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Found 1,301 results

  1. AGM-154A/C Block I & AGM-154C1 Block II (648383 & 648384) 1:48 Eduard Brassin The AGM-154 is a medium-range cruise missile, or Joint Standoff Weapon (JSOW) that is air-launched from a distance that saves the launching aircraft from having to engage with the target position's defences. It glides to its target from up to 17 miles at low-level launch, and 68 miles at high altitude launch, with a 1,000lb payload in a compact form factor. The wings fold back for storage and carriage, and deploy once launched to improve the weapon's glide-slope to the aforementioned levels. The A variant uses GPS and inertial navigation throughout its flight, and carries a cluster of smaller submunitions that are armour piercing incendiaries that are designed to penetrate and destroy armoured targets. The C variant adds infrared for terminal guidance and carries a single two-stage warhead that improves penetration by a fraction of a second so that the 2nd charge blows through the initial damage. The C1 has avionics and cost-saving upgrades to the original C specification. As usual with Eduard's larger resin sets, they arrive in the oblong Brassin box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched wrapped around, providing extra protection. AGM-154A/C Block I (648383) There are two missiles in the box, with 24 resin parts in total, plus a small sheet of decals for the stencils. The wings are separate, so can be posed open or closed, and they are then covered by a top-section, which has one of the two suspension lugs added into the depression on the top. The horizontal stabilisers are added to each side into depressions in the missile body, and the four diagonal vanes fit into similar depressions for a good snug fit. The colours are called out in Gunze codes as usual, and decal placement is detailed on the painting diagram for your ease. AGM-154C1 Block II (648384) If you were expecting something vastly different, you're in for a surprise because they're not massively changed, just the odd panel line and fastener here or there, as the major changes are inside the fuselage of the missile. You get exactly the same number of parts, and they build up in exactly the same manner. They also use the same stencils, so the two are interchangeable. Review sample courtesy of
  2. Sea Fury Update Sets & Masks (for Airfix) 1:48 Eduard Airfix's lovely new 1:48 Sea Fury hasn't been without its issues, but setting those aside we have a delightful new tooling of this last hurrah for the piston-engined fighter. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Interior (49878) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels, gun-sight, side console and sidewall details are the primary parts on the painted set, with new floor skin; replacement head armour details; canopy internal structure, track and rear seal are also supplied. Zoom! Set (FE878) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts STEEL (FE879) In case you don't already know, these belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. Exterior (48946) This larger set of two bare brass frets contains some important upgrades, such as a complete new main gear bay that will require a degree of thinning of the lower wing to accommodate it; tail wheel bay skin; crew steps; radiator intake at the root of the wings; wing-fold skins with accompanying details; new laminated gear bay covers; brake discs and hoses; rocket ignition wiring; bomb fuse spinners and more in-scale fins for those bombs. landing flaps (48944) Eduard landing flaps use an ingenious technique to achieve excellent true-to-scale flaps using few parts, and requiring the modeller to simply remove the retracted flaps from the lower wing, plus scrape the upper wings to accommodate the thickness of the completed bays. Each half of the three flap sections (bay and flap itself) is constructed in the same manner, by twisting and folding over the attached ribs to create a 3D shape, with extra parts added along the way. The bays glue to the inside of the upper wing and the flap attaches to the rear wall of the new bay. Repeat this for the other side, and you're almost done. The bays have a "dimpled" panel in the small central section, and after pressing the details through with the tip of a ball-point pen, these are inserted in the same manner as the inner and outer sections. Masks (EX573) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition you get a set of hub/tyre masks for all the wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Review sample courtesy of
  3. DKM Graf Zeppelin Upgrades (53206 & 53207 for Trumpeter) 1:350 Eduard The Graf Zeppelin was one of those almost projects from Nazi Germany, who beforehand had dismissed aircraft carriers, and never fully committed to the concept even during construction. Coupled with the loss of some of their important maritime assets and their lack of native coastline the Zeppelin was shelved, moved and finally abandoned before war's end, which possible gives part of the impetus to those that wonder what would have been. There have been few kits over the years, until Trumpeter gave us their new tooling recently, and now we have Eduard producing their usual raft of sets this time sets 3 & 4 in round 2 to finish off improving the detail over and above what's in the box. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable ziplok package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Part 3 – Antennas & Island (53206) Another large fret that also includes gun emplacements, details for the range-finders, searchlight upgrades, and platforms for the smaller gun mounts. The antennae are of course present, as well as more in-scale solid upstands on the island; plus extra railings for the areas, and some skins for the floors; funnel details; a huge array of mast parts as well as antennae; a substantial replacement for one of the island parts with doors and windows etched out with a choice of open or closed doors that have integral frames; plus a few more railings! Part 4 – Railings & Nets (53207) This set contains two sheets of PE with a load more railings, some that replace the kit railings, but also new parts, detail under the nose of the deck; doors; cranes; stowage lockers; ladders and bracing wires for the fold-up masts at edge of the deck, and of course the nets to prevent cries of "Man overboard!". More boat detailing that includes some kit surgery to replace the superstructure; pulleys, wires and railings for the crane; launch cradles and PE canopies for the Bf.109Ts, Fi.167s and Stukas that are included in the kit; and even a Kubelwagen and four Kettenkrads that you build up from 100% PE, all of which is laid out in easy-to-follow diagrams to ensure you don't mess up. Those vehicles are the highlight of all the sets for me so I had to pinch the photos from Eduard's site to show you, although I wonder what the tracks of a Kettenkrad would do to the deck, even though they are rubberised. Review sample courtesy of
  4. Harrier T.2/T.4/T.8 Upgrades (for Kinetic) 1:48 Eduard Before Kinetic's relatively new kit of the much missed two-set Harrier trainer, we had a couple of resin conversion sets of varying quality in this scale, so I'm pretty sure the kit has sold very well since release last year (2017). Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Interior (49882) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels and side consoles are the primary parts on the painted set, with new rudder pedals; ejection seat details; sidewall details; coaming instrumentation and some canopy internal structure are also supplied. Zoom! Set (FE882) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts STEEL (FE883) In case you don't already know, these belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the two sets of crew belts, you also get a set of the pull-handles over the pilot and co-pilot's heads that gets them out of there in case of an emergency. Exterior (48945) This larger bare brass set contains some important upgrades, such as new heat-shields for the aft nozzles, with scrap diagrams showing how they should be fluted with a biro and arranged; an interior surface skin for the air-brake bay; an upgrade to the detail in the bicycle landing gear and the wingtip out-rigger wheels, along with some bay enhancements and replacement bay doors, while others are detailed rather than replaced. New in-scale vortex generators are supplied for the upper wing surface, along with a set of templates that ensure accurate placement, but keep that glue on the frugal side, or you'll have a permanent jig! Lastly, there are pylon mating surface skins for if you're not arming your Harrier. Masks (EX577) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. There are two centre panes to the windscreen, due to there being a choice of parts between variants in the kit. In addition you get a set of hub/tyre masks for the out-riggers, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Masks Tface (EX576) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with everything above, but also give you another set of canopy masks tailored to fit the interior of the glazing so that you can paint the interior and give your model that extra bit of realism. There are two centre panes to the windscreen on both sides of the pane, due to there being a choice of parts between variants in the kit. I guess Tface stands for Two Face or something similar? Review sample courtesy of
  5. Hello, after receiving my Eduard #2124 Library Edition of the MIG-21MF, I spent some time comparing it with the RV kits of the MIG-21MF, MFN and bis. As further reference I used «Mikoyan MIG-21», Midland Publishing 2008, ISBN 978 1 85780 257 3 (Reference 1) What puzzles me most are the wing upper surfaces panel lines. RV encloses two versions in their kit, one with a slim panel with rounded edges and one without it. See picture: A with this panel, B without. Eduards MIG-21MF is, according to the kits instructions, a Gorky built aircraft and these MF incorporated modifications from bis aircraft already in production there. Inofficially, MF’s built in Gorky are designated MF-75 and are distinguishable by their 8-digit serial numbers vs. 6 digit serial numbers for aircraft built in Moscow (1). The kit from Eduard has the B wing, so in accordance with (1). RV’s MIG-21 MFN uses the B wing, what makes sense, since the MFN are modified Gorky produced MF’s. Interestingly, RV’s MIG-21 bis instructs to use the A wing, where I awaited a B wing. In my neighbourhood there is a Czech MIG-21MF on display, serial 965210, which is a Moscow built aircraft and has the A wing. I supposed the B wing is for Gorky produced MF’s and bis, all bis except the Indian license production are from Gorky (1). This contradicts with RV’s MIG-21bis instructions. So far I haven’t found a picture of a bis where I can proof which wing it was equipped with. Or has the bis type also two different wings like the MF's? Can anyone help solve this puzzle? Thanks a lot Martin
  6. F-8E Crusader BIG SIN Set 1:48 Eduard Brassin BIG SIN (SIN 64840) The F-8E was the most produced version of Vought's famous carrier fighter. The F-8 would serve for over 2 decades with the US as well as the French and The Philippine Air Force. As at the time the F-4 had missiles only it would become famous for being the "Last of the Gunfighters". The Big Sin Set combines 4 other eduard sets at a more cost effective price. Ejection Seat (648388) Inside there is a Martin Baker seat as used by the F-8E. There is the resin seat, head box and seat cushion. The harness and ejection seat handles as well as other smaller parts are inclused on a colour nickel plated photo-etch sheet. A small decal sheet provides seat markings. This is a drop in fit for the kit seat and extra detail will really make the cockpit stand out. Wheels (648387) Surprisingly this set contains the wheels! Two main units and the smaller nose wheel are included. Casting is up to Eduard's usual excellent standards and they will be drop in replacement for the kit. Air Intakes (648301) This set provides two new resin intake scoops for the afterburner cooling on the rear of the Crusader. PE Mounting plates are provided for these. Exhaust Set (648302) This set provides a new resin exhaust, burner ring, and fan, with a small pe fret for the internals. BIG SIN Review samples courtesy of
  7. Using Eduard Etch sets

    I am unsure how exactly to use the film provided in eduard etch sets (like in the pic provided). I have a rough idea, but I'm not sure if I should paint the dials from behind, or what. Could someone with a little more experience please help? I have a few projects where there is film provided for dials and etc. Thanks, CS.
  8. FAB 100, 250 & 500 Soviet WWII Bombs (648376, 648377 & 648378) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Russian free fall iron bombs in three sizes, now referred to as dumb bombs in this age of laser or radar guided munitions might seem a blunt instrument to us, but during WWII that was pretty much all they had on all sides for the most part. As usual with Eduard's resin sets, they arrive in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. FAB 100 Soviet WWII Bombs (648376) You get eight of these diminutive bombs in the pack, with Photo-Etch (PE) fins, actuating spinners and a tubular support to the aforementioned stabilising fins. The bomb body is provided as a resin part, with the stand-off for the front fuse spinner, with another separate stand-off for the one at the rear. You have to roll up the tubular stiffener to fit between the fins, which will be aided by annealing the part in a flame and allowing it to cool naturally before you roll it on a suitably small rod. Decals are included, and these are shown in place in the painting guide, which uses Gunze paint codes for call-outs, as usual for Eduard. FAB 250 Soviet WWII Bombs (648377) You get two of these medium sized bombs in the pack, with Photo-Etch (PE) fins, actuating spinners and a bracing brackets to the aforementioned stabilising fins. The bomb body is provided as a resin part, with the stand-off for the rear fuse spinner, with another separate stand-off for the one at the front. Decals are included, and these are shown in place in the painting guide, which uses Gunze paint codes for call-outs, as usual for Eduard. FAB 500 Soviet WWII Bombs (648378) You get two of these larger sized bombs in the pack, with Photo-Etch (PE) fins, actuating spinners and a bracing brackets to the aforementioned stabilising fins. As with the 250s, the bomb body is provided as a resin part, with the stand-off for the rear fuse spinner, with another separate stand-off for the one at the front. Decals are included, and these are shown in place in the painting guide, which uses Gunze paint codes for call-outs, as usual for Eduard. Review sample courtesy of
  9. L-39C Albatros Update sets & masks 1:48 Eduard for Trumpeter Kit Eduard now bring us an update set, seatbelts and two sets of masks for the new Trumpeter L-39C Update Set (49884) Inside there are two frets, one coloured nd one not. The coloured parts are mainly for the cockpit including new instrument panels, sides panels, and various levers. There is a new HUD, and new rudder pedals. There are new sides for inside the cockpit as well as various grills and vents. There are parts for the ejection seats and the cockpit floor. For the rest of the airframe there are parts for the intake, exhaust, landing gears legs, landing gear doors, speed brakes and canopy sils. There are new vortex generators for the tail and a guide to help fit them. New fold out entry steps are also provided. If the modeller only want the coloured cockpit etch then this is available as a zoom set. Full Set ZOOM Seat Belts (FE885) This contains a full set of seatbelts for the kits ejection seats. It also contains ejection seat handles and the seat base cushions. All in the newer Eduard flexible steel, in full colour. Masks (EX578 & EX579) Eduard provide two sets of masks. EX578 is the outside of the canopy and wheels, EX579 includes an extra set for the inside of the canopy if you are displaying it open. EX578 EX579 Review samples courtesy of
  10. A-4E Skyhawk Update sets & masks 1:48 Eduard for Trumpeter Kit Eduard now bring us an update set, seatbelts, Airbrakes and a set of masks for the new Trumpeter A-4E Update Set (49871) Inside there are two frets, one coloured and one not. The coloured parts are mainly for the cockpit including a new instrument panel, sides panels, and various levers. A new floor is provided along sides for the ejection seat, also new HUD parts are provided. For the airframe new parts are provided for the gear doors, and gear bays as well as the jet exhaust and rear chaff launchers. New parts are provided for the inside of the canopy and the fillers on the fuel tanks. If the modeller only wants the coloured cockpit etch then this is available as a zoom set. Full Set ZOOM Seat Belts (FE872) This contains a full set of seatbelts for the kits ejection seats It also contains ejection seat handles. All in the newer Eduard flixible steel, in full colour. Airbrakes (48939) This contains a full set of replacement speed brakes and interior well parts for the kit. Masks (EX569) Eduard provide two sets of masks. These are for the canopy and the wheels. Review samples courtesy of
  11. F-8E Crusader Ejection Seat & Wheels 1:48 Eduard Brassin - For Hasegawa Kit The F-8E was the most produced version of Vought's famous carrier fighter. The F-8 would serve for over 2 decades with the US as well as the French and The Philippine Air Force. As at the time the F-4 had missiles only it would become famous for being the "Last of the Gunfighters". Ejection Seat (648388) Inside there is a Martin Baker seat as used by the F-8E. There is the resin seat, head box and seat cushion. The harness and ejection seat handles as well as other smaller parts are included on a colour nickel plated photo-etch sheet. A small decal sheet provides seat markings. This is a drop in fit for the kit seat and extra detail will really make the cockpit stand out. Wheels (648387) Surprisingly this set contains the wheels! Two main units and the smaller nose wheel are included. The prominent main wheel brake units are also supplied. Casting is up to Eduard's usual excellent standards and they will be drop in replacement for the kit. Review samples courtesy of
  12. Spitfire Mk.VIII Top Cowl (648338 for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Hot on the heels of the latest variant of the Mk.VIII the HF Mk.VIII, here's the answer to at least part of your filling fun on that ever-so-prominent top cowling. The kit parts have to be moulded as two due to their shape and the inflexible moulds used in injection moulding, whereas resin is cast in flexible resin moulds allowing for undercuts and some leeway when removing the parts from the mould. Goodbye seam and having to square it away whilst maintaining the details, and we all know that sometimes filler shrinks back and leaves a depression, even after the model has been painted, which grates immensely from personal experience. As usual with Eduard's resin sets, they arrive in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. There is only one part in this box, and it is protected on each side by resin rails that link to the casting block that terminates at the front of the cowling. The part is easy to remove from its block, and with just a little light sanding it is ready for installation. Check the fit and adjust as necessary, then CA it into place once you have dealt with the seam on the fuel tank in front of the windscreen of course. Detail is excellent, and knowing that seam won't come back is good news all round. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. Hi guys. I would like to share with you my first kit after a 20+ years hiatus from my teenager years. It's been so much fun to be back, really proud of my fragile little Fokker. I also made a 5-part video of the full build, together with comments on historical accuracy of the kit to the original plane, goods and bads of the kit, my mistakes, etc. 5 minute summary - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wvnqKocZro Part 1 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-gU60LLYdQ Part 2 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fAfY_TablbI Part 3 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aD8olXLbaOI Part 4 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVxn_4roBJ4 Part 5 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LnMTXAxr3Ag I am already working on a second kit, I would love to hear all the feedback I can. Cheers.
  14. Spitfire HF Mk. VIII ProfiPACK 1:48 Eduard The Spit needs little introduction other than that it helped to save Britain from the Luftwaffe's onslaught during the Battle of Britain, holding off the fighters while the Hurricanes went after the bombers. It was a flexible airframe and was capable of much improvement, which rendered it useful for the full course of WWII, with many changes during service both to the airframe and the Merlin powerplant, which was later replaced by the more powerful and larger Griffon engine. The Mark VIII airframes were all built by Supermarine themselves and saw a lot of use overseas, with the Mk.IX used more in defence of the British Isles and benefitting from the extra power the revised engine gave it. The high altitude HF was equipped with a set of wingtip extensions to improve climb and lift in the thinner atmosphere at height, and ran a Type 70 Merlin that was able to propel it a further 3,500 feet above the standard Mk.VIII, as well as 10mph or so higher top speed. The extended wingtips gave little in the way of assistance, while slowing down the aircraft's roll-rate, and although it was well-liked by pilots (with standard tips), it was eclipsed by the more potent IX. The Kit Eduard's Spitfire range just keeps on growing, and this new boxing uses as much existing tooling as is appropriate, and adds new parts to complete the airframe as its mark requires. Consequently there will be a fair number of parts remaining in the box after completion of your model. The kit arrives in the standard ProfiPACK box with the orange band, with four sprues in dark grey/blue styrene, one in clear, two sheets of decals, a small sheet of pre-painted and nickel-plated Photo-Etch (PE), a sheet of yellow kabuki tape masks, and the glossy colour printed instruction booklet with painting and marking guide to the rear. The sprues are bagged in resealable clear foil bags, while the circular clear sprue is bagged separately in a ziplok type bag for extra protection from chaffing. The PE and masks are in a bag each, with the PE protected by a piece of card, and the decals are in their own bag with paper covering the printing to protect them. Eduard's 1:48 Spitfires are beautiful models that have exquisite surface detail, go together well and look the part. There's not much unusual about this build, and the cockpit goes together as you'd expect, with a small depression to fill on the head of the frame behind the seat, and a choice of two parts either with the head armour moulded in or added as a separate PE part. There are optional styrene or colour PE instrument panels, and a decal on the sheet to overlay the styrene part if you really don't like laminated PE panels. There's also a decal for the compass that sits between the pilot's knees hanging from behind the instrument panel. If you're closing up the canopy you'll need to trim a few sections of the cockpit sill, which are indicated in red on scrap diagrams, and a few holes need drilling in one wing root and in the starboard nose for the later application of a small teardrop fairing peculiar to the HF's engine configuration. The wings are full span underneath as you'd expect, and there are a choice of colours for the underwing recognition lights, which is predicated by your decal choice. The tops glue on after the wheel wells have been constructed from three parts each, and the airframe is brought together by adding the wings, elevators and rudder at the rear. The cowling is a perceived weak-point of the kit due to the fact that it must be moulded as two parts due to its shape and you then have to deal with the seams, which are prominent, and with some fillers have a tendency of coming back both there and over the fuel tank in front of the windscreen. This not limited to Eduard's Spits, as I remember having it with another brand myself. Don’t forget to add the exhaust stacks with their hollow slide-moulded tips, which are closer in look to resin than styrene. At this stage the wings are clipped and have no control surfaces, which are added next, and the former have long tabs that slip inside the slot in the wings, so take care with alignment here and save yourself a lot of heartache later by minimising the seam. Underneath you need to add the chin with prominent scoop plus the radiator housings, all of which have PE mesh intakes and in the case of the latter, exits too. The doors at the rear of the housings can be posed open or closed by fitting a different actuator, the angles and positions of which are shown in scrap diagrams. The Spit's landing gear was notorious for causing many a nose-over due to its narrow track, and this is replicated well by the kit, with each wheel having four parts, the main strut having either styrene or PE scissor links on the oleo, and the bay doors nicely detailed as well a commendably thin. If you are posing your model in flight, leave the tabs at the wing end intact, otherwise they need trimming as instructed. The VIII had a retractable tail-wheel in the search for speed, and this is well depicted with a two-part yoke around the tyre, and two clamshell doors that have the correct position pointed out in another scrap diagram. Pitot probe, aerial and two metal hooks are fitted on the underside, and then it's just a case of choosing whether to leave your canopy open or closed and fitting the prop. A rear view mirror and closure mechanism is provided in PE, and if you are closing the canopy, you have a single part for the opener and the fixed rear part, while the open canopy has two sections that fit one over the other. Choose your cockpit door position, then fix the single part prop to the back plate and top it off with the spinner, locating it on the front (shocker!) with its spindle through the thoughtfully provided hole. A fuel filler cap, aerial post behind the cockpit and a pair of cannon barrels with domed over outer positions finishes things off nicely. Markings This is a ProfiPACK kit, and you have your usual five markings options spread between two sheets. The main sheet contains the machine specific decals, while the smaller sheet is full of stencils for the airframe that are common between them. These are called out on a separate page of the instructions. Decals are by Eduard, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, and a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. From the box you can build one of the following: JF364, No. 32 Squadron, Foggia, Italy, early 1944 JF476, No. 92 Squadron, Triolo, Sicily, November 1943 JF519, No. 1 Squadron SAAF , Trigno, Italy, February 1944 JF630, flown by F/O L. Cronin, No. 81 Squadron, Palel, India, March 1944 308th Fighter Squadron, 31st Fighter Group, Castel Volturno, Italy, 1944 Yes, those roundels on the right are a bit bright, but they're supposed to be like that. Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, the masks provide you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition you get a small number of masks for the wing and fuselage lights where needed. Conclusion One of the less famous Spitfire marks with a quirky set of wingtips gets a thoroughly modern, well-detailed rendition with a nice selection of decal options that should please most folks. If you're hungry for more detail, just check out the back page of the instructions, which has an advert extolling the benefits of the resin wheels, engine, cockpit, gun bays, exhausts and various PE sets that you can add. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  15. Hi everyone For my next project I’ll be building Eduards 1/48 Lysander Mk III. ...This one will be OOB as you get everything that you need in the box. The only change I’ll probably make is to redo the Sutton Harness in tape as I really don’t like the metal alternatives. Cheers Iain
  16. Hi all. This will be my first WIP post and will actually be a bit of a catch up, since I started this build back in February and have made progress up to the point of painting. So, if anything glaringly wrong is found in these next few posts, it may be too late to fix! The subject aircraft this Bf109E-4B of 5/JG51 depicted below from the Kagero BoB Volume 3 Topcolours series. The rather unique inscription on the side says "Achtung Anfänger" which translates to a rather ambiguous "Caution or Beware Beginners". It could mean "if you are beginners, watch out!" or it may be "we are beginners so stay clear!"?The other interesting feature is what appears to be an unpainted (or lightly painted) cowl covering the MG17s. Recent discussions I've had Dave (tango 98) has led me to conclude that the cowl was likely a factory replacement part and that Kagero's interpretation that the cowl was painted entirely in RLM 65 is probably correct. The kit used for this project is Eduard's 1/48 Bf109E-4 which is rather nice. The cockpit and other areas are enhanced with penty of nice PE details including the pedals, scuff pads and oil cooler grilles. Eduard have provided a duct for the latter, a nice detail, so you won't see up into the engine. I didn't get Eduard's additional PE detail set but I went and embellished the cockpit walls a bit, adding oxygen tubing on the starboard side and a scratch built throttle quadrant and levers on the port side. The trim wheel and O2 regulator have been added here. Eduard would have you glue the trim wheel chains to the sidewalls but I decided to glue them to the floor assembly. I'll leave it at that for this first post and chuck some more pics up here soon. Thanks for watching. Andy
  17. FW 190 prop with external weights

    Hello all, I am currently building two Eduard Fw190-A8s and am looking for a prop with external weights for one of my chosen options. Here’s the build: http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235035722-eduard-fw-190-a8-dual-build/ Can anyone suggest an aftermarket company that produces this in 1/48th, preferably in the UK. Thanks Howard
  18. I started this around a year ago but for some reason just lost interest in it. So i'm hoping posting it on here will gee me up and get it finished. I've not got any in progress pics of the build but didn't encounter any problems with it, just plenty of dry fitting and taking your time is the trick with these kits. This is where i'd got to up till today. With careful work the wing root gun covers fit perfectly. National markings are sprayed on using Top Notch masks, codes and unit badge are from Owl. I wasn't veey happy with the fuselage mottling so tweaked it a bit amd applied the all important exhaust staining. Painted using Mr Paint. Weathered with oils. I've got some Master gun barrels to use and also some Brassin wheels. I've also got to try and find a couple rather important parts, namely the prop and spinner!!! Tim.
  19. #10/2018 When the new Tamiya 109 was released my dad couldn´t help himself and had to build one. As you may expect from a new Tamiya kit, excellent quality and engineering. Was mostly built oob, PE seatbelts and main markings are from Eduard, Gunze and Tamiya acrylics, EZ Line for the antenna wires Model shows the aircraft of Major Ludwig Franzisket, I./JG27, Austria in early 1944. Build thread here DSC_0001 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0002 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0003 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0004 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0005 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0006 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0007 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0008 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0009 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0010 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0011 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0012 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0013 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0014 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0015 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0015 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0016 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0018 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr
  20. Hello Everyone, I have been building the FW190 over the last couple of weeks and originally wasn't going to submit it in RFI because I had a few issues but in the end, I decided I would. The Eduard kit is very nice, the panel line and rivet details are absolutely amazing and the fit of every piece is perfect. The problem I had was with the decals, I managed to smudge the port wing cross whilst it was drying and then just made it worse trying to fix it. I then decided to remove both decals and start again but just ended up messing up the paint! I ended up having to paint the upper wing surfaces again and as I didn't have any replacement decals I painted the crosses. Its one of those things that you wouldn't notice unless someone points it out but I know its there are it bothers me, the only upside was I really liked the painted crosses so will paint them on more often in future. Despite the issues, I enjoyed building her and I am quite pleased with the result but any constructive criticism is more than welcome.
  21. Hello there, i wanted to present my latest Project, the Eduard 109G-6 (Profipack Edition) which is undoubtedly one of there best kits and one of the best 109s in 1/48 out there. I chose the Markings for " 2./JG300 Red 8" flown by Kurt Gabler only to find out, that there is a little bit Discussion on this plane on the internet, specifically if Gabler actually flew this Aircraft. But after some research i´m pretty convinced, that this is Gablers Plane. According to the Eduard Instructions, the Aircraft was stripped of paint to reduce weight and drag to match the RAF Mosquitos. Consesus seems to exist, that the "8" on both sides of the Fuselage is actually black, so i put the right decals on. I found it a joy to build, all went together very well, i only had some minor Problems with the Radiators because there was not much room for Photoetch. I must admit, that i kinda screwed up the bare metal paint work. I used Tamiya gloss black as undercoat for the Vallejo metal color Chrome (more like a bright silver) but the surface after painting was pretty rough so i had to sand it down as best as i could with Grit 2000 Sandpaper. In the end i tink it turned out ok. One tip, don´t use Tamiya Clear Gloss with a paintbrush on the Vallejo metal colors, it eats into it, i found out the hard way. From there on i used the acrylic Clears from AK, worked ok. As a first for me, i used an Oil wash on the model and have to say i like it very very much, the oil brings the rivet detail of the kit really to life. The model ws sealed with AK Satin, but i thought it was still too shiny on the wings, so used Tamiya Clear flat on top of that. So, now the pictures, i hope you like it. Cheers P.S.: Dust is the enemy.
  22. Tornado F.3 ADV Upgrades (for Revell) 1:48 Eduard Revell gave us a new Tornado IDS in 1:48 to knock the ageing Italeri and the dubious Hobby Boss kits off the top, and have now tooled an ADV that British aviation enthusiasts know as the F.3, which was our interceptor for quite some time until the Typhoon took over in recent years. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Interior (49880) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels and side consoles are the primary parts on the painted set, with new rudder pedals; ejection seat details; coaming instrumentation; sills; rear-view mirrors, and canopy internal structure also supplied. Zoom! Set (FE880) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts STEEL (FE881) In case you don't already know, these belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the two sets of crew belts, you also get a set of leg-restraints and the pull-handles between the pilot's knees that gets him out of there in case of an emergency. Exterior (48943) This larger bare brass set contains some important upgrades, such as delicate new afterburner rings; wing-seal details; reversing bucket ribs and mechanism details; spoiler and spoiler bay parts; aileron bay details; air-brake interior skins for bay and brakes; fuel tank fillers; a new set of vortex generators for the tail with an attachment template and a number of grilles for vents etc. Undercarriage (49881) Consisting of two frets, one of which is nickel-plated and painted, the other in bare brass, this set comprehensively details the gear bays, which are quite cavernous and boxy. The painted fret contains equipment boxes, while the bare fret is structural in nature. The main bay is skinned with details for the most part, with strips for in between each rib; boxes that fold up to add missing detail; gear leg parts including data placards and brake hoses. The nose gear bay is similarly bedecked, and the gear leg gets the same treatment, improving realism immensely. Masks (EX574) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition you get a set of hub masks for all the wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Masks Tface (EX575) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with everything above, but also give you another set of canopy masks tailored to fit the interior of the glazing so that you can paint the interior and give your model that extra bit of realism. I'm quite excited to try these out, as canopy interior detail makes a big difference to a model IMHO. I guess Tface stands for Two Face or something similar? Review sample courtesy of
  23. L-29 Ejection Seats (648375) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Designed in Czechoslovakia in the 1960s, the Delfín was a two-seat military jet trainer used by the Warsaw Pact countries that is still in operation with some countries and in private hands today. It is simple in construction and cheap to operate, with a good safety record due to its pleasant handling characteristics, which endears it to the cost conscious and anyone wishing to stay alive. Inside are two seats which can be used with the AMK kit or the Eduard re-box. As well as the main seat parts there are separate seat pads, headrests, footrests, and photo etched parts for the harnesses & belts. These are pretty much a drop in replacement for the kit parts which really should make the cockpit pop out. Review sample courtesy of
  24. Bf.109G-14 ProfiPACK (82118) 1:48 Eduard The G variant of the 109, colloquially known as the Gustav was one of the primary fighters available to the Luftwaffe during the closing years of WWII, and saw extensive active service, all the while being upgraded to combat the increasing Allied superiority in the air. Happily for the Allies, the supply of experienced pilots was fast running out, so as good as the upgrades were, they couldn't make an appreciable difference to the outcome. The G-14 was brought into service at a crucial time for the Axis forces, as the Allies pushed inland from the beachhead at Normandy, and it had an improved water injection system that gave the engine extra performance, plus the new clear-vision Erla-Haube canopy as standard. It was also an attempt to standardise the design to ease the job of construction, which had become decentralised due to the ferocity of the bombardment of the industrial areas by the Allied bombers at that stage of the war. As a result, few sub-variants were made of the G-14 even though over 5,000 were built, with command fighters and high-altitude variants the main exceptions, but the U4 had a high powered 30mm MK108 cannon fitted through the engine and firing through the centre of the prop. The Kit The 109G has been fairly comprehensively retooled by Eduard from their original, and while this is a new variant some of the sprues date back to the re-tool after issues with the original kit were found. The five-digit product code is a clue to this do-over. The ProfiPACK offers additional decal options as well as other upgrades to the basic kit, and alongside the four sprues of grey styrene you will find one of clear, a sheet of nickel-plated and pre-painted Photo-Etch (PE), a sheet of pre-cut yellow kabuki tape masks, two decal sheets and the usual Eduard colour instruction booklet printed on glossy paper. There are a lot of these new Gs out there amongst everyone's stashes by now, so most of us are familiar with the fine surface detail and dainty riveting on the outer skin, and the level of detail that has been crammed into this excellent tooling. There are also tons of aftermarket parts available from Eduard for those that want to add even more detail to their models, from engine, cockpits, to wheels, bronze gear legs and flying surfaces. The world really is your oyster when it comes to how much you want to throw at your build, but for many the included PE will be more than adequate. It's all up to you! Predictably the build starts with the cockpit, which has a number of PE controls added to the floor, and a full set of PE instruments that are ready to add to the painted cockpit, as well as the fuel line part that is supplied on the clear sprue because it has a glass section as it runs through the cockpit to allow the pilot easy access for checking if there's fuel getting to the engine. A choice of humps between the pilots knees cater for the cannon fitted U4 sub-variants, and a full set of painted crew belts are supplied on the PE fret, plus rudder pedals for good measure. More PE is attached to the cockpit sidewalls, and with all that glued and painted you can close up the fuselage around it, not forgetting the retractable tail wheel used in one of the decal options, with a spinner back-plate fitted to the front of the fuselage, and the exhaust stubs with their slide-moulded hollow tips inserted from inside into their slots. The nose cannon insert, supercharger intake and cannon bulges in front of the windscreen fit into their respective areas, and a set of flame deflectors made from PE are added over the exhaust stacks to prevent blinding the pilot in low light flying. The G-14 had a couple of options for the tail fin, with the increased use of non-strategic wood, so the fin base is moulded to the fuselage, while the tip is one of two separate choices, with a straight rudder hinge, or the more familiar cranked hinge-line. The fixed tail wheel for four of the decal options is fitted to a recess under the tail at this point too. The wings are full span underneath, and depending on your decal choice you may need to open up some holes for a centre-line rack and on the port wing for the forward-raked antenna carried by most decal options. The wheel bay sides are modular and mate with the inner surface of the upper wings to give an excellent level of detail once finished. A small pair of rectangular panel lines are scribed into the fuselage just in front of the windscreen using a PE template that is provided on the sheet, and a pair of teardrop masks are supplied for the wingtip lights, which are moulded into the wing, but can easily be replaced by cutting out the area and fitting some clear acrylic sheet of a suitable thickness, then sanding it to shape and polishing it back to clarity. A depression depicting the bulb can be drilled in the clear part before gluing to further enhance the look if you feel minded. Separate leading-edge slats, ailerons and flaps are supplied, with the latter fitting around the radiator bays under the wing, which have PE grilles front and rear. A scrap diagram shows the correct orientation of the parts to ensure that both layers align correctly as per the real thing. The narrow-track landing gear consists of a single strut with moulded-in oleo scissor, a captive cover that glues against it, and the two-part tyre with separate hubs on each side. A choice of radial or smooth tread is offered with no decal options suggested for each, so check your references, or just make a random choice. The legs fit to scokets in the wheel bays, and horn balances are fitted to the ailerons, the antennae under the wing are added, and a small PE access panel is glued under the fuselage behind the wing trailing edge. Before fitting the canopy, the clear gunsight must be partially painted and fitted to the top of the instrument panel, and a pair of PE grab handles are attached to the inside of the windscreen, which should be partially painted RLM66 inside or outside before the exterior colours. The canopy opener also has PE parts added plus the pilot's head armour and an aerial on the rear, with a PE retaining wire included for posing the canopy open. A manual starter handle is also present in case you wanted to show your G-14 in a more candid pose on the ground. The prop is a single part and is sandwiched by the back plate and spinner before being inserted into the hole in the front of the fuselage. Two styles of additional fuel tank are supplied, one with a flat bottom edge for ground clearance, and the other with a smoother exterior. These fit on a rack that sits on the centreline for two of the markings options, a rudder trim actuator is fitted to three of the options, and a small twig antennae is fitted to all options with a tiny circular base, both of which are made of PE. Markings Decals are printed in Czechia and have good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. The main markings are carried on the larger sheet, while the stencils are on the smaller one. Stencils are drawn on a separate page of the instructions to reduce repetition and clutter, and each marking option has a page all to itself to cut down on confusion and give the modeller good sized diagrams to follow. From the box you can build one of these five options: Bf 109G-14/U4, flown by Hptm. E. Hartmann, 4./ JG 52, Csór, Hungary, October 1944 Bf 109G-14/U4, W. Nr. 512382, flown by Lt. H. Schlick, 4./ JG 77, Schönwalde, Germany, November 1944 Bf 109G-14, W. Nr. 464380, flown by Magg. M. Bellagambi, CO of 5 Squadriglia, o2 Gruppo Caccia, Aeronautica Nazionale Repubblicana, Osoppo, Italy, March 1945 Bf109G-14, flown by Oblt. R. Schlegel, CO of 10./ JG 4, Jüterbog – Damm, Germany, March 1945 Bf 109G-14, W. Nr. 464534, EJG 2, Pilsen, Czechoslovakia, May 1945 The masks (not pictured) cover the armoured glass in the pilot's head armour, the wheel hubs and of course the canopy, with the curved part having frame-hugging masks that need filling in the compound curved areas with scrap tape or liquid mask. These are a great time-saver and the fit of them is usually spot-on. Conclusion These are superb kits from Eduard, and they are priced well, considering the detail and markings options included. They don't bother with novelties such as magnets to hold cowlings in place, but if you should perchance want to show off your engine, you can get a superbly detailed resin one separately and those that don't want to show off their engines don't have to pay for parts they aren't going to use. The G is my personal favourite, so I'm more than happy to see another one from Eduard. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  25. Fokker E.II Eduard 1:48. Weekend Edition. (8451) One of the most easily recognisable aircraft of the Great War, the ‘Eindekker’ was one of a handful of monoplanes to achieve front line service. Despite its modern appearance, it still used the old style wing warping control method, and was not a particularly manoeuvrable aircraft. It’s great advantage though, was the synchronised machine gun able to fire directly ahead through the spinning propeller. Apart from a few early E.I’s fitted with Parabellum LMG 14’s, all the others through to the E.II and E.III were fitted with Spandau LMG 08’s. Being virtually hand built, and under constant development, there were variations between individual machines. Essentially though, the E.II was the same airframe as the E.I, but powered by the 100 hp Oberursel U.1 instead of the 80 hp Oberursel U.0. And similarly the late production E.II was externally the same as the E.III. All of which creates some difficulty in the identification particular aircraft, especially when the different span wings are added to the mix. Entering service in July 1915, the E.1 and E.II heralded the start of the ‘Fokker scourge’ which saw them dominate the skies over the Western Front, inflicting heavy losses on the British and French air forces. By early 1916 the British had introduced the DH.2, and the French the Nieuport 11. Both were highly manoeuvrable, and tipped the balance of air superiority back to the allies favour. By the end of 1916 the ‘Eindekkers’ were mostly withdrawn from service. The Kit Eduard’s ‘Weekend’ edition of the Fokker E.II is a re-issue rather than a brand new kit, but is very welcome nonetheless. The box contains three large sprues and one very small clear moulding for the windscreen, thoughtfully contained in its own little zip lock bag. Also present is a 16 x 12 cm decal sheet offering two options. There is of course no etched brass fret, as this is the simpler and cheaper Weekend version. The sprues contain the options (wing, engine, cowlings, etc) to build an E.III, but these are marked as unused on the parts map. If you want an E.III you will need to get the Profipack version of this kit. Sprue A Moulded in Eduard’s now standard medium grey plastic, the sprue contains the starboard fuselage half, port wing, an unused starboard wing for an E.III, propeller, engine, cowling, and tailplanes. As will all the sprues, everything is crisply moulded with barely any flash and no sink marks. Sprue B Similar to sprue A, this contains the port fuselage half, the starboard wing, ammo case, cockpit coaming, and rudder. (Plus unused items port wing, ammo box, engine, cowling & propeller – all useful items for the spares box.). Sprue C The largest of the sprues, this one contains the many smaller detail items. All of the cockpit items are provided here, including the tubular framework for the sides. The interior detail is extensive, covering the usual items such as the seat, control column, and rudder pedals, but also providing the fuel tank behind the pilot, the pressurisation pump, and the supporting framework for the engine on the rear of the firewall. Seatbelts are provided as decals as there is no etched fret with this kit. The complex undercarriage structure is neatly represented, with a logical breakdown of parts that make assembly comparatively straight forward. The wheels are supplied as completely separate hubs and tyres, which makes painting them so much easier. A tip here is to use white glue to put them together after painting. Any excess can be wiped off with a damp cloth, rather than risk spoiling the paintwork. Again, there are a number of items surplus to requirements, which can go in the spares box. Lovely moulded in detail on the cockpit floor; Sprue D A single item, the windscreen is supplied here. Cleanly moulded, and crystal clear. Decals. Sharply printed, with good colours and minimal carrier film, they look nice and thin. All the national markings are supplied, plus a number of smaller details. The under fuselage stitching looks interesting, I'll be interested to see how that comes out on the model. A word on rigging. The instructions provide a clear rigging diagram, showing where all the lines go. It is not as daunting as it might at first appear, and in many ways a monoplane like this is easier to do than a biplane. Basically there are 4 main lines that run from the central pylon, through a wing to the undercarriage assembly, then back up through the opposite wing, returning to the central pylon. With holes drilled through the wing, these lines can be done as single pieces using smoke coloured invisible mending thread and cyano glue. Smaller rigging lines can be made with heat stretched sprue, attached with white glue. Measure using dividers, cut the stretched sprue to length, pick up with tweezers and dip each end in a blob of white glue, and apply to the model. Nothing to be afraid of. This is one I made many years ago, not from this kit, but from the original Eduard plastic/etch kit of the1990's, issued by Flashback. It illustrates what i have said about the rigging though; Markings. A. Fokker E.II 68/15 flown by Lt. Brückmann, Armeeabteilung Gaede, Western Front, late 1915 to early 1916. B. Fokker E.II 69/15 flown by Lt. K. Crailsheim, Feldfliergerabteilung 53,Western Front, October 1915. Conclusion. This is another beautifully produced Great War kit from Eduard. It looks very good in the box, with fine and crisply moulded parts. The surface detail is particularly impressive on the fuselage components, both inside and out, and the fabric effect on the wings looks just right. Although I already have four of these kits in the stash, I have not yet got round to building one. Having built 30+ of Eduard’s various other 1:48 Great War kits, this one looks so well moulded that building it should be as good an experience as all the others. It is such an important aircraft that it really deserves a place in any collection. Recommended. Review samples courtesy of
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