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Aviation trivia quiz - just a bit of fun


pigsty

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The Curtis P-36 Hawk? Evaluated by the RAF but not selected, then undelivered French orders came to the RAF but went to India, along with some built locally,  but there they were known as the Mohawk, which is a Native American tribe not a bird of prey…

best,

M.

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1 hour ago, Jure Miljevic said:

Perhaps Reggiane Re.2000 GA Falco? Built with with integral wing tanks to reach Italian colonies without refueling? Cheers

Jure

You are absolutely right!The RAF ordered 300 Reggiane Re2000 to be used as standard fighter aircraft in the middle East but it was cancelled when Italy entered the war.

 

Saluti

 

Giampiero

Edited by GiampieroSilvestri
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14 hours ago, cmatthewbacon said:

The Curtis P-36 Hawk? Evaluated by the RAF but not selected, then undelivered French orders came to the RAF but went to India, along with some built locally,  but there they were known as the Mohawk, which is a Native American tribe not a bird of prey…

best,

M.

No,it is not a American built aircraft.

 

Saluti

 

Giampiero

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19 minutes ago, GiampieroSilvestri said:

You should be right but according to wikipedia the engine was built from 1926 to 1937 and it was only installed in pre war aircraft.

 

Saluti

 

Giampiero

It did get licensed and built in Russia and Japan, and the Russians used their license built version in tanks as well…

best,

M.

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1 hour ago, cmatthewbacon said:

It did get licensed and built in Russia and Japan, and the Russians used their license built version in tanks as well…

best,

M.

Yes,but the Russian Mikulin engine was built until 1937.The list of aircraft and Tanks that were equipped with it only shows pre war types.I also think that Pigsty is right.

 

Saluti

 

Giampiero

Edited by GiampieroSilvestri
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Hello!

Congratulations, it is BMW VI. It was still in use post-WWII in Yugoslavia, installed in at least two ex-NDH Do 17 E/F aircraft, converted to transports. License built version M17 also powered a handful of remaining R-5 in Soviet Union, Iran and Mongolia. During Polish campaign III./KG 77 still flew Do 17 E bombers with BMW VI engines, although they were replaced shortly afterwards. It also powered some other minor types, like He 60 maritime reconnaissance aircraft, which flew combat missions in Greece and on Crete. Second line use also included courier aircraft like He 70. Possibly some of the older types with BMW VI engine had been later converted into nuisance bombers.

BMW VI was twelve cylinder V-version of six cylinder inline BMW IV, which in turn was developed from WWI BMW IIIa. Max Friz started working on this famous engine before the name of the company had been changed from Rapp to BMW. Earlier in the war Rapp produced V-8 engines for Austro-Hungarian air force, which was the first V-engine of the company. All three types were overcompressed and oversized. I think for BMW VI version with the highest compression ratio "zero-altitude" was set on 3200 m. In thin high altitude air engine overcompression certainly helped, but while volume of the air would be sufficient, its mass would not, hence oversized engines. There was a NACA paper on this topic, translated from German, which offers detailed explanation, but I cannot find it on the web at the moment.

Black Knight: agreed, Hispano-Suiza originally was Spanish company (owned by Spaniard and with chief engineer being French from Suisse), but from 1914 on its main factory was in Bois-Colombes in Paris. I understand vast majority of HS WWI aircraft engines had been built there.

Over to you, Sean. Cheers

Jure

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