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pheonix

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Everything posted by pheonix

  1. Great to see another WW1 subject being built - and to the highest standard too. Will be looking forward to seeing more of this. P
  2. Interesting update. It is becoming clear now just how big this model is - and very interesting threasd to follow too. Keep up the good work. P
  3. The Spad is coming on fine - your modelling shed is too by the look of it! As one who models on a shoestring I eny some of you luckier people! P
  4. I have finished making the wheels. For those who have not seen my method before here is a short explanation of how I make them. I start by marking out a circle the diameter of which is the wheel minus the tyre on a piece of card of suitable thickness: because these are large wheels I laminated two pieces of 40 thou card. I cut out a square of card with the circle on it and trim and file the disc using the groove as a guide for when to stop. I file the edge of one face of the disc to represent the wheel cover, the other side is left flat. Then I take a piece of rod, in this case 80 thou, to match the size of the tyre and wind this round a paintbrush handle or piece of dowel. The diameter of the handle or dowel needs to be slightly smaller than the wheel disc so that the tyre will cling on to the disc. Hold the rod tightly on the handle before plunging the rod and handle into boiling water for a few seconds. Withdraw the rod from the water and either plunge it into cold water or simply wait for it to cool, still holding it tightly while doing so. Slide the rod from the handle and you will have a plastic coil from which you can measure and cut lengths which can then be placed around the edge of the disc. You will need to bend the rod gently to make the two ends join properly before wrapping around the disc. Secure the rod tyre with liquid glue and if necessary apply a little filler to any small gaps. I moulded the chin piece below the nose using the standard plunge moulding technique. This was a small piece so I added a handle to the male mould. When the piece had been cut and trimmed I was able to cut the small vent holes using a very small drill and tip of a new scalpel blade and then cemented it to the underside of the nose. At the same time I shaped a mould for the cover above the engines and cut this out ready to fit later. Thanks for looking. P
  5. I have already started to post this build on other sites but as I am new to this site and some of you may not have seen this before I am posting all the current material here in one go. I have scratch built several WW1 types but they have been single or two seat types and therefore relatively small. I recently decided that it was time to follow Stevehed's splendid example and go big and so I did some research on these early large German machines: the best source is The German Giants by P Grosz and G Haddow, some of which is available of the net. Then I found that DataFile no 89 has a lot of material and drawings of the first of these machines, the Seimens-Schuckert R.1 (Riesenfleugzeug - giant aircraft), which was first flown in May 1915. I decided that here was a project which would be worth following because it is larger than any of my other scratch builds but still small enough to fit into my display cabinet. There will no doubt be some interesting problems to resolve as I proceed but that is part of the fun and challenge of scratch building. For those like me who are not familiar with this design here is what it looks like (and of course this contains a set of plans in 1/72 scale which could prove to be useful). Here is my kit although I suspect that a paper clip may also be used later for attaching wings. I started with the nose which looks like the front of a very large lorry with three radiators - one in the front and one on each side with a bonnet over them all. There were three engines in the front of these machines, two of which were between the side radiators and a third beneath and behind the pilots. I do not intend to make the engines as they cannot be seen on the completed model unless the top of the nose is left off. I cut three pieces of 30 thou card and glued lengths of 10 thou rod onto the faces of the card to represent the radiator pipes. Strips of stretched sprue represent the steel bands holding the pipes in place. Then I made a top and bottom plate to which I could attach the three radiators. Thanks for looking.
  6. Bear Paw has posted a lovely model of the Airfix Albatros so this is another antique, (well nearly), Airfix Albatros D Va. I built it as part of a WW1 GB on another site - the build log can be found at http://airfixtributeforum.myfastforum.org/viewtopic.php?f=508&t=42907. I know that this kit is terribly inaccurate - the nose is too short and shallow, the cockpit is bare, the engine is a joke (or in my case was missing from the kit altogether), … I could go on. HOWEVER, a reasonable model can be made from this with a little effort and even less cost if one wants to. For me this was also a trip down memory lane as I had originally built one of these over 50 years ago (giving my age away there), when I desperately wanted to make a model that was not just OOB but lacked the skills to do so. I had found an article in a comic which was about a zebra-striped Albatros D Va so I painted mine in these markings (minus the wing stars which were not mentioned), in gloss(!) colours. To this day I am not sure who the pilot in the article was but I wanted to repeat the exercise for purely nostalgic reasons. This model represents a machine as flown by Ltn. Rudolf Windisch of Jasta 32 in the summer of 1917. Windisch started flying bombers and reconnaissance sorties on the Eastern Front in 1916, but transferred to fighters in early 1917 and was posted to Jasta 32 where he adopted the scheme illustrated in the rise of flight. He was credited with 8 victories with Jasta 32 and transferred to become commander of Jasta 66 in February 1918, where he was credited with another 14 victories before he was forced down and disappeared on 27 May 1918. His fate is not known. According to the rise of flight website two versions of his personal scheme are recorded in photos, one with wider borders to the national crosses and wider lines for the stars. I know that there were at least four different pilots who flew Albatros aircraft with zebra stripes, this is just one of them. Apart from having to add an engine and exhaust which I built from scratch, I put some detail into the cockpit. thinned the trailing edges, replaced the elevator, guns from Aeroclub, new prop and spinner, and put in some other details such as engine covers from card. The markings were partly from the kit except for the upper wing crosses, one of which disintegrated because it was so old, (I bought the kit in the late 1970's): very fortunately Stevehed gave me some spares from his box. The stars on the top wing were made from Letraline dry transfers touched up with Humbrol enamel. The model was painted with Humbrol enamels and a hairy stick. http://i1155.photobucket.com/albums/p555/stevef100/Airfix%20Albatros/DSCF1770_zps83f7d216.jpg][/MG] http://i1155.photobucket.com/albums/p555/stevef100/Airfix%20Albatros/DSCF1778_zps6d2a2140.jpg http://i1155.photobucket.com/albums/p555/stevef100/Airfix%20Albatros/DSCF1798_zpsb5389f53.jpg http://i1155.photobucket.com/albums/p555/stevef100/Airfix%20Albatros/DSCF1788_zps2d74bdde.jpg http://i1155.photobucket.com/albums/p555/stevef100/Airfix%20Albatros/DSCF1806_zpsf6d23917.jpg
  7. Another old fogey has been taken down memory lane. The transfers were almost impossible to get to stick on before the advent of softners etc, but somehow they did. In its time this was a very good kit which stood up well to contemporary offerings. As did the He 177 come to that. P
  8. Not seen this kit before (but have seen the markings). You have done a superb job on this - and extremely well weathered too. P
  9. No warts there. That is a really well turned out model with just a few extras in the cockpit! I am reminded of the original Airfix offering of the same model which I remember building many years ago...... no comparison!!
  10. I am posting this again as I have been having problems with photographs from photobucket. Hopefully this time everything will work! Bear Paw has posted a lovely model of the Airfix Albatros so this is another antique, (well nearly), Airfix Albatros D Va. I built it as part of a WW1 GB on another site - the build log can be found at http://airfixtributeforum.myfastforum.org/viewtopic.php?f=508&t=42907. I know that this kit is terribly inaccurate - the nose is too short and shallow, the cockpit is bare, the engine is a joke (or in my case was missing from the kit altogether), … I could go on. HOWEVER, a reasonable model can be made from this with a little effort and even less cost if one wants to. For me this was also a trip down memory lane as I had originally built one of these over 50 years ago (giving my age away there), when I desperately wanted to make a model that was not just OOB but lacked the skills to do so. I had found an article in a comic which was about a zebra-striped Albatros D Va so I painted mine in these markings (minus the wing stars which were not mentioned), in gloss(!) colours. To this day I am not sure who the pilot in the article was but I wanted to repeat the exercise for purely nostalgic reasons. This model represents a machine as flown by Ltn. Rudolf Windisch of Jasta 32 in the summer of 1917. Windisch started flying bombers and reconnaissance sorties on the Eastern Front in 1916, but transferred to fighters in early 1917 and was posted to Jasta 32 where he adopted the scheme illustrated in the rise of flight. He was credited with 8 victories with Jasta 32 and transferred to become commander of Jasta 66 in February 1918, where he was credited with another 14 victories before he was forced down and disappeared on 27 May 1918. His fate is not known. According to the rise of flight website two versions of his personal scheme are recorded in photos, one with wider borders to the national crosses and wider lines for the stars. I know that there were at least four different pilots who flew Albatros aircraft with zebra stripes, this is just one of them. Apart from having to add an engine and exhaust which I built from scratch, I put some detail into the cockpit. thinned the trailing edges, replaced the elevator, guns from Aeroclub, new prop and spinner, and put in some other details such as engine covers from card. The markings were partly from the kit except for the upper wing crosses, one of which disintegrated because it was so old, (I bought the kit in the late 1970's): very fortunately Stevehed gave me some spares from his box. The stars on the top wing were made from Letraline dry transfers touched up with Humbrol enamel. The model was painted with Humbrol enamels and a hairy stick.
  11. That is a lovely rendition of the venerable old kit. Of course it has its drawbacks (not least the engine and nose which is too short) but who cares when you have markings like these? And who can tell unless they take a really close look with a micrometer? Those old Revell and Airfix kits are good value for money, quick and easy to build and for some of us take us down memory lane. I will post one of these shortly which I made for a WW1 GB for another site which was just such a trip for me.
  12. Going great guns Ian. My you do move quickly on your models - and keep evrything to the highest standard into the bargain. Wait until you get to the rigging.....ha, ha! P
  13. These are some pictures and a short history of a type which I will bet most of you have not heard of before. Nor had I until I saw one of these built from a vacuform by Steve Cox. Steve very kindly sent me a set of plans which I used as the basis for this model - for those interested there is a build log at http://airfixtributeforum.myfastforum.org/viewtopic.php?f=79&t=47162 Gustav Otto was a Bavarian engineer who established a factory for building aircraft in Munich in the years just before WW1. Unusually for German designers he focussed on pusher machines, and according to contemporary British sources these were copies of Farman designs. In fact this was a little unfair as it would be more accurate to say that he was inspired by the Farman designs as his machines were considerably different in outline and construction. Whereas most contemporary machines were built with wooden frames, Otto used steel. This was a very marked innovation for the time as was his use of elevators rather than wing warping which was common on most contemporary French and British designs. The engine was mounted on a platform above the rear of the nacelle and was an Argus of 100hp, again a more powerful plant than most of its non-German contemporaries. However the basic design went through many variations over time, as did many other contemporary designs, as Otto tried to refine and improve the basic idea. There were variously machines with four fins and rudders, twin two-wheel undercarriage units and various shapes to the nacelle. One photograph shows an Otto without any nacelle at all as on the Bristol Boxkite, with the pilot sitting fully exposed in the front of the aircraft and the passenger equally exposed behind. It would seem that by 1914 the design had settled to something like what I have tried to represent in my model, but I cannot be certain of all the details as there is little reliable information published in English. The military service career of these machines seems to have been limited to reconnaissance on the Eastern front by a very few machines. The Army did not like them because they were considered to be badly constructed and the Navy ordered several but these seem to have suffered from poor construction too. However some machines do seem to have been employed at least in the early months of the war before they were withdrawn from service. One machine was sent to German South West Africa in May 1914 to try to establish an air presence in the colonies. This machine was privately sponsored and sent by sea to the port of Swakopmund where it was unpacked and assembled before being flown to Windhoek the capital. The pilot Bruno Büchner demonstrated the machine to crowds in several communities where some people paid to have joy rides. He also carried post on a couple of occasions. In July 1914 Büchner had the aeroplane crated again and sent by sea to Dar-es-Salaam as he was unable to fly it to German East Africa because the South African government would not give him permission to fly over their territory. Büchner was in Zanzibar when he learned of the outbreak of war so he returned to Dar-es-Salaam and sailed to the meet the battle-cruiser Königsberg. On arrival, he offered his aircraft to Oberstleutnant Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck, the commander of the Schutztruppe. Von Lettow-Vorbeck ordered Büchner to undertake a scouting mission in the direction of Zanzibar. Flying along the coast, he spotted two gunboats which immediately opened fire. He was wounded in the arm. On landing, the plane struck deep sand and somersaulted. Büchner was thrown clear, but injured, and late in the evening he arrived at his base, utterly exhausted. While he was still in hospital, another Schutztruppe officer, Leutnant Henneberger, had the plane repaired and took off. However, when he was attempting to land, the aircraft clipped the tops of palm trees and crashed. The pilot was pulled out dead from the only lightly damaged plane. After his recovery, Büchner was ordered to fit floats to his plane and to support the Königsberg, which was then lying disabled in the Rufiji Delta. The aircraft was rebuilt and sheet-metal floats were attached. It was then found that there was insufficient petrol available, and the project was cancelled. The inventive Büchner fitted the aircraft's engine to a small-gauge railway goods truck and, with this much admired Schienen-Zepp (Rail-Zepp[elin]), undertook two goods transport trips to the inland town of Morogoro. Following the occupation by the British, Büchner and his wife were interned. The information about the East African venture was pointed out to me by Old Man and I would like to thank him for doing so. P
  14. Missed this one recently - been away and forgot to look it up when I got back. If you consider that you are slow with these you ought to see my work rate! Doing an excellent job on both - I too like that Gators grip - looks to be good material to use. Looking forward to seeing them completed.
  15. Yes I usually use 40SWG copper wire which I roll flat using a piece of brass strip and a block of wood. The lengths are measured from the model using dividers and the wires attached with CA. It saves drilling endless holes which can be nearly impossible on pushers (I have a penchant for pushers). I do sometimes use thread on larger biplanes (twin engine bombers or larger). Thanks to all the rest of you who have dropped by and left such positive comments - I really appreciate them. P
  16. You are doing great things with this Ian. The glazing looked like a huge lump of armoured glass before you set to. What an improvement. I still think building from scratch would have not been much more difficult........! P
  17. Completely agree with Sgt Squarehead about those pedals - that is some very fine work indeed. P
  18. That looks very good Ian. Reads like a good solution to your problem: getting ribs to look right on flying surfaces is one of my biggest problems when scratch building. P
  19. I have been away over the holiday break visiting relatives but this is where I had got to before I left. I had joined the lower wing sections and added the ribs to the wings, ailerons and horizontal tail surfaces from 10 x 20 thou strip. The centre rib was missing from the tail surface when the photo was taken - that is now in place. While I was away I decided to take a small box of tools and bits with me so that I could make some parts for this build in the evenings when the relative i visit has gone to bed. This was an experiment which I will now repeat as I was able to make the small wheel discs for the rear wheels and the gearbox housings where the drive shafts from the engines are connected to the propellor shafts. These were small tasks that did not require large amounts of materials or time but kept me happy! The image shows the housings which were made from sprue, and the wheel discs made from 30 thou card with one of the main wheels which I have also completed. The tyres for the small wheels will be made from 30 thou rod wound around a thin paintbrush handle and dipped into hot water. The main wheel was made in this way from 100 thou card shaped with a file and 80 thou rod for the tyre. Thanks for looking.
  20. Spectacular is an understatement. I am not sure which words to use...... have just broken my jaw as it hit the ground. P
  21. I enjoy scratchbuilding but only in 1/72 scale because I do not have a quarter scale hangar in my garden to store/display my models! Bowled over by the sheer skill and dedication - an absolute winner on every count. P
  22. Brilliant build from a not altogether exceptional kit to put it bluntly. P
  23. Only just found this Ian - I had no idea that you had started this project. It is certainly up to your usual standard and a vast improvement on the kit. It reminds me of the Frog Vimy which I attempted to upgrade in an earlier modelling incarnation many years ago - but you are making even better improvemnets to this that I managed. Will follow along with avid interest. P
  24. Brilliant painting of the engine - and extra details too! P
  25. That is looking very good. I will be very interested to see how the doped fabric colour turns out - it is always a difficult shade to get right.