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Found 938 results

  1. Hi all, my (First, there may be more) effort for this GB is Eduard's "Weekend Edition" DH-2 in 1/48th scale. Apparently not for beginners, before starting this my sum total of experience with biplanes is one Matchbox Walrus, a Frog Gladiator and a Revell Fokker DVII. The Walrus remains on the shelf of doom as all the single struts scared me.... Still, there are a couple of Airfix's recent biplane efforts in the stash for another day but I'm looking forward to the challenge of this one. If not the rigging....
  2. I started these several years ago and had one almost ready for paint, but they have been languishing on the unfinished pile for too long now. The original plan was to complete one aircraft as per the box illustration, and I had intended to use a couple of CMK resin sets along with some Linden Hill decal and stencil sheets that I had purchased at a later date on the other. However I may switch things around and use the resin and the kit decals on the second kit in the box, and because the part finished kit is almost ready for paint, I would do something using the Linden Hill sheets to wrap this one up. The box, its contents and extras. It may be a little while before I restart but I am hoping to get them finished by the deadline.
  3. Hy guys, Recently i took the decison to quit the 48th scale and buy and build only in 72nd scale. But... i have this in my stash (and others things in 48th scale), so i decided to build my last 48th plane (or one of the lasts). And this GB is the right occasion to do it! So, this is my subject: a classic MiG-21MF in bulgarian old style markings. To build it, i will use the Eduard kit: I will build it straight out of box, except for the Linden Hill decals sheet "Brothers in arms". And this my airplane: Before i begin, i have to finish another model in "final circuit". ciao Ale
  4. Hi all, this is Eduard's Fw190, out of the box, using the supplied decals. I got this after building the Airfix A-8, which I really liked the look of when finished. I'm using the same hangar (last time, promise!) A great kit, nicely detailed that fell together-recommended...(still not sure if I prefer the look of the Airfix though!) http://i68.tinypic.com/2wntxr5.jpg[/IMG Thanks for watching.. cheers, Dave
  5. My poor poor winterized Harrier hit a big snag recently, so much in fact that Ii put it back in the box for a while. To cheer me up a little, I decided to have a deeper look into my Christmas gift: 31 different decal options, but only 2 complete set of kits. I really hope that Eduard will offer more Overtrees soon! First, I thought that I should do one of the Grey Nurses, since I do have a thing for Sharkmouths... And I definitely want to do a brown/green one, and a desert one with the blue/light blue roundels and one green one with bomb racks... So, instead of botching Bobby Gibbes rather spiffy looking machines I decided to start with this to learn how to build an Eduard Spitfire. Pictures to follow! //Christer
  6. My dad´s newest project with the new Eduard F-4 with Kagero decals
  7. I wasn't sure I had anything already in the stash that qualified for this GB and Mrs K is keeping a close eye on purchases...but I pulled out a Weekend Edition of the Eduard IIIC with a rather nice NMF Armee de L'Air from April 1976 based at Cazaux. The actual plane is No.92, EC 02/010 Seine, Armee de l'Air, BA120 Cazaux. I have found a couple of reference pictures but am still doing my research. I should mention that I have never attempted NMF before and so this is going to be a bit of a learning curve. I am planning to use Vallejo Metal Colours. Finally I should like to dedicate (my attempt at) this build to my good friend Tim, the only modelling friend I had to share builds with in person (as opposed to you lot) who died in a tragic motorbike accident last month and whose funeral was yesterday. Although not a member I know he had enjoyed browsing the forum for inspiration. Love to his wife Charlotte, son Hugo and daughter Petrie. On with the build. Some photos of the kit: As always all comments very welcome. Dave
  8. Spitfire V.III Update sets, masks & decals - For Eduard Kit 1:72 Eduard The new Eduard kit is a good one, however Eduard are also offering their update sets for the kit. Here we have an update set, flaps, masks and additional decals. Update Set (72645) This is one brass fret. It contains parts for the cockpit bulkheads, pilots seat (and frame), rudder pedals, radiator flaps, undercarriage doors, tail wheel doors, canopy crash bar, and rear control linkages. Flaps(72646) This is one large brass fret which provides flaps, and wells for the kit. The ribs are those already attached which need to be bent into position. Some work on kit parts is needed. Stencil Decals (D72013) This small sheet provides the stencils the kit needs. Rather than a stand alone item this is ideally suited to the modeller who has purchased overtrees to use another of the kit main decal options, Masks(CX478) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. Conclusion These sets will enhance your Spitfire model. Recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  9. F2H-2 Banshee Update sets & masks - For Kittyhawk Kit 1:48 Eduard The new Kittyhawk kit is a good one, however Eduard are along as always offering their update sets for the kit. Here we have 3 sets; Update, flaps and seatbelts. Update Set (49809) This is one brass fret and one nickel one. The coloured parts on the nickel fret are mainly for the cockpit including the main instrument panels, side panels and controls, and cockpit sils. Inside the canopy new rails are provided. Other parts in the set include new back plate and foot rest for the ejection seat. New links are provided for the landing gear legs. New door are provided for the main gear. Flaps(48912) This is one large brass fret which provides flaps, airbrakes and wells for the kit. These are split on the kit with part on the straight wing, and part on the engine nacelle. The ribs are those already attached which need to be bent into position. Some work on kit parts is needed. Seatbelts(49810) This small fret provides a full set of coloured seatbelts for the aircraft. These are the new Steel belts from Eduard. They are etched from 0.1mm sheet, which looks like stainless steel because it doesn't rust, these new belts combine the best of both worlds. The resulting etch is thin at around 0.06mm, and the paint that has been applied after etching is included in that thickness. The paint itself seems to be more flexible too, and the designs have added details such as shadows printed near buckles and joints to give an added depth to the design. They appear less susceptible to fatigue and will stand up to repeated movements, and can be posed much more realistically due to the ease of bending of the surface. The paint is also a lot less likely to flake off at a sharp bend, which is a worry for standard PE belts. Masks(EX543) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. Wheel Masks, and camera window masks are also supplied. Conclusion These sets will enhance your Banshee model. Recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  10. So far 2017 isn't great for modelling for me - this is the third kit i've started - first an Amusing Hobby kit that I managed to spill cellulose thinners on, then started the new release of the Classic Airframes Blenheim, only to find that i've been given 2 resin starboard cockpit sidewalls and no port sidewall. So wanted to do a kit i know will fit - out with a Tamiya :-) I got this off ebay a while ago, came with the Eduard etch set as well so started by fitting etch Then a quick blast of primer, followed by some Mr Color RLM66 Peter
  11. #4/2017 What the Versailles Treaty was for Germany, the St.Germain Treaty was for Austria after the end of WW1. Austria´s military wasn´t allowed to have a standing army bigger than 30.000 men, no heavy artillery, no tanks and no aircraft. Nevertheless, like Germany, Austria secretly formed a Fliegerkorps in 1927 with Austrian, British and German built aircraft. In 1928 the pilot training started, a technical infrastructure was built up and further aircraft ordered in Italy. The first of the latter ones arrived in 1933. Two Fliegerregiment were formed and stationed in Wien-Aspern and Graz-Thalerhof. And finally in 1936 the typical Austrian roundel was introduced. On April 22nd 1937 the Austrian Airforce ordered a single Bf108 which arrived in Wien-Aspern on July 27th 1937. In October 1937 a wing broke off during flight and the aircraft crsahed, killing all 4 crewmembers. Eduard kit (old black boxing), added handgrips on the roof and rudder joints from the sparebox. The aircraft was painted in blue, most likely Messerschmitt factory blue (RAL5008) so my dad made a selfmix. Wooden propeller from the Eduard Brassin line. The Luftwaffe style letter decals are from Fantasy Printshop. Couldn´t find the correct number style decals, especially in that small size, for the rudder, therefore used some US Navy style decals from Superscale. DSC_0001 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0002 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0003 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0004 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0005 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0006 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0007 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0008 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0009 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0010 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0011 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0012 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0013 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0014 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0015 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0016 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0017 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0018 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr
  12. G'day folks, as they might say down under! Eduard's new 1/72 Aussie 8 set will be here in the next week or 2 and we would like to know if anyone is interested in it, so we can get them ordered. The set contains 2 plastic kits and 2 sets of resin wheels, plus mask/etch for each kit. There will be a book (in English) in the set about Aussie Spitifre VIII's. It's pretty much exactly like the 1/48 set but scaled down, I can't remember the number of marking options but it's something like 30 or 40 different choices! Based on the price from our supplier, we estimate our price to be about £44-£45, which I know is a lot for a couple of 1/72 kits but the big H are wanting nearly £59 for it! Postage is TBA (we don't know what size box it will be or the weight) but we'll be able to keep the total cost of kit plus post to under £50. Also if you're not in the EU - you don't pay VAT, so it's even less for you! Please let me know asap, if anyone wants it, so we get the numbers right! thanks Mike
  13. In March 2017, Eduard in to rebox the Hasegawa's 1/48th Hawker Typhoon Mk.1b kit - ref. Source: https://www.eduard.com/store/out/media/InfoEduard/archive/2016/info-eduard-2016-11EN.pdf V.P.
  14. Supermarine Spitfire Mk.VIII Wheels 1:72 Eduard Brassin Both of these sets are for the new Eduard kit but can be used on any kit. 4 Spoke Wheels with Smooth Tyre (672146) & 4 Spoke Wheels with tread (672147) Each set of wheels comes with both main wheels, the tail wheel & leg combined and a set of mask for painting. Smooth Tyre Tread Tyre Conclusion There's nothing much wrong with Eduard's VII, but even the best kits can be improved on. Naturally Eduard themselves have provided the means to enhance their kit, and quality wheels always look good. Recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  15. Eduard Steel Belts 1:72 Eduard This month sees Eduard release another batch of pre-painted etched steel seat belts covering a range of WWI and WWII subjects. Production is up to the usual Eduard standards, with nice, sharp details. All you need to do is snip them from the fret, bend them to shape (carefully) and glue them in place. They will respond well to weathering techniques, including washes and/or pastels. Overall, these are handy sets that deserve a place in the collection of all modellers. Recommended. Seatbelts RFC WWI Steel (1:72) Seatbelts France WWII Steel (1:72) Seatbelts Italy Steel (1:72) Seatbelts USN WWII Steel (1:72) Review sample courtesy of
  16. FFAR Rockets (672145) 1:72 Eduard Brassin The Forward Firing Aircraft Rocket (FFAR) is not to be confused with the later Folding Fin Aerial Rocket which share the same abreviation. They were originally developed as a 3.5" anti submarine warfare rocket with no charge designed to punture a submarines hull. Due to their accuracy they were later developed into a 5" explosive version by attaching a 5" shell to the original 3.5" rocket body. There were some limitations to the rocket carrying a 5" shell and the High Velocity Aircraft Rocket was developed to overcome these. The original FFAR was carried by the Duntless & Corsair aircraft. The set arrives in the familiar Brassin box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts. There are eight rockets casts in resin with their rear fins. These are very thin and care will be needed to remove them. Each rocket then has two PE mounting clamps which need to be bent to shape, and a rear fuse line to add. Conclusion. These are highly detailed units and will contribute to the look of your 1:72 build. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  17. After two imperial aircraft and a bunch of post WW2 aircraft, my dad finally starts to add some models for our homeland collection that flew between the wars, starting with a 108.
  18. It's 2017 now, so now it's time for a new special offers thread. Remember, like the title says, we get new offers in stock pretty much every Friday, so keep checking our website every Friday! Meng 1/700 Trumpeter 1/700 USS West Virginia (1945) £21.30 USS Maryland (1945) £19.60 Trumpeter 1/350 1/72 Eduard Messerschmitt Bf110C-6 Ltd Ed £19.20 Eduard Avia B.354 Serie III Profi £9.70 Eduard Lavochkin La-7 Profipack £9.00 Eduard Bf110G-2 Profipack £14.00 Eduard Fw190A-8 Profipack £10.80 Eduard Fw190A-5 Profipack £8.60 Eduard F6F-3 Hellcat Profipack £9.10 Eduard Spad XIII Weekend £4.30 Eduard L-39C Albatros Weekend £7.20 Eduard F6F-5 Hellcat Weekend £6.30 Eduard F6F-5N Hellcat Nightfighter Weekend £6.00 Eduard Fw190A-8 Std Wings Weekend £6.60 Eduard Fw190A-5 'Heavy Fighter' Weekend £7.80 Eduard Fw190A-5 'Light Fighter' Weekend £6.00 Eduard MiG-15Bis Weekend £6.30 Eduard Avia B.534 serie III weekend £5.00 Eduard Avia B.534 Serie IV weekend £5.00 Eduard Hellcat Mk I Weekend £6.00 Eduard Fokker DR.1 Triplane Weekend £5.00 Hobby Boss F-14B Tomcat £12.90 Hobby Boss AH-64A Apache £7.90 Hobby Boss UH-1F Huey £8.40 Hobby Boss Mil Mi-2US Hoplite gunship £9.40 Hobby Boss Mil Mi-2URP (anti tank) £9.40 Meng 1/72 Fiat G.91R £11.70 F-102 (case xx) Delta Dagger £12.00 1/48 Eduard P-47D Thunderbolt 'Over Italy' Ltd Ed £27.00 Eduard F-86 Sabre Ltd Ed £29.70 Eduard Albatros D.III Profipack £10.50 Eduard Aiva B.534 Serie III Profi £10.30 Eduard Messerschmitt Bf109G-5 Profi £18.00 Eduard MiG-21R Profipack £21.40 Eduard Albatros D.III OEFFAG Profipack £12.60 Eduard MiG-21R Weekend £12.40 Eduard F6F-5N Hellcat Nightfighter Weekend £10.00 Eduard Avia B.354 Serie IV Weekend £7.00 Eduard Fokker DR.1 Weekend £6.60 Eduard Nieuport Ni-11 Weekend £8.00 Eduard Yak-3 Weekend £9.00 Eduard Bristol F.2B Fighter Weekend £9.60 Eduard Mirage III Weekend £15.70 Hobby Boss Me262A-1b £10.10 Hobby Boss P-61C Black Widow £25.60 Meng Me410A-1 £28.30 Revell 1/48 Spitfire IX/XVI £13.70 1/35 Armour 1/32 Hobby Boss thanks Mike
  19. Hi everybody! I am back with a new kit on my workbench since last summer. This model is wonderful, lot of details, very good engineering and beautiful surfaces. Some people don't like the high number of pieces but it allows a greater level of detail in my opinion. I added the Brassin wheel wells (impressive pieces), a Master pitot probe and obviously some scratchbuilt details. My title is quite ambigus :-) because I'gonna do the Croatian scheme. A picture of the box ( most of you know it I think) The scheme I am interested in: And a nice picture of the real aircraft (thanks airliners!) <Sorry, but Airliners.net copyright photo has to go. Next time put a link in to their site where the photo is held> I will post only the main steps, or what I feel as main steps :-) because I don't really follow the steps of the notice. I have already done the airbrake wells, the wheel wells, the landing gear and the engine, so I'm gonna post more pictures very soon! PZR
  20. Supermarine Spitfire Mk.XVI Brassin Resin Accessories for Eduard Kit 1:72 Eduard This brace of new resin sets for Eduard's Spitfire Mk.XVI mirrors those released for their Mk.IX a few months ago. As good as Eduard's kit might be, there are still limitations to what can be achieved with injection moulded plastic. The Czech firm have recognised this and delivered a suite of neat upgrades that should please every modeller keen to make the most of their new muse. Supermarine Spitfire Mk.XVI Top Cowl for Eduard Kit 1:72 Eduard Eduard have produced a resin upper cowling for the new kit, which is helpful if you don't fancy dealing with the seam caused by the division of the kit part into separate port and starboard halves. The replacement part is well made and will be handy if you wish to finish your model with an exposed engine. Supermarine Spitfire Mk.XVI Wheels for Eduard Kit 1:72 Eduard Nice as the kit wheels are, there is a limit to the level of detail that can be achieved with injection moulded plastic alone. Eduard have therefore produced these resin items as direct replacements for the kit parts. As with the cowling, the quality of casting is excellent. Eduard have included a set of paint masks too, and having used Eduard’s pre-cut masks on a number of occasions, I can vouch for their usefulness. Conclusion There's nothing much wrong with Eduard's XVI, but even the best kits can be improved on. Naturally Eduard themselves have provided the means to enhance their kit, and with a host of photo etched parts (reviewed elsewhere), this new range of kits and accessories is shaping up to be one of the premier modelling projects for fans of WWII subjects. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  21. Hi all,here's my entry for this GB,having only ever built Airfix's ancient 1/72 offering I'm looking forward to building my second from this superb kit,now I arrived on this earth in 1960 so grew up in three of the decades of the cold war as you might expect it was into the seventies when my interest in models and what was in the news grew so the latter stages of the Vietnam war were being played out every night on TV and Soviet aircraft were just grainy B&W photos,I remember the excitement of Viktor Balenko landing the Mig 25 at Hakodate AB in Japan the shooting down of Korean Air 007 in 1983 and finally the wall coming down at last. Ah,two massive military block's glaring at each other across half the globe itchy fingers on the nuclear button,the world seemed a much safer place back then! Anyway here's the quite large box for now.
  22. I built three Eduard Spitfire IXs (two IXc late, and one IXc early) as my first builds of 2017. I weathered Henryk Dygala's "Pat", but things went south after that, so no more weathering for me for a spell.
  23. Spitfire Mk.XVI Dual Combo 1:72 Eduard More than any other aircraft - at least on this side of the Atlantic - the Supermarine Spitfire has attained the status of a true legend. An unrivalled reputation and its role in the Battle of Britain have combined to ensure the type is ingrained in the nation's psyche. One of the ultimate Merlin powered variants was the Mk.XVI. The Mk.XVI was essentially a Mk.IX, with a licence-built Packard Merlin 266 in place of the Rolls Royce Merlin 66. The Mk.XVI was optimised for low-altitude combat, and a large number were produced with a cut-down rear fuselage and bubble canopy for improved pilot visibility. Just over a thousand Mk.XVIs were produced at the Castle Bromwich factory by the end of the War. Eduard have earned an excellent reputation in recent years with world-class models such as their 1:72 Hellcat, Bf110 and MiG-15. Their models typically feature a mixture of exquisite detail and superb – if complex – engineering which puts them right at the pinnacle of modern kit manufacturers. The latest all-new 1:72 kit to roll off the Prague production line is actually a range of kits, covering the late mark Merlin engine Spitfires, including the Mk.VIII, Mk.IX and Mk.XVI. This kit represents the latter. To kick this particular marquee off, the first edition is a dual combo edition containing two complete kits as well as photo etched parts and pre-cut masks. The kit arrives packed into a glossy, top-opening box adorned with a picture of both high and low-back examples. Each of the two kits comprises well over 150 plastic parts, as well as a small fret of pre-painted photo etched parts and a set of die-cut paint masks. The instruction book is a glossy, stapled A4 affair which includes full-colour painting diagrams. The overall impression is of a really premium package. The quality of the mouldings is up to the usual Eduard standard, with clean, crisp details and no flaws anywhere. As with other recent kits from Eduard, there is plenty of fine detail, with parts such as the cockpit comparable to high-end resin items (which, in turn, should tell you how good Eduard's resin cockpit is). The surface detail on the outside of the airframe is exquisitely rendered, with fine recessed panel lines and delicately engraved rivet and fastener detail. Eduard take an uncompromising approach when it comes to detail, resulting in a cockpit that is simply fabulous, particularly so in this Profipack edition. I don't think I've ever seen a Spitfire kit in this scale with a seat made up of three parts, so it's just as well that a set of pre-painted harnesses have been included too. There is a choice of plastic or photo etched parts for the pilot's armour, and further tiny photo etched details for the control column and throttle controls. The instrument panel also benefits from the addition of photo etched parts, with a detailed plastic alternative provided if you don't fancy using the metal parts. Unusually, the cockpit sidewalls have been moulded separately. I can only think that Eduard have done this in order to maximise the amount of detail they have been able to pack in, as well as paving the way for their resin cockpit, which uses the same approach. Once the cockpit has been assembled and painted, it can be fitted between the vertically split fuselage halves, along with the engine firewall, a blank part into which the propeller is fitted later on, and the pilot's head armour. The leading edge wing root also has to be fitted at this stage. The fact that these parts have been moulded separately to the rest of the kit is testament to Eduard's commitment to detail, if not buildability! The breakdown of the wing is no less complex. As you might expect, the lower wing has been moulded as a single span, with separate upper wing surfaces. Between the two you must sandwich seven parts which together make up the walls of the main landing gear bay. The ailerons and wing tips have been moulded separately, which allows both regular and clipped wing variants to be built from the same moulds. The same applies to the rudder and elevators. Multiple alternatives are included on the sprues, so make sure you use the correct version for your intended subject. The upper and lower cowlings are moulded separately, with the former split along the middle. Even the wing radiators are made up of six parts each, with the surface of the radiators themselves picked out in photo etched metal in this boxing. Turning the model over, the undercarriage is just as detailed as the rest of the kit. Each of the main landing gear legs is made up of seven parts, with the tyres moulded separately to the hubs and photo etched parts to represent hub covers (where fitted). The separate tyres will make painting easier, which is just as well as the included paint masks don't cater for the landing gear. A long range fuel tank and a couple of small bombs are included and the wing cannon barrels are moulded separately, which means they can be added at the end of the build in order to avoid accidental damage. For the high back version, two different rear canopy sections are included so you can finish your model with the canopy open or closed. A single rear canopy is provided for the low back version, which can simply be posed in open or closed position as you wish. As this is a ‘profipack’ edition, a full set of canopy masks has been included. I’ve used Eduard’s pre-cut masks a number of times now and have always found them to be excellent for turning a time consuming chore into a quick and easy job. Eduard are usually pretty generous with the decal options in their profipacks, and this is no exception. Choices are provided for a giddy eight aircraft: Spitfire Mk.XVI TB900, No. 349 Squadron, Wunstorf, Germany, Summer 1945; Spitfire Mk.XVI TD341, No. 443 Squadron, Uetersen Airfield, Germany, August 1945; Spitfire Mk.XVI TB675, No. 485 Squadron (RNZAF), W/O M. Lond, Fassberg, Germany, Summer 1945; Spitfire Mk.XVI SL721, Flown by Air Vice Marshall Sir James Robb, 1948; Spitfire Mk.XVI TD240, Flown by Squadron Leader Boleslaw Kaczmarek, Commanding Officer of No. 302 Squadron, Varrelsbuch Air Field, Germany, Summer 1945; Spitfire Mk.XVI RR227, Flown by Squadron Leader Otto Smik, Commanding Officer of No.127 Squadron, Grimbergen Airfield, Belgium, November 1944; Spitfire Mk.XVI TB634, No.421 Squadron (RCAF), Pilot Officer A.F. McIntosh, B.90 Airfield, Petit Brogel, Belgium, March 1945; and Spitfire Mk.XVI TB752, Flown by Squadron Leader Henry Zary, Commanding Officer of No.403 Squadron, Belgium, April 1945 All of the aircraft are finished in a variation of the Ocean Grey/Dark Green over Medium Sea Grey scheme with the exception of Air Vice Marshall Sir James Robb's aircraft, which is finished in overall PRU Blue. Each option is illustrated with a four-view colour profile. The decals look crisp, thin and glossy and the colours used are nice and bold. Conclusion Eduard's range of 1:72 Spitfires is simply excellent. The kits are both accurate and highly detailed, putting them some way ahead of most other 1:72 kits on both counts. This dual combo package is particularly appealing because of the inclusion of both low and high back versions, the excellent range of decal options and the addition of photo etched parts and masks makes. The only downside is complexity. Other than that, this looks mighty impressive on the sprue and can be highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  24. Spitfire F Mk.IX Profipack 1:72 Eduard When the prototype Spitfire took to the air for the first time on 5 March 1936, few involved could have foreseen where the development of the type would lead. By the end of the Second World War, the type had earned itself a place in the history books as well as the nation's psyche. One of the ultimate Merlin powered variants was the Mk.IX. The Mk.IX was a response to the appearance of the Focke Wulf Fw190, which proved itself more than a match for the Spitfire Mk.V. Powered by the two-stage supercharged Merlin 61, the performance of the Mk.IX was a quantum leap over its forebears, enabling the Spitfire to meet its German foe on equal terms. By the end of the War, over 5,600 Mk.IXs had rolled off the production line at Castle Bromwich. The Spitfire Mk.IX is the latest all-new 1:72 scale kit to be released by Czech firm Eduard. In typical Eduard style, multiple versions are now appearing the initial release. The latest variant is the F Mk.IX with the Merlin 61 engine and C type wing. The kit arrives packed into a neat top-opening box adorned with high quality artwork. Inside are five sprues of parts moulded in blue-grey plastic and a single sprue moulded in clear plastic. Altogether there are well over 150 parts and, as this is a ‘Profipack’ edition, the plastic parts are accompanied by a small fret of pre-painted photo etched parts and a set of pre-cut paint masks. The instruction book is a glossy, stapled A5 affair which includes full-colour painting diagrams. The mouldings are up to the usual Eduard standard, with clean, crisp details and no flaws anywhere. As with other recent kits from Eduard, there is plenty of fine detail, with some of the cockpit parts comparable to high-end resin items. The surface detail on the outside of the airframe is exquisitely rendered, with fine recessed panel lines and delicately engraved rivet and fastener detail. Being a profipack, this kit has been sprinkled with a little extra Czech fairy dust. The cockpit is fabulous, with a seat made up of three plastic parts plus pre-painted harnesses and a choice of plastic or photo etched parts for the seat back armour. More photo etched details have been included for the control column, throttle controls and instrument panel. Unusually, the cockpit sidewalls have been moulded separately. I can only think this has been done this in order to maximise the amount of detail while making it easier to take advantage of Eduard's own optional resin cockpit set. Once the cockpit has been assembled and painted, it can be fitted between the vertically split fuselage halves, along with the engine firewall, a blank part into which the propeller is fitted later on, and the pilot's head armour. The leading edge wing root also has to be fitted at this stage, which is testament to Eduard's commitment to detail, if not buildability! The breakdown of the wing is no less complex. As you might expect, the lower wing has been moulded as a single span, with separate upper wing surfaces. Between the two you must sandwich seven parts which together make up the walls of the main landing gear bay. The ailerons and wing tips have been moulded separately, which allows multiple versions to be built from the same moulds. The upper and lower cowlings are moulded separately, with the former split along the middle. Again, Eduard themselves provide a resin replacement for this part if you don't like the thought of cleaning up that seam. Even the wing radiators are made up of six parts each, with the external surfaces of the radiators picked out in photo etch in this boxing. Turning the model over, the undercarriage is just as detailed as the rest of the kit. Each of the main landing gear legs is made up of seven parts, with the tyres moulded separately to the hubs and photo etched parts to represent hub covers (where fitted). The separate tyres will make painting easier, which is just as well as the included paint masks don't cater for the landing gear. A long range fuel tank and a couple of conformal fuel tanks are included. The wing cannon barrels are moulded separately, which means they can be added at the end of the build in order to avoid accidental damage. Two different canopies are included depending on whether you wish to finish your model with the canopy open or closed. This is just as well given all the superb detail in the cockpit. As this is a ‘profipack’ edition, a full set of canopy masks has been included. I’ve used Eduard’s pre-cut masks a number of times now and have always found them to be excellent for turning a time consuming chore into a quick and easy job. Eduard are usually pretty generous with the decal options in their profipacks, and this is no exception. Choices are provided for the following six aircraft: Spitfire BS392, No. 340 Squadron, flown by Squadron Leader Bernard Dupérier, Biggin Hill, Autumn 1942; Spitfire EN315, Polish Combat Team, flown by Squadron Leader Stanislav Skalski, Polish Combat Team, North Africa, Spring 1943; Spitfire EN133, No.611 Squadron, Biggin Hill, Early 1943; Spitfire EN354, 1st Lieutenant Leonard V Helton, 52nd Fighter Group, 4th Fighter Squadron, La Sebala Airfield, Tunisa, June 1943; The first and third aircraft are finished in a Ocean Grey/Dark Green over Medium Sea Grey, while the second and fourth options are finished in Dark Earth and Middle Stone over Azure Blue. Each option is illustrated with a four-view colour profile. The decals look crisp, thin and glossy and the colours used are nice and bold. Conclusion Given Eduard's track record with their recent 1:72 scale kits, it should come as no surprise that their Spitfire is so good. It is both accurate and highly detailed, putting it some way ahead of most other 1:72 kits on both counts. The addition of photo etched parts and masks makes this edition as close to a complete package as it’s possible to get, as well as being superb value for money. The only downside is the kit's complexity, with the part count exceeding most 1:48 scale Spifires. Other than that, this kit looks mighty impressive and can be highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  25. Hello everyone. Just one model i managed to build last year. This Spit had a few chances to fly to the trash can (the kit itself is just brilliant - you know) but after all it survived. Don't ask me why, but i have only 2 pics ((