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Found 12 results

  1. Hello mates, I am back and quite tired from Nuremberg Toy Fair (Darell Burge was so very kind and showed me a lot of beautiful Airfix stuff like Hunter and Wellington), so here as promised more pictures for you of my ripe Miss (Marilyn) Minooky, built 1999... Cheers, Thomas
  2. Hello mates, This is a test if i can receive any reaction at this time (t-online.de). I will be busy for the Nuremberg Toy Fair soon, but after, if you like, i will make more pictures for you of my quite ripe missy, more than 18 years old now... Cheers, Thomas
  3. Gentlemen, Frankly spoken, Sabres are my favourite jet aircraft with a particularly soft spot for the Sabre Dog variant. Accordingly, it was more than a happy event when both Monogram/ProModeler and Revell of Germany released a new-tool F-86D in 2001. Monogram released the earlier "round tail" version and Revell the later version featuring a distinctive parabrake housing introduced with the F-86D-45. 53-1001 in its 1956 livery when being deployed to Yuma AB for live fire training. "Texas Terror" was the personal mount of Col. Grover Wilcox. Later in 1956 53-1001 was converted to an F-86L. The kit offers a wealth of finely recessed surface details and overall fit is outstanding, safeguarding an enjoyable build right out of the box. Nevertheless, I replaced the kit's cockpit with a Black Box office. IP and IP coaming came from an Eduard PE set. The decals came from an Eagle Strike sheet. Item #48069. In order to replicate the natural metal finish, I used three different shades of Alclad II: Duraluminium, Airframe Aluminium and Semi Matte Aluminium. In order to highlight individual panels and joints I used Gunze Smoke. The model was finished with a final coat of satin varnish "à la maison" consisting of Polly Scale flat varnish, TAMIYA X-20A thinner plus a whiff of Future floor finish at a (by approximation) 60:35:5 ratio. Having another dozen of these kits in my stash, definitely not the last Sabre Dog taking off from my workbench. Thanks for looking! Cheers, Erik
  4. Royal Danish Air Force F-86D, pics by Hans J
  5. Julien

    F-86K Sabre Dog - 1:32 Kitty Hawk

    F-86K Sabre Dog 1:32 Kitty Hawk The F-86DK was developed by North American from their F-86D. In the early 1950'e there was a requirement in NATO nations for an all weather fighter. Plans by FIAT to produce the de Havilland Venom under licence had failed. in 1953 the US Air Material Command informed North American they would like to produce the F-86D in Italy to supply to NATO nations under the Mutual Defence Assistance Program. However the aircraft was to have a simpler fire control system and be armed with guns instead of rockets. The initial specifications also called for a two seater aircraft. The rationale behind the simpler fire control system was the fear that the new E-4 Fire control system for the F-86D would be compromised. Also at the time the USAF was having problems maintaining the complex E-4 system as well. North American replied to the requirement for the new aircraft with a modified F-86D. It was pointed out that to make a two seat aircraft would require a complete re-design which would be lengthy and costly. The company produced the MG-4 fire control system which would use a nose radar to give the pilot his firing range and break away time. By providing this information direct to the pilot there was no need for a radar operator. Under the NA-205 project the USAF gave North American two F-86Ds to be converted to YF-86K standard. At the same time they entered into an agreement with FIAT in Italy for the licence manufacture of the F-86K using MDAP funds. The first YF-86K was flown at Los Angeles in 1954, with the first production aircraft being delivered in may of 1955. It was agreed that the first 120 aircraft would be made by North American to get production underway. These aircraft would be for Norway and Holland while FIAT would make aircraft for Italy, France and Germany. The first FIAT aircraft would fly in May 1955 also. Many of the aircraft made at FIAT would feature the longer wing as fitted to the F-86L. Many aircraft with the original wing would also be retro fitted with the longer wings. Other nations which at first should have received the F-86K did in fact get the F-86D. The arrival into the USAF of the F-102 led to surplus F-86Ds being released to Denmark, Japan, Greece and Yugoslavia. By this time the E-4 fire control system was not considered to be a security risk. In the end only Norway, Germany, Italy and France received the F-86K under MDAP. Two other nations would also end up flying the K model; Venezuela and Honduras. In 1965 they negotiated purchase of all surviving German aircraft. Some of these aircraft had never actually been flown by the Luftwaffe due to shortages of trained pilots and ground crew! 51 aircraft were exported. In the early 1970s following the arrival of F-5 aircraft four (or six depending on the source) F-86Ks were transferred to the Hondurans. Not much is known about these aircraft except they flew in a NMF with sharks mouths. Given the low number operated, and complex systems it is assumed they did not operate for long. There are photos on the web as late as 2014 showing at least one of these aircraft survives . The Kit It was only a matter of time after the initial F-86D release that we would get an F-86K in 1:32 scale. The kit arrives in a smaller box than you would expect, however it is crammed full of parts. You get seven sprues of light grey parts, a clear sprue (thoughtfully packed in its own card box for protection), a small PE fret and 2 sheets of decals. Shockingly enough the construction starts with the cockpit. The first item to be made up is the ejection seat. This is a complex affair with a total of 11 parts being used. The seat looks to be a good representation of the unique seat made for the Dog. Following construction of the seat, the electronics area behind it is assembled and attached to the main cockpit tub. Decals are provided for the panels in the cockpit, though the modeller can choose to paint them if they wish. Following this the control column and rudder pedals are installed. The next step is to complete the front landing gear and its wheel well. This is formed on the underside of the engine intake trunking. The wheel retraction gear forms part of the walls of the well and these are glued to the underside of the trunking. The well for the mighty mouse rocket tray which sits behind the wheel well is then constructed along with the rear section of the intake trunking. The two sections of trucking with their sub assemblies attached are then joined up. Construction then moved onto the engine. Even though most of it will not be seen a full engine is provided in the kit. The engine is a model in its own right. The forward inlet cone and fan are constructed. The individual burner cans (8 of them) are constructed and then added to the engine section. The rear fan section can then be constructed. The front engine system is then attached to the intake trunking and the completed cockpit from earlier attached to the top of the trunking. As mentioned a lot of the engine will not be visible. It could be left out as model in its own right, however it seems to provide a lot of structure for the supporting fuselage, and if left out the modeller would need an intake blank and rear blank as well. Following the engines the left and right cannon bays are built up. These can be left open if wanted by the modeller. The bays feature two full 20mm cannons with associated control and ammo boxes. Even if leaving these panels closed the modeller will still need to build the bays and put the cannon in as these can be seen through their firing openings. Next the instrument panel is built up. Again decal is supplied if the modeller does not wish to paint this area. The instrument panel is attached to the front fuselage sections which are then closed around the completed engine/trunking section. A rear bulkhead mounts the engine section inside the fuselage, while the cockpit mounts the front section. Next in the construction sequence is the building of the main wheel wells. These are 5 parts each, and once built they attach to centre section of the underside for the main fuselage section. This section and a front underside section are then attached to the previously constructed main fuselage section. The rear engine section can then be added to the now nearly complete front fuselage section. The rear fuselage sections 9left & right) then join around the engine section. Construction then moves onto the wings, tail-planes, and vertical tail. These are of a convention upper/lower for each side, with left and right for the tail. The main wings feature separate flaps, and the all important leading edge slats. At this time the main landing gear units are also constructed. These items can then be added to the fuselage. Finishing touches are adding the landing gear, pilot entry steps, and rear mounted airbrakes. The radio gear shelf is added into the large canopy and canopy rails added also. Drop tanks are provided, along with rails for sidewinders, for those options which were so armed. Canopy The large clamshell canopy is one of the distinguishing features of the F-86D/K/L family and Kitty Hawk have done it proud. For a large part it is clear and free from distortion or moulding problems. As mentioned a nice touch is that the clear sprue is packaged in its own separate box. Decals Decals are provided for 5 examples. Luftwaffe - JD-352, 3.JG74 Neuber der Donau. Armée de l'air ECTT 1/13 Artois, Colmar 1957. Aeronautica Militare XII Grupo, 36º Stormo. Royal Norwegian Air Force ZK-Z. USAF 355tth Combat Crew Training Sqn, Perrin AFB 1960. The inclusion of the last set of markings (The USAF) ones is strange as the K was an export Sabre Dog. All references point to 51-2961 being an F-86L, not a K. This is not a game changer as I suspect nearly all modellers getting this kit will do so for one of the European options. All of these aircraft except the Luftwaffe one flew in a BMF finish. Please note the colour call outs for the Luftwaffe aircraft are in British Standard colours. There aircraft flew in local German Federal Standard RAL Colours not BS colours. There is no manufacturer listed for the decals. They are matt, well printed, in register and look colour dense. Like the F-86D Kitty Hawk don't give you multi-part decals for the national insignia which go over the air brakes. All of the decal options feature markings over the airbrake. This will be manageable to cut the decal out for this, however a split decal would have been appreciated. Similarly the decal for the wings are not cut where they overlap onto the leading edge slats, though this will be a lot easier to fix. Conclusion It is great to see the K follow on from the D, hopefully we will see an L model in the future as well. Very Highly Recommended. Review sample courtesy of and available soon from major hobby shops
  6. Announced at the US IPMS Nats 2014, the next Kitty Hawk 1/32nd kit (after the OV-10 Bronco http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234952767-132-north-american-ov-10-bronco-family-by-kittyhawk-new-cads/) is a N.A. F-86D Sabre Dog - ref. KH32008 Source: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kitty-hawk/736521713066784?sk=timeline&ref=page_internal V.P.
  7. Julien

    F-86D Sabre Dog - 1:32 Kitty Hawk

    F-86D Sabre Dog 1:32 Kitty Hawk The F-86D Sabre, or "Sabre Dog" was developed by North American Aviation from the highly successful F-86 Sabre. Surprisingly the F-86D only has a 25% commonality in parts with the "Sabre". Along with other projects at the time such as the F-84F from the F-84E it was easier to get funding for a development of an "existing" aircraft as opposed to a new design! The F-86D was to dispense with guns as its armament and it was designed around the then new 2.75 inch Folding-Fin Aerial Rocket (FFAR) or "mighty mouse" as it was known. These would be housed in a ventral tray which would deploy under the aircraft for firing. The F-86D would feature a nose mounted AN/APG-36 all weather radar in the nose which would force the engine air intake to be relocated under the nose. Compare to the original Sabre the F-86 would be longer and wider. A clamshell canopy was introduced in place of the rearwards sliding canopy of other models. Thrust was provided by a General Electric J47-GE-17 which featured afterburning, this would later be replaced by an uprated J-47GE-33. A total of 2504 D models would be built. The design would be exported with the Mighty Mouse replaced by four 20mm cannons under the F-86K designation. The D model design would later be upgraded with new electronics, better wings (in the form of extended wingtips & leading edges), with an uprated engine. This would be designated the F-86L. In all the USAF, Japanese Self Defence Forces, Royal Danish Air Force, Hellenic (Greek) Air Force, Philippine Air Force, Republic Of South Korea, Republic of China (Taiwan), Turkish Air Force, and The Yugoslav Air Force would use the F-86D. The Kit The Kitty Hawk F-86D is the first time this iconic aircraft has been kitted in 1:32 scale. The kit arrives in a smaller box than you would expect, however it is crammed full of parts. You get seven sprues of light grey parts, a clear sprue (thoughtfully packed in its own card box for protections), a small PE fret and 2 sheets of decals. Shockingly enough the construction starts with the cockpit. The first item to be made up is the ejection seat. This is a complex affair with a total of 11 parts being used. The seat looks to be a good representation of the unique seat made for the Dog. Following construction of the seat, the electronics area behind it is assembled and attached to the main cockpit tub. Decals are provided for the panels in the cockpit, though the modeller can choose to paint them if they wish. Following this the control column and rudder pedals are installed. The next step is to complete the front landing gear and its wheel well. This is formed on the underside of the engine intake trunking. The wheel retraction gear forms part of the walls of the well and these are glued to the underside of the trunking. The well for the mighty mouse rocket tray which sits behind the wheel well is then constructed along with the rear section of the intake trunking. The two sections of trucking with their sub assemblies attached are then joined up. Construction then moved onto the engine. Even though most of it will not be seen a full engine is provided in the kit. The engine is a model in its own right. The forward inlet cone and fan are constructed. The individual burner cans (8 of them) are constructed and then added to the engine section. The rear fan section can then be constructed. The front engine system is then attached to the intake trunking and the completed cockpit from earlier attached to the top of the trunking. As mentioned a lot of the engine will not be visible. It could be left out as model in its own right, however it seems to provide a lot of structure for the supporting fuselage, and if left out the modeller would need an intake blank and rear blank as well. Next the instrument panel is built up. Again decal is supplied if the modeller does not wish to paint this area. The instrument panel is attached to the front fuselage sections which are then closed around the completed engine/trunking section. A rear bulkhead mounts the engine section inside the fuselage, while the cockpit mounts the front section. Next in the construction sequence is the building of the main wheel wells. These are 5 parts each, and once built they attach to centre section of the underside for the main fuselage section. This section and a front underside section are then attached to the previously constructed main fuselage section. The next item to be constructed is the mighty mouse rocket tray. This can be shown in the deployed or retracted position, though it would be a shame to hide the detail in what was the main armament of the Sabre Dog. If the modeller wants to display the model with the nose radome open than a radar scanner is provided for this area, and needs to be built next. The rear engine section can then be added to the now nearly complete front fuselage section. The rear fuselage sections 9left & right) then join around the engine section. Construction then moves onto the wings, tail-planes, and vertical tail. These are of a convention upper/lower for each side, with left and right for the tail. The main wings feature separate flaps, and the all important leading edge slats. At this time the main landing gear units are also constructed. These items can then be added to the fuselage. Finishing touches are adding the landing gear, pilot entry steps, and rear mounted airbrakes. The radio gear shelf is added into the large canopy and canopy rails added also. Drop tanks are provided, along with rails for sidewinders, for those options which were so armed. Canopy The large clamshell canopy is one of the distinguishing features of the F-86D and Kitty Hawk have done it proud. For a large clear part it is clear and free from distortion or moulding problems. As mentioned a nice touch is that the clear sprue is packaged in its own separate box. Decals Decals are provided for 6 examples. 82nd Fighter Interceptor Squadron, USAF. 325th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, USAF - The "Sabre Knights" Aerobatic team. 181st Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Texas Air National Guard. Japanese Self Defence Forces Republic Of South Korea Air Force Republic Of China Air Force There is no manufacture listed for the decals. They are matt, well printed, in register and look colour dense. Kitty Hawk give the modeller a split decal for the tail/rudder but surprisingly don't give a multi-part decal for the national insignia which go over the air brakes. All of the decal options feature the National Insignia over the airbrake. This will be difficult but manageable to cut the decal out for this, however a split decal would have been appreciated. Similarly the USAF and US Insignia for the wings are not cut where they overlap onto the leading edge slats, though this will be a lot easier to fix. Conclusion Many of us have been waiting for a Sabre Dog to be made in 1:32 scale, and this kit does not disappoint. Highly Recommended. Review sample courtesy of and available soon from major hobby shops
  8. Kitty Hawk have announced at the US Nationals that a 1.32 scale F-86D Sabre Dog is on the way. FB link for those on there; https://www.facebook.com/736521713066784/photos/a.736556396396649.1073741827.736521713066784/776608805724741/?type=1&theater Julien
  9. If anyone fancies either of the new Special Hobby 1/48 F-86K Sabre Dog kits, we'll do them for between 10-15% off UK RRP. Please let me know as we'll be ordering them tomorrow for next week. There's a chance that you could have them in time for Christmas! thanks Mike
  10. Sources: http://aeropoxy.wordpress.com/ http://aeropoxy.wordpress.com/2013/02/01/f-86-k-sabre-kilo-132-scale-resin-conversion-set/ F-86 K Sabre Kilo 1/32 scale resin conversion set. F-86 K Sabre Kilo 1/32 scale resin conversion set for HASEGAWA or KINETIC N.A. Sabre F-86E . Box art and first test cast photo. V.P.
  11. F-86D Sabre Dog 'J.A.S.D.F COMBO' Hasegawa 1:72 In 1948 following an intelligence warning concerning Soviet long range bombers the USAF was prompted to accelerate the development of an all-weather interceptor to protect the US. This interceptor was to be based around the new 2.75 Mighty Mouse Folding Fin Aerial Rocket (FFAR). It was felt at the time that a salvo of such rockets would be more effective against a large bomber formation than cannon fire. These were fitted to the F-86D in a ventral tray which extended under the airframe. North American designed the interceptor around their already successful F-86A, although the D model only actually had a 25% commonality of parts with other F-86 variants. It had a larger/wider fuselage, a larger after burning engine, a clamshell canopy; and a nose radome hosing an AN-APG-36 all weather radar. The prototype (then called the YF-95) first flew on 22/12/49 becoming the first night fighter with only a single a crew member and a single for the USAF. Following WWII Japan was denied any military at all. Following the Self Defence Law of 1954 Japan was able to form a Military for Defence of the Japanese state. The newly formed JASDF wanted to procure 150 F-86Ds from the US. Initially pilots went for training in the US with the first 3 aircraft being handed over in January 1958. In the end Japan only received 122 Sabre dogs, 98 went into service with the remainder being used for part. Part shortages posed a big problem for the JASDF, and in its final days only about 30% of the aircraft were serviceable. 4 squadrons flew the F-86D in JASDF service, 101st, 102nd. 103rd and 105th Hikotai. The Kit This kit from Hasegawa has been around for a while yet but is still the best F-86D in 1/72.The kit represents the later model F-86D with the parachute housing. The moulds are starting to show their age a bit as there is a lot of flash on some of the parts, that being aid its great to see the kit being re-released as its been hard to find of late. Construction of the kit follows the usual steps starting with the cockpit. This is not as detailed as some F-86 kits with the base of the ejection seat being moulded into the cockpit tub. Following this you need to make and add the intake, and exhaust to the fuselage before closing it up. No mention is made of having to add any nose weight, however its pretty sure this will be needed. With the fuselage complete its time to add the wings. These are conventionally moulded with the slats as deeper panel lines. Hasegawa missed a trick here, the aircraft is rarely seen on the ground with the slats retracted and the kit would have been so much better had this feature been included in the kit. Following this, it just remains to add all the detail parts to the airframe. The undercarriage is very nice, as its close to scale thickness care must be taken at this stage. If wanted, a complete tray of the mighty mouse rockets can be built and placed under the fuselage, in the down position. The drop tanks are two halved, but the fins are provided as separate parts which will enable the seam to be removed without any trouble. Hasegawa have done a credible job in moulding the rear vortex generators, some additional ones are provided for above the tailplane which the modeller will have to apply themselves. The canopy is very clear and you can see the antenna lines moulded into the plastic which is good. Decals Decals are included for 101st, 102nd, 103rd & 105th Sqn aircraft of the JASDF. Separate code letters are included to model near enough any code lettered aircraft you want. Conclusion Its great to see this kit out on release again from hasegawa. The double boxing's are a great way of getting more value for your money from Hasegawa; overall recommended. Review sample courtesy of UK distributors for
  12. F-86D Sabre Dog "Shark Teeth" Hasegawa 1:72 In 1948 following an intelligence warning concerning Soviet long range bombers the USAF was prompted to accelerate the development of an all-weather interceptor to protect the US. This interceptor was to be based around the new 2.75 Mighty Mouse Folding Fin Aerial Rocket (FFAR). It was felt at the time that a salvo of such rockets would be more effective against a large bomber formation than cannon fire. These were fitted to the F-86D in a ventral tray which extended under the airframe. North American designed the interceptor around their already successful F-86A, although the D model only actually had a 25% commonality of parts with other F-86 variants. It had a larger/wider fuselage, a larger afterburning engine, a clamshell canopy; and a nose radome hosing an AN-APG-36 all weather radar. The prototype (then called the YF-95) first flew on 22/12/49 becoming the first night fighter with only a single a crew member and a single for the USAF. The Kit This kit from Hasegawa has been around for a while yet but is still the best F-86D in 1/72.The kit represents the later model F-86D with the parachute housing. The moulds are starting to show their age a bit as there is a lot of flash on some of the parts, that being aid its great to see the kit being re-released as its been hard to find of late. Construction of the kit follows the usual steps starting with the cockpit. This is not as detailed as some F-86 kits with the base of the ejection seat being moulded into the cockpit tub. Following this you need to make and add the intake, and exhaust to the fuselage before closing it up. No mention is made of having to add any nose weight, however its pretty sure this will be needed. With the fuselage complete its time to add the wings. These are conventionally moulded with the slats as deeper panel lines. Hasegawa missed a trick here, the aircraft is rarely seen on the ground with the slats retracted and the kit would have been so much better had this feature been included in the kit. Following this, it just remains to add all the detail parts to the airframe. The undercarriage is very nice, as its close to scale thickness care must be taken at this stage. If wanted a complete tray of the mighty mouse rockets can be built a placed under the fuselage in the down position for the tray. drop tanks are two halved but the fins are provided as separate parts which will enable the seam to be removed without any trouble. Hasegawa have done a credible job in moulding the rear vortex generators, some additional ones are provided for above the tailplane which the modeller will have to apply themselves. The canopy is very clear and you can see the antenna lines moulded into the plasic which is good. Decals Decals are provided for two US aircraft from The 498th Fighter Intercept Squadron which feature the Sharks Teeth as the boxing would suggest. The first is FU-866, this aircraft has "Kings Queen" on the side and a crown. The second is FU-997, unlike the first aircraft this hs the "US AIR FORCE" titles on the side. This second aircraft has wing stripes, plus the character "BIG VIV" on the side. I am not sure who she was, or whether she appreciated being on the side of this F-86! The decals appear well printed and not as thick as some of Hasegawa's normal offerings. The tail and tank decals come as two parts, they can be applied as a whole; or painted and the individual decals applied separately. The same can not be said for the canopy decals as you only get the complete sets with the white stars not being supplied as a separate. Conclusion Its great to see this kit out on release again from hasegawa, despite some flash showing on the parts, this is not great problem for the modeller; overall recomended. Review sample courtesy of UK distributors for
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