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    • Mike

      PhotoBucket are no longer permitting 3rd party hosting   01/07/17

      As most of you are now painfully aware, Photobucket (PB) are stopping/have stopped allowing their members to link their accumulated years of photos into forums and the like, which they call 3rd party linking.  You can give them a non-refundable $399 a year to allow links, but I doubt that many will be rushing to take them up on that offer.  If you've previously paid them for the Pro account, it looks like you've got until your renewal to find another place to host your files, but you too will be subject to this ban unless you fork over a lot of cash.   PB seem to be making a concerted move to another type of customer, having been the butt of much displeasure over the years of a constantly worsening user interface, sloth and advertising pop-ups, with the result that they clearly don't give a hoot about the free members anymore.  If you don't have web space included in your internet package, you need to start looking for another photo host, but choose carefully, as some may follow suit and ditch their "free" members at some point.  The lesson there is keep local backups on your hard drive of everything you upload, so you can walk away if the same thing happens.   There's a thread on the subject here, so please use that to curse them, look for solutions or generall grouse about their mental capacity.   Not a nice situation for the forum users that hosted all their photos there, and there will now be a host of useless threads that relied heavily on photos from PB, but as there's not much we can do other than petition for a more equitable solution, I suggest we make the best of what we have and move on.  One thing is for certain.  It won't win them any friends, but they may not care at this point.    Mike.

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Found 155 results

  1. Hi All, I have just completed an Academy 1/72 scale P-51D, I have only just started making models so this is one of my first serious attempts so had help from my dad and enjoyed making it, I wanted to make it 'Old Crow' as I'm an aviation graphics artist and managed to get a couple of my pieces signed by Bud Anderson himself, so this will go along side them in my room. Comments and criticism welcome always looking to improve I have got another Academy P-51B which I will make into Berlin Express and also an Airfix 1/72 scale P-51D which I'm looking at making into 'Tall in the Saddle'. 1/72 'Old Crow' P-51D Mustang 357th FG by Ryan Dorling ( Ryan Dorling Photography, Reheat Ph, on Flickr 1/72 'Old Crow' P-51D Mustang 357th FG by Ryan Dorling ( Ryan Dorling Photography, Reheat Ph, on Flickr 1/72 'Old Crow' P-51D Mustang 357th FG by Ryan Dorling ( Ryan Dorling Photography, Reheat Ph, on Flickr Kind Regards Ryan
  2. Hi all I've just been looking at Wg Cdr M L Donnet's Mustang in "RAF Mustang and Thunderbolt Aces" I cannot find supporting photos of it anywhere else. How big would his personalised fueslarge recognition letters have been and can I find them on a 1/72 decal sheet? What colour is the spinner bose? Book gives dark blue. Black on some sites showing artists' impressions. If anyone can give me a link to photos of KM121, I shall be very grateful Cheers M.M.
  3. Dear fellow Britmodellers, here's my 1/72 Airfix Mustang P-51D (Kit #A01004A) built straight from the box. Decals represent the mount of Lt. Eugene W. James, 352nd FG, 328th FS, Bodney/Norfolk, England 1944. Painted with acrylics from Gunze/Mr.Hobby and Alclad II. This kit is cheap, easy to build and has very good surface detail. The plastic used by Airfix is quite soft, which resulted in some broken or bent parts. I broke the control column and the blade antenna when trying to remove it from the sprues. (I scratch-built a new control stick and replaced the kit's antenna with a photoetch item.) One of the undercarriage legs was badly bent. Due to the softness of the plastic, the model is in a "wobbly" state, when you touch it, it rocks from side to side! This is the only weak point of the whole model kit. If I build another one, I will invest in a metal undercarriage from Scale Aircraft Conversions. Ok, here's the pictures ... as usual, taken by Mr. Wolfgang Rabel of IGM Cars & Bikes. Best wishes from Vienna! Thanks for your interest! Roman
  4. Hello! Here is one of my models. In building I used RasKit whells set, Aires cockpit, Eduards photo etched setMini World barells set, Rex exhaust nozzles set. In painting I used AK {Xtreme metal and MR color Super metallik paints. Weathering- oil dots pigments and washes. Decal- Isra decal.
  5. A 1/48th N.A. P-51D Mustang. More tomorrow. Source: https://www.facebook.com/officialairfix/posts/10154504386816271:0 Oh no. I would have preferred... (blablabla) For the record: Meng soon to release new tool P-51D: http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235009127-148-north-american-p-51d-mustang-by-meng-box-artcads-release-2016/ Eduard 1/48th Mustang family in project... http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234974169-148-north-american-p-51-mustang-family-long-term-project-by-eduard/ HobbyBoss recent easy assembly Mustang: http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234922415-p-51d-mustang-iv-hobby-boss-148/ etc. https://www.scalemates.com/search-solr.php?fkSECTION[]=Kits&q=North+American+P-51+Mustang+P-51D+1%2F48 V.P.
  6. Kiwi resin is to release soon a 1/48th Cavalier Mustang conversion set. Source: http://www.kiwiresin.com/#!product/prd1/4506744761/coming-soon!-1-48-cavalier-mustang-conversion V.P.
  7. Airfix's 4th(?) foray into blue-nosed Mustangs. I'm sure we're all familiar with the plastic, so here's the new bits: Box art: Painting guide: Cartograf decal sheet:
  8. I'll be building two kits for this group build, two Airfix F-51Ds in RNZAF markings. These aircraft flew in the Territorial Air Force and only flew for a short period between 1951/2 to 1955 before being retired. They had arrived in New Zealand in 1945, but were put into storage due to the end of hostilities with Japan. I'll be building NZ2425, seen at the top of the Ventura sheet here. I believe this aircraft was still in its factory finish of natural metal with the panels joins in the wings filled in and the wings painted aluminium/silver. The roundels were painted directly over the American markings on the fuselage, upper port wing, and lower starboard wing. And NZ2413 seen here. This aircraft was repainted in high speed silver and had a cuffed propeller. According to Anderson's Mustangs of the RAAF and RNZAF when the Mustangs assembled 1951 the wings, control surfaces, and undercarriage doors were painted in high speed silver. I was going to give NZ2425 painted wings regardless as I believe they came this way from the factory, but I'm not sure about the control surfaces and undercarriage doors. Need to get myself a copy of the definitive Mustang resource, Southern Cross Mustangs, by David Muir. I originally wanted to depict NZ2415 in the markings of the Canterbury squadron of the Territorial Air Force. This used to be a popular aircraft flying at shows around the country, but I haven't seen it in the air for quite some time. However, I'm happy to be able to depict two Auckland based aircraft in different schemes from this sheet! I'd like to depict a few other Auckland aircraft in the coming years. I've got a Spitfire Mk Vb W3577 I'd like to build with the crest of the University of Auckland on the port side under the forward section of the canopy.
  9. Hi all, I just cant stop myself! Sorry. Here are just two that I came across in my files: I-BILL F-51 at Greenham Common in 1976(?). Sadly she was written of a short while after this. N232J Sea Fury at North Weald in the late 1990s. She was ferried to the UK by my old friend Norman Lees (sadly now winging his way up on high) Martin
  10. Hi folk's built for the Mustang GB my take on Flt.Lt Arthur Doley's Mustang "Dooleybird" which was for a while posted to Acklington just up the road from me,also I had happy memories of the old Matchbox kit built way back.Dave (Spadad) fixed me up with the decal's and Tamiyas kit was a no brainer for my chosen scale,there are differing views on the actual finish of the real thing Blue front fuselage,Yellow and blue and both with anti glare OD panel but I stuck with Blue,painted with Halford's rattle can silver,thanks for looking in.
  11. Next Kovozávody Prostějov - KP (http://www.kovozavody.cz/) 1/72nd kit is a new tool North American P-51B/C Mustang - ref. Source: https://www.facebook.com/SAMEditor1 V.P.
  12. North American P-51D Mustang 1:72 Airfix The North American P-51 Mustang is one of the most famous and easily-recognisable of Allied types to have served during the Second World War. It was originally designed to a British requirement for a low-altitude fighter, and because it was designed around the Alison V-1710 engine, it had limited performance at higher altitudes. This shortcoming was famously addressed by the marriage of North Americans airframe to the Rolls Royce Merlin aero engine. Once so equipped, the Mustang was able to take on Luftwaffe fighters on equal or better terms up to 15,000 feet. In common with later Spitfires, the D model of the Mustang employed a cut-down rear fuselage and a bubble canopy, giving pilots superb all-round vision. The outstanding feature of the aircraft was is range, which enabled Mustangs to escort bombers all the way to Berlin and back. This prompted the famous quote from Reichmarshal Herman Göring: "When I saw Mustangs over Berlin, I knew the jig was up." Airfixs Mustang has only been around for a few months, but in that time it has garnered a good reputation in terms of fit and accuracy. The kit is part of Airfixs series one range and as such as a fairly simple kit, made up of just fifty three parts spread across two sprues of grey plastic and a single small clear sprue. The mouldings are clean and crisp and moulded detail looks good. The panel lines look pretty fine to me, but some will no doubt find them a little too deep. In my opinion they arent too broad though, so treatment with primer would seem to be the way to go here. The cockpit is assembled on top of a large floor piece which also acts as the roof of the radiator tunnel. Onto this are added an instrument panel (with a decal for detail), a gun sight, control column and seat. Sidewalls and radio kit is moulded in place. The inner sides of the fuselage have some nice raised/recessed detail which helps to add a sense of realism to the cockpit. Overall impressions are very favourable, particularly for a kit in this scale and at this price point. If you want the airscrew to be moveable, you will have to assemble it before the fuselage halves have been joined. This will make it a bit of a nuisance to paint though, so I would recommend adding it later and fixing it in place. Whichever route you choose, once the fuselage halves are joined then you can add the wing. The lower wing is moulded as a single span, which will help you achieve the correct dihedral. The main gear bays are boxed in and feature some convincing structural details. The tail planes are moulded as solid pieces, but the rudder is a separate part, so you can finish it in a deflected position if you so desire. There are separate flaps too, which is a bonus. The Finishing details show that Airfix has put some care and attention into the design of this kit. The mouth of the radiator inlet is moulded as a separate part, saving you the trouble of cleaning up a visible seam. The cooling air exhaust is also a separate part and can be posed in either open or closed position. The undercarriage doors are detailed on the inside and the landing gear itself is also very nice. The tyres have a cross-cut tread and subtle flat spots moulded in place. Two drop tanks are provided to hang under the wings. Two canopies are provided, but only the bulged version is used for the decal option supplied with this kit. The frame of the rear canopy is a separate part too, and of course the canopy can be posed in open or closed position. As this is a series 1 kit, just one scheme is provided on the decal sheet - the aircraft flown by First Lieutenant Spurgeon Ellington, Tuskegee Airmen, 100th Fighter Squadron, Ramitelli, Italy, December 1944. The decal sheet is printed by Cartograf and includes a full range of stencils. Conclusion Whilst the subject is one that has hardly been ignored by model manufacturers, this is a neat little kit and Im very glad that Airfix took the decision to release it. The level of detail is surprisingly good for the scale and price, and it looks as though this should build up into an excellent model. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. Revell is to release in 2017-2018 a new tool 1/32nd North American P-51D Mustang kit - ref. 03944 Source: http://www.kitreviewsonline.de/revell-neuheiten-fuer-das-jahr-2017/ V.P.
  14. HI For a while I had the Tamiya 1/72 P-51D in my stash. It comes with markings for aircraft flown by Chuck Yeager (Glamorous Glennis III),Clarence Andersons (Old Crow which had white wall tyres) and John landers (Big Beautiful Doll). I bought two Airfix 1/72 P-51Ds and will use the three kits so I can build the aircraft of these famous aces. Yeagers & Landers aircraft will be built undercarriage up ( which I generally do) and Old Crow with gear down to show of those white wall tyres. As the airfix kits come with a flaps down and with tyres showing the effect of weight on them this has meant using the Airfix Kit for Old Crow and the tamiya for Big Beautiful Doll ( the Tamiya kit does not allow a wheels up option out of the box) . The kits are being built out of the box with no after market add ons and with canopy closed but with fully painted pilots from the two airfix kits and an old airfix WW2 pilot I had to hand. I will put pictures up soon as I have finished the build but want to show progress of the painting, I have also some comments on the comparrisosn of these two kits which are very similar in layout but with subtle and significant difference when it comes to building them
  15. Hi all. Needed something to keep me going before christmas day so i visited my local hobby shop in Ely and picked up this 1/72 mustang for a tenner. Bargain bouquet ! What a lovely kit, and a pleasure to build. Really enjoyed my first experience with Hasegawa. Pro’s: Its a Mootang. Superb fit & lovely detail. Fun to build! Con’s: Decals on the thick side All comments and critique very, very welcome. Hope you enjoy the pictures. Cheers! Thanks for looking!
  16. These are the completed builds from the recently finished P-51 STGB III which I did not complete on time. The original thread is here which has the work in progress. http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235015012-phantomes-triple-172-build-2x-tamiya-p-51d-1x-academy-p-51b/ Quick summary of the three aircraft: 1) P-51D "Jumpin' Jacques" (Tamiya). Built OOB except for Eduard superfabric seatbelts (amazing stuff!). Decals were some spares from a Hasegawa kit. Paints were Mr Metal Color for the NMF and Gunze/Tamiya for everything else. Weathering was done with Flory washes, with Tamiya Smoke for the exhaust stains. 2) P-51D "Detroit Miss" (Tamiya). Same as above except decals from an old Microscale set. 3) P-51B "Bonnie B" (Academy). Same as above except decals from Xtradecals. Color was Gunze H73 as Olive Drab. I was extremely pleased. Gunze totally botched RAF Dark Green (which is what it was supposed to be) and unwittingly created a very nice faded olive drab with just the right amount of green and brown. H73 was also used for the olive drab anti-glare in the other two aircraft. Weathering was done with Humbrol enamel wash. There are a few inaccuracies in the markings, some my fault some from the decals.In particular I was not pleased with Detroit Miss as the markings seem somewhat oversized. Also I think the Bonnie B markings on this set are incorrect (no locomotive kill mark and Bonnie B should be white). I used TallyHo decals for the insignia of the first two planes which ended up being noticeably translucent (and did not conform to panel lines). Terrible stuff. Anyway, were fun builds and reminded me why the Tamiya 1/72 Mustang is my favorite kit in the universe (and the Academy P-51B is nearly as good)
  17. Hey guys, pretty long long time since i was making wip build here on BM - finaly i might have a bit more time, so i m happy to be back A lot of things changed, most of it for good I have got married this summer, so you can imagine, siting by the work bench for whole evening is not anymore an option Anyway, when i saw this GB i was thinking about building the Tamiya 1/72 or 1/48 kit.. Then Meng and Airfix announced new 1/48s and i know Eduard is going to release their 1/48 D in not so far future too.. sooo.. i was thinking what to do.. then saw this kit in a sale.. well, long storry short, here i m with the amazing Tamiya 1/32 Mustang And i would like to begin with a little bit of begging If anyone has some good references for Korean Mustangs, mainly about the 45th TRS "Polka dot squadron" and their RF-51D, it would be great! I would need everything - from cockpit colour scheme, wheel wells colours, camouflage details.. If there are some aftermarket decals/masks and such.. All i know from my previous F-51D build is, the Korean mustangs had usualy cockpits repainted in black, wheel wells along with whole airframe (so not only wings but fuselage too) repainted by silver laquer. But that is quite all i know Another option could be some pacific theatre Mustang (as there are decals for it ) or some OD top side mustang, if i got some decals.. Well, thats it for now, i have a bit of free time so hurry up !
  18. With only a few days left until the GB is over, I'm going to attempt an extremely ambitious triple Mustang build taking advantage of the fact that both the Tamiya and the Academy Mustangs are extremely good 'shake and bake' kits that should not cause me much trouble. Here's a summary of the builds and (possible problems) 1) Academy P-51B "Bonnie B II". Taken from the Xtradecal D-Day sheet. Alas, this particular P-51B had the fin fillets which the "Old Crow" boxing does not have. I ordered the P-51C kit that does but has not yet arrived. That still does not stop me from building up everything except the separate tail section. 2) Tamiya P-51D "Detroit Miss". Have always wanted to build this one so here's the chance. 3) Tamiya P-51D "Jumpin' Jacques". I have some old Hasegawa decals but I'm slightly terrified of how thick they'll look on natural metal. I ordered some Mr Setter/Softer from Japan a few weeks ago but waiting for that to arrive. If it does not arrive by early Saturday I will replace it with something else. The "JJ" will be armed with two bombs, rather than drop tanks, hence why I chose the F-51 kit.
  19. Well I have taken a bit of a sabbatical from group builds as the subjects were not my usual area of fast, noisy pointy things. I however started on a 617 Sqn project, namely 3 x Lancs, with some other aircraft, including a Mustang III. Had a quick scan in prep for the upcoming F16, F111 and F15 GBs and thought.....I could get this Mustang III done! So, here it is, a bit out of my comfort zone, 1/72 and a prop powered a In The De Havilland Mosquito and then in a ?Borrowed? P-51B Mustang III (P-51B) Leonard Cheshire had pioneered a new method of marking enemy targets, flying in at a very low level in the face of strong defences. In four years of fighting against the bitterest opposition he maintained a standard of outstanding personal achievement, his successful operations being the result of careful planning, brilliant execution and supreme contempt for danger - for example, on one occasion he flew his P-51 Mustang in slow figures of 8 above a target obscured by low cloud, to act as a bomb-aiming mark for his squadron. Cheshire displayed the courage and determination of an exceptional leader. Group Captain Geoffrey Leonard Cheshire, Baron Cheshire, VC, OM, DSO and Two Bars, DFC (7 September 1917 ? 31 July 1992) was a highly decorated British RAF pilot during the Second World War. Among the honours Cheshire received as a bomber pilot is the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. After the war, he became a charity worker, setting up the Leonard Cheshire Disability as well as other philanthropic organisations. Cheshire was, in his day, both the youngest Group Captain in the service and, following his VC, the most decorated. His notable wartime record makes his subsequent career all the more remarkable. Kit: Decals: References: Now any advice appreciated - what weapons should I mount, is the spinner sky or white?
  20. Good afternoon, just got back from a week of holidays in Paris. Beautiful weather, by the way! And now, time to start with the Mustang. It's the famous kit from Revell, this time with the Malcom hood and decals for two RAF versions in the Dark sea grey/Ocean grey/Dark green scheme. It should be a rather quick build, which I will do along the Airfix Tiffie. They are both the same colours, so I will improve efficiency in painting two aircrafts with one mix of colours. So, don't be alarmed if you spot some parts which don't belong to a Mustang! Just some minor questions, the interiour of the mustang was the usual RAF interior green/grey, correct? Alex
  21. Hi all, Since I've finished a build in the MTO GB, I though I could start another. And this time it will be this Sprues are full of flash The kit comes with resin wheel replacements for the dreary looking ones on the sprues Also included are some PE for the interior (mostly). Though I have used some of it on another kit already... And the first problem (already?) I'm not too surprised about the broken canopy (seeing the condition of the box), though I am bummed out. I do have another Smer P-51 kit that contains an intact canopy, but I want to build two P-51's. One USAAF one, from the kit decals, and an RAF one. I'll see if I can get a replacement canopy, or see what it would looks like if I glue this one. Wish me luck. Cheers Jimmy
  22. Eduard will not only produce a 1/48th P-51D (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234974169-148-north-american-p-51d-mustang-by-eduard-release-in-2018/) but also a North American P-51B Mustang kit - ref. Source: https://www.facebook.com/EduardCompany/posts/1523757530972522 V.P.
  23. North American P-51D/K/Mk.IV Zoukei-Mura 1/32 History Whilst the earlier versions of the Mustang are well known, it is the P-51D/K with its bubble-top canopy was perhaps the most recognised and most well known version of the P-51 family. It was also the most widely used variant of the Mustang, with a grand total of 8102 machines of this type being produced. One of the problems encountered with the Merlin-powered P-51B/C was the poor view from the cockpit, particular towards the rear. The "Malcolm hood" fitted to the P-51B/C was an early attempt to correct this deficiency. However, a more lasting solution was sought. In January of 1943, Col Mark Bradley had been sent to England, and while there he saw how the newly-invented "bubble" or "teardrop" canopy had given Spitfire and Typhoon pilots unobstructed 360-degree vision. He returned to Wright Field in June, and immediately began exploring the possibility of putting bubble canopies on USAAF fighters. Republic Aviation put a bubble canopy on the P-47D Thunderbolt in record time, and Bradley flew it to Inglewood to show it to James H. Kindelberger, the President and General Manager of North American Aviation. Following discussions with the British and after examination of the clear-blown "teardrop" canopies of later Spitfires and Typhoons, North American Aviation secured an agreement with the Army to test a similar canopy on a Mustang in order to improve the pilot's view from the cockpit. A P-51B was selected to be modified as the test aircraft for the new all-round bubble canopy. The aircraft was redesignated XP-51D. The new bubble-shaped hood gave almost completely unobstructed vision around 360 degrees with virtually no distortion. The large rear section did not reach its point of maximum height until a point well aft of the pilot's head was reached, since wind tunnel testing showed that this shape was found to offer the best combination of viewing angles and minimum aerodynamic drag. The Plexiglas of the hood was mounted in rubber in a metal frame, the sill around the bottom being very deep. This was needed to provide the strength and rigidity required to avoid distortion and to prevent the binding or jamming of the canopy in the fuselage rails while it was being opened and closed. There were three rails, one along each side of the cockpit and one along the upper centreline of the rear fuselage. The canopy was manually opened and closed by a handle crank operated by the pilot. In order to accommodate the new all-round vision hood, the rear fuselage of the Mustang had to be extensively cut down. However, the amount of retooling needed to accomplish this was not extensive, and very little re-stressing of the fuselage structure was necessary. The newly-modified XP-51D took off on its first flight at Inglewood on November 17, 1943, test pilot Bob Chilton at the controls. One of the shortcomings of the P-51B was its limited firepower of only four machine guns. In addition, the guns in each wing were tilted over at quite sharp angles, requiring a sharp kink in the ammunition belt feeds and resulting in frequent gun jams. NAA took the opportunity afforded by the introduction of the new Mustang to correct this problem. The gun installation was completely redesigned, and the result was the installation of three MG53-2 0.50-inch machine guns in each wing, all of them mounted upright and all fed by ammunition belts. The inboard guns each had 400 rpg, and the others each had 270 rpg. However, Mustang users had the options of removing two of the guns and having just four, with 400 rounds each, and some pilots did actually select this option. Another visible change introduced by the P-51D was in the increase of the wing root chord. The main landing gear was strengthened in order to accommodate the additional weight, but the wheels maintained the same diameter of 27 inches. However, the wheel bays and doors were modified and the "kink" in the wing leading edge, barely seen in earlier marks, was made much more pronounced. Four P-51D-1-NA Mustangs had been completed with the original B-type canopy before the first P-51D-5-NA model (company designation NA-109) rolled off the production line. There were previously known problems with the installation of the 85-gallon tank in the rear fuselage of the P-51B and its adverse effects on the directional stability. With the P-51D these problems were exacerbated, due to the fact that the cutting down of the top line of the rear fuselage caused a lot of keel area to be lost. In order to provide for better directional stability, a dorsal fin was added ahead of the rudder during the production run of the P-51D Block 10. Some of the earlier P-51Ds (plus a few P-51Bs) were retrofitted with this dorsal fin. The extra weight and drag caused by this fin was quite small, but it helped a lot in improving the directional stability, especially when the rear fuselage fuel tank was full. The P-51D/K introduced the K-14 computing gyro gunsight, based on a British (Ferranti) design. When it first appeared, it was considered almost miraculous. The pilot needed only to dial in the wingspan of the enemy aircraft he was chasing and then feed in the target range by turning a handgrip on the throttle lever. Once the data had been selected an analogue computer worked. All that the pilot had to do then was to get the wingtips of his target lined up on the bright ring projected on the gunsight, and press the trigger. The K-14 was fitted almost from the start of P-51D production, the P-51K receiving this sight from mid-1944. This sight played a major role in the P-51D's impressive score of aerial victories. The P-51D began to arrive in Europe in quantity in March of 1944. The 55th Fighter Group was the first to get the P-51D, trading in its P-38s for the new bubble-topped fighters. The change from the torqueless twin-engined P-38 to the single-engined P-51 did cause some initial problems, and the lack of directional stability caused by the presence of a full fuselage tank took a lot of getting used to. However, once their pilots became fully adjusted to their new mounts, they found that the P-51D possessed a marked edge in both speed and manoeuvrability over all Luftwaffe piston-engined fighters at altitudes above 20,000 feet. However, Luftwaffe pilots considered the Mustang to be rather vulnerable to cannon fire, particularly the liquid-cooled Merlin engine which could be put out of action by just one hit. The Mustang was the only Allied fighter with sufficient range to accompany bombers on their "shuttle" missions in which landings were made in Russia after deep-penetration targets had been attacked from English bases. The Mustangs also participated in low-altitude strikes on Luftwaffe airfields, a rather dangerous undertaking as these fields were very heavily defended by flak. The Model This is the second P-51D Mustang released by Zoukei-Mura, but only the first this reviewer has actually got his hands on, although having several other ZM releases I am quite familiar with the Super Wing Series concept. The sturdy medium sized, yet deep, top opening box, with a lovely rendition of a British P-51K on the front, is jam packed with styrene. Each of the twelve grey and two clear sprues are individually wrapped in poly bags, with the clear sprues also having foam wrapping around the parts for extra protection. There are three large decal sheets which are supplied in another protective poly bag along with the instruction booklets. It is pretty obvious that the main instruction book is from the first P-51D release as this kit builds up in the same way, but if you are building a P-51K then you will need to refer to the supplementary booklet which is associated to the extra sprue specific to this mark. The medium grey styrene is beautifully moulded, with no sign of flash as is expected these days, but there are a lot of moulding pips, probably due to the nature of the parts design, which does mean there is a little extra cleaning up to do. The details on the parts are very well moulded with restrained panel lines, rivets fasteners on the outer skin, whilst the interior, which is what makes these kits rather special, is quite mind boggling, not just with the finesse of design but with the amount of interior parts provided. That said, there are a couple of noticeable problems, the first is that the wings have definite panel lines which I believe were actually filled to help with the laminar flow of the wing, but an easy fix. The second is the machine gun barrels, which, although quite well protected on the sprue, three or four have a pronounced warp on the review example as the barrel muzzles aren’t connected to the sprue. Of course this is easily overcome with the purchase of the metal barrel set that ZM have also released, but this shouldn’t occur with the sort of technology available these days. The instruction book is beautifully laid out, clear and easy to read, with a preface of aircraft specifications and assembly information, followed by paint colours required and the usual safety information ref tools etc. After the preface pages each major assembly has its own build section. The first page of which provides photos of the completed sub-assemblies, a written guide to what these sub-assemblies are called and in the top right hand corner of each the number of parts used in each assembly. The photos/diagrams all show the colours used to paint each part and how it should look when complete, not accounting for weathering of course. The build itself begins with the engine and what could be termed over the top in relation to the amount of detail provided that will never be seen. Each cylinder block is moulded in two halves with each of the individual cylinders moulded into one half. The completed blocks are then attached to the three piece crank case, followed by the intake manifold and cam covers. To the front of the engine the front and rear portions of the gearbox are joined, with the propeller shaft sitting between and the dual drive unit at front and the whole assembly attached to the engine block. The two piece coolant header tank is then fitted above the gearbox and the four piece ignition harness attached to the top of the engine. The two magnetos, coolant pump and cam shaft drive unit ate assembled and fitted to the rear of the engine, followed by the supercharger unit, which is made up of the two piece supercharger housing for each of the first and second stages, boost control unit, drain valve and aftercooler. The aftercooler pump and ignition harness are fitted to the port side, whilst on the starboard side the ignition harness and oil relief valves are attached. The individual exhaust stacks are then attached along with their respective fairings ensuring that the stack angles are correct. The final stage of the engine assembly is the building up of the firewall, onto which the two piece oil tank is attached, along with the oil line on the front and a couple of black boxes on the rear. The engine bearers are then fitted to each side of the engine then attached to their respective points on the firewall. Lastly the oil line is fitted between the bottom of the oil tank to the pump on the underside of the engine. The next stage concerns the assembly of the cockpit and begins with the fitting of the filler pipe and gauge to the fuselage fuel tank which is then fitted to a support base, then the fuselage floor frame along with a small rear bulkhead. There is a choice of seats, one with seatbelts moulded into it, the other without, depending on whether the modeller intends to add a pilot figure, one of which is available separately. The seat is attached to the rear armoured bulkhead via two supports, whilst the aerial relay box is attached to the rear of the headrest. The radio set and battery are attached to the support framework, to the front of which the heater and ventilation pipes are attached. This assembly is then fitted to the rear of the armoured bulkhead and assembled to the cockpit floor with the battery/radio frame sitting on the fuel tank. There is a choice of instrument panel; one with very nicely detail moulded instruments, which with careful painting should look great, the other is plane as is meant for use with the provided decal. To the underside of the panel the rudder pedal unit and switch box are attached. The side panels are then fitted to the cockpit along with the instrument panel assembly and instrument pipework to the rear of the panel. Moving onto the fuselage interior, the engine assembly is attached to the cockpit assembly. The oil cooler is assembled and fitted to the supporting frame and put to one side. The coolant radiator is then assembled out of the radiator front matrix, rear matrix and sides. The oil cooler, coolant radiator and rear radiator exhaust duct are attached to the underside of the cockpit assembly. The long coolant/oil pipes are then attached to their respective radiators and the inlet/outlet fittings on the engine. The three part carburetor air induction duct is then assembled and fitted beneath the engine attaching to the supercharger intake and the front of the engine. A small oil pipe is then fitted to the starboard side of the oil cooler assembly. It’s only now that the fuselage itself is assembled. Unlike standard kits where the fuselage is split into port and starboard halves, in this kit it is made of up of individual panels and sections. First of all the sides are added, not forgetting to fit the two oxygen bottle to the inside of the starboard side panel. These are followed by the upper fairing and the lower panel which surrounds the radiator/oil cooler duct. The engine cowling is next and the modeller is given a choice of having them fitted or not, and since there is so much detail in the engine it would seem a shame to have it covered up. There doesn’t appear to be an option to have them removable, unlike the Tamiya kit and their magnetic answer. If the cowling is to be fixed permanently closed then there is no need to add the panel supporting framework around the engine, if the engine is to be exposed then these will need to be attached. Also take note to fit the correct intake filter panel for use on the Mk.IV as specified in the supplementary instruction sheet. The separate tail cone, made up of two halves into which the tail wheel bay is assembled from the two sides, roof and forward bulkhead, is now assembled, using either the standard or supplementary parts are necessary. This also goes for the vertical tail unit as the modeller has the choice one with a filet and one without depending on the model being made. Before fitting the fin and rudder the horizontal tailplanes are assembled from upper and lower full span halves and separate elevators. This is then fitted to the top of the tail cone and the fin/rudder unit on top of that. Either of the N-9 or K-14 gunsights are then assembled and fitted to the coaming which has been attached forward of the cockpit. The windscreen is then fitted along with the completed tailcone assembly thus completing the fuselage. Moving onto the wings and once again, like the fuselage, it’s like building the real thing, albeit somewhat simplified. The single piece spar and rib unit is fitted out with the six machine guns, each with their separate ammunition belts, three per side in their gun bays. The two part main fuel tanks are then assembled and fitted inboard of the gun bays before the whole sub-assembly is attached to the single piece lower wing skin part. The three clear identification lights are then fitted to the starboard underside wing tip coloured, probably best, from the inside. The undercarriage bay front bulkhead is attached to the wing by two outer spars and a central longitudinal bulkhead. The hydraulic actuators are then attached, two per side, whilst the retractable landing light is fitted to the port bay. The upper outer wing panels are then fitted, along with the separate leading edge panels inboard of the gun bays, the port leading edge having had the camera gun fitted beforehand. The flaps can be posed either retracted or extended depending on the modellers choice of display. Before the wing can be fitted to the fuselage, the joystick and associated control linkage is attached to the top of the wing and the wing fillets fitted to the mid-lower fuselage. With these in place the wing can be attached. With the kit looking more like a model aircraft the build moves on to the addition of ancillary parts, such as the radiator duct air intake, which comes in three parts and is also fitted with an additional length of pipework before fitting to the fuselage. The oil cooler and radiator outlet doors, which are then attached to the rear of the under fuselage, the radiator door is also fitted with an actuator jack and strengthening bar. The main undercarriage units are each made up of a single piece oleo, separate brake pipe and scissor link. The wheels consist of the brake unit, inner and outer hubs and two halves of each tyre. When assembled they should look rather good, although I would prefer the tyres moulded as a single piece. The completed units are then slid into position and twisted to fit the trunnions into their correct position. The inner doors and actuators are then fitted with the required droop, depending on how long the aircraft has been shut down, whilst the outer doors are fitted to the main oleos. The tail wheel assembly is a simpler affair with the main leg being moulded in a single piece, with the single piece wheel/tyre being fitted to the axle. Once fitted into the tail wheel bay the two bay doors can be attached. Whilst the aircraft could carry a variety of stores and equipment the kit comes with just a pair of drop tanks. Each is split horizontally and when assembled are fitted with the air and fuel pipes and attached to the pylons via two crutch plates. The completed assemblies can then be fitted to their respective hardpoints just outboard of the main undercarriage legs. Final outfitting means more choice for the modeller, dependent on which version or mark they are building. ZM have included three different canopies, (M-1 Inglewood built, K-1 Inglewood built and K-13 Dallas built), each with a separate internal frame and one with an external rear view mirror. There is also an option on which propeller to use as both the cuffed Hamilton Standard and un-cuffed Aeroproducts props are provided, with their respective backplates and spinners. There is also an option to have the radar warning antenna fitted to either side of the vertical fin, so check your references to see if the aircraft you are modelling was fitted with them and open up the holes in the fin halves before gluing them together. The last thing to be fitted are the gun bay doors, either open or closed, the navigation lights, tail light, pitot probe and aerial mast. Decals There are three large decal sheets included with this kit. Each very nicely printed with very little carrier film visible, with the exception of the Southern Cross decals and Star and Bar surrounds which will be covered up anyway. They appear to be in register and nicely opaque which is particularly useful if using the identification stripes on a couple of the paint options. There are stencils for one aircraft and include some cockpit placards and instruction placards for the gun bays. If you include the original kit schemes which are included in this one then the modeller can make one of seven different aircraft. These include:- P-51D-5-NA Ser.No. 44-13837 of the 343rd FS, 55th FG Miss Marilyn II, flown by Capt. Robert Welch P-51D-10-NA, Ser.No. 44-14450, of the 363rd FS, 357th FG, Old Crow, flown by Capt “Bud” Anderson P-51D-25-NA Ser.No. 44-73108, of the 334th FS, 4th FG Red Dog XII flown by Maj. Louis Norley Mustang IVa, Ser.No. KH774, 112Sqn, Royal Air Force Mustang Iva, Ser.No. KH716, 3Sqn, Royal Australian Air Force P-51K-10-NT, Ser.No. 44-12073, of the 348th FS, Sunshine VII P-51D-5NA Ser.No. 44-13410 of the 361st FG, Lou IV There is also a small sheet of masks to aid the painting of the canopy and windscreen. Conclusion If you’ve never come across a Zoukei-Mura Super Wings Kit before then have a look. They can appear to be pretty intimidating until you look at the clever and well thought out break down of parts. I don’t purport that they will be an easy build as there is a lot to do, both in preparation, painting and fitting, but the end result is well worth it. Whilst some don’t see the point of having all the internal structure, and yes it isn’t an exact replica of the real thing, but it gives options for some well detailed dioramas as well as looking interesting if left exposed. I think this kit is one of the most accessible ZM have released as it’s not overly complex and should be ok for the intermediate modeller and above. As with everything, take your time and the results will speak for themselves. With this kit you also get to build a 1:32 Mustang in British or Australian colours which has got to be good. If you want to really go to town on the model then ZM have also released a raft full of aftermarket items from the likes of Eduard and Master Models to enhance the build, although I would have liked to have seen at least an interior etched set or seatbelts included in the standard kit. Oh! And you will need to change the machine gun barrels, particularly if you’re leaving the gun bay doors open. Extremely highly recommended Review sample courtesy of
  24. Hi All, Picked this up last year at Hinckley, second hand sans original decals, But these were in the package too, So I guess I'll be doing "Old Yeller" then. I'll need to add a second seat and for true accuracy the cuffs need to come off the propellor blades but no one else would know chez Bonhoff so the second may not happen.
  25. The complete story of the not so quickie Hobby Boss P-51D Mustang build. I started this build because the Academy P-51A was taking longer than I had planned, The delays weren't the models fault but mine, as I spent to much time making little, pointless items more "perfect". So I decided to make a quick build of the HobbyBoss P-51D so that I could be sure that I would get something done for this Mustang Group Build. Picking an easy model and an easy (all metal) paint scheme insured that I could get it done fast, SO fast that my first photos included a clock. The clock was there because I had the hope that with a simple kit and a simple paint job I could get this kit finished in 24 hours. As it turned out I was off a bit on that estimate. With the clock ticking I jumped into the kit. Then I make my first mistake, I chose these decals. In theory, the Carpena decals for the Somali Air Force would be perfect. All done in silver paint (the Somali Mustangs started our as USAAF Mustangs in the Med., post Italy's capitulation they were transferred in a rather weary condition to the Italian AF. After a few years service in the Italian AF they were sold to Somalia. (I suspect that either Italy threw in a free coat of paint with the deal or Somalia painted them silver upon receipt, but I have no proof, I am just guessing on that one). Painted silver (including the spinner) with an Olive Drab nose panel the simple Somali markings would make decaling the model a breeze. Unless, of course, the decals shattered. With great care I got the first two roundels on but the more complex "2" shattered. So I set the model aside looking like this which was pretty advanced for the few hours invested in the build. Now the clock slows down...a lot... Turns out no other airforce makes a a "2" that looks like the Somali "2" or is the same size as the Somali "2". I spent several evenings looking, checking all the decals I have (and I do have a lot of decals) and I found nothing. Finally I admitted that I would need a replacement set of decals and off I went to EvilBay while the clock ticked on my "24 hour" build..... Graced with a little luck (or backed into a corner enough that I couldn't really afford to wait for a bargain) I got a second set and promptly coated them with gloss clear to strengthen the decal. But the Carpena Decals weren't my only decal issue, I had also decided to save painting time by using a solid olive drab decal for the nose. Great idea! Didn't work at all... Sticking in some spots and bubbling up in others I cut and then sand the nose decal off. So I painted the nose after removing the decal, BUT I had decided that leave the exhaust stacks off so they wouldn't get in the way when I masked the nose. They would, or could, have been a good decision had I not made a hamfisted whoops with the glue which spilled into the painted olive drab and dissolved part of it away. More cleaning - More Masking - More Time, and finally my "24 hours" Mustang is done...in 23 DAYS..... Greg in OK