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rickshaw

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About rickshaw

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    Downunder
  1. Caribou paint colour/Decal problem (RAAF)

    Use the black titles/markings.
  2. Caribou paint colour/Decal problem (RAAF)

    I used Vallejo Acrylics. All with a few drops of white in them to fade them a little.
  3. Caribou paint colour/Decal problem (RAAF)

    I remember flying in the 'bou as a passenger when I was a digger in the Army way back in the late 1970s. I remember returning from an exercise where the pilot and crew were flying an all white aircraft with the big letters "UN" on the side - they had just returned from Kashmir where the RAAF had a commitment to the peacekeeping force at the time. The pilot flew us like he flew in Kashmir. He loaded us on, we went down the runway and he literally bounced us into the air to get us up quicker. He took off, went about ten feet into the air and let it down suddenly, leaving our stomachs behind when we hit and left the runway the second time. Most amazing experience, better than any rollercoaster that I've been on. You could feel the wings bend when we made contact. Anyway, up we went! Your model looks good but a bit "green" - not faded as it would have been in the Australian sun very quickly after leaving the painting bay. I did a V-22 in this scheme for a What-if. It was remarked upon by someone who was working on the V-22 design office and he asked if he could show pictures of it to his colleagues. I suggested he might like to use them in a sales effort.
  4. Bluewater Missile

    Bluewater Ground launchers
  5. Caribou paint colour/Decal problem (RAAF)

    Try Vallejo 70.982 Cavalry Brown as an equivalent to FS30109. However that appears to dark so I'd recommend lightening it a bit with a few drops of white.
  6. Supermarine TOR4040

    Unicraft? Crappy models. I refuse to buy any, no matter how attractive they look on his website.
  7. Gloster Javelin in Republic of China Air Force Service

    Contact adhesive. You coat both surfaces wait for it to dry and then press them together. Looks like a slightly thicker PVA glue to me.
  8. Sabre Mk. 6

    CAC Sabres were only ever powered by Avon engines, not Orenda ones...
  9. stevehnz, we truly thank you for taking one for the team. As soon as you replace something/scratchbuild something, someone will replace a new kit and each of us has to make that sacrifice at one time or another...
  10. Grumman HU-16 Albatross ASW in Australian Coast Guard Service After the Tampa affair, and the declaration of the War on Terrorism, in 2001 Kim Beazley announced that the Australian Labor Party, if in government, would establish an Australian Coast Guard "responsible for conducting Australia's coastal surveillance and meeting Australia's maritime protection needs, including in relation to illegal immigration, drugs, fisheries, and quarantine-related issues". This plan met with criticism. Defence Minister Peter Reith under the Liberal-Coalition Government criticised Beazley for stating that an Australian Coast Guard both will and will not be an "answer to the question of people smuggling". The plan was criticised by the Australian government, on the grounds that it would either be prohibitively expensive or inadequate to the task. Later, the motives for the establishment of an Australian Coast Guard were interpreted by some as "a plan to extend the capabilities of the Australian Federal Police." After the defeat of the Howard Government in the 2003 election, the ALP Government, let by Simon Crean instituted the Australian Coast Guard – a subsidiary organisation, run by the Australian Federal Police and intended to protect Australia's coast line from incursion by illegal people smugglers and drug runners and to rescue wayward seafarers. Equipped initially with mainly cast off equipment from the RAAF and the RAN, the ACG was intended to secure the coastline out to 1,000 km. In this case, we have the HU-16B ASW aircraft, donated by the RAN Fleet Air Arm. Used by the RAN FAA as a close in, coastal ASW and SAR aircraft, the HU-16B performed sterling service for over 20 years. However, they were retired in 1988. After sitting at Nowra's HMAS Albatross air base for ten years, they were identified as surplus to requirements and donated to the Australian Coast Guard. However, their engines were discovered to be rather worn. The ACG hit upon the idea of replacing them with Rolls Royce Dart Turboprops, for commonality with their Fokker F27 Troopship Mk. Iis. After six months of work, the job was done. Zero houred airframe, digitalised avionics and new engines. As part of the deal with the RAN was the agreement that in emergency, the Albatross aircraft could still perform their function as ASW aircraft. So, here we have a HU-16 Albatross, stationed at HMAS Albatross on the New South Wales south coast, performing it's once a year, demonstration of ASW capability. Equipped with Radar and a MAD boom, armed with two acoustic homing torpedos, the aircraft spread fear and trepidation amongst any Indonesian submariners who witnessed their abilities. The Model The model is the venerable 1/72 Monogram HU-16 Albatross model. It has been converted to ASW configuration through the addition of an enlarged radome and an extending MAD boom. The Torpedoes came from an Airfix Shakleton kit, via Zenrat Enterprises. The engines came from a 1/100 Heller Transall. She was painted with a hairy stick and the decals came from the spares box and Speckman Enterprises.
  11. Fokker F27 Troopship Mk.II in Australian Coast Guard Service After the Tampa affair, and the declaration of the War on Terrorism, in 2001 Kim Beazley announced that the Australian Labor Party, if in government, would establish an Australian Coast Guard "responsible for conducting Australia's coastal surveillance and meeting Australia's maritime protection needs, including in relation to illegal immigration, drugs, fisheries, and quarantine-related issues". This plan met with criticism. Defence Minister Peter Reith under the Liberal-Coalition Government criticised Beazley for stating that an Australian Coast Guard both will and will not be an "answer to the question of people smuggling". The plan was criticised by the Australian government, on the grounds that it would either be prohibitively expensive or inadequate to the task. Later, the motives for the establishment of an Australian Coast Guard were interpreted by some as "a plan to extend the capabilities of the Australian Federal Police." After the defeat of the Howard Government in the 2003 election, the ALP Government, let by Simon Crean instituted the Australian Coast Guard – a subsidiary organisation, run by the Australian Federal Police and intended to protect Australia's coast line from incursion by illegal people smugglers and drug runners and to rescue wayward seafarers. Equipped initially with mainly cast off equipment from the RAAF and the RAN, the ACG was intended to secure the coastline out to 1,000 km. In this case, we have a Fokker F27 Troopship Mk.II. The Fokker was originally used by the RAAF as a light, tactical transport and was designed to be common with the civilian F27 Friendship. The RAAF was the launch customer for the Troopship Mk.II which introduced a large ramp at the rear to facilitate tactical loading directly onto the back of a medium truck. By the time of the formation of the ACG, the RAAF were looking for replacements for the elderly Troopships. They were considered perfect for Coast Guard use and were adopted in squadron strength, where they still serve today. The Model The model is a combination of an Esci 1/72 F27 Friendship and a Heller 1/100 Transall. The model was painted with a hairy stick using Tamiya and Vallejo Acylics. The Decals came from the spares box and Kit Speckman Enterprises.
  12. Gloster Javelin in Republic of China Air Force Service In 1945 the Koumintang Government of the Republic of China contracted with Gloster aircraft of the UK to create a single-engined Jet fighter. Being only the fourth country in the world to put into operation a jet powered combat aircraft, the ROCAF was proud of it's achievement. It didn't win the Chinese Civil War though, and in 1948, the KMT Government of Chiang Kai Shek was forced to flee the mainland for the island of Formosa. The Communists, thwarted of their ultimate goal of ruling all of China bided their time on the mainland. The US Navy intervened and prevented them from invading Taiwan, as the island became known. The KMT, leery of becoming too dependent on the United States turned again to Glosters who supplied them with their most advanced product, the Javelin, all-weather fighter. The Model The kit is a Polish repop of the venerable Frog Javelin Mk.9 kit. It required considerable work and I decided to try an alternative method of creating a polished metal surface, using cheap Aluminium foil. It worked reasonably well, I felt. The decals came from the spares box.
  13. Nanching Q-5 “Fantan” strike aircraft The Nanchang Q-5 (Chinese: 强-5; pinyin: Qiang-5; NATO reporting name: Fantan), also known as the A-5 in its export versions, is a Chinese-built jet ground-attack aircraft based on the Soviet MiG-19. Its main role is close air support. The PRC was an enthusiastic user of the MiG-19, which it manufactured locally as the Shenyang J-6 from 1958. In August 1958 the People's Liberation Army requested development of a jet attack aircraft for the air support role. Lu Xiaopeng was appointed chief designer of this project. Lu also designed the J-12 fighter jet.[2] Although based on the MiG-19, the new design, designated Qiangjiji-5 (fifth attack aircraft design), had a longer fuselage, area ruled to reduce transonic drag and accommodate a 4 m (13-ft) long internal weapons bay.[3] The air intakes were moved to the fuselage sides to make space in the nose for a planned target radar (which was never actually fitted). New wings with greater area and reduced sweep were incorporated. The Q-5 shares the J-6's Liming Wopen WP-6 A (Tumansky RD-9) turbojet engines. The redesign cost some high-altitude speed, but the Q-5 is as fast as the MiG-19/J-6 at low level, thanks largely to the area-ruled fuselage. Fixed armament of the Q-5 was reduced to two Type 23-1 23 mm cannon with 100 rounds per gun, mounted in the wing roots. Two pylons under each wing and two pairs of tandem pylons under the engines were provided in addition to the weapons bay. A total of 1,000 kg (2,205 lb) of ordnance could be carried internally, with an additional 1,000 kg externally. On many aircraft the weapons bay is now used primarily for an auxiliary fuel tank. About 1,000 aircraft were produced, 600 of them being the updated Q-5A. A small number, perhaps a few dozen, Q-5As were modified to carry nuclear weapons; these are believed to retain their internal weapons bay. A long-range Q-5I, introduced in 1983, added a fuel tank instead of the internal weapons bay, compensating for that with the provision of two additional underwing pylons. Some of these aircraft serve with the PLA Navy, and have apparently been equipped with radar to guide anti-ship missiles. Subsequent minor upgrades include the Q-5IA, with a new gun/bomb sighting system and avionics, and the Q-5II, with radar warning receiver (RWR). In the 1980s, the aircraft was exported to nations such as Pakistan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, and is often known as the A-5 in those nations. Plans for an upgraded Q-5/A-5 with Western equipment and new navigation and attack (nav/attack) systems were largely aborted following the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, but the aircraft continues in service. It is a capable light attack aircraft, although its limited navigation and weapons-delivery systems are inferior to more modern aircraft. In more recent years, the PLAAF has begun to field newer models of the Q-5, that incorporate some of the technology developed during the canceled Q-5M and Q-5K projects. The Q-5 introduces a nose-mounted laser rangefinder, and a laser designator is also likely to be fitted since the aircraft is said to be able to deliver laser-guided bombs.[5] The Q-5A variant is believed to be capable of delivering nuclear munitions. The Q-5D is an upgrade with new avionics, including a HUD and a new navigation system. The Q-5E and Q-5F models are reportedly being worked on, though little is known about them at this time. One of them could potentially be the new two-seater that has been seen in a few photographs, although the two-seater could bear the designation Q-5J. The Model This is one of my few “real world” models. I built it because it was unusual (and I wanted to beat Trumpeter ). I've had this on my radar for a couple of years. I missed several vacuforms before snagging this one on EvilBay. It was primitive but a mixed media kit. The undercarriage was white metal, as was the exhausts. The drop tanks were resin. None were of a very high nature. I lost one of the exhausts to the carpet monster and have a pair of replacement ones coming in the snail mail but I thought, “why not?” I decided to post it up, still missing one exhaust. The other is unpainted. My plan is to replace both. The canopy is also vacuform and came with the kit. It is painted up as an aircraft from the regiment serving on Hainan Island in the South China Sea. Overall, it was a reasonably pleasant kit to build.
  14. MiG-22 Flipper

    MiG-22 Flipper To fulfil the needs of the PVO (Protivovozdushnaya Oborona – air defence forces) for a heavy interceptor to carry out automatic interceptions, the MiG bureau had developed a range of large fighter aircraft starting with the swept wing I-3 series (a.k.a. I-380, I-410 and I-420), followed by the I-7 and the I-75. The requirement for supersonic interception speed and the ability to carry the heavy avionic systems dictated the size; in comparison the contemporary MiG-21F (similar in layout), weighed 4,819 kg (10,624 lb) and was 15.76m (51 ft 8-1/2in) long, compared with 12,345 kg (27,215 lb) and 18.14m (59 ft 6in) respectively, for the Ye-150. The MAP (Ministerstvo Aviatsionnoy Promyshlennosti - ministry of aviation industry) ordered the Mikoyan OKB to build prototypes of the new interceptor, to be armed with either K-6, K-7, K-8, K-9, unguided rockets, or an aimable twin cannon installation. Automatic guidance to the interception point was to be provided by Urugan-5 (hurricane-5) integrated weapons systems. Ye-152A The Mikoyan-Gurevich Ye-152A was a twin-engined version of the Ye-152, sharing its general layout but utilising two Tumansky R-11 afterburning turbojets mounted side by side in a revised rear fuselage. The change in engine type, necessitated by the extremely poor reliability of the R-15, led to a widened rear fuselage with large ventral fins. The majority of the airframe was identical to the Ye-152, incorporating the extended inlet and fuselage found to be advantageous during testing for the proposed Ye-151 cannon armed variant of the Ye-150. Due to the use of fully developed and reliable R-11 engines the Ye-152A was ready for flight in July 1959 and continued to fly on test duties at the Mikoyan-Gurevich test centre until it crashed in 1965. Armament was to have been two K-9 air-to-air missiles, as part of the Ye-152-9-V weapon system, featuring the TsKB Almaz TsP-1 fire control radar. The Ye-152A was assigned the NATO reporting name Flipper after a flypast during the 1961 Aviation Day display at Tushino and also erroneously labelled as the MiG-23. Uragan-5 Development of the Uragan-5 automatic weapon system was initiated by the Council of Ministers in 1955 to intercept supersonic bombers flying at 10-25,000m ( ft) altitude at 1600–2000 km/hour up to 100–120 km range from the interceptor base, (with sufficient warning). The system relied on ground based radar to guide the interceptor to an intercept with the target and aircraft based radar and weapon aiming systems to complete the mission using the following components: A high resolution ground based radar system, to provide accurate position and height data at a range of 345 km. Active interrogation system (SAZO) Automatic guidance facility Digital control computer Command data link (SPK) Interceptor-fighter with Airborne radar (detection range of 25 km minimum), Autopilot, and Weapon-aiming computer (SRP) Armament options included: 2 x 30mm cannon in a tilting rotatable mount. Unguided rockets. 2x Grushin K-6 air-to-air missiles 2x Toropov K-7 air-to-air missiles 2x Kaliningrad K-8 (R-8) air-to-air missiles 2x Raduga K-9 air-to-air missiles A combination of delays in development of the electronic components, missiles and poor reliability of the Tumansky R-15 engines for the aircraft component led to the Uragan-5 system, fitted to Ye-150 derivatives being cancelled in 1962. Adoption of the Ye-152a The PVO adopted in limited numbers the Ye-152a as the MiG-22. As part of the Mastrovoka campaign against Western Intelligence, the aircraft was given a different identification which Western Intelligence Agencies had erroneously given it (MiG-23). However, the MiG-22 was not a success and was quickly superseded by the Sukhoi Su-15. This however did not prevent the MiG-22 being sold overseas to client states of the Soviet Union. Both the Cuban Air Force and the Indonesian Air Force adopted it. Both felt the need for a fast climbing, heavily armed interceptor which would allow them to protect their island nations. After the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis when Cuba was heavily dependent on the Soviet Union for it's protection against an impeding American attack and invasion, the MiG-22P (Perekhvatchik “Interceptor”) was supplied to the island nation. Armed initially with K9 “AWL” missile which looked impressive, even if it performed badly, the missile was quickly superseded by the much shorter ranged but more reliable K13 Atoll missile. This actually fitted more closely with the Russian's plans for the Cubans, preferring to keep their aircraft on a “short leash” rather than arming it with the longer-ranged K9s. The K9 missiles were however kept for intelligence purposes and nearly all photos of the MiG-22 in Cuban service show it carrying the larger, less reliable missile. In 1965, when the Communist Party of Indonesia overthrew the Sukarno Government and created the Peoples' Democratic Republic of Indonesia (PDRI) under President Untung bin Syamsuri who had lead the Revolution on 30 September 1965. He replaced President Sukarno soon afterwards. The Indonesian Air Force, which had already been largely equipped with Soviet aircraft, adopted the MiG-22PFM (Perekhvatchik Forsirovannyy Modernizirovannyy "Interceptor Uprated Modernised"), an improved version, mounting the K8 Air-to-Air missile, in both Infra-Red and Radar homing versions. This missile was also carried by the Su-15 and Yak-28 Interceptors in Soviet Service. The MiG-22PFM served with the TNI-AU for the next 10 years before it was replaced by Su-15 Flagon interceptor. 17 18 20 21 22 The Kit A Modelvisit 1/72 Ye-152a Flipper model. A most unusual model in that it doesn't have a single locating pin in the entire kit! It uses ledges and channels to locate everything. A little difficult to build but quite interesting. The missiles came from another poster (Chris) and the Decals from Kit. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  15. S-2GT Turbo-Tracker in RAN Service

    S-2GT Turbo-Tracker in RAN Service In 1967, the Royal Australian Navy received the first of its 18 S-2E Tracker ASW aircraft. In 1976, 13 of these aircraft were written off or damaged in a deliberately lit fire in their hangar at the Nowra Naval Air Base in Australia in an act of sabotage. Those 13 aircraft were replaced with S-2G tracker aircraft purchased from the USN stocks in the United States. In 1980, the decision was taken to replace HMAS Melbourne with a new, larger carrier. In 1983, the decision was taken to update the S-2G to turbine engines, Pratt and Whitney PT-6 engines being chosen, to give the RAN an all turbine fleet, removing the necessity to carry two types of fuel onboard the carrier. This is the kit I'm starting with: This is the S-2G conversion kit, from Uncle Les over at Beyond the Sprues forum: This is the Turbo Firetracker conversion kit to bring it up to a Turbo Tracker: http://imageshack.com/a/img908/3672/rRRdA9.jpg[/img] The build is finished: http://imageshack.com/a/img923/4916/1sRc1F.jpg[/img] The Model As you can see, this was a Hobbycraft S-2 Tracker kit, married to an Uncle Les S-2G conversion kit, plus two new Turboprop engines from Lone Wulf models. The decals came from a set I purchased off of Ebay. Painted with a hairy stick, using Tamiya and Vallejo Acrylic paints.
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