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Found 298 results

  1. Biber Trailer + Resin Wheels 1:72 Special Hobby The Biber (Beaver) was a German Naval midget submarine used in WWII. It was crewed by one man and carried to externally mounted 53cm (21") torpedoes, or could carry mines. One advantage if there were any with the Midget Submarines was that by carrying the weapons externally it mean the width was less and it was able to be transported by road. With typical German efficiency even though as a weapons system it was not that great they designed and built a trailer specifically for moving it by road. This standard road trailer with a single axle at either end, the front axle articulating with the draw-bar. A frame work was also added to carry a canvas cover to conceal the load. It also appears from WWII photos the trailer could take the weight and dimensions of a sub loaded with torpedoes. The Kit Inside the box there is one sprue which contains all the parts for the trailer. There is also a small bag with an additional part which has not been moulded correctly on the sprue. For construction the twin wheel units for each corner are mad up first. The articulating front axle unit is then made with a ring top which will fit onto a similar ring on the trailer chassis. The main chassis is a one part moulding to which the front part is added, a back axle and additional straightening parts. The rest of the plastic sprue is then made up of the frame parts for the trailer. If the modeller wants to model the trailer with its tarpaulin cover then a paper template is provided to make a cover. Decals There are no decals provided for the trailer. It can be painted either German Field Grey or Dark Yellow. Wheels Under their Blitz Armour accessories line CMK/Special Hobby supply a set of rein replacement wheels for the trailer. This is one of the few cases where I feel the resin wheels add nothing to the kit at all. The plastic wheels have better tread definition and the hub detail is about the same. The resin wheels will require clean up from the pour blocks, and it would seem the holes in the wheels are flashed over in resin so they will all need to be cleaned up. The plastic wheels meanwhile will need a quick pass of a sanding stick where they remove from the sprue, and to clean the mould line (which is hardly visible) Conclusion The trailer will be a great accompaniment to the Biber submarine and will allow it to be displayed without having to resort to a water diorama, or the stand. It also allows the sub to be part of a larger vehicular diorama if needed. Highly recommended for the trailer, but pass on the extra wheels. Trailer Wheels Review sample courtesy of
  2. source: http://modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=97&t=77712&start=720#p1880503 "Dalšími v pořadí nejbližšími rozpracovanými projekty (ono je toho docela hodně) je moderní dvoumotorák s vrtulemi a druhoválečná stíhačka." next project is a twin-engine modern aircraft with propellers And next is WW2 fighter http://modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=97&t=77712&start=735#p1880919 "ne, nebude to Turbolet, lítá to nebo lítalo na západ od nás (a na jih, sever a možná i na východ)" No, not L-410 Turbolet. It flies or flew to the west of Czech Republic (and to the south, north and maybe to the east) type is still secret
  3. Special Hobby is to (re-)release (ex-MPM) a 1/48th Aero L-39C Albatros "NATO Trainer" kit - ref. SH48171 Hope this time with an injected canopy... Source: http://www.mpmkits.net/2015/07/l-39c-albatros-nato-trainer-148.html Box art V.P.
  4. MPM/Special Hobby is to release 1/48th Grumman Guardian AF-2S & AF-2W kits. First test shot is on display at the Spielwarenmesse Nürnberg 2014. Source IMPS Germany : http://www.ipmsdeutschland.de/Ausstellungen/Nuernberg2014/Bilder_VH/66.html I really like the look of this aircraft! Source: http://www.aviastar.org/pictures/usa/grumman_guardian-s.gif Source: http://img.wp.scn.ru/camms/ar/784/pics/3_3.jpg V.P.
  5. Special Hobby is to release a family of Allison engined 1/72nd Curtiss P-40 Warhawk kits from P-40E to N. Source: http://www.specialhobby.net/2017/02/info-z-norimberku-no2.html V.P.
  6. Hi all! This excellent site had a thread devoted to converting the Wirraway to Harvard Mk. 1 in 2012: Since then Special Hobby have introduced in 1/72 scale, two Wirraways: Special Hpbby 1/72 CA-3/5 Wirraway - First Blood over Rabaul Special Hobby 1/72 CAC CA-9 Wirraway What's the difference? Which shall I chose for converting? Incidentally, I think I can get away with a Harvard Mk.1 canopy from: Special Hobby 1/72 BT-9/NJ-1 US Trainer Plane. Thanks in advance for any help M.M.
  7. Special Hobby is to release a 1/72nd Dornier Do.27 kit - ref.SH72327 Source: https://www.facebook.com/specialhobby/photos/a.458974014197468.1073741825.256992114395660/985391688222362/?type=3&theater Maybe next time in quarter scale... V.P.
  8. Special Hobby is to reissue in 2017 the AZUR/FRROM 1/32nd IAR-81C kit - ref. SH32068 Source: http://www.specialhobby.info/2016/12/special-hobby-newsletter-january.html AZUR/FRROM IAR-81C kit review: http://www.hyperscale.com/2014/reviews/kits/fr8001reviewbg_1.htm V.P.
  9. Source: http://modelweb.modelforum.cz/2013/08/10/172-pripravovana-novinka-od-firmy-mpm-production/?lang=CS V.P.
  10. Kittyhawk Mk.IA 1:72 Special Hobby The P-40 was based on the earlier P-36 but adapted and improved to give a good turn of speed, a stable gun platform and the agility to allow it to enter into service with the US Army Air Force. Improvements continued until the E-model entered service with a more powerful Allinson engine, extra guns and bomb shackles under the wings. It saw action mostly in the desert and Far East where the more delicate thoroughbreds at the leading edge of technology might have stumbled due to the conditions. The K was a similar aircraft with a more advanced Allinson engine and a curved fin fillet to stabilise the aircraft due to the additional torque of the engine. The E was known as the Kittyhawk Mk.IA, while the K was the Kittyhawk Mk.III in foreign service, with many Allied air forces, including Britain, the Soviet Union, Canada and China. Over 13,000 of all variants were built, and the aircraft served until the end of the war. This is the second boxing of Special Hobby's new kit, with a number of revisions to enable the Kittyhawk Mk.IA to be built. It is unrelated to the P-40F released in 2008. Inside the top-opening box are two sprues of grey plastic, a small clear sprue and a sheet of decals. There are no resin or photo etched parts, indicating Special Hobby's continued progress towards the mainstream. The parts are all well detailed and crisply moulded, although the panel lines are a little heavy here and there, particularly on the fuselage sides and lower wing surface. Altogether there are over 70 parts. Cockpit detail is very good indeed. The cockpit sidewalls are moulded separately to the fuselage and feature crisp, clear details. The pilot's seat, armour and bulkhead are all moulded separately, as is the instrument panel and control column. The floor of the cockpit is moulded in place on the part that joins the upper wing halves, but this does not particularly compromise detail, particularly in this scale. Aside from the cockpit, the only other item that has to be assembled before the fuselage halves can be joined is the radiator, which is made up from three different parts. The lower wing, just like the upper wing, is moulded in one piece. The main landing gear bays are made up of a plastic square part which sandwiches between the wing halves to give convincing depth and detail. The tail wheel is moulded in one piece. Once the wing has been joined to the fuselage, you can add the remaining control surfaces. The horizontal tail planes are solid parts, while the rudder is moulded separately to the vertical tail. The engine exhaust pipes are moulded separately to the fuselage and can be added from the outside of the fuselage, which is a major plus when it comes to the painting stage. Two sets of cooling gills are provided; one open and one closed. The propellor is moulded with all three blades as one part which, once painted, can be sandwiches between the front and rear parts of the spinner. A choice of two different drop tanks are provided, along with a bomb for the centerline pylon. The transparent parts are beautifully thin and clear and the sliding part of the canopy is moulded separately to the windscreen. Two different parts are provided depending on whether you wish to finish the canopy in the open or closed positions. The decal sheet provides for three options: ⦁ Kittyhawk Mk.IA AK772 GA-Y (no sniggering) 'London Pride', No. 112 Squadron RAF, Libya, 1942. This aircraft is finished in Middle Stone and Dark Earth over Dark Mediterranean Blue; ⦁ Kittyhawk Mk.IA A29-153 O 'Orace', No. 75 Squadron, RAAF, Milne Bay, New Guinea, March 1943. This aircraft is finished in the Dupont equivalent of Dark Earth and Dark Green over Sky Blue; and ⦁ Kittyhawk Mk.IA AK905 LZ-D, No. 111(F) Squadron RCAF, Anchorage, Alaska, 1942. This aircraft is finished in the Dupont equivalent of Dark Earth and Dark Green over Sky Grey. The decals themselves are nicely printed and look glossy and opaque. Conclusion It's great that Special Hobby have released a kit of the Kittyhawk to complement Airfix's early Warhawk. This kit is both more detailed and more complex than the Airfix kit, and it's all the better for it. It should build up into a pleasing model, particularly if you acquire some of the not-inconsiderable resin sets that CMK have released alongside the kit. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. P-40N Warhawk 1:72 Special Hobby The Curtiss P-40N Warhawk was a single seat fighter that could trace its roots back to the radial engined P-36 Hawk first flown in 1938. It ranked amongst the most widely produced US fighters of the war, with more than 13,000 rolling off the production line. A popular aircraft with its pilots, the P-40 earned a reputation as a manoeuvrable yet tough aircraft. The P-40N was the last major production variant. The fuselage behind the cockpit was stretched to counter the torque of the more powerful engine. In an effort to reduce weight, the number of .50 cal machine guns was reduced from six to four, but was later increased to six following feedback from pilots. In Commonwealth service it was known as the Kittyhawk Mk.IV This is an all-new kit from Special Hobby, unrelated to the P-40F released in 2008. Inside the top-opening box are three sprues of grey plastic, a small clear sprue and a sheet of decals (plus a small extra 'addendum' sheet. Gone is the fret of photo etch parts, indicating Special Hobby's continued progress towards the mainstream. The parts are all well detailed and crisply moulded, although the panel lines are a little heavy here and there, particularly on the fuselage sides and lower wing surface. Altogether there are over 70 parts. Cockpit detail is very good indeed. The cockpit sidewalls are moulded separately to the fuselage and feature crisp, clear details. The pilot's seat, armour and bulkhead are all moulded separately, as is the instrument panel and control column. The floor of the cockpit is moulded in place on the part that joins the upper wing halves, but this does not particularly compromise detail, particularly in this scale. Aside from the cockpit, the only other item that has to be assembled before the fuselage halves can be joined is the radiator, which is made up from three different parts. The lower wing, just like the upper wing, is moulded in one piece. The main landing gear bays are made up of a plastic square part which sandwiches between the wing halves to give convincing depth and detail. Two different main gear wheels are provided, so make sure you select the correct version for the particular aircraft you wish to build. The tail wheel is moulded in one piece. Once the wing has been joined to the fuselage, you can add the remaining control surfaces. The horizontal tail planes are solid parts, while the rudder is moulded separately to the vertical tail. The engine exhaust pipes are moulded separately to the fuselage and can be added from the outside of the fuselage, which is a major plus when it comes to the painting stage. Two sets of cooling gills are provided; one open and one closed. The propellor is moulded with all three blades as one part which, once painted, can be sandwiches between the front and rear parts of the spinner. A choice of two different drop tanks are provided, along with a bomb for the centerline pylon. The transparent parts are beautifully thin and clear and the sliding part of the canopy is moulded separately to the windscreen. Two different parts are provided depending on whether you wish to finish the canopy in the open or closed positions. The decal sheet provides for three options: ⦁ Curtis P-40N-5, 49th Fighter Group, 7th Fighter Squadron, Gusap, New Guinea, 1944. This aircraft is finished in Olive Drab over Neutral Grey with a white tail; ⦁ Curtis P-40N-5 "Butter Bean II", 80th Fighter Group, 89th Fighter Squadron, Nagaghuli, Assam, India, 1944. This aircraft is finished in Olive Drab over Neutral Grey; ⦁ Curtis P-40N "Snafu", No. 120 Squadron, ML/KNIL/RNEIAAF, 72nd Air Defence Wing, RAAF, Mokmer Biak, New Guinea, 1945. This aircraft is finished in Olive Drab over Neutral Grey; and ⦁ Curtis P-40N "Snafu", No. 120 Squadron, ML/KNIL/RNEIAAF, 2VB Andir, Dutch East Indies, 1947. This aircraft is finished in Olive Drab over Neutral Grey. The decals themselves are nicely printed and look glossy and opaque. Conclusion Airfix have already provided us with a nice early Warhawk, so it's good to see Special Hobby cover the later Warhawk with this new kit. It is both more detailed and more complex when compared to the Airfix kit, and is all the better for it. It should build up into a pleasing model, particularly if you acquire some of the not-inconsiderable resin sets that CMK have released alongside the kit. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  12. "Czech wars" is not over. After the surprise re-release announcement from the AZmodel 1/72nd SMB2 kit (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235011686-172-dassault-super-mystère-b2-smb2-by-azmodel-re-release-box-artschemessprues-release-december-2016/): Special Hobby is to release, in cooperation with Azur-FROMM, a new tool 1/72nd Dassault Super Mystère B2 (SMB2) kit - ref. SH? Armements and fuel tanks will be included in the box. Different boxings will offer the opportunity to reproduce the original SMB2 as well as the Israeli re-engined variant. Source: http://www.specialhobby.net/2016/11/super-mystere-172-pripravovany-model.html CADs Special Hobby, do you hear me, true scale modellers need a 1/48th SMB2 kit... V.P.
  13. My latest two completions, the Airfix Seafire FR.47 and the Special Hobby Seafire XV. The Airfix kit used the BarracudaCast propeller and seat, Squadron Canopy and Aeromaster decals for 800 Squadron in 1949. The Special Hobby kit was pretty much OOB with Aeromaster decals for 803 Squadron RCN in 1947. Vallejo paints used throughout. I've included shots of the Seafire 47 with the Spitfire I, the Seafire XV with its close relative the Spitfire XII and with its replacement in the RCN, the Sea Fury. As usual, please excuse the dust and the poor photography! Thanks for looking! Chris
  14. J2M3 Raiden Seat with Belts, for Hasegawa kit 1:72 CMK Somewhat out of the blue, Special Hobby have issued a replacement resin seat for Hasegawa's Mitsubishi J2M3 Raiden kit. I for one am pleased about this, not least because I have a dual combo edition of this kit in my stash, acquired for a keen price from the excellent Hamex kit swap. The seat is nicely detailed and has harnesses cast in place. The quality of casting is top-notch too, with no bubbles of flaws in evidence. If you have the Hasegawa Raiden, then this will make a simple but effective upgrade to the cockpit. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  15. Special Hobby working on SAAB VIGGEN scaled down to 1/72 metal mould made with 3D CAD-CAM CNC technology like Vampire, Gnat, Mirage etc.
  16. Biber "German Midget Submarine" 1:72 Special Hobby SN72006 The Biber (Beaver) was a German Naval midget submarine used in WWII. It was crewed by one man and carried to externally mounted 53cm (21") torpedoes, or could carry mines. Like many projects at the time the Sub was hastily developed to meet the threat of an Allied invasion of Europe. Construction of the prototype which began in Feb 1944 only took 6 weeks, design was said to be influenced by the British Welman Submarine one of which the Germans captured in Norway in 1943. As the submarine carried its weapons externally it made the width less and easy to transport by land (see later review for the trailer). The hull was made from 3 sections in steel with an aluminium conning tower on top which contained armoured glass view points. The submarine was difficult for the one man to operate as he had to control the hydroplanes, rudder and periscope at the same time, while trying to keep track of course, speed and depth; plus any target! In addition no trim system was fitted. All of this was not helped by long missions where they pilots used drug or caffeine laced drinks in order to stay awake. For propulsion the Germans used a 32hp petrol engine for surface running. Despite concerns over carbon monoxide issues the engine was used as it was cheap and plentiful. Underwater a 13hp electric motor was used. Underwater endurance was not great, and even more so when batteries were taken out to help obtain neutral buoyancy. Despite many attempts to launch the boats operationally they were only responsible for the sinking of one Allied vessel the Alan A Dale which was sunk off the Dutch port of Terneuzen. All 65 on board survived. Even though only one allied vessel was sunk, an inadvertent discharge in port buy one sub manged to sink another 11 (good going!). It would seem the Biber like the Welman were both ineffectual at best and you wonder if the resources would have been better placed elsewhere. The Kit Inside the box are five sprues of grey plastic, a small clear one and a small sheet of decals. The sub is on one sprue on its own, there are two sprues with the torpedoes on them, and two sprues for the stand. The quality of the parts is first class and you can clearly see where the different parts of the pressure hull bolted together. There is no real interior but then even with the main hatch open you will not see much inside. Construction starts with the crewman's seat being made and added to the helm console, This is then installed in the conning tower. The clear view ports are then added into the conning tower. The tow hull halves can then be joined. The rudder and stern planes are then added. The side racks to hold the weapons and their support structure is then added. The top of the conning tower is added along with the main hatch, and then the periscope and what looks like air intake for the surface running petrol engine. Two skids are added to the underside of the hull along with the propeller shaft and prop. The torpedoes are then made up. These are simple constructions of two halves with the side fins, rear propeller and front impeller being added. Lastly the stand is made up from four parts. Decals There is a small decal sheet in house from Special Hobby. They look to be in register and should pose no problems. There are schemes for 5 Subs. Unknown vessel, K Flotilla, late 1944. Four tone camo vessel, K Flotilla, 263(3 Biber Flotilla) Hollen Base Norway, Spring 1945. Unknown vessel with Sharks mouth, Early 1945 found washed up with pilot dead. Unknown vessel K Flotilla, captured by allied forces, likely France 1944. Biber 87, K Flotille 1945 Conclusion This is a well detailed if not a great number of parts kit which will build up into a great looking kit. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  17. After the F.MK.3/.5 ( http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234944522-172-de-havilland-dh100-vampire-fmk35-by-special-hobby-released-new-fmk3-boxing/?hl=vampire) Special Hobby is to release a 1/72nd de Havilland DH.100 Vampire F.Mk.1 kit - ref.SH72339 Source: http://www.ipmsdeutschland.de/Ausstellungen/Nuernberg2016/Bilder_AT/Special_Hobby_09.htm V.P.
  18. After the 1/48th Tarangus' Saab JA37 (ref.TA4803 - http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234970637-saab-ja37-viggen-148/?hl=viggen) and the Special Hobby's AJ37 Viggen (ref. SH48148 - http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234981928-saab-aj-37-viggen-148/?hl=viggen), here's the two seats variant, the Saab Sk37 Viggen, once again by Special Hobby - ref.48150 Source: https://www.facebook.com/specialhobby/posts/920557591372439 V.P.
  19. HAL Ajeet Mk.I / Gnat F1 1:72 Special Hobby The Folland Gnat was a lightweight, subsonic fighter and trainer aircraft designed by Teddy Peter of Westland Whirlwind and English Electric Whirlwind fame. Although the fighter version of the Gnat was never used by the RAF, it was used by Finland, Yugoslavia and India, who built many examples of the diminutive fighter under licence. The Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) Ajeet (invincible) was an improved Gnat F.1, with additional fuel tanks in the wings, an extra pair of underwing hardpoints and improved avionics. This is a re-release of Special Hobby's Gnat F1, with decals and parts relevant to the revised Indian version. The kit comprises three sprues of light grey plastic, a small clear sprue and the aforementioned decals. As this is a modern Special Hobby tooling, there are no resin or photo etched parts. Construction, as ever, begins with the cockpit. This comprises a tub, rear bulkhead, instrument panel, gunsight, control column and ejection seat. Curiously there are two instrument panels; one for use with an open canopy and one for a closed canopy. The former looks larger, and presumably is more accurate but would not allow the canopy to close. A choice of two different ejector seats are provided, thus capturing one of the more obvious differences between the Gnat and the Ajeet. Before the fuselage can be closed, the four-part engine tailpipe and the nose gear bay must also be fixed in place. You don't need to worry about adding ballast at this stage, as the nosecone is a seperate part and can easily accommodate the recommended one gram of weight. The wings are moulded with seperate upper and lower parts, while the vertical and horizontal tail parts are moulded as solid items. I thought the Ajeet had slab elevators, but the parts provided are the same as those used for the regular Gnat F.1. I can't seem to find any decent photographs of the Ajeet's tail, however, so I shall have to reserve judgement for now. A choice of two different nose cones are provided, so make sure you use the correct version for the particular aircraft that you want to build. Flip the aircraft over and things get busy, with nicely detailed landing gear and a selection of fuel tanks and two different rocket pods. Two different canopy parts are provided; one open and one closed. The decal sheet provides for three options: HAL Ajeet E1997, No. 2 Squadron "Winged Arrows", Indian Air Force, 1980s. This aircraft is finished in overall natural metal with the fuselage from the trailing edge of the wing backwards painted in light blue; Hindustan Gnat IE1083, No. 23 Squadron, Indian Air Force, 1965s. This aircraft is finished in overall natural metal; Hindustan Gnat E256, Operational Conversion Unit, Indian Air Force. This aircraft is finished in overall natural metal with yellow and black tiger stripes along the spine and vertical tail; HAL Ajeet E2024 "Murali", No. 2 Squadron "Winged Arrows", Indian Air Force, 1980s. This aircraft is finished in overall natural metal, with black chevrons on the upper wing and rear fuselage/tail. Conclusion Special Hobby's Gnat is a nice little kit and easily the equal of Airfix's trainer version. Construction looks straightforward and the kit is surprisingly well detailed. Notwithstanding the question mark over the elevators (which I may well be wrong about), this looks like a really well-executed kit and one that can be highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  20. Seahawk

    Revell 1/72 Vampire F.3 out

    This one caught me by surprise on the shelves: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/RV3934 It's a rebox of the relatively recent Special Hobby kit and I expect the parts are unchanged. Also present on the runners are clipped wingtips and 4 rather nice rockets on rails for the FB.5, the extended starboard intake fairing for the FB.9 and the framed canopy (but not the squared off fins) for the F.1, plus a transparent upper nose section for a variant that I'm not aware of. Very nice Cartograph transfers for VT821 L of 601 Sq, North Weald, 1952, and VF316 A of 608 Sq, Thornaby, 1951. I know there were expressions of disappointment about the air intake shape when Special Hobby first issued this kit. They are perhaps a bit "squashed" vertically but they don't scream "wrong" at me when I look at the parts on the runners. But Vampires are not my subject. NB I am NOT saying they have been modified.
  21. Hi Here are my last builds with these two Curtiss fighters from Special Hobby. First, this is the P-40N-5 s/n 42-105233 from the 89th Fighter Squadron / 80th Fighter Group in 1944 and based in Assam, East India. She was painted with Olive Drab and Neutral Grey from the Aqueous Gunze range. Decals came from the box. I added the resin wheels from CMK 72295 and the seat from 72294. Second is the Kittyhawk Mk. Ia AK772 of the No 112 Squadron RAF in spring 1942 somewhere in Libya. The paint came from Gunze for the Dark Earth and Middle Stone and from Xtracrylics for the Azure Blue. Inside the cockpit, I used CMK 72301 side panels and 72293 seat. Both builds will be published in Tamiya Model Magazine French Edition. Comment are welcome. Patrick
  22. CASA C-212-100 (72344) 1:72 Special Hobby The CASA C-212 Aviocar is a medium cargo aircraft with a short field capability designed by Construcciones Aeronáuticas SA or CASA of Spain. The aircraft is a boxy fuselage with a high mounted wing and twin turbo prop engines. The cabin is not pressurised. In the 1960's the Spanish Air Force was looking to modernise as at the time it was still relying on a mix of C-47s and Ju-52s for its transport requirements. The SASA 212 was a proposed 18 seat transport aircraft which could fill a few different roles. The aircraft first flew in 1971 and the Spanish Air Force would acquire them from there. 477 Aircraft were built over 42 years, with the last -400 with a glass cockpit by then being built in 2012 when Airbus Military decided to discontinue production. Production continues though under license in Indonesia. The aircraft has been used by many military and civil users all over the world The Kit This is a new toolkit from Special Hobby. The kit arrives on five sprues of plastic and a clear spure. From the look of the unused parts on the sprue a maritime/patrol version is planned at some point. Construction starts with adding the instrument panel in at the front. Instruments are supplied as decals. The windows are put into the main fuselage halves from the inside at this point, as well as the side cockpit glazing. The main fuselage doors and inserts at the front are then added. The rest of the cockpit is then built up, this can then be added and thee main fuselage closed up. Its worth noting there in no interior for the main cargo cabin and the ramp is moulded closed. Next up the undercarriage is made up and the main sponsons added. The nose is added along with the main cockpit glazing. The tail planes are made up with separate control surfaces. The instructions advise to add nose weight but omit how much is needed. The tailplanes ad rudder are now added to the main fuselage, along with the tail plane fairings. The wings are made up next. There is a single part upper and left/right lowers. 4 flap actuator fairings are added to each side. The two engine nacelles are made up and added along with the fronts and propeller assemblies. These can then be added to the wings. Two trim tabs on the wing need to be removed. The wing is now fitted to the fuselage along with various antennas and sundry parts. As these differ in the varietals attention will be needed to select the correct ones. The wings are made up next. There is a single part upper and left/right lowers. 4 flap actuator fairings are added to each side. The two engine nacelles are made up and added along with the fronts and propellor assemblies. These can then be added to the wings. Two trim tabs on the wing need to be removed.The wing is now fitted to the fuselage along with various antennas and sundary parts. Markings There are printed by Eduard and should pose no problems, three options are provided; Spanish Air Force. Paracute school Murcia Alcantarilla AB, 2009 - Overall Grey. Chilean Army, Santiago de Chile International, 2009. Two Greens/tan over grey. Colombian Navy 2005. Two tone grey. Conclusion It is great to see this over looked small transport aircraft now being injection moulded in 1/72. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  23. Blohm & Voss BV 155V-1 "Karawanken" 1:72 Special Hobby The Blohm & Voss BV-155 was a high-altitude interceptor, not dissimilar in concept to the Westland Welkin. The aircraft started life on the drawing board at Messerschmitt's headquarters at Augsberg as a navalised adaptation of the Me 109, before morphing into a high-altitude interceptor. The work was eventually handed over to Blohm & Voss in 1943 as Messerschmitt were simply too overworked to complete the design. Blohm & Voss made a number of key changes, including replacing the wing with a laminar flow design and fitting a new tail unit. The prominent wing-mounted radiators were also re-designed and the cockpit was moved forward in order to restore the proper centre of gravity. This delayed the aircraft's first flight until February 1945. Although the type was engaged in a full flight test programme, it failed to progress beyond this stage before the end of the war. The aircraft was named "Karawanken" after the Karawanken alps that form the border between Austria and Slovenia. If you think this is a re-release of the original Special Hobby kit from 2003, then think again. This is an all-new kit which could be described as mixed-media, although curiously the only resin parts are inserts for the main landing gear bays. Tke kit comprises well over 60 parts, although several are marked as unused for this particular edition, spread across four frames of grey plastic, as well as a single clear part and the aforementioned resin bits. The moulded detail is fine and crisp, although the overall impression is of a kit that is more limited run in nature than Special Hobby's recent P-40 or Vampire kits. The cockpit comprises a floor and rear bulkhead, seat, sidewalls, rudder pedals, control column and throttle. The sidewalls and throttle have to be fitted directly to the inside of the fuselage rather than to the cockpit tub itself. A plan view of this arrangement is included in the instructions, which suggests one should take care with the placement of these parts. before the fuselage halves can be joined, the tail wheel and large oil cooler assembly must be assembled and sandwiched between the two halves. Typically for a low-wing monoplane, the lower wing (at least the central part) is moulded in a single span, with seperate upper surfaces. None of the control surfaces are moulded separately. The huge underwing radiators are each comprised four parts that fit neatly behind the main landing gear bays. Once the wing has been assembled, it can be joined to the fuselage. The main landing gear is nicely detailed and the wheels are split vertically. An additional diagram showing the exact angle of the landing gear leg and the camber of the wheel is provided. There are a couple of air intakes to fit to the forward fuselage, as well as a small DF loop which locates behind the cockpit. The canopy isn't quite as crisp as I would like, but it's definitely usable. The instructions show the arrangement for fitting the canopy in the open position, but keen-eyed modellers will have noticed that judicious application of the razor saw will be required if this option is desired. The propellor is moulded in two pieces which fit one over the other. This is a slightly unusual arrangement and a little extra care will be required to ensure that all four blades are sitting true before fitting the spinner. The decal sheet provides marking for a single prototype BV 155-V1, based at Finkerwalde in December 1944. Colour references are provided for the original RLM and Gunze codes. I believe a 'what if' version is in the offing if you prefer to finish your model in a theoretical in-service configuration. Conclusion From time-to-time I review a kit that really appeals to me, regardless of the subject. This is a really nice little model. Despite its simplicity relative to some modern Special Hobby kits, it is well detailed and nicely executed. I can't see how it would take longer than a week to build and it will certainly stand out on your model shelf. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  24. MPM SH32049 boxart: http://www.modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=97&t=71717&start=0&st=0&sk=t&sd=a translation: Main parts from short run and small details from metal mould.
  25. Special Hobby is to release in 2018 a family of Armstrong Whitworth Meteor nightfighters kits incl. NF.11/12/13 & 14 - ref. SH72358, 72360, 72363 & 72364 Source: http://www.specialhobby.net/2017/12/sh72358360363364-aw-meteory-nf.html Canopies mould V.P.
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