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Tim Reynaga

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About Tim Reynaga

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  1. Hello everyone, I just wanted to mention that Kalmbach Publishing this month has released a new modeling book, Modeling World War II in the Pacific, and one of the articles included is my piece on a Fujimi 1/700 scale Japanese Maru-Yu submarine. The Maru-YU class cargo subs were special transports deployed in a desperation program by the Imperial Army (independently of the Navy) to slip emergency supplies to starving troops on remote Pacific islands cut off by U.S. forces. The how-to article for the little diorama is in the book and I can’t republish it here, but I can give you all some pictures of the model as a preview: The book has sixteen other projects as well, including a USS Oklahoma salvage diorama, an Essex-class carrier, and a beautiful build of the Japanese cruiser Tone. Check it out!
  2. Trumpeter's 1/144 scale LCM(3)! Trumpeter included markings for both a dark blue Pacific LCM and a D-Day boat in grey. I airbrushed it Navy Blue 5-N for the Pacific boat, but I overdid the light grey streaks added for weathering so much that it ended up looking grey. Rather than redo things, I just went with it and added more grey and used the D-Day markings. The only changes I made to the kit were to add a sheet plastic door and handle (the doors weren’t flush-mounted as Trumpeter depicts) and semicircular mounts for the life rings.
  3. Eduard MiG-15s! The MiG-15 NO-37 was the mount of Lt. Jaroslav Sramek, 5th Fighter Regiment, Plzen-Line Air Base. On March 10, 1953, Lt. Sramek shot down a USAF F-84 Thunderjet that had intruded into Czech airspace. The other MiG-15 is in the livery of the 29th Guards, Dachang Air Base, China. The Soviet 29th Guards Fighter Air regiment fought in Korean War (with Chinese-marked aircraft) from November 1950 to February 1951.
  4. With the addition of the landing gear, the tiny MiG-15s are complete! The MiG-15 NO-37 was the mount of Lt. Jaroslav Sramek, 5th Fighter Regiment, Plzen-Line Air Base. On March 10, 1953, Lt. Sramek shot down a USAF F-84 Thunderjet that had intruded into Czech airspace. The other MiG-15 is in the livery of the 29th Guards, Dachang Air Base, China. The Soviet 29th Guards Fighter Air regiment fought in Korean War (with Chinese-marked aircraft) from November 1950 to February 1951.
  5. Time for decals; I started with the nonslip walkways on the wings. Eduard provided an amazing six marking options for aircraft from five different countries. And the decals are excellent quality too! I chose a Chinese and a Soviet aircraft. The markings look good, but I found the spartan Soviet set to be a bit plain, so I replaced them with the more colorful ones of a Czechoslovakian aircraft from 1953.
  6. Not if you are a 1/144 F-86!
  7. With the rest of the fittings attached, a quick coat of paint and decals slapped on, the 1/144 scale LCM(3) is complete! Trumpeter included markings for both a dark blue Pacific LCM and a D-Day boat in grey. I airbrushed it Navy Blue 5-N for the Pacific boat, but I overdid the light grey streaks added for weathering so much that it ended up looking grey. Rather than redo things, I just went with it and added more grey and used the D-Day markings. The only changes I made to the kit were to add a sheet plastic door and handle (the doors weren’t flush-mounted as Trumpeter depicts) and semicircular mounts for the life rings. And done!
  8. Painting these birds couldn’t be simpler – Tamiya Bare Metal Silver AS-12 right out of the spray can!
  9. Ok, fast forward – all but a few of the fittings are installed and I’ve started to paint, beginning with the .50 cal machine guns. These are nicely done and there are even two extras, one set of guns molded with the pedestals and two guns with the two-part pedestals separately molded. Cool. I opted for the separate pedestals which are slightly sharper.
  10. Designed to destroy enemy bombers, the MiG-15 was well armed with two 23mm and one 37mm cannon. Eduard’s renditions of these in 1/144 are impressively petite. Molded together with their fairings, the guns are sharp and in-scale. They fit neatly into slots under the fuselage nose. The only change I made was to drill out the muzzle ends. Eduard’s MiG-15 kits also come with a choice of nicely molded underwing fuel tanks. These include the early PTB-260 260 liter (69 gallon) slipper tanks and the later PTB-400 400 liter (105 gallon) underwing tanks with fins. There is even the option of PTB-400 underwing tanks mounted to BD3-53 bomb racks – a unique Czechoslovak modification on the fighter-bomber variant of the later MiG-15bis (Fagot-B). Cool.
  11. Major assembly of the LCM was completed last night, so today I’ll install the smaller fittings and be ready to paint this evening! The propulsion gear, vents, and other parts (like these tiny bitts) are petite and sharp. This kit is a pleasure to work with!
  12. Maybe eventually. It is an excellent little kit, but to finish this by the end of the weekend I think I'll just put it on a plinth. I very much enjoyed your HMS Upholder build, by the way!
  13. Added to the assembled fuselages, the tailfins and high-mounted stabilizers complete the distinctive MiG-15 airframes. These kits are great to work with. Outlines are dead accurate, and the design and fit tolerances of the parts are so consistently tight that, so far, the models have required no filler at all.
  14. I just bought Trumpeter’s 1/144 scale LCM(3) as a bagged kit with no box on e-Bay for less than ten bucks - it looks to be a fun, quick build! The LCM was waiting for me on the porch when I got home from work yesterday. Tearing open the package after dinner, I was impressed with the quality of this little molding. The weld seams on the interior bulkhead shown here, for example. Nice. Assembly is so simple I’m going to try something different this time; having cancelled travel plans with the wife this weekend because of the COVID-19 virus pandemic, I think I’ll stay in and see if I can polish this off before Monday! The first assembly was the open interior “box”... then the deck and hull... ...and then fitting them together. I’m already halfway done! Have to work today, but after that I have all weekend...
  15. Eduard’s fuselage assemblies are an unconventional top/bottom arrangement. Fit is precise. Gentle, low-pressure scrapbooking clamps borrowed from the wife assure a tight fit to minimize seams as the cement dries. The tail nozzles fit neatly into the assembled fuselage. A measure of Eduard’s commitment to excellence is the detailed engine backs molded about 1/4 inch inside the one-piece tailpipes. They can barely be seen, but they’re in there. Outstanding!
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