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Does Micro Kristal Klear work on non flat holes?


Housesparrow
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I wonder, does anyone know if Micro Kristal Klear end up looking ok if filled into non flat holes?

I have a submarine model with some clear part missing, so I had in mind to use some bits of styrene to create the window frames, and then use Micro Kristal Klear to create the glass.

Only worry is that, the window frame has a bend to it, hehe so I am curious if maybe the liquid plastic would end up being flush with the rounded surface on the conning tower windows (which are shaped like squares), or just end up looking weird and dented.

I can try test this myself, but I thought I'd toss this thread out there in case someone actually have this a similar experience with this particular product.

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The Kristal Klear and similar concoctions rely upon surface tension, and so will pull straight. In practice you will usually ind that the edges are thicker than the centre, so it is slightly dimpled. This can then be filled with gloss varnish, but there is no way to make a liquid follow a convex curve. If you want a transparent part to follow the hull curve, you have to fill the hole with shaped transparent rod/block, then cut off the excess and file/polish smooth.

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It's possible to a certain extent - the liquid is thick enough that surface tension does not always result in it following the 'shortest line between two points', especially if you let it partially set (or blow on it!). But it's difficult and it only works on relatively shallow one dimensional curves

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The stuff also finds the centre of the thickness of the plastic framing the hole it's filling so the thinner you can make the surrounding walls, the more flush it will dry (ie the less dimpling you will get).

Also try and use as little of the stuff as you can get away with: the less you use, the more transparent your window will be.

I was a little disappointed with how well it coped with the small navigator's windows on my Kate (single curve): I probably need to pay more attention to my rule 2.

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Gravity can be your friend, to a point.

I once used white glue to achieve the same effect, on a curved surface (round fuselage). I put quite a bit in, set with the window down and let it cure for a couple of days. Then I started polishing to get it to conform to the fuselage side, and to get it more clear. It worked, but it wouldn't meet my standards today. It was clear-ish at best and way too much effort.

I'd use a clear acrylic glue (like Gator's grip) or even Future and try the same method. Or...cut a piece of clear plastic larger than my window, warm it to bend to shape, cut the hole larger than required and glue it all in. Then polish to achieve clarity and the mask it.

I've sometimes been successful with the latter method using the overly thick kit glazing.

Tim

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