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albertross

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About albertross

  • Rank
    Newbie
  • Birthday 01/09/1972

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Bedford
  • Interests
    Most moving mechanical things.

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  1. As far as I am aware OH is no longer involved and hasn't been for some time. Fantasy did the original printing and they were sold by Paul at LittleCars. Both well known reputable traders. I believe his banning on here was nothing to do with the decal sales.
  2. From an engineering point of view much easier to measure diameters, internal and external, with micrometers. Therefore practically using D in the Pi theory equations is, to use an engineering term, preferred. David
  3. Hi Muzz, Finish looks good. Are you planning on using the kit undercarriage? Cheers David
  4. I have thought about this problem a bit more. Aerosol contains two things paint and propellant. We vigorously shake the can to mix the paint and thus the propellant is mixed into the paint. When the paint is sprayed onto the surface it will then start to cure and the propellant disappears, if there is a higher ratio of propellant that means less paint. I am also assuming the paint will shrink slightly as it dries. Thus leaving shrinkage cracks on the surface. Perhaps the filler is more porous than the plastic and more paint collected on these areas. I am likening this to shrinkage porosity you see in castings. Perhaps in future I will let my primer can stand for a bit post shaking. I am sure you will recover the situation but I am sure it will require some more delicate rubbing down! What fun that is David
  5. Hi Nigel, This is too late to help now, but I had a similar crazing issue on a airship model I was working on for a local company. This was attributed,after discussion with a painter to the gasses in the aerosol primer not having been fully released before another coat of paint went over the top. Never happened before or since. Good luck. David
  6. I believe a number of articles have been written that the majority of Stanier Loco design was completed with out much technical input from Stanier. Tommy Coleman an ex-North Staffs Railway designer should be credited for much of the work. As you would expect as a CME for a large company he knew what he wanted and had people to make it happen. Tin Hat Time?
  7. Intresting, educational and fun. What more can you ask for in a build thread. Black Milliput, old pen jet pipes et al. Brilliant. Keep up the good work. David
  8. I would suggest the part has 'work hardened'as you have been rolling it and the part needs to be re-annealed to make forming easier. Will follow with interest. David
  9. Very neat work on the forming of the cover, what technique did you use to roll the bends after annealing. Thanks. David
  10. Hi Nigel, Attached is an assembly model I created over a couple of lunch times a number of years ago of the tool that I used. I have used other simpler tools but the punch and anvil with return spring remain constant. I will try and complete a rendering of the model or photo of the actual item for better clarity. Cheers David
  11. Hi Nigel, Outstanding, informative and inspiring. Anyway enough 'gushing' (plus I have run out of superlatives). You mentioned previously that modelling was genetic, this is certainly true for me. Son of a model engineer / model loco builder. Brought up doing 7mm modelling used to using riveting tools. In a previous post you had a detail shot of some half etched parts is this what you used above or have you created the strip yourself. From a young age it was beaten into me that raised half etched rivets on etched locos bad half etch in and form yourself good (or completely form yourself if scratch-building). I have attached an image hopefully - first attempt and all that) of a small strip I just created using a bespoke tool from the 'dark' world of railway modelling. It is based on a tool designed by the great loco builder Stanley Beeson. Sorry for rubbish photo but I hope it illustrates my point of the usefulness of this tool which is a simple anvil and punch press with a depth stop. I have used 0.015" (or 0.38mm) plastikard but the tool is designed for brass/ nickel silver of a similar thickness. I hope you like. Please keep up the great work David
  12. Excellent work as always Nigel. Love the second elbow. I am only surprised you haven't made a miniature pipe bender. (Imagine a winking smiley they don't seem to be working) From much earlier in the thread "I think a good micrometer is an almost essential modelling tool but I have not seen much evidence that others use them. Good for sorting out drill sizes..." Especially the really small ones when you drop your box of microdrills all over the desk. You know how I know. I have the exact same set of Starrett 0-25 as well as M-W 0-1" I am bi-something when it comes to measuring units apart from feeler gauges which I always prefer imperial!!. It never ceases to amaze me the lack of tools in some peoples modelling toolbox. How they get by on one type of glue and a sanding stick I'll never know. Its probably an engineer thing but you cannot have too many quality tools that last a lifetime (another imagined smiley) Happy New Year David
  13. Hi Nigel, with regards the aluminium mesh there is a product called Devcon Aluminium putty, which is an epoxy filled with aluminium particles which cures to a dull silver. It may be possible to create your own version with a metallic acrylic paint mixed into the epoxy. I have no idea have no idea if this would affect the cure time or stop it all together. Hope this helps and keep up the great work. Regards David
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