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Found 1,195 results

  1. F-35A Lightning II Update Sets (for Meng) 1:48 Eduard Meng were a little late to the F-35A party, but a late appearance is better than none at all, with a nice kit being the result, as you can see here. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Update Set (49864) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels and side consoles are the primary parts on the painted set; ejection seat details; coaming instrumentation; rear deck and substantial canopy internal structure also supplied. On the airframe side, tie-downs and hubs are added to the wheels; details are added in the bays; a complex afterburner ring is inserted into the exhaust trunking, and a small number of panels are added to the area on the top of the fuselage where the wings blend with the intake trunking. Zoom! Set (FE865) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts STEEL (FE865) In case you don't already know, these belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the two sets of crew belts, you also get a set of the unusually placed pull-handles either side of the pilot's knees that gets him out of there in case of an emergency, plus the leg restraints that pull tight to prevent flail injuries. Masks (EX567) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition you get a set of hub/tyre masks for all the wheels (including the out-riggers), allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort, plus the faceted lenses of the sensor under the nose. Review sample courtesy of
  2. Hello; Here's my latest built: Eduard's 1/48 Fw190D-13 W.Nr.836017 Stab./ JG 26. It's a great kit, but not perfect. The main colour is Tamiya and the decals are from the kit. I built oob. All comments very welcome. Cheers, Cristian Zarichta
  3. Hello Folks This is my latest off the bench and represents a few firsts for me. - First 1/32 in a long time, - First time using MRP paints, - First time using Montex masks. - First time using a turps based panel line wash. Eduard(Hasegawa) P-40N A29-607 BU-G as flown by Sqn Ldr John Waddy, 80 SQN RAAF . All but the kill tally and tail code are painted on using Montex masks. Kit stencils. I love the MRP paint and will use it again. The Eduard kit gives you resin wheels and exhausts and some etchy goodness. Hope you like my BU-G. Cheers Andrew P.
  4. Hullo. I built this for a GB over on Kampfgruppe 144, where there's a full WiP. Like one of those soppy parents who can't help but show you pictures of their child at every opportunity, I'm afraid I'm pretty proud of it so felt compelled to post here. Forgive me. The French inherited some Spits (VIIIs initially, latterly IXe's) from General Gracey's British forces that re-occupied Indochina after the Japanese defeat in August 1945. In the war of ground support against the Viet Minh, the nippy little interceptor that was built to take on the Fw-190 was really pretty inadequate really: they lacked the hitting/lifting power of the big, brutish American Hellcats, Helldivers and Bearcats that the French later received in the late-1940s, and they also lacked the legs to conduct close air support where they were needed most (i.e. along the Chinese border and upcountry Tonkin highlands where suitable airstrips were few and far between). The Spits rapidly became knackered - the photo below gives a sense of this. The scheme (of GC. 1/4) is relatively popular, being one of the more colourful kit options for the Eduard 144 IXe. I used the kit decals, but added some bomb racks (Brengun), bombs (3D printed via a seller on Shapeways - superb little things)…. I actually had a devil of a time finding RAF 250lb bombs in this scale so was delighted when I found these and discovered they were of such good quality/detail. I also used Eduard's own (and really quite lovely) photo etch, cutting open the cockpit door. This is really only the second aircraft I've attempted with reasonably serious photoetchery - a skill I've learned over the course of the Vietnam GB this was built for (the other build was my Toucan). I've been pleasantly surprised to find that it's not as daunting as I had once thought, and the process can even be enjoyable! I used pale pastels to weather and fade the the panels. In the harsh light of the photo booth this has not come out very well, but looks great to my (naked, possibly biased) eye. I'll use that technique in future, I think. Prismacolour silver pencil for the chipping (which I tried not to overdo, but these poor Spitfires really were knackered). I have to say, I've enjoyed this build enormously. Although it has taken me a while, it has been a blast (and a welcome sanctuary from nappy changes) - which is what this hobby is all about, I reckon. Much fun had. Thanks for looking!
  5. RN Battleship Roma Detail Sets 1:350 Eduard Since Trumpeter released the Roma as long ago as 2012, it’s taken the re-boxings released this year for Eduard to release anything for it. These two sets, each with two sheets, although the second sheet of set two barely constitutes a sheet. As usual you will need to remove quite a few parts of the kit details before the PE can be used. 53-199 – Main Deck and Guns. The first set consists of two sheets of etched brass crammed full of new parts, not including multiples. The sheets contain the usual numerous small parts such as the watertight doors, deck hatches, vents, skylights, vertical ladders, and anchor chains, complete with chain stoppers. There are also new jibs for both the small cranes and the large aircraft handling crane, loads of replacement deck houses, ammunition lockers, parts to details the winches, capstans, splinter shields, barbette walkways, breakwaters, support braces for the searchlight towers, boat cradles, funnel caps, and a complete replacement for the ships catapult. There are also new mast platforms, complete with support braces, yard arms complete with Jacobs ladders and halliards. The boat handling booms have cable rollers fitted as well as other fittings to the uprights. The main turrets are fitted out with a new AA platform, splinter shields, ammunition racks, vertical ladders, new doors for the rangefinder extensions, ammunition lockers, and strake around the base of eh turrets and to finish them off, each gun barrel can be fitted with their individual tampions. 53-200 – AA Guns. Naturally, this two sheet set is to add detail to the kits AA guns, but, not exclusively, as with most Eduard sets. The secondary armament turrets are fitted with new AA mountings, including supports, ready use lockers, vertical ladders, hatches and barrel tampions. The smaller turrets have new hatches, and canvas bags, but only to be used in the extreme elevation. The smaller AA weapons are all given various amounts of new detail and could include new sights, seats, ammunition chutes, elevation arcs, hand wheels, levers, and foot pedals. In addition to the AA guns, there is also new detail for the paravanes, pipe brackets, liferaft ramps, searchlight hand wheels and grilles, rangefinder hatches, doors, and fittings. There are also handling trolleys for the ships aircraft, launching cradles. The RO.43 biplane is also given new supports for the main and wing floats, new struts for the wings and tailplane and finally a machine gun for the rear gunner. Conclusion This is another pair of very useful etched sets from Eduard. The amount of detail covered is quite exhaustive and will require a fair amount of patience and time to get it all fitted correctly. Some of the details are completely new, not found in the kit so research will be required to ensure it was fitted. My biggest gripe is still the instructions, which really need to be made clearer, especially where parts positioning is concerned. Still, that’s a personal thing, which doesn’t stop me from recommending this set to any one with the lovely Trumpeter kit. Review sample courtesy of
  6. HMS Hood Parts 6 and 7

    HMS Hood Parts 6 and 7 1:200 Eduard Continuing their releases of etched sets for the huge 1:200 HMS Hood from Trumpeter, Eduard have released the last two sets. The first, (No.6) covers the ships superstructure, the second, and final one for review, (No.7), for the main top. Part 6 (53-194) – Superstructure. This two sheet set contains numerous parts to upgrade the kits superstructure, including the many water tight doors, each made up from two parts, deck hatches, vertical ladders, vents, and skylights. There are also new parts for platform supports, splinter shields, yards and wind deflectors. Mainy of the deck houses are almost completely replaced, I almost as the roof sections need to be cut away and used with the new PE sidewalls. The biggest problem with the set is that it’s been designed to be used on the kit funnels, the forward one of which has been shown to be the wrong size. So, if you’re a detail nut, and if you’re using these sets that’s a given, then you will need to get hold of the replacement funnel set from the likes of www.scalemodelwarships.com. The rear funnel is fine and you can use the parts from this set which includes new internals to the funnel top. Before using the PE, read the instructions carefully as there are quite a few areas of kit detail that needs to be removed before the PE can be added. Part 7 (53-197) – Main Top. Although this two sheet set is for the main top, it also includes many other details for the forward section of the superstructure, including the lower armoured bridge, such as watertight doors, sections of the bridge not included in the kit, splinter shields, railings, wind deflectors, brackets, support braces, and end bulkheads. The main top itself is provided with new window frames, star platform, star support braces, vertical ladders, doors, railings, access walkway and railing, a whole new lookout section, upper mast platform and supports. Once again, read the instructions carefully to ensure you are removing the correct sections of the kit before adding the PE parts. Conclusion Although the prices of these sets seem to inexorably rise, they are perfect for super detailing this mighty kit. At least the modeller has the option of how much detail you wish to add, rather than buying one large set. These two sets are more than that mentioned on the pack labels and really do look the business. Review sample courtesy of
  7. F4U-1 Propeller 1:32 Eduard Brassin - For Tamiya Kit Propeller (632110) This is a new prop unit. The blades are individual and seat into the top of the hub via a provided jig. When this is removed from the pour block the modeller will have to drill a locating hole in it. Review samples courtesy of
  8. USN Ensign Flag - Steel 1:350 Eduard USN Flags (53202) This set is for any 1:350 ship/boat needing a US Flag or Ensign. They are in the new steel material so can be bent etc to make them look a bit less flat. They are double sided and come with eyelets to bend round to affix to your rigging. Review sample courtesy of
  9. 1/48 Eduard Aussie 8s are all finished up! HUGE thanks to Brewer for the amazing pictures. First up, the NMF: Alclad and Tamiya chrome silver rattle can Brassin wheels Barracuda resin cowling topper. Silver Spit 14 by Aaron Long, on Flickr Silver Spit 15 by Aaron Long, on Flickr Silver Spit 1 by Aaron Long, on Flickr Silver Spit 4 by Aaron Long, on Flickr Silver Spit 7 by Aaron Long, on Flickr Silver Spit 8 by Aaron Long, on Flickr Silver Spit 17 by Aaron Long, on Flickr Teeth! Eduard 8 Tamiya RAF colors and Gunze for the RAAF gray and green. Brassin Wheels Ultracast cowling top. Ultracast cockpit door. Grey Nurse 1 by Aaron Long, on Flickr Grey Nurse 3 by Aaron Long, on Flickr Grey Nurse 5 by Aaron Long, on Flickr Grey Nurse 7 by Aaron Long, on Flickr Grey Nurse 10 by Aaron Long, on Flickr Grey Nurse 11 by Aaron Long, on Flickr Grey Nurse 17 by Aaron Long, on Flickr Grey Nurse 19 by Aaron Long, on Flickr Grey Nurse 4 by Aaron Long, on Flickr Thanks for looking! And BIG thanks to Jason Brewer (Brewer Models) for the pics.
  10. MiG-21SMT 1:48 Eduard - ProfiPACK Edition From its inception in the 1950s the MiG-21 with the NATO reporting name of Fishbed has become the most produced jet fighter in history. With 10645 being produced in the USSR, 194 in Czechoslovakia, and 657 in India. The simple construction and low maintenance costs made the aircraft a favourite of many countries who purchase Eastern Bloc hardware. The SMT was a development of the SM (which brought a uprated engine, built in 20mm canon, and upgraded avionics). The SMT had an increased fuel capacity and is easily distinguished by the larger spine where the fuel tank was. Initially the tank caused stability issues as it disrupted airflow to the tail, however this was resolved by the designers with a slightly smaller tank. The Kit Eduard's MiG-21 range is now pretty much established as a great range of kits. The initial MF version came out in 2011 followed soon after by the SMT. In this boxing there are eight sprues of grey plastic, a clear sprue, two sheets of PE (one coloured), masks, and two sets or resin rocket pods. Construction begins shockingly with the cockpit area. The front wheel well parts are attached to the underside of the cockpit floor. The instrument panel is then made up from five parts plus the PE. The next step is to complete the engine exhaust. The exhaust is made up from 11 parts and looks to be fairly detailed for plastic parts, this is enhanced by a few PE parts as well. Once complete this is set aside for later. The main wheel bay is then constructed from 9 parts, and again this looks fairly comprehensive for plastic parts. Construction then moves back to the cockpit. The side consoles are constructed and placed in the appropriate fuselage halves. Again there are PE parts supplied for this. Once the side consoles are in, the cockpit floor, exhaust assembly, cockpit bulkhead; and nose cone (it is recommended to add weight in here, though the instructions dont mention how much) are all placed indie the fuselage halves and they can be joined together. The nose ring is then added. The large fuselage spine complete with fin can then be added to the fuselage, and the rudder added. This then complete the main fuselage and construction moves onto the wings. The wings are a one part bottom wing with split left/right uppers. If the side airbrakes are to be positioned open then they will have to be cut out from the wing. A variety of small parts are added to the wheel bays, along with the walls of the bays. The main wheels wells can then be added to the fuselage and the lower wing glued into place. The tail planes are added at this stage along with various linkages and intakes in the engine bay area. The upper wings are added next, along with their separate control surfaces. PE wing fences are added. Work then switches to the underside. The main airbrake can be added in either the open or closed position. Flap actuators are added as is the under tail fairing. Work then switches to the undercarriage. The main wheels are built up along with tyres. The front landing leg is also assembled. These are attached along with the main gear doors. Last touches are to complete the ejector seat. This is 19 part affair in plastic! as good as some resin seats I have seen, and with the addition of the PE seat belts should really look the part. A resin seat with the ProfiPACK kit would have been a nice addition though, The canopies and pitot tubes are added and the underwing/belly pods/ordnance can be added. Drop tanks, large rockets, bombs, and air-2-air missiles are provided for the modeller to use as they want on the plastic sprues. In resin there are two sets of rocket pods. Clear Parts The clear parts are up to Eduard's usual standard. Clear and free from distortion. Decals The kit provides one sheet of decals for the main aircraft markings and a larger sheet for the myriad of stencils which adorn the aircraft & weapons. Both are printed in house by Eduard and should pose no problems. As this is a ProfiPACK boxing 5 decal options are provided. MiG-21MT, Serial Number 96.40.14, Dolgoye Ledovo, Russia MiG-21MT, Serial Number 96.40.15, Dolgoye Ledovo, Russia MiG-21SMT, 582 IAP, Chojna Airfield, Poland, Late Eighties MiG-21SMT, Krasnodar Higher Aviation Training Facility, Soviet Union, ca 1980 MiG-21SMT, 296 IAP, Soviet Union Conclusion This is a great kit from Eduard. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. Fw 190A-8 universal wings 1:72 Eduard WEEKEND Edition The Focke-Wulf Fw190 was designed by Kurt Tank in the late 1930s. His aim was to create a fighter that was not only fast and agile, but also reliable. It had a wide track undercarriage to improve ground handling and also utilised electric rather than hydraulic controls to reduce the risk of system loss in combat. The Fw190 also marked a departure from aircraft like the Bf109 and Spitfire as it combined a 14 cylinder radial engine with a development of the NACA cowling system. This choice was crucial as it meant that the Fw190 would not create additional demand for DB 601 liquid cooled engines. It also allowed a low drag profile for such a powerful engine. Despite early teething problems, the Fw190 first entered operational service over France in August 1941. It proved to be quite a shock for the RAF whose 1440hp Spitfire Mk.V, the best fighter available at the time, was outclassed in terms of firepower and all round performance, particularly at lower and medium altitudes. The Fw190A-8 was the ultimate evolution of the radial-engined fw190s and entered service in 1944. It featured improvements such as extra fuel, improved armour and nearly 2000hp output with emergency boost. The A-8/R2 replaced the outer 20mm cannon in the wings with Mk.108 30mm cannons. The Kit These new Fw 190 kits from Eduard are setting a new standard in 1.72 for excellence. The kit itself is made up of 92 plastic parts spread across of two sprues of dark blue-grey plastic and a single clear sprue with the now-familiar circular layout. The instruction book is a glossy, stapled booklet with full-colour painting diagrams, and 2 decal options as now seems the norm with the Weekend boxings. The quality of the plastic parts is second to none. The mouldings are clean and crisp and there are no traces of flash and no sink marks. The surface detail on the outside of the airframe comprises recessed panel lines and delicately engraved rivet and fastener detail. It looks absolutely superb. The cockpit is made up. Once assembled, the whole thing can be sandwiched inside the fuselage halves along with the firewall and the basic-but-good-enough-in-this-scale engine face. Setting the semi-completed fuselage to one side for a moment, construction turns to the wing. The lower wing is moulded as a single span, to which the main spar (which also forms the rear wall of the main landing gear bays) must be added. The other parts which form the structures and details of the landing gear bays must be added at this point, prior to everything being fixed in place by the addition of the upper wing surfaces. The ailerons are moulded separately to the rest of the wing, which opens up some possibilities for the diorama builder, as well as enhancing the level of realism. Turning back to the fuselage, the rudder is also moulded as a separate part, although the tail planes are solid lumps. In common with other kits of the type, the upper fuselage forward of the cockpit is moulded separately (in this case as two parts with a third for the cannon barrels). Once the basic airframe is together, its time to fit the undercarriage and other finishing details. Each of the main gear legs is made up of two parts, the wheels themselves are made up of nicely moulded tyres and separate hubs. This should make painting them much easier. Ordnance is taken care of with a drop tank and, along with the associated racks and shackles. There are a number of small parts included to cover the final details, including the aileron balance weights and various aerials and antennae. The canopy deserves a special mention as there are four rear sections included; blown and unblown, with different parts for closed and open options. Two propellers are included as well, although only one is needed for the included options. Decals There is one sheet of stencil decals and one for the aircraft markings. Decals are printed in house by Eduard and look to be good, in register and colour dense. 2 options are provided; W. Nr. 73372?, II./JG 300, Bayreuth-Bindlach, Germany, Spring 1945 W. Nr. 170393, flown by Fw. A. Bindseil, 6./JG 1, Störmede, Germany, Spring 1944 Each option is illustrated with a four-view profile a. Conclusion This is a great kit from Eduard and it is good to see it released in a Weekend boxing. Highly Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  12. We've added the latest forthcoming Eduard, AZ Models and Special Hobby kits to our future release section on our website! http://mjwmodels.co.uk/future-releases-by-manufacturer-383-c.asp We've added the following kits - Eduard 1/48 Fw190A (early) Royal Class set, Messerschmitt Bf109G-14 Profipack, Aero L-29 Delfin Profipack - also the Kinetic two Seat Harrier! AZ Models 1/72 kits - Curtiss Mohawk Mk III, P-36A and C (Pearl Harbour markings included), Saunders Roe SR 53 (2 boxings), Martin Baker MB 6 (2 boxings) Eduard 1/72 kits - Fw190A 'Grunherz' Dual Combo set. Special Hobby 1/72 kits - Kittyhawk Mk Ia (P-40E) and P-40N Warhawk All kits are at discounted prices (provisional at the moment) and the Eduard kits are at very good prices (we expect the Bf109G-14 to go down in price to what we have advertised it for), much better than the big retailers! If anyone is interested in them, please put your email in the box provided to be notified when they are in stock, so you can place an order. We expect the December Eduard releases to be here next week hopefully! thanks Mike
  13. Fokker DR.1 ProfiPACK Edition 1:72 Eduard One of the best known and most recognisable aircraft of the First World War, the Fokker Dr.I was developed in response to the appearance of the Sopwith Triplane over the skies of the Western Front in early 1917. Although it couldn’t match other fighters for speed, either in a straight line or in a dive, its initial rate of climb was good and it was supremely manoeuvrable. The Fokker was used by a number of aces, most notably Manfred von Richthofen who scored his final 20 victories in the type until he was shot down and killed on 21 April 1918. The Kit This kit is was originally released in 2000 but is still a good one. The parts are nicely moulded, with no traces of flash but a respectable amount of moulded detail. The cockpit comprises six parts, including a floor, seat, control column and instrument panel. As this is a profipack, there seatbelts and host of other photo-etched parts to use in the kit. These include seatbelts, engine wiring harness, gun cooling jackets, and the pilots seat. Once the fuselage halves have been joined, he lower and middle wings can be added, along with the brace of forward-firing machine guns. The wedge shaped horizontal tail is moulded as a single, solid part, as is the vertical tail/rudder. The upper wing is the last major part of the airframe to be added, along with the outer struts, which slide through the middle wing to join both lower and upper wings together. A fairly basic engine is included, but Eduard to produce a resin replacement if you wish to add detail here. Once the engine and cowling have been fitted, all that remains to do to finish the model is to add the propeller, landing gear and tail skid. One advantage of the DR.1 is the minimal amount of rigging required to complete the model. Decals This being a ProfiPACk edition a generous 5 marking options are included: 450/17, Lax Lt Jacobs, Jasta 7, Rumbeke, Belgium March 1918 545/17 Lt Weiss, Jasta 11, Cappy, France April 1918 425/17 Rttm Von Richthofen, JG1, Lachelle, France March 1918 404/Hptm Von Tutschek, JG2, Toulis, France Feb 1918 454/1 Lt Von Richthofen, Jasta 11, Avesnes-le-Sec, France March 1918 The decal sheet is printed in house and should pose no problems, Conclusion This is an appealing kit, largely because of its simplicity. In contrast to some of their more modern kits, Eduard made it no more complex than it needed to be, and as a result, it majors on modelling pleasure and buildability. What better way than to start a collection of WWI subjects? Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  14. SE.5a Hispano Suiza (82132) 1:48 Eduard ProfiPACK edition The SE.5 was a huge improvement on early WWI fighters, although it originated in 1916 as an experimental scout aircraft, designed by Henry Folland amongst others, who went on to found Folland Aircraft. After some rather serious design problems that resulted in the death of one of the designers, the kinks were ironed out, and coupled with the powerful Hispano-Suiza engine, it became arguably the most capable fighter of the Great War. After a short run of the original SE.5, the A variant appeared with the 200 hp Hispano Suiza engine turning a large 4 bladed prop. There were a number of aces that flew the SE.5a, and coupled with the Camel, the aircraft helped the Allies to gain air superiority over the battlefield, with more American built aircraft scheduled to join the fray that were cancelled by the Armistice reducing their usefulness to nil. After the war many were sold into private hands and the type continued to be seen in the skies for years to come. The Kit This is a new tooling from Eduard, and that shows in the details that are immediately apparent when perusing the sprues. Arriving in one of their smaller kit boxes with the familiar orange ProfiPACK branding, inside are two sprues in medium-dark grey plastic, a circular clear sprue, two frets of Photo-Etch (PE), a sheet of kabuki-style pre-cut masks, and a decal sheet with 5 options. The quality of the kit is outstanding, the parts are crisply moulded, with lots of finley executed stitching, ribs, hinges and fasteners depicted in a mixture of engraved and raised forms. The cockpit is also well detailed, with additions in PE to bring the detail level up where needed. The kit comes with PE belts and instrument panels, which are pre-painted with fine details to enhance the finish. The cockpit framework is inserted into a representation of the inner structural framing along with the seat, fuel tank, controls and cross-braces, which once painted in your preferred manner to simulate wood, are laced with bracing wires to further enhance the detail, but you will need to provide the necessary wires/thread. The cockpit floor is moulded into the lower wing, and here additional ammo cans are stored for the overwing Lewis gun, with another above the instrument panel, which has its plastic details removed before installation of the improved PE version. The dials are raised, so individual PE faces have been supplied on the fret, and great care will be needed to ensure these don't ping off into oblivion. With the cockpit installed in the lower wing, which is a one-piece arrangement by the way, the fuselage is then closed around the assembly, trapping a number of formers within the front section under the engine bay. The engine is then built up, beginning with the sump, banks of pistons, rocker covers and exhaust manifold, to which some additional plug wires and other details could be added if the modeller wishes. The pilot's cockpit decking is also built up at this time, with a clear access panel on one side that is fitted with a PE surround, and a small winder with a PE handle at the joint with the main fuselage. These are both installed later after the upper fuselage section between them is added, and the separate ailerons and elevator fins are glued into their positions. At this point a number of clear triangular inspection windows are inserted into the wings and elevator fins, to show off the moulded-in control detail that will need painting beforehand. A choice of two types of elevator are offered, and the fuselage mounted machine gun is installed just prior to the top decking being closed up. A choice of curved or straight windscreen glass is given, and a simple sighting device with PE mounts is fitted to the top after filling in the slot for a simplified plastic version of the mount. The radiator is mated with the cowling as it is fitted, after which the upper wing is prepared for fitting. Another set of clear inspection panels and PE surrounds are fixed into the wing before it is lined up with the struts and glued in place, usually after much of the painting and rigging is already completed. The ailerons are repeated on the upper wings, and PE arms are fitted, replacing the simple plastic pegs moulded into the parts. The fixed landing gear consists of an aerodynamic triangular frame on each side of the lower fuselage with an axle between them with an aerofoil section. Once complete, it can be installed on the underside of the fuselage in sockets that should hold it firmly in position, and a similar attachment scheme is used for the tail bumper at the rear. The rudder is also fixed at this late stage, with a PE actuator rod replacing the plastic nub that is moulded in. Tail-wheel steering is the order of the day, and another actuator is added under the tail, again replacing the nub on that part too. The Lewis gun and its mount is added to the upper wing right at the end with the circular magazine receiving a PE carry handle and outer face, while the muzzle gets a tiny iron sight. As one decal option doesn't carry the wing mounted gun, it should be filled, but as early in the build as possible to make life easier. A two blade prop or 4 blade prop is fitted depending on the decal option being made. A full page of wiring diagrams are included on the last page of the instructions, with the wires picked out in blue against the airframe to make spotting them easier. Markings The basic colour scheme of most SE.5as was green/olive drab with a linen colour underside, and whatever additional markings the pilot applied. There are quite a variation on the theme with the provided options, with the exception of the camouflage scheme from the 40 Sqn machine. From the box you can build one of the following: D3511, Maj. R. S. Dallas, No. 40 Squadron, Bruay Airfield, France, May 1918 C9539, Capt. H. G. Forrest, No. 2 Sqd, Australian Flying Corps, Savy - Berlette, France, March 1918 C5303, Lt. L. N. Franklin, No. 56 Squadron, Baizieux, France, March 1918 F5910, Lt. W. G Claxton, No. 41 Squadron, Lealvillers, France Feb 1918 D5969, Lt. C. H. R. Lagesse, No. 29 Squadron, St. Omer, France, June 1918 Decals are in house by Eduard and should pose no problems. Conclusion This is a great model from Eduard which has the same Superb detail and some really nice decal options, PE and masks as the Wolseley Viper release. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  15. P-51D Mirrors, Gunsights, and Bazookas 1:48 Eduard Brassin - For Airfix Kit Eduard offer us three new resin sets to upgrade the Rear view mirrors, gunsight, and Bazooka rocket launchers. Rear View Mirrors (648359) This set gives replacement resin mirrors for the canopy frame of the round type. Three are supplied and either one or two can be fitted. The modeller with need to check their references however as there seems to be no pattern to the fitting of these. Gunsight (648361) This is a new gunsight to replace the kit version The main body is in resin with a PE shroud and film for the actual sighting glass. Decals are also supplied for the data plates. Three units are supplied in the pack. Bazooka Rockt Launchers (648337) These are a complete set of replacement launchers for the kit. For the rear of the tubes either empty or loaded ends are available. The racks to attach to the wings are also included as are PE sway braces. Review samples courtesy of
  16. Evening all- Long time since I posted anything.. this is the Eduard new tool G-6. Very nice kit, my only reservations being the slightly oversize exhausts. Finished as white 11 of 1/Jg. 27, c. 1944 C&c welcome, thanks for looking. Cheers, Dave
  17. P-51D Wheels, Control Surfaces & Propeller 1:48 Eduard Brassin - For Airfix Kit Eduard offer us three new resin sets to upgrade the Wheels, Control Surfaces and Propeller of the new Airfix kit. Wheels (648335) This set gives new main wheels and the tail wheel. The main wheels have the diamond tread pattern, and come with separate hubs. The tail wheel is one part and comes with a new leg which is made from a different type of resin which is probably less prone to sagging. As well as the wheels a set of yellow tape masks are also supplied (not pictured). Control Surfaces (648345) These are a new Rudder, tailplanes, and ailerons for the Airfix kit. They are direct drop in replacements with some slight modification only needed to the fuselage where the rudder fits in. Hamilton Standard Propeller (648347) This is a new Hamilton Standard replacement prop unit. The blades are individual and seat into the top of the hub via a provided jig. When this is removed from the pour block the modeller will have to drill a locating hole in it. The unit is then fitted to the base and the spinner added. A small PE part is then fitted to the front of the spinner, as it is a small part 3 are provided as its a given the carpet monster will claim at least one! Review samples courtesy of
  18. Hello gents, this is my new project, FW-190A-4, EDUARD, 1/48, ProfiPACK My goal is Start... For comparison I used photo of FW-190A-8 from RAF Museum Cosford (visited 4 time...) Test fit...
  19. Su-35 Flanker E Update Sets (for Kitty Hawk) 1:48 Eduard Amongst the current flurry of modern Soviet/Russian jets, Kitty Hawk's Flanker E arrived, and now we have some updates for it. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Interior (49858) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass, plus a slip of clear acetate sheet. A complete set of new layered instrument panels and side consoles are the primary parts on the painted set, with new rudder pedals; ejection seat details including cushions and leg restraints; coaming instrumentation including HUD (with acetate glazing) and canopy internal structure, locking mechanism and sills also supplied. Zoom! Set (FE858) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts STEEL (FE859) In case you don't already know, these belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the set of crew belts, you also get a set of the pull-handles between the pilot's knees that gets him out of there in case of an emergency. Exterior (48934) This larger bare brass set contains some important upgrades, such as delicate new afterburner ring, with scrap diagrams showing how they should be arranged; a host of sensors and aerials under and over the nose as well as on the spine; slime-lights; main wheel bay skins to add extra detail and relief there; access panels across the airframe; delicate mesh FOD guards on the intakes, and detail on the inner surface of their cowlings; more in-scale wing fences and wing details; a set of chocks for the mainwheels, and some small upgrades to the landing gear. Masks (EX562) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition you get a set of hub/tyre masks for the wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Review sample courtesy of
  20. After a longer WW1 pause, finally my dad started a new one, an addition for our homeland collection, only two Oefffags so far. DSC_0001 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0002 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr
  21. Pfalz D.IIIa 1:48 Eduard WEEKEND Edition Before WWI the Pfalz company produced Morane-Saulnier aircraft under licence. In late 1916 they hired Rudolph Gehringer as their chief designer to work on an original fighter design. This would become the D.III and it emerged in April 1917. The new aircraft used a plywood monocogue fuselage with plywood strips being formed over a muold to form the fuselage.Once glued together the fuselage halves were covered with a layer of fabric which then doped. This gave great strength to the fuselage and was the same as used by Roland. The wings were of conventional construction for a biplane. Ailerons were wooden and the tail featured an inverted aerofoil section. The Pfalz was well suited to diving attacks due to the strength in its lower twin wing double wing spar. However there were problems with the design and pilots reported they were unable to clear gun jams as the guns were buried in the fuselage. The D.IIIa would cure this by relocating the guns to the upper fuselage decking. In addition it gained enlarged horizontal stabilisers and a more powerful engine. The Kit The Eduard kit of the Pfalz D.IIIa has been with us since 1996, bit has not been re-issued since 2010 according to our friends at Scalemates. The kit arrives on two sprues of grey plastic. There are no signs the moulds have lost anything over the years. Construction starts in the cockpit with a handful of smaller parts being added into each half. To the floor is added the seat, control column, rudder pedals and forward bulkhead. Seatbelts are provided on the decal sheet. The floor and instrument panel (instruments provided on decal) are added into the left fuselage. The engine is built up and provides a good representation of the real thing. This is then also added into the left fuselage along with its support structure. The main fuselage can then be closed up. The tailplanes, rudder, tail struct and lower wing can then be added. The Eduard instructions have you round of the wing tips from the lower wing which are triangular, but strangely on the sprues is a complete lower wing with rounded tips which is not even shown on the sprue layout in the instructions?? The engine exhaust is now fitted along with the guns in front of the cockpit. The upper wing can now be added being careful to line up the wing and fuselage struts. Lastly the landing gear is added along with the prop. For those who are not to great at rigging Eduard have included a diagram to show where it goes. Decals There is one sheet of decals for the aircraft markings. Decals are printed in house by Eduard and look to be good, in register and colour dense. 2 options are provided; which seems the norm for Weekend kits at present. Flown by Oblt B von Alvensleben, Jasta 21, Boncourt, France June 1918 (Box art) Flown by Olbt W Ewers, Jasta 77, Vraignes, France April 1918 Conclusion This is a great kit from Eduard and it is good to see it released in a Weekend boxing. The parts count is not that high that this kit would be a good start for those wanting to try a WWI Subject. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  22. Su-17M4 Update Sets (for Hobby Boss) 1:48 Eduard After years of no new tool Su-17/22 we've now got plenty of choices, with Hobby Boss's new offering a nice kit. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Interior (49855) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels and side consoles are the primary parts on the painted set, with new rudder pedals; ejection seat details including cushions and leg restraints; coaming instrumentation including HUD (with acetate glazing) and canopy internal structure and sills also supplied. Zoom! Set (FE855) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts STEEL (FE856) In case you don't already know, these belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the set of crew belts, you also get a set of the pull-handles between the pilot's knees that gets him out of there in case of an emergency. Exterior (48931) This larger bare brass set contains some important upgrades, such as delicate new afterburner ring, with scrap diagrams showing how they should be arranged; a host of sensors and aerials under and over the nose; splitter plates at the wing roots; access panels along the spine; static wicks on the flying surfaces; more in-scale wing fences and wing details; a set of chocks for the mainwheels; pitot probe fins and filler caps for the fuel tanks. Masks (EX561) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. Review sample courtesy of
  23. P-39K/N 1:48 Eduard Weekend Edition The P-39 was developed to meet a proposal in 1937 for a single engine high altitude interceptor having the tactical mission of interception and attack of hostile aircraft at high altitude. Specifications called for a level airspeed of 360mph at altitude, and a climb to 20,000 feet in under 6 minutes. Armament was to be heavy including a cannon, the engine was to be liquid cooled, and the aircraft was to feature a tricycle undercarriage. Bell had previously designed the YFM-1 Aracuda featuring a mid-fuselage mounted engine to free up space for a large calibre 37mm cannon which would fire through the propeller hub. This was unusual as fighters were normally designed around an engine, not a weapons system. The Bell XP-39 would make its maiden flight in April of 1938 reaching 20000 feet in 5 minutes and maintain 390 mph. However it was found that top speed at 20000 feet was lower than the original proposed 400 mph. Bell would change the aircraft configuration for production to remove the turbo charger so production aircraft were only fitted with a single-stage, single-speed supercharger. Its been argued that Bell did this to save money, though its been said that testing showed aerodynamic issues with it. As a result production aircraft performance declined above 12000 feet and it was never able to serve as a medium level let alone high level aircraft. The RAF ordered the aircraft based on the XP-39 specifications however limitations of the "new" aircraft became apparent, and despite modifications it never was deemed acceptable. Only one Squadron No. 601 would use the aircraft operationally. All UK based aircraft would be sent to Russia, along with aircraft being built under contract in the US. In contrast to the UK, the USSR appreciated the P-39, although they would use it primarily in the ground attack role. The tactical environment of the Eastern front suited a low speed, low altitude aircraft much better. As well as in ground attack the USSR developed successful group aerial fighting tactics for the aircraft. 5 out of the 10 high scoring Soviet aces scored a majority of kills flying P-39's. Contrary to popular myth the Soviets did not use the aircraft for Tank Busting as the US did not supply any armour piercing rounds for the aircraft. The US requisitioned 200 aircraft from an order based for the UK, they called these aircraft the P-400 as they were advertised with a top speed to 400mph. Following the attack on Pearl Harbour these aircraft were deployed to the South West Pacific. Despite being out classed by Japanese aircraft the aircraft excelled in the ground attack. Pilots would fight Zeros and the aircraft were fairly even in the low level environment. By the end of 1942 over 80 Japanese aircraft were credited. These aircraft would go onto fly from Aleutian Islands, and serve in the Panama Canal Zone. The 81st & 350th Fighter Groups would fly in the Mediterranean TO but mainly on maritime patrol missions. Later the 81st would transfer to the Burma TO. The K & N models would feature an Aeroproducts propeller. The Kit The Eduard Cobra kit has been with us for a while now but it is still up to their excellent standards. It is being re-issued here in a Weekend boxing. The kit comes on 3 sprues each of grey plastic, and a clear sprue. Construction starts shockingly enough with the cockpit area. The prominent radio area behind the cockpit is the first area to be built up, and the radios installed. The bulkhead behind the pilots seat is then installed. The seat is then installed along with the instrument panel. The front gear well is attached to the front of the cockpit along with the propeller shaft. Weight is indicated to be needed in this area due to the tricycle undercarriage, however there is no indication of exactly how much is recommended! Once the cockpit/wheel well assembly is completed it can added to the fuselage, and the two parts closed up around it. Construction then moves onto the main wing. This is of a conventional single part lower with to which top left & right wings are added. The insides of the main wheel wells are added along with the oil coolers which are in the wing leading edge. The right inserts will need to be added depending on the armament of your chosen option. If the modeller is going to add underwing tanks or bombs, then the holes will need to be opened up at this point. Once the wings are completed they can be added to the main fuselage along with the tail planes. The last job on the wings is to complete the underside cooling vents. Construction then moves to the main landing gear. As mentioned at the start of the review two sets of brassin wheels are included in the kit. Once the wheels have been added to the model along with the multipart main gear doors and their actuators. Once the main wheels are completed the nose gear can also be constructed. The nose wheel and its gear doors are also added. If bombs or fuel tanks are to be fitted (and the modeller remembered to open up the locating holes before!) then these can be added at this point. The main canopy is then added (full canopy masks being provided) along with the engine exhausts and cockpit side doors. The final touches are to add the pitot probe, wing guns, and lastly to assemble the propeller. Different bosses are provided for the different armament options. Decals As seems to be the norm with their weekend kits these days two decal options are provided. P-39N s/n 42-18805 41st FS, 35th FG Tsili Tsili Air Base New Guinea 1943. P-39K s/n 42-4358 40 FS, 35th FG, Port Moresby, New Guinea 1943. Conclusion The Eduard Cobra has been a round for a while now and its good to see it has been released in a Weekend boxing. It is also good to see that the slightly forgotten use of these aircraft in the New Guinea TO are getting some attention. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  24. P-51D Fuel tanks 1:48 Eduard Brassin - For Airfix Kit Eduard offer us two new sets of drop tanks for the new Airfix P-51D; 75 Gal Fuel Tanks (648349) The are two whole cast replacement P-51D 75 gal drop tanks. Small PE braces and fuel lines are also supplied, as is a small decal sheet with tank markings, 104 Gal Paper Fuel Tanks (648350) The are two whole cast replacement P-51D 104 gal paper drop tanks. Due to their larger size and more complex surface they are three part. Small PE braces, the larger straps, and fuel lines are also supplied, as is a small decal sheet with tank markings. Nose cones are provided for early and late tanks. Review samples courtesy of
  25. P-51D Exhaust Stacks 1:48 Eduard Brassin - For Airfix Kit Eduard offer us two new sets of exhaust stacks for the new Airfix P-51D. One set with fairings and one set without. Once the pour blocks are cleaned off either set will be a drop in fit; Exhaust Stacks (648336) Exhaust Stacks With Fairing (648344) Review samples courtesy of
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