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  1. Eduard is to release 1/48th Grumman F4F Wildcat kits: F4F-3 through F4F-4, FM-1 and FM-2 to Martlets. Sources: https://www.modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=95280&start=33705#p2449036 https://www.modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=95280&start=33720#p2449051 https://www.modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=95280&start=33765#p2449103 V.P.
  2. F4F-3 Cockpit w/Telescopic Gunsight (648765 for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin But wait… there’s more! More aftermarket for the new tool Wildcat from Eduard, and this is the second wave of aftermarket sets that they have released for those that want to increase the level of detail over and above what’s achievable using injection moulded styrene. As is now usual with Eduard's larger resin sets, they arrive in a deep Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. This set will please those that want to model an earlier Wildcat with the simple telescopic sight that was fitted to the first aircraft off the production line. There are three Ziploc bags within the box, two containing directly 3D printed parts, the other containing a fret of nickel-plated pre-painted Photo-Etch (PE), and a small decal sheet, both protected by a small sheet of white card. On emptying the parts out of the bag, the first thing you notice is the sheer level of detail present, but also the relatively small parts count thanks to the capabilities of 3D printers, where supports are all that is required to protect overhangs, and there is no degrading of mould fidelity over time because there are no moulds to wear out. The short parts list is also evident immediately on viewing the instructions, which begin with an ostensibly complete aft cockpit assembly, to which you add the seat with painted PE lap belts only for the initial batch of airframes. The control column slips into a deep recess in the gaiter, some half-moon levers are added at the sides of the pilot, then the forward bulkhead with integral tank, plus a separate head cushion are mated to the cockpit. The side consoles are slotted between the two bulkheads with detailed painting guide and decal placement instructions to complete those, then a little wire from your own stocks is threaded through sections of the cockpit, and the kit bulkhead is brought in from behind. The beautifully detailed rudder pedals are a single part that is truly amazing to behold, and it too has its own painting instructions and two decals for the centre of the piece. The kit insert to the tank is slotted into the 3D printed part to complete it, and then you have a choice of how to complete the instrument panel, using a blank panel with two-layer PE dial sections plus some tiny levers, or a detailed printed panel to which you add a decal, or if you’re very brave, paint fully yourself. The small angled coaming with separate tubular gunsight is glued to the top of the coaming to finish off. The cockpit can then be inserted into the fuselage as per the kit instructions, but with a small resin part fixed to the starboard interior, and a pair of tiny pegs are removed from the styrene part. If you are a little anxious about removing the 3D printed parts from their printing bases, and having to deal with all those tendril-like fingers that hold them in place and support them during printing and curing, fret not. As it was the first time I had dealt with a completely 3D printed cockpit from Eduard, I took the precaution of removing the parts from their bases of the previously reviewed later cockpit and preparing them for assembly as part of my build. It didn’t take me long, as I used the new CMK Razor Saw set we reviewed a wee while ago here. I used the square blade chucked all the way over on the fine-toothed blade side, and once I’d cut the attachment points, I snapped off the fingers so I could work on the next side easily. Some parts you can just saw at the base of the supports, but it gets messy and you can’t quite see what you’re cutting. Here’s a quick pic of the mess I was making during the removal process, remembering it isn’t this set, but one very similar: After a little sanding of the forest of tiny ‘pimples’ that were left under parts and the more delicate parts being trimmed by a new #11 blade, the results were very pleasing. There are detailed painting and decaling instructions given throughout the leaflet, in Eduard’s usual Gunze Aqueous and lacquer ranges, using H and C codes respectively. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. It is about time I started a WIP instead of looking, dreaming of building a model and picking on "Bill the Butcher" a.k.a Navy Bird. With all my banter about Bill's missfortune I went and stabbed myself with a knife and a lot of claret escaped, serves me right for being a dork. I am going to butcher AZmodels Grumman Martlet Mk.1/G.36. So let us have a look at the bits. I wanted to do a G.36 but found very few reference photos especially for the fuselage guns. Boxart Masks My start, No you won't find any blood on these bits it is on the wings and I wiped it off. The parts go together well so far although the engine placement seems to be a bit hairy. Thanks for looking. Stephen
  4. Hello all, this is my latest completion, Arma Hobby's 1/72 F4F-4 Wildcat, built in the markings of John.L ."Smitty" Smith's aircraft, White 2 (Guadalcanal, 1943). This kit was the most complex one I've built yet, there were lots of small and thin parts for the internal structure and landing gear (which I broke by accident, but managed to fix by inserting a metal pin to reinforce it). The detail in the kit is great and the engine is fantastic. The model was painted with Ak real colors acrilycs; the decals used are the kits', though I modified the numbers because this scheme doesn't come in the box. The model was weathered with a silver pencil, tamiya weathering powders and tamiya enamel washes. The aftermakets used were eduard PE and brass tube for the gun barrels. The figure is from the CMK set, US Navy F6F Hellcat Pilot and Mechanic Hope you enjoy it! Oompa Loompa
  5. Source: https://www.facebook.com/ArmaHobby/posts/4494536197243369 Update http://armahobbynews.pl/en/blog/2021/08/13/f4f-4-wildcat-1-72-test-shots/ V.P.
  6. F4F-3 Exhausts & F4F Gun Barrels (648766 & 648769 for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin We’ve just reviewed the super new tool Wildcat from Eduard, and this is one of the many aftermarket sets that they have released at the same time for those that want to increase the level of detail over and above what’s achievable using injection moulded styrene. Although the sets arrive in a flat package, the directly 3D printed parts are safe inside a clear plastic clamshell box inside the package, which also has a sticky pad inside to prevent the parts from rattling about. The parts are printed resin, attached to the base via thin tendril-like fingers that are easy to cut off and sand the little upstands away, leaving them ready for action. F4F-3 Exhausts PRINT (648766) The sticky pad in this set holds two exhausts on its print base, which have super detail and are totally hollow, with crisp detail around the lip and along the weld-lines. There is a tab to fix the parts to the kit in a drop-in manner, once they have been prepared and painted appropriately. F4F Gun barrels PRINT (648769) Although the very early Wildcats only had four .50cal machine guns, later output had their armament increased to six, although with no extra bullets in the magazines, doubtless leading to some frantic clicking and the lucky escape of a Zero on occasion. This set contains six barrels with hollow muzzles and recesses to depict the holes in the cooling jacket all over the sides of the tubes. Once removed from the base, they’re a simple drop-in replacement, and although tiny, the detail is exceptional, just like the exhausts above. I couldn’t resist cutting one free just to see if the hole went all the way through. It didn’t, but it looks deep enough for our needs. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. As promised on another thread, This will be the AH1 version. Still early stages yet but the build is well under way now, Combination of styrene sheet build with ply / balsa, some vac-forming of parts and some fibre-glassing of parts. DSCF4064 by Mark Stevens, on Flickr DSCF4066 by Mark Stevens, on Flickr DSCF4069 by Mark Stevens, on Flickr Mark
  8. F4F-3 Wheels Early & Late (648767 & 648768 for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin We’ve just reviewed the super new tool F4F-3 Wildcat from Eduard, and this is one of the many aftermarket sets that they have released at the same time for those that want to increase the level of detail over and above what’s achievable using injection moulded styrene. As is now usual with Eduard's smaller resin sets, they arrive in a shallow Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. F4F-3 Wheels Early (648767) This set includes two main wheels with cast-in hubs in grey resin, and three choices of tail wheels, their fairings and yokes. There is also a sheet of pre-cut yellow kabuki-style masking material (not pictured) included along with the instructions to allow you to cut the demarcation between wheels and tyres cleanly, and with little effort. Once removed from their casting blocks the wheels are all drop-in replacements for the kit parts, and each has a slight weighting moulded into the bottom of the tyre to simulate the pressure of the aircraft. F4F-3 Wheels Late (648768) This set is slightly different, as in addition to the two main wheels and three tail wheels in resin, there are also two insanely delicate-looking spoked hubs that have been 3D printed and are safely ensconced inside a clear clamshell box with a sticky pad, plus a small fret of Photo-Etch (PE) containing two flat hubs in the same bag as the masking material. You choose whether to use the spoked hubs or the flat ones during the build, but it would be a real shame not to use the spoked hubs as they’re so attractive. Again, all wheels have a flat-spot on their bases to simulate weight. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. F4F Undercarriage BRONZE (648779 for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin We’ve just reviewed the super new tool Wildcat from Eduard, and this is one of the many aftermarket sets that they have released at the same time for those that want to increase the level of detail over and above what’s achievable using injection moulded styrene. As is now usual with Eduard's smaller resin sets, they arrive in a shallow Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. This set enhances the styrene landing gear with metal main struts and 3D printed resin supports on one side, utilising some of the kit parts for the other side. In the box are a pair of cast bronze main struts, which need very little in the way of preparation, just removing the sprue clipping point from the upper tubular section, which is best done with a motor tool and abrasive disc, taking your time so the part doesn’t overheat and you don't go past the moulded-in limit (you can just see this in the pic above). With that done, the resin parts are removed from their printing bases and glued in place in the same manner as the original kit parts. The other side of the support is taken from the kit, using parts L1 and L2, as well as the lower supports from the kit, which are parts L6 and L7. The main benefit of the bronze is strength, but the included 3D printed centreline gear bay doors are a big improvement on the kit parts and are printed as single parts with no fiddly gluing of small bits together. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  10. F4F-3 Cockpit w/Reflector Gunsight PRINT (648777 for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin We’ve just reviewed the super new tool Wildcat from Eduard, and this is one of the many aftermarket sets that they have released at the same time for those that want to increase the level of detail over and above what’s achievable using injection moulded styrene. As is now usual with Eduard's larger resin sets, they arrive in a deep Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. There are three Ziploc bags within the box, two containing directly 3D printed parts, the other containing a fret of nickel-plated pre-painted Photo-Etch (PE), a tiny slip of acetate and a small decal sheet, both protected by a small sheet of white card. On emptying the parts out of the bag, the first thing you notice is the sheer level of detail present, but also the relatively small parts count thanks to the capabilities of 3D printers, where supports are all that is required to protect overhangs, and there is no degrading of mould fidelity over time because there are no moulds to wear out. The short parts list is also evident immediately on viewing the instructions, which begin with an ostensibly complete aft cockpit assembly, to which you add the seat with either painted PE lap belts only for the initial batch, or a full set of four-point belts for later production. The control column slips into a deep recess in the gaiter, some half-moon levers are added at the sides of the pilot, then the forward bulkhead with integral tank, plus a separate head cushion are mated to the cockpit. The side consoles are slotted between the two bulkheads with detailed painting guide and decal placement instructions complete those, then a little wire from your own stocks is threaded through sections of the cockpit, and the kit bulkhead is brought in from behind. The beautifully detailed rudder pedals are a single part that is truly amazing to behold, and it too has its own painting instructions and two decals for the centre of the piece. The kit insert to the tank is slotted into the 3D printed part to complete it, and then you have a choice of how to complete the instrument panel, using a blank panel with two-layer PE dial sections plus some tiny levers, or a detailed printed panel to which you add a decal, or if you’re very brave, paint fully yourself. The small angled coaming with moulded-in reflector gunsight is added atop the panel that is locked in on two pegs, and a tiny piece of acetate sheet is glued to the top of the sight to finish off. The cockpit can then be inserted into the fuselage as per the kit instructions, but with a small resin part fixed to the starboard interior, and a pair of tiny pegs are removed from the styrene part. If you are a little anxious about removing the 3D printed parts from their printing bases, and having to deal with all those tendril-like fingers that hold them in place and support them during printing and curing, fret not. As this is the first time I have dealt with a completely 3D printed cockpit from Eduard, I took the precaution of removing the parts from their bases and preparing them as if for assembly. It didn’t take me long, as I used the new CMK Razor Saw set we reviewed a wee while ago here. I used the square blade chucked all the way over on the fine-toothed blade side, and once I’d cut the attachment points, I snapped off the fingers so I could work on the next side easily. Some parts you can just saw at the base of the supports, but it gets messy and you can’t quite see what you’re cutting. Here’s a quick pic of the mess I was making during the removal process: After a little sanding of the forest of tiny ‘pimples’ that were left under parts and the more delicate parts being trimmed by a new #11 blade, the results were very pleasing, as you can see below: There are detailed painting and decaling instructions given throughout the leaflet, in Eduard’s usual Gunze Aqueous and lacquer ranges, using H and C codes respectively. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. F4F Seat PRINT (672291 for Arma Hobby) 1:72 Eduard Brassin Although this set arrives in a flat package, the directly 3D printed parts are safe inside a clear plastic clamshell box inside the package, which also has a sticky pad inside to prevent the parts from rattling about. This set has onew printed resin seat on its own print platform, with the parts attached to the base via thin tendril-like fingers that are easy to cut off and sand the little upstands away, leaving the parts ready for action. There is also a small fret of STEEL Photo-Etch (PE) that are also pre-printed with seatbelt parts, which includes four belts and a single comfort-pad for underneath the buckle. Once removed from the print-base, the seat is a drop-in replacement, and after painting it should be draped with the seatbelts, the shoulder straps in a single Y-shape that is folded over the rear of the seat-back, while the lap belts are attached to the sides of the seat and folded over as if the pilot has just left his cockpit. Detail is fabulous as you’d imagine from 3D Printed resin and PE, which should be easy enough to add some extra detail to your Arma Wildcat. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  12. Hello forum, About to start on my next 1/72 Airfix Dogfight Double Midway F4F-4 following my Fw-190/Hawker Typhoon build linked below. Given Johnny's @The Spadgent's build of the same kit, along with Detail and Scale's review, I am looking forward to a straight forward where effort will be spent on the engine, wheel well intercoolers, Photo etch cockpit & working on getting the colors correct. @giemme's builds always inspire me to push on some of the overlooked details on excellent kits like Airfix's F4F-4. Unlike Johnny, I am going to do this with the wing's extended. For reference, I am using @Dana Bell's F4F Wildcat, Aircraft Pictorial #4 book, Detail and Scale's F4F Wildcat (E-Book), Detail and Scale's US Navy Carrier Based Aircraft of WW2 (e-book), WW2 In Review No 30 Wildcat (e-book), F4F Wildcat vs Zero Sen (Edward M Young-e-book) and this website I found useful https://www.angelfire.com/dc/jinxx1/Wildcat/F4F_pt1.html . Given the overall quality of Airfix's decals and research on previous Dogfight Double's I have built, I decided to build LCDR Thatch's aircraft with their markings. Additionally, I noted in Airfix's instructions that Starfighter decals assisted with developing the markings so I feel good about their accuracy--I have always been impressed with their products. About the only error I can find, and it seems to be common with all Airfix Wildcats, is most F4F-4's carried Curtiss Electric propellors and not Hamilton Standards, so the propellor stencils will need to be modified. In this scale I have decided to just use the technical stencils on the cuff & cut off the red Hamilton Standard oval--I purchased Yellow Wing's 1/72 manufacturer propellor logos so I might use the Curtiss Electric Seal--that said, I think photographic evidence in @Dana Bell's book points to no manufacturer seals on Midway Wildcat propellors. I have read that Thatch's aircraft is pictured below prior to the Battle of Midway--a great resource that I will use on the build. My 1st order of business is to figure out what colors to use for the project. I initially purchased Colorcoates as I trust their research and have heard nothing but good things about them. However, since I plan on thinning the paints I like to use the manufacturer's proprietary so I can save unused paints/avoid complications--it has been next to impossible for me to get their thinner, so I decided to use the lids as paint chips to compare other manufactures against. (I am very impressed with the research put into Colorcoates and will use them in the future when I get thinner--I also understand they paint the lids with the actual color in the tin). I decided to give AK Real Colors a try based off one of @billn53's builds, Gunze, AK Acrylic (Bronze Green) and Tamiya (experiment with XF-5 for cockpit bronze green only) and Vallejo (cockpit bronze green). A quick eyeball check against Colorcoats and @Dana Bell's book convinced me to use AK Real Colors Bronze green for the cockpit. I am thinking that AK's Blue Grey and Light Grey will work for the exterior, but I am still going back and forth with Gunze's near matches--I know this is very unscientific eyeballing, but I think it will hit the mark. For the elusive Grumman Grey Primer, I am going to trust at Eduard's Hellcat instructions juxtaposed with Detail and Scale's Hellcat book and go with Mission Model's Light Gull Grey. Paint swatches I created against light grey are pictured below: All comments are welcome--including those that think my color interpretation needs improvement. Also, please do not hesitate to add to my Wildcat knowledge if my research is off--I am always amazed at the bench of historical and craftsman knowledge on this site. Best to all, Erwin
  13. F4F-4 Wildcat (70048) 1:72 ARMA Hobby Grumman began development work on a new fighter in the mid 1930. Originally the new aircraft was outpaced by the Brewster Buffalo and Grumman resigned their aircraft to carry a supercharged version of the Pratt & Whitney R-1830 "Twin Wasp" radial engine. Original orders from France were delivered to the British Royal Navy after France fell. The RN designated the aircraft the Marlet. The US Navy would then adopt the type in late 1941. Originally armed with 4 0.50 cal machine guns the F4F-4 was introduced in 1941 with 6 of these guns. The aircraft also featured a wing fold system to allow more aircraft to be on a carrier. Even though the armament was increased to 6 gun the ammuntion capacity was not, thus actually giving pilots less firing time which was disliked. The extra weight from the guns and wing fold also reduced performance. The Kit This is a new tool kit from ARMA Hobby which seems to have garnered good reviews. This kit is the same plastic as the Expert kit we reviewed here, except this kit comes without the photoetch and masks of that kit. The kit arrives on a main plastic sprue, a clear sprue, and decals. The moulds are crisp with what feels like the right level of detailing and recessed panel lines for this scale. Construction starts with the cockpit. The instrument panel is attached to the front bulkhead (instruments being provided as decals). The rudder pedals then fit to the back of this bulkhead and it can be attached to the cockpit floor. The seat can then be attached to the read cockpit bulkhead. with decals seatbelts provided. The rear bulkhead can then be attached to the cockpit floor. Side parts then join the front and rear bulkheads. The cockpit can then be added to the right fuselage. The front bulkhead for the landing gear area can now be added in front of the cockpit. The internal parts of the gear mechanism can then go in. We then follow this up with assembling the engine and it's bearers as this goes onto the front side of the gear bulkhead. twin banks of cylinders have their parts added, the gearbox then fits to the front. At the rear the mounts and exhausts go on along with the oil tank and oil coolers. Once the bearers are on the fuselage can be closed up and the engine mounted to the front. The engine cowls can then be added. This is split in half with a front ring, with different ones being provided for one of the decal options. The propeller can then be fitted. Now the tailplanes and rudder can be fitted along with tail wheel. The wings can now be fitted, these are conventional left/right with uppers and lowers. If using the drop tanks you will need to open up the holes for these. Once the wings are one the complicated landing gear itself needs to be built up. Arma provide a frame to align some of the parts or this. The ear can then be added to the fuselage and the wheels added. Some nav lights will need to be removed from the kit for this boxing and then wing lights and pitot tubes added. Bomb racks and the drop tanks go on if you are using them. Lastly the canopies and top aerial are fitted. Markings There are printed by Techmod so should pose no problems. only 2 marking option are provided for the kit in this boxing; VMF-111 Western Samoa, Spring 1941 VF-11 Sundowners, Henderson Field, Guadalcanal 1943. Conclusion It is great to see this important aircraft being kitted by a new manufacturer. The kit seems to have been very well received by modellers. Very Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  14. Although having been building models for many years this is my first since joining the BM forum so I hope this overview is of interest to like minded Fleet Air Arm enthusiasts. The kit is the vintage Tamiya GRUMMAN F4F-4 WILDCAT from the early 1990s. To my mind it still stands up well to more modern versions even though the rear fuselage rivet detail is rather heavy. I had no problem putting it together and only complicated things for myself by deciding to include the AIRES wing fold conversion. This is cast resin and very finely detailed but extremely delicate and I managed to damage some of the components whilst cleaning up the castings. Thinning down the wing sections to accept the cast parts was a chore but I think worth the effort. The only other issue was that I like to have canopies open, particularly when we spend so much time and effort on the cockpit interiors. The kit transparency is too thick to slide aft of the cockpit so I reduced the fuselage spine a little to allow it to sit down in a more realistic fashion. This butchery can't be seen once the canopy is in place. So there it is, my first BM post. I'm now rummaging in the stash to decide on the next project. Thanks for looking. Ian
  15. So this is my first attempt at putting some words and pictures together regarding my latest build. The model is the TAMIYA 1/48 scale Grumman F4F-4. I decided to build a Royal Navy WILDCAT V and chose JV394 of 842 sqn using decals from Eagle Strike. I like to have folded wings on my carrier borne aircraft and so also have a resin conversion kit from AIRES. Main components laid out ready for next stage.
  16. FM-1 & FM-2 Wildcat (70050) 1:72 ARMA Hobby Delux Set Grumman began development work on a new fighter in the mid 1930. Originally the new aircraft was outpaced by the Brewster Buffalo and Grumman resigned their aircraft to carry a supercharged version of the Pratt & Whitney R-1830 "Twin Wasp" radial engine. Original orders from France were delivered to the British Royal Navy after France fell. The RN designated the aircraft the Marlet. The US Navy would then adopt the type in late 1941. Originally armed with 4 0.50 cal machine guns the F4F-4 was introduced in 1941 with 6 of these guns. The aircraft also featured a wing fold system to allow more aircraft to be on a carrier. Even though the armament was increased to 6 gun the ammuntion capacity was not, thus actually giving pilots less firing time which was disliked. The extra weight from the guns and wing fold also reduced performance. While Grumman's Wildcat production ceased in 1943 to make way for the Hellcat General Motors continued to produce the Wildcat. Even though technically obsolete by this point it was still a useful aircraft for the smaller escort carriers. The FM-1 was identical to the F4F-4 but the number of guns was reduced to the original 4 with provision being made for bomb racks, or rockets to be fitted. The FM-2 was an improved airframe with a more powerful engine, and increased rudder area to compensate for the extra torque. The Kits These are new tool kits from ARMA Hobby. There is a common smaller sprue with different main sprues for the 2 versions. The kits will also need some modifications by the modeller to accurately reflect the airframes. As well as 2 lots of kis there is an additional PE sprue in this double boxing. An additional bonus in this boxing are two laser cut wooden decks. The moulds are crisp with what feels like the right level of detailing and recessed panel lines for this scale. FM-1 Construction starts with the cockpit. The instrument panel is attached to the front bulkhead (instruments being provided as decals, behind a PE part). The rudder pedals then fit to the back of this bulkhead and it can be attached to the cockpit floor. The seat can then be attached to the read cockpit bulkhead. PE with decals seatbelts are provided. The rear bulkhead can then be attached to the cockpit floor. Side parts then join the front and rear bulkheads. The cockpit can then be added to the right fuselage. The front bulkhead for the landing gear area can now be added in front of the cockpit with PE details for the gear retraction mechanism going in. The internal parts of the gear mechanism can then go in. We then follow this up with assembling the engine and it's bearers as this goes onto the front side of the gear bulkhead. twin banks of cylinders have their parts added along with a PE wiring harness, the gearbox then fits to the front. At the rear the mounts and exhausts go on along with the oil tank and oil coolers. Once the bearers are on the fuselage can be closed up and the engine mounted to the front. The engine cowls can then be added. This is split in half with a front ring, with different ones being provided for one of the decal options. The propeller can then be fitted. Now the tailplanes and rudder can be fitted along with tail wheel. The wings can now be fitted, these are conventional left/right with uppers and lowers. If using the drop tanks you will need to open up the holes for these. Once the wings are one the complicated landing gear itself needs to be built up. Arma provide a frame to alight some of the parts or this. The ear can then be added to the fuselage and the wheels added. Some nav lights will need to be removed from the kit for this boxing and then wing lights and pitot tubes added. Bomb racks and the drop tanks go on if you are using them. Lastly the canopies and top aerial are fitted. FM-2 Construction starts with the cockpit. The instrument panel is attached to the front bulkhead (instruments being provided as decals, behind a PE part). The rudder pedals then fit to the back of this bulkhead and it can be attached to the cockpit floor. The seat can then be attached to the read cockpit bulkhead. PE with decals seatbelts are provided. The rear bulkhead can then be attached to the cockpit floor. Side parts then join the front and rear bulkheads. The cockpit can then be added to the right fuselage. The front bulkhead for the landing gear area can now be added in front of the cockpit with PE details for the gear retraction mechanism going in. The internal parts of the gear mechanism can then go in. We then follow this up with assembling the engine and it's bearers as this goes onto the front side of the gear bulkhead. the cylinders are added along with push rods, the gearbox then fits to the front. At the rear the mounts and exhausts go on along with the oil tank and oil coolers. Once the bearers are on the fuselage can be closed up and the engine mounted to the front. The engine cowls can then be added. This is split in half with a front ring. The propeller can then be fitted. Now the tailplanes and rudder can be fitted along with tail wheel. The wings can now be fitted, these are conventional left/right with uppers and lowers. If using the drop tanks, and rockets you will need to open up the holes for these. Once the wings are one the complicated landing gear itself needs to be built up. Arma provide a frame to alight some of the parts or this. The ear can then be added to the fuselage and the wheels added. Some nav lights will need to be removed from the kit for this boxing and then wing lights and pitot tubes added. Bomb racks, rockets and the drop tanks go on if you are using them. Lastly the canopies and top aerial are fitted. Markings There are printed by Techmod so should pose no problems. 4 marking option are provided for each of the kits, FM-1 A32/S31 VC-33 USS Nassau, Sept 1943. Wildcat V JV579/F "That Old Thing" 846 Sqn FAA, HMS Trumpeter (invasion stripes as providing anti-submarine cover over the landings) FM-1 No.7, VC-6, USS Core, Dec 1943 North Atlantic. Wildcat V, JV439/C9-N, 733 Sqn FAA, Tricomalee Airfield, Ceylon 1945. FM-2 No.8 "Hot Lips", VC-99, USS Hoggatt Bay, Pacific Theatre 1945 FM-2 No.D6, "Judy", VC-14, USS Hoggatt Bay, The Philippines 1944 FM-2 No.4 VC-13, USS Tropoli Atlantic Ocean March 1944 Wildcat VI JV752/320-9 AAEE Boscomble Down Feb 1945 Carrier Decks Two deck sections typical of a US Escort carrier are provided in the box in laser etched wood. Conclusion It is great to see a double boxing of this excellent kit now being offered with the bonus inclusion of the carrier deck sections. Very Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  17. Let me present the result of our small group build. It is the F4F-4 Wildcat of VGF-29, USS Santee, operation Torch , October 1942. The build is straight OOB with small improvements. I think Arma Hobby kit has a high value for wide range of modellers. For those who makes only simple OOB builds as well as for those who wants improve it as there is some potential to make it more detailed and accurate. If you are interested, you can visit the galery with more finished Wildcat builds there: https://kitforum.cz/viewforum.php?f=94
  18. F4F-4 Wildcat (70047) 1:72 ARMA Hobby Expert Set Grumman began development work on a new fighter in the mid 1930. Originally the new aircraft was outpaced by the Brewster Buffalo and Grumman resigned their aircraft to carry a supercharged version of the Pratt & Whitney R-1830 "Twin Wasp" radial engine. Original orders from France were delivered to the British Royal Navy after France fell. The RN designated the aircraft the Marlet. The US Navy would then adopt the type in late 1941. Originally armed with 4 0.50 cal machine guns the F4F-4 was introduced in 1941 with 6 of these guns. The aircraft also featured a wing fold system to allow more aircraft to be on a carrier. Even though the armament was increased to 6 gun the ammuntion capacity was not, thus actually giving pilots less firing time which was disliked. The extra weight from the guns and wing fold also reduced performance. The Kit This is a new tool kit from ARMA Hobby which seems to have garnered good reviews. The kit arrives on a main plastic sprue, a clear sprue, a small sheet of PE, masks and decals. The moulds are crisp with what feels like the right level of detailing and recessed panel lines for this scale. Construction starts with the cockpit. The instrument panel is attached to the front bulkhead (instruments being provided as decals, behind a PE part). The rudder pedals then fit to the back of this bulkhead and it can be attached to the cockpit floor. The seat can then be attached to the read cockpit bulkhead. PE with decals seatbelts are provided. The rear bulkhead can then be attached to the cockpit floor. Side parts then join the front and rear bulkheads. The cockpit can then be added to the right fuselage. The front bulkhead for the landing gear area can now be added in front of the cockpit with PE details for the gear retraction mechanism going in. The internal parts of the gear mechanism can then go in. We then follow this up with assembling the engine and it's bearers as this goes onto the front side of the gear bulkhead. twin banks of cylinders have their parts added along with a PE wiring harness, the gearbox then fits to the front. At the rear the mounts and exhausts go on along with the oil tank and oil coolers. Once the bearers are on the fuselage can be closed up and the engine mounted to the front. The engine cowls can then be added. This is split in half with a front ring, with different ones being provided for one of the decal options. The propeller can then be fitted. Now the tailplanes and rudder can be fitted along with tail wheel. The wings can now be fitted, these are conventional left/right with uppers and lowers. If using the drop tanks you will need to open up the holes for these. Once the wings are one the complicated landing gear itself needs to be built up. Arma provide a frame to alight some of the parts or this. The ear can then be added to the fuselage and the wheels added. Some nav lights will need to be removed from the kit for this boxing and then wing lights and pitot tubes added. Bomb racks and the drop tanks go on if you are using them. Lastly the canopies and top aerial are fitted. Markings There are printed by Techmod so should pose no problems. 6 marking option are provided for the kit; VMF-121 Capt Foss (26 Aerial Vicotiries) Guadalcanal, Oct/Nov 1942 VF-6, USS Enterprise, April 1942. VGF-26, Ex Operation Torch Aircraft, Guadalcanal April 1943. VF-3, USS Yorktown, Ltd Cmr Thach Battle of Midway June 1942 VGF-29 USS Santee, crash landed by Esn Gallano during Operation Torch Nov 1942 Martlet II, 999 Sqn FAA, HMS Formidable, Algeria Dec 1942. There are also 4 additional bonus markings included; White 50, VMF-121 Capt Foss, Guadalcanal Nov 1941 Black 53, VMF-121 Capt Foss, Guadalcanal Nov 1941 White 1, VF-3, USS Yorktown, Ltd Cmr Thach Battle of Midway June 1942 29-GF-1 VGF-29 USS Santee, crash landed by Esn Gallano during Operation Torch Nov 1942 Conclusion It is great to see this important aircraft being kitted by a new manufacturer. The kit seems to have been very well received by modellers. Very Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  19. In 2022, Academy is to release a new tool 1/48th Grumman F4F-4 Wildcat - Battle of Midway - kit - ref. ? Despite rumours It won't be a rebox from the future Eduard F4F kits family (thread), dixit words from M. Vladimir Šulc, boss from Eduard–Model Accesorries ltd., as from M. Gustav Jung, boss from Wolfpack Design, who's close ties with Academy Hobby Model Kits - see here: link Source: https://www.facebook.com/photo?fbid=4666693050091873&set=pcb.4666695563424955 V.P.
  20. Earlier this week I met a friend on Bodmin Moor where we spoke to a lone driver looking after a couple of Army trucks (very friendly but he didn't give much away). Putting 2 and 2 together, with some local knowledge and a bit of a trek we eventually found a group of Commandos about to stage an attack on an abandoned building. They told us where we'd be safe to watch so we did some climbing and found a suitable spot. The Wildcat provided some recce (from a long way away) and then some top cover during the attack. Interestingly one of the Aircrew has been in touch with my friend after seeing his photos and said he could see us and the dog on their camera, we weren't even aware the helicopter was there at that stage! As an aside, has anyone got their hands on the Airgraphics Wildcat conversion yet?
  21. AZmodel is to reissue its 1/72nd F4F Wildcat in Grumman Martlet Mk.I Two boxings expected in September 2021. Original AZmodel updated/cleaned mould and new parts like the engine. Source: http://www.modelarovo.cz/grumman-martlet-mk-i-1-72-azmodel/ box art - ref. AZ7804 - Grumman Martlet Mk.I https://www.azmodel.cz/produkt/martlet-mk-i/ - ref. AZ7806 - Grumman Martlet Mk.I/G-36 https://www.azmodel.cz/produkt/martlet-mk-i-g-36/ V.P.
  22. Hi, This is going to be my first-ever Group Build, and to ensure I have a chance of completion before the September deadline, I've decided to apply the principles of KISS, or "Keep it simple, stupid!" The kit cost me £8.99 (plus postage, of course) from Model Hobbies, my current first port-of-call. At the time I bought it, I intended to add a Yahu instrument panel and seatbelts, but as either of these takes the cost over the Tenner, they'll be saved for a future project. Here is the kit, still in its box and unrifled, snoozing beside my Number One Helper until zero hour: http:// I'm really looking forward to doing this GB and being among such good company! Cheers for now! Mark
  23. Hi, I'm just wondering if anyone has heard of plans to release a kit of the new AW159 Wildcat helicopter? That is one seriously nice looking machine. Hoping in advance. Rick
  24. F4F-4 Wildcat / Mitsubishi A6M2b Zero Dogfight Double Gift Set 1:72 Airfix A50184 This dogfight double from Airfx brings us their newer tool Zero and Wildcat kits. As well as the two kits there is a display stand to hold both models and a set of paints with glue and brushes. The infamous Mitsubishi Zero was able to dominate the early years of the Pacific air war through a combination of tremendous agility and endurance. Mitsubishi designed their fighter to be as light as possible in order to make the most of the relatively low power available from its radial engine. This weight saving became a major weak spot for the Zero, however, once heavily armed and armoured opposition such as the Grumman Hellcat entered the fray. The legendary British test pilot Eric ‘Winkle’ Brown flew the Zero in 1946. He found that it possessed superb manoeuvrability and a good rate of climb. He was less impressed by the constant ‘panting’ noise emanating from the aircraft’s ultra-thin metal skin in flight and the lack of a bullet-proof windscreen, seat armour and self-sealing fuel tanks. The Wildcat was developed in the late 1930s and came into service in early 1940s. While its performance was a little less than the Zero, however its ruggedness and better use of in with US Tactics gave it an improved kill ratio over the Zero. Lessons learned from the Wildcat were used to develop the much improved Hellcat. The Zero The Zero was a new kit from Airfix in 2011 The kit is part of their series one range. The painting instructions for the single example provided for on the decal sheet are printed in colour in the instructions. The kit’s 47 parts are nicely moulded and the panel lines are very engraved, the kit does include options for folded wings. The Wildcat This Zero was a new kit from Airfix 2015 The kit is part of their series one range. The kit is part of their series one range. The painting instructions for the single example provided for on the decal sheet are printed in colour in the instructions.The kit’s 58 parts are nicely moulded and the panel lines are very engraved, the kit does include options for folded wings. Markings The decal sheet from Cartograf (so no issues there) gives us one option for each aircraft. These are B11-181 From the Carrier Soryu, Battle of Midway June 4th 1942, and F-22 From the Fighting 8, USS Hornet (CV-) Battle of Midways June 4th 1942. Conclusion This looks like another winner from Airfix. The kits are well moulded, nicely detailed and if they build up as well as they look there should be no problems. As a keen modeller of 1:72 subjects I have to say I’m very happy with Airfix’s recent output and I look forward to more of the same. Review sample courtesy of
  25. Here are my completed builds numbers 2 & 3 for 2016: the Airfix Dogfight Double set comprising the Grumman Wildcat and the Nakajima B5N2 'Kate' torpedo bomber. The kits are nicely detailed and went together very well, I don't recall having any particular problems with either of them. I used the kit transfers and mostly Sovereign Hobbies Colourcoats paints, USN Blue-gray, USN Light Gray, Nakajima Amber Grey-green (Ameiro) IJN D1 Deep Green Black and Mitsubishi Cowling Blue-black. If you think the paint chipping effect on the Kate is a bit overdone, kindly allow me to direct you here I used the Peewit canopy mask sets for both kits, they are about half the price of the Eduard ones. The markings represent the Wildcat flown by Lt.Cdr John 'Jimmy' Thach and the Kate commanded by Lt Joichi Tomonaga - Airfix have managed to get both the protagonists' names wrong in the instruction and painting booklet which is a bit of a shame given that it took me two minutes to look them up on the internet and I can't imagine why Airfix could not have done the same before sending it off for printing - at best it looks sloppy, at worst it looks a bit disrespectful, especially since Lt Tomonaga did not survive the encounter. That however is the only real criticism I can level at this set. Anyway, here they are, first the Wildcat: ... and the Kate: ... and finally together, locked in combat as Airfix intended: Thanks for your attention Cheers, Stew
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