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Tony Oliver

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Tony Oliver last won the day on January 12

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About Tony Oliver

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    North Yorkshire
  • Interests
    Trying to glue & paint bits of plastic.

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  1. Very tasty pal
  2. Even though this is the original 2014 'large' version, it still looks like a 109 to me. And that awesome paint work makes it easier to look at good job so far pal πŸ‘πŸΏ
  3. Not much as busy with he-111. But got the N's winders up to decent-ish level to commit to paint. Could be better but you have to draw the line somewhere. These revell ones have more detail than the hasegawa ones, but covered in sink marks and ejection pins marks and heavy seams etc etc...
  4. Right onto some tricky bits... 1 - prepainted seatbelts. Always flake off on me when trying to install. So... Detatch & fold little buckles over etc mount on tape and then spray with some cellulose thinner. They need to be wet, but not dripping. As we are trying to soften the coating to make it flexible for long enough to work with but not melt it off completely or leave fingerprints when we touch it. There is a narrow 10 mins or so window of working with them, and you will still get cracking (like the 180 degree bends on the strap seat ones) but it does make them easier to work with. I did try spraying them on a build once when still on the etch frame, but by the time you cut them out and fold bits etc they dry out again cause the cellulose evaporates so quick... Enough waffle. from this... to this... I am aware that there are some shiny glue bits, but thats why they are on now. Because still to come we have a gloss coat to seal, weathering to tone them down, and then a flat coat to finish. In the past I used to put prepainted belts into completely finished cockpits and they would look like they'd just been added (cause they had) and nine times out of ten have to re-flat varnish again to get rid of shiny glue spots. So now I try add them earlier to help them blend in and 'belong' 2 - throttle levers. All the detail is sanded off of a panel, then an etch piece placed on top. You are then supposed to put all the levers into the slots in said panel. The problem is that the levers only have enough space to stand up in that is the thickness of the etch. Not enough for good purchase. So what I did was put a little rectangular shim on the panel that would lift the etch up. I measured to place it in an area that there are no levers, about 1/3 along it. And it looked like this. (All done prior to painting. Now a couple dollops of white glue either side of shim, and place panel on. Now there are deeper slots to place levers into the glue below. And it looks like this: (sorry its blurry but you get the idea) Once set, the levers were painted black and white knobs on ends built up. Other colours will be added to the knobs later once I check references, some are brown and orange I think. It's just easier to see the white when first painting them. Here it is with floor in situ. Similar process used for box with levers and plungers next to pilot seat. 3 - Last is IP's. So the films were painted white on the rear. Cut out then tacked into place on the panel with a drop of superglue. Next some old school klear is brushed onto film generously. Then the front etch piece is attached and pressed on, the dials all ooze up with klear to fill them. Any excess wicked away. I need to paint the rlm66 aound the dials on this and the other ones (eg bit on front of throttle panel) so they match the rest of the pit. These will be flat coated in due course with everything else and then dials picked out again. All dials line up pretty well with the film. Thanks for looking!
  5. Dont you mean phor phever?
  6. Nice phantom as all the rest have said, but do people actually look at when the thread was started? 10 years ago!
  7. Interior bits been drybrushed. Then the black seat leather and the fabric seat back and pedal staps done. Film sprayed white on the back ready for assembly of IP's. Once done they will be glued into place with all the placards and seatbelts. Plan is then a gloss coat to seal it all in. Then some washes for depth and tone down drybrushing. Then flat coat and gloss the IP glass dials. Perhaps some silver scuffs... A note on the seat strap backrest. This is provided as a pre painted piece of etch. But experience says that it will all flake off when trying to wrap around the reworked seat frame. So what I did (and do sometimes on normal seatbelts too) is burn all the paint off in a flame. This anneals the brass too making it softer. Fitting that T-piece it was like paper Primed along with rest of stuff and then picked out in a canvas colour. Right lets get to it.
  8. white and black bits! Black bits will be having some alclad tonight. There's some extra black bits being done for a tomcat. (An f-16 doesn't need 3 afterburner faces!)
  9. Did you not have any spares from the masterclub set to replace the ones on the turret sides with their solid teeth and ejector pin marks?
  10. Thats better! trΓ¨s bien mon ami! πŸ‘πŸΏπŸ‘πŸΏπŸ‘πŸΏ
  11. PS not to rain on your parade but, I am concerned that the paint will be too 'cured' by the time it comes to chipping, and the solution underneath won't work... I've always chipped off the top layer with warm water as soon as its dry to the touch. Anyone here tried it after a week or so?
  12. Pink? Perhaps do a load and re-sell them on as 'vintage' or 'weathered for modellers'
  13. Nice mug mate πŸ‘πŸΏ paintwork aint bad either...