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Marklo

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About Marklo

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  1. I wouldn't necessarily assume that as my Tomahawk came to the USSR via the RAF and had the roundels crudely overpainted before (some) stars were applied.
  2. Funnily enough I'm in the midst of a Bulldog as well (smer kit) and a Flycatcher and a Fury. The Smer isn't all that bad, once the molded on decals were removed, the ejector marks removed, the under wings skinned and some detailing around the engine and some interior detail addded, hmm
  3. Thanks, I'm pretty pleased with the build so far. Yes the propeller looks silly for the size of the machine, but it is to plan. Funnily enough I find carving propellers quite therapeutic.
  4. Finished sanding (for now) and skinned the underside of the wings. Much happier with the resultant profile. I'll use milliput extra fine to finish off the wing roots next. Working on the propellor, profile is now good but still baseball bat like in thickness.
  5. Did quite a bit on the Gamecock over the weekend. strakes, Windscreen, bomb rack, new tail skid and the wing lights all fitted. Exhausts, more lights, fuel lines and gun barrels to follow.
  6. In propellor country myself at the moment, started on the prop for the Bristol racer. Pretty much the same process but it's probably the same size as your entire model
  7. Built the Airfix Tomahawk kit earlier this year. It's a lovely and somewhat underrated airplane. I was certainly pleased with the results (although I do seem to gravitate towards schemes that were applied with a 4" brush in real life )
  8. Pheonix. I do agree with you . It's a hobby and we do it for fun (and in my case distraction from CFS as well) and I wouldn't criticize anyone who is doing that whatever their skill level, so long as they enjoy it. I love the fact that the aftermarket is there when you I want to treat myself or for things I hate doing (like radial engines and wheels ) and that there are many many types in kit form nowadays that just weren't available years ago. (although I do regret the fact that the hobby isn't as widespread as it was what with Kids favoring the virtual over the real world hobbies) My ire (if that's what it is ) is more aimed at Airfix and the like as all they seem to do is put pressure on modelers to use scads of aftermarket products and sets to be a real modeler. I'd love to see some simple conversions and basic scratchbuilding/detailing in the magazine. I remember the days of Airfix and Scale models which had articles covering all skill levels, from basic tips on gluing and painting, through conversions, vac forms and scratch builds (granted in those days you had to go there if you wanted anything even slightly out of the ordinary) TL:DR so long as you are happy with your modelling I'll never argue with you as we're in it for the entertainment value most of all. # Oh and I like soapboxes so long as no one gets hurt
  9. Because it amuses and occupies us and there is s certain satisfaction from knowing it's there and being able to model at that level (lovely work btw) I tend to vary from bare minimum that can be seen once the cockpit is button ed up to lavish (over) detailing as the mood takes me. But if I were being honest and totally sane and rational, I wouldn't put a whole lot more than a seat a stick and a control panel because generally you can't see the rest. Come to think of it if I were entirely sane and rational I might not enjoy making scale models of historic aircraft at all
  10. Looking really beautiful Putty. Even more amazing given the tiny scale.
  11. Funny I was reading through my copy of Warplanes of the first world war (Fighters; Volume 1) yesterday evening and going through the Avro section (I really Like the Avro spider which uses 504K parts for the forward fuselage and may turn up in my collection sooner rather than later) and I started wondering where your 504K had gotten to.
  12. Really beautiful work. The classic modelers dilemma, how much detail to put in when it may or may not be seen in the finished build.
  13. Within sight of the finish line. All the fiddly detail bits that have to go on. The exhausts ( I'm sure I have two but can't find the other, thank you Pip) the fuel lines, two landing lights, four formation lights, ten strakes (with a few spares for the carpet monster), a replacement tail skid, the bomb rack and a windscreen. Gun barrels some radio lines, control lines, fuel gauges and fairings and some rigging and some touchup of the paint work after that then it's finished
  14. I already have my main artwork done. I cut a bitmap out of the photo then used expression to draw and edit a B-spline around it. Once I paint the fuselage I was going to photograph it to match the red and then print it either on clear film with white underneath or on the white. How many have been sold. Hmm €12 Would double my outlay on the build Not to start a controversial debate but I'm very conflicted on aftermarket stuff in general. It can be nice to buy a sub-component (engines, decals etc) but the ready availability of add ins (I feel) dilutes the hobby and makes it very expensive too. Let me explain my issue, I subscribe to Airfix magazine (digitally I might add) and although I like reading the magazines, the builds all tend to be kit a, with resin cockpit set b, and landing gear set c and detail set d which to me means that there is a lot of assembly going on but little or no creative modelling skill, also the build will have gone up to €50 plus by the time you've got the kit and the resin and the PE, yes the end result is very nice, but for me the stand out builds are where the modeler has made something unique and applied some measure of skill in building and detailing the model, other than just putting someone else's bits together. Now don't get me wrong, if you're happy with that then that's ok, but it doesn't work for me (Puts soapbox away)
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