertiary armament casemate before fixing the bridge superstructure to the forecastle. Finishing details include funnels, searchlight platforms, stairways, davits, masts and anchors. A full completment of boats is included, and very nicely detailed they are too. The display stand will be handy if you wish to finish your model in full hull configuration. Personally I'd be tempted to opt for the waterline option, as part of a diorama with one of Mark One's Zeppelins drifting through the skies above! The colour scheme shows Großer Kurfürst as she appeared in 1915, along with a very basic rigging diagram. The decals, such as they are, look nicely printed. Conclusion We've seen quite a few WWI-era battleships released to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the conflict, so this kit is already in good company. While a nice set of photo etch will be required to bring the kit up to competition standard, ICM have done a great job of providing a platform to work from. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. Sd.Kfz. 261 German Radio Communication Vehicle 1:48 ICM The Sd.Kfz. 260 was part of the Leichter Panzerspähwagen (light armoured reconnaissance vehicle) series of armoured cars. Unlike the Sd.Kfz. 221, 222 ans 223, the Sd.Kfz. 261 was unarmed but featured a radio set and roof-mounted antenna for battlefield communications. It was powered by the same Horch 3.8 litre V8 petrol engine, coupled to a four-wheel system for off-road performance. Almost 500 examples of the Sd.Kfz. 260 and the similar 261 were produced by the end of the War. 1:48 is still rather a niche scale for AFV modellers, but it has been around for a lot longer than you might think. The scale was first popularised by Bandai, who developed a fairly good range of vehicles and figures in the 1970s and 80s, before pulling out of the market some time in the 1990s. Tamiya picked up the mantle in 2006, and have steadily built up a good range of kits, focussing mainly on WWII subjects, but adding more modern subjects such as the recently announced M1A1 Abrams. Other manufacturers such as Ace, AFV Club, Airfix, Italeri and ICM have also released kits along the way. It is the latter manufacturer with which we are concerned here, as they have just released the first Sd.Kfz 261 in this scale. Inside ICM's typically robust box are five frames of grey plastic, as well as a set of rubber tyres and a small fret of photo etched brass. Full colour instructions and decals complete the package. Moulding is clean and crisp, with plenty of fine detail. Just like the Sd.Kfz. 223 released last year, this kit borrows the moulds from ICM's earlier Sd.Kfz. 222 and adds parts for the 261's radio gear, as well as the option of rubber tyres. There is no interior to speak of, so construction kicks off by joining the upper and lower sections of the hull together. A quick dry fit of the parts suggests the fit might not be world-class, but I'm sure it can be made to go together well enough with the application of pressure (and a bit of shouting) in the right places). Crew access doors are moulded seperately, but the lack of intereior means most modellers will simply glue them shut. The axles, drive shaft and transfer box are all moulded as one part, which is good for ease of assembly. As mentioned previously, there is a choice of plastic or rubber tyres provided, which is a smart move on ICM's part as it caters for all tastes. Small details such as headlights, mud guards, and stowage bins are next. As this is one of the unarmed variants of the Leichter Panzerspähwagen, there is no turret to assemble. Instead, the semi-open crew compartment is covered by a mesh roof constructed from three parts which need to be carefully folded in order to create the correct shape. You can finish the model with the two mesh hatches in the open position, although the instructions don't mention this - perhaps because no crew or interior detail is provided. If you don't have a dedicated etch folding tool, it might be a good idea to invest in one prior to begining work on this kit. The delicate but perfectly useable bedframe radio antenna provides the finishing touch, along with a few tools which have been moulded seperately to the rest of the kit. Decal options include: Sd.Kfz. 261, Ukraine, Summer 1941 (finished in overall grey); Sd.Kfz. 261, Russia, November 1941 (finished in overall grey with a temporary white camouflage); Sd.Kfz. 261, Tunisia, March 1943 (finished in overall dark yellow); and Sd.Kfz. 261, Belarus, October 1943 (finished in overall dark yellow) The decals, such as they are, look nicely printed. Conclusion Any new 1:48 AFV kit is welcome as far as I am concerned, and this is no exception. It is small, fairly simple, yet well-detailed and goes together without any major problems. Even though it is based on the older Sd.Kfz.222 kit, it shows that ICM are keeping the faith with the scale. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. Sd.Kfz. 260 German Radio Communication Vehicle 1:48 ICM The Sd.Kfz. 260 was part of the Leichter Panzerspähwagen (light armoured reconnaissance vehicle) series of armoured cars. Unlike the Sd.Kfz. 221, 222 ans 223, the Sd.Kfz. 260 Kleiner Panzerfunkwagen was unarmed but featured a radio set and roof-mounted antenna dedicated to communication with aircraft. It was powered by the same Horch 3.8 litre V8 petrol engine, coupled to a four-wheel system for off-road performance. Almost 500 examples of the Sd.Kfz. 260 and the similar 261 were produced by the end of the War. 1:48 is still rather a niche scale for AFV modellers, but it has been around for a lot longer than you might think. The scale was first popularised by Bandai, who developed a fairly good range of vehicles and figures in the 1970s and 80s, before pulling out of the market some time in the 1990s. Tamiya picked up the mantle in 2006, and have steadily built up a good range of kits, focussing mainly on WWII subjects, but adding more modern subjects such as the recently announced M1A1 Abrams. Other manufacturers such as Ace, AFV Club, Airfix, Italeri and ICM have also released kits along the way. It is the latter manufacturer with which we are concerned here, as they have just released the first Sd.Kfz 260 in this scale. Inside ICM's typically robust box are five frames of grey plastic, as well as a set of rubber tyres and a small fret of photo etched brass. Full colour instructions and decals complete the package. Moulding is clean and crisp, with plenty of fine detail. Just like the Sd.Kfz. 223 released last year, this kit borrows the moulds from ICM's earlier Sd.Kfz. 222 and adds parts for the 260's radio gear, as well as the option of rubber tyres. There is no interior to speak of, so construction kicks off by joining the upper and lower sections of the hull together. A quick dry fit of the parts suggests the fit might not be world-class, but I'm sure it can be made to go together well enough with the application of pressure (and a bit of shouting) in the right places). Crew access doors are moulded seperately, but the lack of intereior means most modellers will simply glue them shut. The axles, drive shaft and transfer box are all moulded as one part, which is good for ease of assembly. As mentioned previously, there is a choice of plastic or rubber tyres provided, which is a smart move on ICM's part as it caters for all tastes. Small details such as headlights, mud guards, and stowage bins are next. As this is one of the unarmed variants of the Leichter Panzerspähwagen, there is no turret to assemble. Instead, the semi-open crew compartment is covered by a mesh roof constructed from three parts which need to be carefully folded in order to create the correct shape. You can finish the model with the two mesh hatches in the open position, as depicted on the box artwork, although the instructions don't reflect this. If you don't have a dedicated etch folding tool, it might be a good idea to invest in one prior to begining work on this kit. The vertical radio antenna provides the finishing touch, along with a few tools which have been moulded seperately to the rest of the kit. Decal options include: Sd.Kfz. 260, Ukraine, Summer 1941 (finished in overall grey); Sd.Kfz. 260, "Grossdeautschland" Division, Don area, Summer 1942 (finished in overall grey); Sd.Kfz. 260, Russia, Winter 1942 (finished in overall grey with a worn, temporary white camouflage); and Sd.Kfz. 260, 5th Panzer Division, DAK, Libya, Summer 1942 (finished in overall dark yellow). The decals, such as they are, look nicely printed. Conclusion Any new 1:48 AFV kit is welcome as far as I am concerned, and this is no exception. It is small, fairly simple, yet well-detailed and goes together without any major problems. Even though it is based on the older Sd.Kfz.222 kit, it shows that ICM are keeping the faith with the scale. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  8. As I´ver already mentioned after some of you asked where my dad stores all his models, free shelf space is rare nowadays. Therefore my dad started to sort out some of his old models with which he isn´t satisfied anymore. I took some last pics before they go their final way. First up a WNF Bf109G-10 with the good old Revell kit DSC_0001 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0002 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0003 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0004 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0005 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0006 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0007 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0008 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0009 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0010 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0011 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0012 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0013 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0014 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0015 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr next is an ICM Bf109F-2 DSC_0001 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0002 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0003 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0004 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0005 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0006 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0007 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0008 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0009 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0010 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0011 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0012 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0013 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0014 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0015 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr and last a Tamiya Fw190D-9 DSC_0001 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0002 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0003 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0004 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0005 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0006 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0007 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0008 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0009 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0010 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0011 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0012 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0013 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0014 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0015 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr
  9. After a long time in my stash I finally managed to finalize my Zil. It is the 1/72 kit from ICM. Build can be found here: Cheers, Stephan
  10. Hi all. ZIL-131 MTO-AT from ICM, figures from Zvezda.Scale 1/35It is made for the customer. Cheers Martin .
  11. WWI Russian Maxim MG Team ICM 1:35 The set from ICM brings us a Maxim 1910 and a crew of two. 58 Maxims were purchased by the Imperial Russian Army in 1899 but then they contracted Vickers to make them in Russia. Even though the contract was signed in 1902 manufacturing only started in 1910. Due to these delays and the war with Japan in 1904 an additional 450 guns we purchased from overseas. The gun was supplied on a wheeled carriage. There is one sprue for the gun crew, two small sprues for the gun and carriage, and one sprue of Weapons & Equipment. This is one sprue from ICM 35672 WWI Russian Infantry Weapons and Equipment. Conclusion This is a good set which provides the gun and crew, it will make a nice little model/diorama in its own right, or can be used as part of a larger diorama. Its good to see ICM producing kits slightly out side the normal westen countries for WWI. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  12. ICM 2018 catalog is online - Sources: http://www.icm.com.ua/news/518-catalogue-2018.html https://www.facebook.com/ICM.Models/posts/741828729343401 Aircraft NEW V.P.
  13. Pz.Kpfw.VI Ausf.B King Tiger (late) with Full Interior (35364) 1:35 ICM The successor to the much vaunted Tiger heavy tank instilled more terror in the Allied forces due to initial encounters lending an almost invincible air to the design. It was soon found that although it packed a formidable punch, and could absorb a lot of punishment, it was in fact a flawed design from an engineering point of view. Stressing the transmission even further than the Tiger I, they suffered terrible attrition due to breakdowns, leading to many examples being captured or scuttled by their crew if these breakdowns occurred under fire. When it worked, it was very difficult to kill, and could seriously outrange almost everything on the battlefield, but as with the Tiger I before it, the Allies worked out a strategy to take them out by cooperative attacks between multiple Allied tanks. As well as the reliability issues that were never fully addressed due to the state of the war, the complexity of the design was such that they were never available in sufficient quantities to make a difference, and even when they were, Hitler's obsession with micro-managing every aspect of the war led to some poor placement of resources. Many King Tigers were captured by the Allies and taken back for analysis, with a few remaining intact long enough to find their way into museums, such as the one at Bovington. The Jagdtiger was a development of the King Tiger, using the chassis to mount an even more powerful gun in a casemate, but again very few of these saw action too late in the war. The Kit There has been a proliferation of Tigers and King Tigers of late, and this is ICM's take on this behemoth of WWII. The tooling is all new, and it includes a complete interior, although in order to show off some of it, you would need to carry out some surgery to the upper deck and turret, and this kit would lend itself perfectly to a cut-away or even a destroyed tank diorama if you have the nerve to hack apart a perfectly good kit of course! The box is of standard width and height, but has been extended by quite a margin to almost 54cm in order to fit all the plastic in. There's your first clue – there's a lot in the box. The instruction booklet is also on the weighty side, with plenty of pages to keep you going through those long winter nights. Seriously though, there are said to be almost 720 parts in the box, and that's a statement I can well believe, as there are a full complement of shells for the ammo store, individual track links that are made from parts (like the real thing), loads of wheels to spread the 69 tonne load, and axles on which the wheels hang. The box has thirteen sprues and three separate parts in a mid-grey styrene, four in black styrene for the tracks, a fret of copper-coloured Photo-Etch, a small decal sheet and of course the instruction booklet with the painting and markings guide at the rear in colour. One of the separate parts is a replacement barrel for the one on the sprues, which is split all the way along the centreline. The replacement has a complete barrel section, with only the sleeve and the flash hider split vertically with two additional parts needed to complete it. This looks to have been decided late in the design process, but it's good to see them thinking of the modeller, although some will probably want to splash out on a turned metal barrel for the strength, additional detail and lack of seams. Yes, I'm one of those ones – I can't help myself. Looking over the sprues the detail is good throughout, although there are no boundaries being pushed in terms of tooling, as the main slabs of armour don't have any texturing to represent rolled steel of the era, but if you're adding Zimmerit, or have tried adding texture to your models before, you'll probably be unfazed by this, as it is surprisingly easy, so at least with a clean canvas you can go any way you choose in that area. The interior is well-detailed, and careful thought has been given to the construction of the various areas so that it all fits together like a big, dangerous jigsaw. The only omission here seems to be stencilling for the shells, and maybe a few more decals for the first aid box etc., and of course the cabling that is way too small to be realistically included on any kit if we're honest. Construction begins with the turret basket, unusually. The basket has a circular floor that is smaller than the aperture, and this is suspended from the turret ring by a framework onto which the gunner's seat is first added, then his controls, and a less salubrious bicycle-style seat is provided for the loader on what will be the other side of the breech. This assembly is mated with the lower turret and ring early in the build, with the aft turret shell racks installed on a double-skin floor that has slots in one layer to locate the racking that the shells slot into, eleven per side. The breech is next, with breech-block, shell ejection guide, the gun mounts and other equipment plastered all over it. The basic breech is then fitted to the twin slots in the front of the turret floor, and the upper turret gets its mantlet and top strip glued in place before the two are mated, after adding the roof-mounted vision-block, which is moulded in grey styrene. The three-part gun barrel is outfitted with the studded ring found at its base, and the two-part ring that sits behind it, protecting the gun and turret front from incoming rounds. Once complete that just slots onto the breech, and can be left loose for painting, so you get paint right behind the shield. Next are the commander's cupola and the gunner's hatch, the latter being well-detailed with hand-holds and latches, and the former having a hatch hinge-point fitted before installation. Lifting lugs, mushroom vent, shell ejection hatch, periscope armour and the commander's life-swivel hatch are fitted, with the rear hatch that doubles as the exit route for the gun during maintenance built up with latches and handles, plus the armoured hinges and a representation of the early pistol port moulded in. The delicate mount for the commander's machine gun is fitted to the top of his cupola, and the hooks for the spare track links are installed over small marks on the side of the turret, with the links being added from the standard links that are used to create the tracks. Now for the hull. There isn't a traditional "tub" for the hull, and you start by building up the sponsons with internal and external parts such as dampers, bases for shell stowage, brakes, final drive housing and the torsion bars for the suspension. The hull floor is a sled to which the lowest parts are added before being partially covered by the torsion bars that extend across the hull floor. The addition of the sponsons finishes off the lower tub, and lays the ground work for the interior once the two perforated ribs are laid front to back on the floor around the torsion bars, and in the process creating support for the incoming equipment. The engine is first to be built, sandwiched inside an armoured box with its auxiliaries, tanks and hosing. It is added to the engine firewall bulkhead and installed in the rear of the hull with the driveshaft, turret take-off box and the final drive/transmission boxes. Two plates are installed under the turret position, with another laid over it that has a cut-out for the turret basket, and further forward the driver's controls and seat are glued into the left of the transmission. The radiator baths with their PE fans that are folded into shape using a pair of tweezers are made as a pair, fitting on each side of the engine, with more equipment being fitted inside the engine bay and on the crew-side of its bulkhead. No space was wasted, and the remainder of the radiator bays are filled with fuel tanks on each side before attention turns to the road wheels. Construction within the hull continues with adding stiffeners across the hull, and supports for the heavy armour along with additional equipment and a full complement of 88mm shells, plus their racks, which build up layer by layer to a total of 46 in the sponson racks. The King Tiger was designed with overlapping pairs of road wheels, learning from the mistakes of the Tiger I which had interleaved wheels to spread the vehicle's weight, which could result in taking off up to 14 wheels if an inner one needed repair or maintenance. The all-up weight increased substantially between the two vehicles, so there are a LOT of pairs of wheels on a Königstiger, with nine axles each side, plus the idler and drive sprockets, all of which are assembled from two parts each and fitted to their respective swing-arms. These are capped off with hubs, and later in the build the tracks are wrapped around them. ICM advise making up two runs for the top and bottom, leaving the counting of links up to you. There are 19 links (comprising two parts) on the top run, and 20 on the lower run, with a further 3 wrapping around the rear and 4 on the front. This is repeated for the opposite side, and you will need to arrange the tracks so that they conform to the shape of the track run, and give the correct (minimal) sag, which you can see in any period photo of a correctly adjusted set of tracks. The upper hull is supplied as a traditional main part with a hole in the rear for the engine bay, turret aperture and the lift-out front section that encompasses the hull crew hatches. The radiator vents are moulded-in, giving no opportunity to display a radiator bay without surgery to the hull, which is a minor negative IMHO. Periscopes are slotted into the front of the hull, hatches are added to the front insert, mushroom vents to the engine insert, and the Kugelblende armoured blister surrounding the bow machinegun is backed with a box to receive the gun stub in preparation for installation, with a small forest of lifting lugs littering the engine deck and lift-out hatches. Armoured covers are fitted to the periscopes and the vents on the engine deck, which leaves it ready for adding to the lower hull in advance of adding all the various smaller parts such as track and pioneer tools, mudguards, armoured exhausts, towing cables, shackles and the PE grilles covering the intakes and vents on the engine deck. The turret secures with a bayonet fitting, and an aerial is glued into a socket on the engine deck, completing the build phase. Markings There are four decal options included in the box, with enough variation in finish from white distemper through Dunkelgelb to two Ambush schemes, that will please most folks without resorting to aftermarket decals. From the box you can build one of the following: Pz.Kpfw.VI Ausf.B, s.Pz.Abt. 509 Feldherrnhalle, Hungary, March 1945 Pz.Kpfw.VI Ausf.B, s.Pz.Abt. 503, Danzig, March 1945 Pz.Kpfw.VI Ausf.B, s.Pz.Abt. 501, Ardennes, December 1944 Pz.Kpfw.VI Ausf.B, Stab/s.Pz.Abt. 501, Ardennes, December 1944 This is an AFV, so the decal sheet is modest in size, with only a few markings on the sheet. The registration is perfect on my sample, as is the colour density and sharpness, but I would have liked to have seen some decals for the shell stencilss, and perhaps some for the stencils that are found inside almost any AFV. Conclusion This model gives you the basis for a good King Tiger build, and although it lacks some of the modern frippery such as rolled steel texture to the armour and a complete interior, there is enough there to give the viewer the impression of how crowded and claustrophobic these vehicles were for their crew. If you want to leave some hatches open on your finished model, as long as you've painted the innards, it will give a convincing sense of a working vehicle. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  14. I started this kit in 2004 and put it aside after finishing the undercarriage. At that time other things got more important and so it was put on a long time hold. Now it is back on the workbench. The quality of the kit parts is still OK to me but some things had to be modified. I have separated the firewall from the seat and replaced them with more space in between. The Mirrors looked odd to me as well so I decided to rebuild them. Because I had no 2mm rod at home I drilled a 2mm hole in a scrap aluminium part where I pushed a melted sprue into it. Afterwards I drilled a hole for the wire into the new formed part an cut it off with a thin saw. Nice Sunday to everyone cheers Stephan
  15. Hi everyone The first work in new year. ICM 1/16 SWAT Team Leader. The figure is executed for the customer. Cheers Martin
  16. ZIL-131 MTO-AT Soviet Recovery Truck ICM 1:35 The ZIL-131 is a general purpose utility truck 6x6, one of the mainstays of the many Eastern Block armies along with the Ural-375. The basic model is a general utility tuck powered by both petrol and diesel engines. Like most armies the chassis for a general truck has been used for a multitude of different versions from a fuel truck to in the case of the ZIL a base for the BM-21 rocket launcher. The version the MTO-AT is a recovery / mobile workshop version. It features a rear cabin workshop and a winch based lifting arm for the front of the truck. The Kit The kit is a reboxing of ICM's 2014 new tool ZIL-131. This kit comes with a complete new rear body workshop and the lifting legs. These can either be mounted for use on the front bumper or stowed on the roof of the vehicle. The workshop body comes with a complete interior from ICM, all the lockers, work bench, compressor, drill press, light fittings, vices etc are included for a comprehensive busy look to the workshop. The only slight drawback is the lack of rigging for the winch if you want to deploy it. Construction starts with the chassis. Plase note the chassis rails for this kit are the ones on the sprues for the workshop body, not the ones on the spure with the rest of the chassis parts. Air tanks are added to both sides and they are then joined by 5 cross members. The mounts for the front and rear suspension units are moulded into the chassis rails. The main gear box is then added. The side mounted fuel tanks are then made up and added. Next at the front of the truck the engine and its drive shaft are made up, this drive shaft then mounts to the gearbox. The engine intake filter and exhaust are then added as well, finished off by the radiator. Moving along to the front of the chassis the drive shaft to the front mounted winch, and winch assembly is built up and added to the engine. The front bumper and number plate holder is added along with the winch cover. The cover plates for standing on are then added to the front bumper. Next up are the main rear wheels and associated parts. The two axles are built up and their leaf springs added, the tyres are fitted to the hubs and then onto the axles. The drive shaft assembly for the main wheels is then built up and added linking to the main gearbox. These are then added to the chassis and the rest of the main suspension parts added. The front axle is then built up, its tyres added along with its drive shaft which links to the main gear box. Once the axle is mounted to the built in leaf springs the dampers can also be added. This now completes the chassis. Construction now moves to the drivers cab. This is built from quite a number of parts and care will be needed to align them correctly. The lower sides are added to the floor along with the are in front of the dash. The dash can then be added along with the steering wheel and other driver controls. The drivers seat and passenger seats are then built up and added. The rear of the cab can then be fixed in, followed by the roof. Once the cab is then together the doors can be built up and added. The front wheel arches with their light cluster added can then be added to the chassis and the cab placed on top of them. The front grill is added then along with the bonnet. Finishing touches are three lights on top of the cab , the rear view mirrors and front light guards. Now that the cab is finished construction moves onto the rear mounted workshop. The forward bulkhead has panels and equipment added before being attached to the floor, followed by the rear bulkhead which also has equipment mounted. A floor mounted compressor is built up and installed, along with a generator which runs from a PTO from the engine/gearbox. A perforated enclosure surrounds this equipment. Windows and equipment are also added to the side panels before these are attached to the floor and the front/rear. The many parts of racking, storage draws, equipment such as drill presses, vices, lights, etc are then made up and installed in the rear. Once the interior of the rear is done the roof can be added. The on the underside the mounting rails to the chassis are added. These are followed by mud guards and rear under mounted storage lockers. A great deal of external equipment, mounts etc are then added to the rear body along with a spare wheel carrier, and full length roof rails with a walkway area. Once complete the body can be added to the chassis. The exhaust can now be added under the rear. Next the lifting boom is mad up. This can be carried stowed on the roof, or on an operational position attached to the front bumper. If it is to be in the operational position then the modeller will need to supply their own rigging cables for this. A rigging diagram is supplied in the instructions. Decals The small decal sheet provides makring for 3 Soviet/Russian and one Ukranian Army vehicle. Any colour you want as long as its Russian Army Green! Conclusion It is good to see many more of these support vehicles being produced. As well as making a a good looking stand alone kit, there are many diorama possibilities available. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  17. Heinkel He 111-H3 (48261) 1:48

    Heinkel He 111-H3 (48261) 1:48 ICM The He.111 was originated in secrecy, disguised as a civilian transport in the mid-30s, but once Nazi Germany came out of the closet and disregarded the Versailles agreement, it immediately became clear that they were rearming in a major way. The early civilian and military variants had a more traditional stepped canopy, and there is a famous piece of film that is used and reused in documentaries showing a D or "Dora" variant dropping bombs during the Spanish Civil War as part of the Condor Legion, which was Hitler's proving ground for his new designs and Blitzkreig tactics. Various revisions followed until the P, which introduced the now-iconic stepless fully glazed cockpit, which improved both aerodynamics and the pilot's situational awareness. The P series saw limited action in WWII as it was replaced by the more competent H variant, substituting Junkers Jumo 211 engines, detuned to give it the throbbing beat that was to be heard over Britain almost until the end of the war. The H-3 had an improved version of the engine and increased numbers of machine guns for self-defence. As is often the case with wartime development, the end of the Battle of Britain saw the introduction of the H-4 with better engines and external bomb racks. The H series continued until the H-23, although there were also a number of side-projects such as the Z, Zwilling with two airframes joined by a central aerofoil and sporting five engines, designed to tow the Me.321 Gigant glider. The Kit We have only had one choice if we wanted a 1:48 He.111, although it has been in various boxes over the years. It's not a bad kit, but this is a 100% new tooling by ICM, who have raised their game substantially over the recent years. The kit arrives in their lidded top-opened with a glossy card lid and painting to top it off, with seven sprues in medium, grey styrene, one in crystal clear styrene, an instruction booklet in line-drawn colour, and a long decal sheet that can be found ensconced within the booklet. On opening the bags, it is very apparent that this is a modern tooling, with lots of lovely details, crisp moulding, and some very clever engineering on display. The cockpit and partial interior will require some thought for painting, but if you get the order right, you should minimise the swearing when you have to reload the airbrush for the Nth time. Construction starts with the two wing spar parts, which are separated by the gear bay roof assemblies and a walkway part. Additional detail is added to the bulkheads along with the fuselage walkways and a smaller bulkhead toward the tail, with the lower portion of the mid-upper "turret" ring attached to the floor. The cockpit floor is then assembled with rudder pedals, instrument panels, seat and control linkages, slotting into the front spar once finished. An additional chair and the overhead instrument panel are installed later in the build. As a prelude to closing up the fuselage, the tail wheel is fitted together, which has the wheel moulded-in, and consists of three parts. Preparation of the fuselage halves involves adding the inserts into the wing roots and making good the join; inserting the paired side windows; adding ammo can racks; radio panel; the pilot's control column, and more glazing in the ventral gondola. The spar/cockpit assembly is then fitted to the starboard fuselage half and the port side is added along with some glue. The rudder is separate and fits to the fin with actuators, then the missing fuselage panels between the spars are added, which of course will need painting and fettling in if you're bothered about the "endoscope brigade". The mid-upper insert is designed to cater for different "turret" installations, and has a lovely serrated ring moulded-in, with controls and bracing strut added before it is installed into the fuselage opening, closing off much of the rear fuselage. You can pose the bomb bay open or closed by selecting one of the two panels, one of which has opening for the bomb bay, where the bombs are suspended tail-first in a framework that is peppered with lightening holes so that the included bombs are visible within. The bombs themselves are built up from two halves that have two fins moulded-in, and a single part that fits on the tail forming the other two fins in a cruciform layout. To these are added stiffening brackets, with four bombs in total to make. With the bomb bay finished, it is inserted into the fuselage from below, filling yet another gap in the skin. Even if you are leaving the bays closed, the bomb bay can be seen from the side windows, so it's best to build that assembly and install it anyway to prevent that section from being see-through from the sides. At this point the wings are begun, with the lower sides added to the fuselage/spar assembly first. The ailerons are separate, and are built up before the uppers are added, as are the elevators, and the two engines, which are provided in their entirety, along with much of the ancillary equipment and engine mounts. The completed Jumo 211s are fitted to the front of the spars and depending on whether you want to display them or not, and then enclosed by cowling panels, radiators and the intake/outlet ramps. The bottom cowlings can be split to reveal the engine detail, which is a good way of showing off the detail without ruining the lines of the aircraft. The upper wings and ailerons are fitted, the remaining cowling panels with the exhausts are added, with the latter having a decent indent at the tip to simulate being hollow, and finally the nose glazing, which has a machinegun and the aforementioned overhead instrument panel, which is moulded in clear styrene and is provided with a decal for the instruments. The nose "cone" is a separate clear part, and it too is fitted with a machine gun with a choice of single or twin drum mags and dump bag for the spent brass. Another two MGs are fitted to the front and rear glazing on the gondola, and the mid-upper gun is added to the turret ring, along with the protective clear shroud at the front. The main wheels are each built up from two halves, and placed between the twin legs that have the main retraction jacks moulded in, and secured with a number of cross-braces between the two legs. An additional ram is fitted within the bay, attached to the rear cross-brace. The gear bay doors fit to the bay sides with large tabs, as do the bomb bay doors if you are using them, and these last parts have the correctly separated four "petals" that are seen on the real thing, rather than a single panel. The props are made up from a single part with two part spinner and back plate, which fit onto the engine's output shaft through the vented front of the cowlings. Markings There are four decal options included in the box, all of which share the same RLM70/71 splinter pattern over RLM65 with the unit markings and codes to differentiate between them. From the box you can build one of the following: He.111H-3, 1./KG53 France, Spring 1940 – coded A1+BH He.111H-3, Geschwaderstab/KG53 France, August 1940 – coded A1+DA with the famous triple rectangular white stripes on upper wings and rudder plus blue spinners He.111H-3, KG26, Norway, Spring 1941 – coded 1H+LH with white spinners He.111H-3, 5./KG27, Russia, April 1943 – coded 1G+KN with yellow fuselage band and wingtips, plus red/green spinners Decals are printed by ICM, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas with a few exceptions around some of the fuselage codes. These can easily be cut off before they are applied however, so it's not an issue. The triple white bars on decal option 2 can be seen in some photos (Google image search "he 111 1a+da"), and those on the starboard wing appear to have a substantial amount of overspray around the trailing rectangle, which could be fun to replicate yourself. Conclusion The He.111 is a truly iconic shape, and we're long overdue a new tooling of the type in this scale. ICM have done a great job of it by the looks of things, and even if you're a detail hound, the list would be a lot shorter than for the ageing kit mentioned earlier. Can we have a Zwilling now please?!!! Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  18. Panhard 178 with French Armoured Vehicle Crew ICM 1:35 The Panhard 178 was at the time of its manufacture (1935) an advanced reconnaissance armoured car used by the French armed forces. The 178 being Panhard's internal project number. The vehicle features 4 wheel drive a 25mm main gun supplemented by a 7.5mm machine gun. It was the first 4 wheel drive type of vehicle mass produced for a major power. A feature of the vehicle was a driving position in the front for the drive, and a separate one at the rear for the second driver. The second driver also doubled as a radio operator in command vehicles. The main gun used was a shorten version of the 25mm Hotchkiss L/42.2 the then standard French Antitank tank gun. To allow for the shorter barrel the gun used heavier charges, this would penetrate 50mm of armour using a tungsten round, 150 rounds of 25mm ammunition were carried. Secondary armament was a coaxial Reibel 7.mm machine gun for which 3750 rounds were carried, approximately half of them being armour piercing. A further machine gun was carried which could be mounted on the turret for anti aircraft use. The magazines for this gun were carried on the walls of the fighting compartment. Approximately 370 vehicles were completed and available for use once war broke out and they were employed by infantry units as well as the Cavalry. When in combat with German vehicles armed with 20mm cannon the Panhards often came out much better than the enemy vehicles. Following the French defeat nearly 200 (many brand new) were used by German reconnaissance units. An interesting modification made by the Germans was to develop the Schienepanzer as railway protection vehicles which were fitted with special wheels to allow them to run on railway tracks. The Kit The kit is a re-release by ICM of their new tool kit from 2015 (Which we note has also been re-boxed by Revell & Tamiya). This kit also includes a set of 4 figures. The kit has a full interior, both in the fighting compartment, both driving positions and the engine bay. The detail on the parts is very well done, down to the rivets on the main hull to the checker plate main floor, and the louvres on the engine covers. There are 4 sprues of tan (or caramac) plastic and 4 rubber tyres in the kit. Construction begins with the fighting compartment floor being glued to the lower hull, followed by the rear driver’s bulkhead and both drivers seats. The longitudinal bulkhead between the rear driver’s compartment and engine compartment is then glued into position, followed by the eleven piece engine. The drivers steering columns and steering wheels are next, along with the gear sticks and foot pedals. The rear drivers transverse bulkhead is then fitted as is the rack of shells for the main gun, which is glued to the fighting compartment bulkhead. Each of the two sides of the hull has a door that can be posed either open of closed. On the inside of each side there is are numerous ammunition drums, for the machine gun, to be glued into position, along with the driver’s instruments and a spare machine gun. The sides are then glued to the lower hull, followed by the front and read bulkheads and front glacis plate. The rear mounted engine deck is then attached, along with the fighting compartment roof. The engine louvres and rear mid-bulkhead hatch are then attached, and can all be posed open should the modeller wishes. The rear wheel arch mounted storage boxes are then fitted and finished off with their respective doors. Fortunately, the running gear an suspension on this kit is really simple, just the two axles with two piece differentials and drive shafts are assembled, the four suspension spring units are then fitted to the underside of the hull, followed by the axles/drive shafts. The steering linkages are then attached, along with the brake accumulators, drop links, horn and towing hooks. The wheels are each made up from two part wheels and a rubber tyre. Once assembled the four wheels are glued onto their respective axles. The rest of the hull is then detailed with grab handles, door handles, pioneer tools, headlights and a rack on the rear bulkhead. The turret is then assembled; beginning with the co-axial machine gun, which is assembled from three parts before being fitted to the left hand front of the turret. The main gun comes in two halves, which once joined together are fitted with the trunnion mounts and elevation wheel. This is fitted to the turret ring along with the turret traverse mechanism. The turret ring and turret are then joined and the commanders and gunners seats are assembled and glued into position. The commander’s hatch is fitted with a handle and vent before being fitted into position. The two rear hatches on the turret can be posed open or closed. There are two, two piece periscopes fitted forward on the turret roof, and two lifting eyes on the rear sides. The completed turret is then fitted to the turret ring on the hull, and the last parts added. These include the two, two piece drivers viewing ports, which can also be posed open, the two piece exhaust silencer, wing mirrors and four miscellaneous panels. Figures The figures are all on a separate sprue. There are 3 crewmen, one of which is working on the engine, and the other two are loading what looks like 25mm ammunition. The forth figure appears to be an officer, and as such is lounging on the vehicle watching the others work The figures are well sculpted and come with a small variety of belt kit. Decals The small decal sheet provides markings for four vehciles; 1st Platoon, 6th CUIR, 1st DLM, France Spring 1940 2nd Platoon, 6th CUIR, 1st DLM, France Spring 1940 3rd Platoon, 6th CUIR, 1st DLM, France Spring 1940 3rd Platoon, 8th CUIR, 2nd DLM, France Spring 1940 Conclusion This is a great little kit from ICM of an important French Armoured Car. The addition of the vehicle crew makes it much more complete. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  19. French Republican Guard Cavalry Regiment Corporal ICM 1:16 ICM continue their theme of World Guards, with this model of a French Republican Guard Cavalry Regiment Corporal. The Guard are part of the French Gendarmerie and responsible for providing guards and security for the state, and guards of Honour in Paris for State occasions. The kit comes on two sprues of grey plastic and one of black, with a separate black pedestal. The parts are very well moulded with no sign of flash or other imperfections, and while the build is relatively simple, the painting is not one for the feint hearted. Being 1:16 scale it’s large enough for the detail to be seen and painted, yet small enough to have a nice collection in a display cabinet. There is in addition in the Box a print of the same picture used on the box art but with out all the text. As with the other kits in this series the instructions are not very clear. They consist of a colour drawing of the completed and painted model, with the parts numbered and arrowed. Seeing that the kit is fairly straightforward it probably won’t worry the seasoned figure builder, but it might put off the beginner. The two legs are glued together as the waist, and then the two part torso is glued together and attached to the legs. The arms are separate and the helmet is one part so there is no seam to worry about. The larger items such as cuffs are separate as is the sword and scabbard. Painting is going to be a case of patience and a very small brush as mainly of the really fine details are moulded to the uniform. But with care the model should come out looking rather splendid. The kit comes with a nicely moulded pedestal, the top of which has a selection of different finishes, plain, curved cobbles, straight cobbles or flag stones. Alternatively the figure can be presented on a plain flat base. Conclusion If you’re a figure modeller then this will be a great way to pass the time. The painting will require a great deal of finesse and patience but the having seen what can be done the results can be amazing. This is really nicely made though and although quite small, (you will need an optivisor to paint the finer details), and it will look really nice in the display cabinet. Review sample courtesy of
  20. S.W.A.T Team Fighter ICM 1:24 With the current world situation armed Police officers and SWAT (Special Weapons and Tactics) Officers are seen all too frequently on the news. ICM have now brought us a 1/24 scale SWAT Figure. The figure is well sculpted and comes in a traditional format to build up. The main torso is on two parts with a join seam at the side, this should be covered in the build by added on equipment pouches. The left and right legs are one part each and are added to the torso. There is a mould seam on both sides of the leg to clean up. The arms are added and again these have mould seam to clean up. The head is then fitted and a choice of three tactical helmets is offered for the top. Goggles are provided for the helmet with a separate clear part. Additional tactical equipment pouches are provided as are a selection of weapons. The instructions only show one type of assault rifle used by the figure, but a sub-machine gun is also on the sprure. Different type of pistol (holstered and drawn) are provided, along with a bullet proof shield. While these are not shown as being used for the figure it does provide many different possibilities for the modeller to use these if they wish to alter the figure in some way. Conclusion This is a new kit of a modern law enforcement figure in a large enough scale for the detail to pop out. Review sample courtesy of
  21. WWI Turkish Infantry Weapons & Equipment ICM 1:35 In the period leading up to WWI the Ottoman Empire decided to modernise its Army, but did so by buying equipment in, instead of arranging for domestic suppliers to do this. A German Army mission was invited to advise on this, and surprisingly they favoured German Army weapons, and German manufacturers. The standard infantry front line rifle was the M1903 Mauser bolt-action rifle, and the side arm the Mauser C96. This set from ICM brings us two sprues of caramac coloured plastic with a selection of the the M1903 with and without a bayonet. The C96 holstered, and out of the holster with the holster separate. Other items on the sprues are Helmets, Bayonets, ammunition pouches, water bottles, grenades, a map case, and even binoculars and their case. Conclusion This is a good set which provides weapons and equipment for any WWI Turkish diorama, or even a German one given that most of the equipment is German. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  22. ICM is to release in Q4 2018 a 100% new tool 1/48th Dornier Do.217N-1 - ref. 48271 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48271 V.P.
  23. The second kit in line is another ICM Mustang, built strictly OOB, but using some aftermarkets decals I had (can't remember the Company). Painted with Gunze Sangyo "acrylics", and some minor weathering done with pastel chalks...Needless to say, any comment will be welcome... 20171205_185122 by Arturo Navarro, en Flickr 20171205_185102 by Arturo Navarro, en Flickr 20171205_185041 by Arturo Navarro, en Flickr
  24. Hi all...after a long time away from modelling, I've resumed my hobby with the challenge of finishing my pile of started models, an evergrowing pile that, at some point, became overwhelming.... The first of that pile is this P51D, built OOB with some leftover decals from an old Airfix kit....Painted with Vallejo Metallic colours Hope you'll like it...and best regards from Tenerife..!!! 20171205_194717 by Arturo Navarro, en Flickr 20171205_194820 by Arturo Navarro, en Flickr 20171205_194854 by Arturo Navarro, en Flickr 20171205_194840 by Arturo Navarro, en Flickr
  25. Hi all Po-2 medical, 1/48 ICM and begemotdecals. Average type of the sanitary plane. It is made for the customer. Cheers, Martin
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