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Found 5 results

  1. MDF Scaled Down #8 - The Dassault Mirage 2000 (9781999661625) 2000B/C/D/N & International versions[/b] MA Publications The Mirage was developed as a replacement for the Mirage III in the 70s, and after some changes to the project, including the French withdrawal from what was to become the Panavia Tornado and the consideration of variable geometry flight, the Mirage 2000 was born. There were several variants of the type, plus some overseas sales that increased the number of airframes in existence to just under 600, seeing active service in Armée de l'air as well as Egypt, Greek, Indian and Peruvian service and a number of others. The final Mirage came off the production line in 2007 and was delivered soon after to the Greek Air Force. Although the earlier versions have been in service for a some substantial length of time, the later variants are relatively new, and the overall design is considered to be 4th generation, so there is plenty of life left in the Mirage 2000 family yet. The Rafale was intended to be its replacement in some roles due to its wider range of capabilities, but the two types fly side-by-side in French service, with the beefed-up Rafale M launched from French carriers, which was a role that the Mirage 2000 could never perform. This book is the 8th in the Modeller’s Datafile Scaledown series, and arrives as a perfect-bound A4+ book in portrait format with 100 pages within the card cover. If you’re familiar with the series, you’ll know the content is split between the real aircraft and modelling them, but here’s a more thorough breakdown: Forward Chapter I Development – the Delta returns Chapter II In French service – the Mirage 2000B/C/D/N and the Mirage 2000 at war Chapter III Mirages for export – Egypt, Greece, India, Peru, Taiwan, UAE, Brazil and Qatar Colour Side Views Four pages of colour side profiles of various types and operators Modelling the Mirage 2000 in popular scales Mirage 2000C Greek Ghost - 1:48 Kinetic (Jezz Coleman) Mirage 2000C Sting in the Tail - 1:48 Kinetic (James Ashton) Mirage 2000D Desert Striker - 1:48 Kinetic (George Roidis) Mirage 2000D Multi-role Mirage - 1:48 Kinetic (James Ashton) Mirage 2000 Delta Blues - 1:72 Tamiya (Mario Serelle) Mirage 2000B École de Chasse Fighter School - 1:48 Kinetic (René Van Der Hart) Appendix I - Walk arounds Mirage 2000B ‘12-KO’ of the Armée de L’air (Luc Colin) Mirage 2000 ‘4940’ of the Brazilian Air Force (Mario Serelle) Mirage 2000C ‘12-YM’ of the Armée de L’air (Luc Colin) Mirage 2000D ‘3-IU’ of the Armée de L’air (Luc Colin) Mirage 2000N ‘4-AG’ of the Armée de L’air (Luc Colin) Appendix II - Mirage 2000 variants 3 pages with pictures Appendix III - Colourful Mirages 8 pages of colour photos of special schemes Appendix IV - Kitography Available accessories, kits & decals at time of writing There is a lot of text on the type during the first half of the book that cover the airframe beginning through prototype, the initial in-service Mirage 2000, the subsequent upgrades to capabilities required by the native and overseas operators, as well as details of the sales to those operators. After the discussion of the airframe comes 12 pages of side profiles of various marks and operators with some varied schemes on display, including camouflage for desert and temperate climates, plus the ever-present grey jets of various forces. The modelling side of the book begins now, and extends to six builds of mostly 1:48 Kinetic kits, and a 1:72 Tamiya kit for a little variation, that are carried out by various modellers, the names of whom you can see in brackets in the list above. I have laid out the list as per the book, not the index page, as there are some differences in layout and titles, with mine being totally representative of the contents. There are lots of different modelling techniques on display to accomplish the sometimes weathered and dilapidated look of the Mirage 2000, especially when on deployment or in foreign service, with plenty of pictures and text to guide us along, we can all learn something from the builds here. The next section consists of a number of walk around photos printed on a cream background that shows the airframes in close-up detail, all of which is grist for the mill for us modellers, and includes some nice photos of the landing gear, airframe and sensors all in suitable sizes that won’t tax ageing eyes like mine, with credits to the photographers, which you can again see in brackets above. The short “Mirage 2000 Variants” section covers the differences between the types in short text summaries with a photo of most types next door for a quick visual cue. The “Colourful Mirages” extends to eight pages and shows lovely side-on photos of special schemes, many of which are for the Tigermeets that they often attend. Some colourful tails are also picked out in close-up photos, along with fuel tank and underside details for a few. The final section is the Kitography, which I’ve always felt is a tiny bit redundant as things change so quickly in our hobby, as we now have helpful sites like Scalemates that are updated constantly. It’s only three pages though, so nothing to fret about if that’s not your thing. Conclusion It’s a good reference for the Mirage 2000, and is a handy one-stop source of information for anyone wanting to improve their knowledge of the type. There is a lot of information within and a lot of excellent photos in full colour, which one of the bonuses of a book about a modern fast jet over a WWII type. Well worth a read, and it will be good source of reference down the line. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  2. Modellers Data File #37 - The F-15 Eagle (9781838045814) MA Publications The need for a replacement to the F-4 was identified in the mid 1960s to counter the threat of existing and new aircraft that were being designed by the Soviet Union. Initially, the request was for an aircraft that had both air and ground capabilities and considerably heavier and faster than the F-4, however this was changed to focus on air superiority in both close and long range scenarios following analysis of air-to-air combat in the US Air Force in the 60s. With 4 manufacturers entering the competition to supply the USAF with an aircraft to meet their F-X requirement, the F-15 won with the decision being made in 1969. Powered by P&W F100 engines, it had a power weight ratio greater than 1, low wing loading to improve manoeuvrability, a radar that could identify low flying targets amongst ground clutter and operate beyond visual range and had all round visibility for the pilot improving visibility significantly compared to the F-4. Not least, one of the lessons learned was that a gun is necessary, so a Vulcan M-61 cannon was installed. With the first flight taking place in 1972 of the F-15A, the first of 483 F-15Cs flew in 1978 benefiting from additional internal fuel, ability to carry the ungainly conformal fuel tanks, the APG-63 PSP radar that could be reprogrammed to suit new weapons, stronger landing gear to cope with a greater maximum weight and new flight systems. In 1985, the F-15s coming off the production lines were to become part of the MSIP (Multi-stage Improvement Programme) that would allow ease of adaptation for developing weapons systems. Whilst the US are the largest operator of the F-15, first blood was achieved with the Israeli Air Force in 1979 developing an enviable reputation against Syrian Migs over Lebanon and went on to use the air-ground capability in the 80s. During the Gulf War, the US followed up this success with their F-15s again in combat with MiG 21s, 23s, 25s and 29s. Of the 39 air-air victories scored by the US Air Force in the Gulf War, the F-15Cs had claimed 34 of them. Over 170 F-15Cs will remain in service for many years to come yet. More recent upgrades to the aircraft are a new AN/APG Radar that link to the helmet mounted sighting system as well as the latest evolutions in armament to ensure that the F-15 remains a potent weapon. As well as Continuing service with the US and Israeli Air Forces, the F-15 also continues to operate with Japan and Saudi Arabia. The F-15E was developed in the 1980s for long range strike without requiring an escort. As well as retaining the capabilities of the single seat fighter conformal fuel tanks fitted with hard points enabled a wide variety of air-to-ground weapons to be carried. The F-15E has been further developed into the F-15I, K, S and SG. Further developments for Saudi Arabia and Qatar will include the SA and SQ, with a further upgrade in Israel being the IA. The USAF is currently purchasing new F-15s in the form of the F-15EX so there plenty of life left in the design yet. This book is the 37th in the long line of books in the Modeller’s Datafile series, and arrives as a perfect-bound A4+ book in portrait format with 184 pages within the card cover. If you’re familiar with the series, you’ll know the content is split between the real aircraft and modelling them, but here’s a more thorough breakdown: Introduction Chapter I Flight of the Eagle - A Formidable Fighter Chapter II Wings of the Eagle - The F-15A to F-15D Chapter III Striking Eagles - The F-15E Chapter IV International Eagles - Israel, South Korea, Singapore, Saudi Arabia & Japan Chapter V Specialised Eagles - Test, Evaluation and Proposed Versions. Colour Side Views Eight pages of colour side profiles of various types and operators Modelling the Starfighter Digital Eagle - 1:48 Academy F-15 C/D (Alan Kelly) Wolf Hounds Eagle - 1:48 Tamiya F-15C (Jos Jansen) Tiger Lead - 1:48 Revell F-15E (Dawid Branski) Updated Eagle - 1:72 Academy F-15C MISP (Danumurthi Mahendra) Eagle Strike - 1:48 Revell F-15E (Toby Knight) Thunder Struck - 1:72 Great Wall Hobby F-15I (Marie Serelle) Eagle School - 1:48 Hasegawa F-15D (Pascal Klasen) Euro Fighter - 1.48 Great Wall Hobby F-15C (Christian Gerard) Appendix I - Technical Diagrams 10 pages with pictures Appendix II - Walkarounds USAF F-15C IDF F-15I Ra'am JASDF F-15J UASF F-15E Appendix III - Understanding the Subject 4 pages of Aircraft Profiles Appendix IV - F-15 Variants 2 pages concerning the different variants of the Appendix V - F-15 Specifications 4 pages concerning the specifications Appendix VI- Kitography Available accessories, kits & decals at time of writing Startfighter Gallery 12 pages of colour photos of the Starfighter Plans 3 Pages of 1/72 plans. There is a lot of text on the type during the first half of the book that cover the airframe beginning through prototype, the initial in-service details, followed by the subsequent upgrades to capabilities. After the US Aircraft there is more consideration to the other nations which then went on to use the type The modelling side of the book begins now, and extends to 8 builds of mostly 1:48 kits, with two 1/72 kits for a little variation, that are carried out by various modellers, the names of whom you can see in brackets in the list above. My only criticism of the book would be that it would be better to maybe have less more detailed builds of the main 1:48 kits as a couple are quite spares in modelling details. The next section consists of a number of walk around photos printed on a cream background that shows the airframes in close-up detail, all of which is grist for the mill for us modellers, and includes some nice photos of the landing gear, airframe and sensors all in suitable sizes. The final sections are the Kitography, which I’ve always felt is a tiny bit redundant as things change so quickly in our hobby, as we now have helpful sites like Scalemates that are updated constantly. It’s only three pages though, so nothing to fret about if that’s not your thing. lastly the Gallery section could be considered padding given the large number of photos available on-line now. Conclusion It’s a good reference for the Eagle as a whole, and is a handy one-stop source of information for anyone wanting to improve their knowledge of the type. There is a lot of information within and a lot of excellent photos in full colour, which one of the bonuses of a book about a modern fast jet over a WWII type. Well worth a read, and it will be good source of reference down the line. As a modelling book I feel that more time devoted to modelling might help the perceived customer base more than the more numerous but less detailed builds included. Still overall recomended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. Modellers Data File #36 - The F-104 Starfighter (9781838045807) MA Publications The F-104 Starfighter (or missile with a man in it) was Lockheed's & Kelly Johnson's attempt to reverse the trend for large more complex fighters then being developed. It was basically an engine with very little airframe surrounding it. The aircraft had a short life in the US with them going towards heavier and more complex aircraft. The Starfighter did have much more success with NATO nations, though it would later transpire that this success was gained someway by Lockheed bribing officials in some of those countries. The G model was the most numerous model made with over 1100 being built, many under licence. This book is the 36th in the long line of books in the Modeller’s Datafile series, and arrives as a perfect-bound A4+ book in portrait format with 184 pages within the card cover. If you’re familiar with the series, you’ll know the content is split between the real aircraft and modelling them, but here’s a more thorough breakdown: Introduction Chapter I Seeing Starts - The Birth of the Starfighter Chapter II The F-104A to F-104D - Starfighters in US Service Chapter III The Canadair CF-104 Starfighter - Canadian Built F-104s Chapter IV Export Starfighters - The F/TF/RF-104F to F-104S Chapter V International Users - Starfighters worldwide Colour Side Views Eight pages of colour side profiles of various types and operators Modelling the Starfighter Vietnam Warrior - 1:48 Hasegawa F-104C (Andy Renshaw) Sleek Greek - 1:48 Hasegawa TF-104S (George Roidis) Supersonic Starfigher - 1:72 Revell F-104G (Jezz Coleman) Bunesfighter - 1:48 Eduard F-104G (Rene Van Der Hart) Marineflieger Startfighter - 1:48 Eduard F-104G (Oliver Soulley) Super Star - 1:48 Kinetic F-104G (James Ashton) Marineflieger Missile - 1:48 Kinetic F-104G (Jezz Coleman) Samurai Starfighter - 1:48 Kinetic F-104J (Dawid Branski) Dutch Master - 1:48 Kinetic F-104G (Barry Koerver) Tiny TF-104G - 1:144 Revell Tf-104G (Tomasz Lubczynski) Danish Star - 1:48 Kinetic F-104G (Marcin Torbinski) Appendix I - Technical Diagrams 10 pages with pictures Appendix II - Walkarounds Belgian F-104G (luc Colin) Japanese F-104J (Z Tanuki) (The text calls ts an F-105J !) Luftwaffe TF-104G Appendix III - Understanding the Subject 4 pages of Aircraft Profiles Appendix IV - Kitography Available accessories, kits & decals at time of writing Appendix V - Starfighter Variants 4 pages concerning the different variants of the Starfighter Startfighter Gallery 22 pages of colour photos of the Starfighter Plans 2 Pages of 1/72 plans. There is a lot of text on the type during the first half of the book that cover the airframe beginning through prototype, the initial in-service details, followed by the subsequent upgrades to capabilities. After the US Aircraft there is more consideration to the other nations which then went on to use the type The modelling side of the book begins now, and extends to 11 builds of mostly 1:48 Kinetic & Hasegawa kits, with a 1:72 Revell kit; and a 1:144 Revell Kit for a little variation, that are carried out by various modellers, the names of whom you can see in brackets in the list above. My only criticism of the book would be that it would be better to maybe have less more detailed builds of the main 1:48 kits as a couple are quite spares in modelling details. The next section consists of a number of walk around photos printed on a cream background that shows the airframes in close-up detail, all of which is grist for the mill for us modellers, and includes some nice photos of the landing gear, airframe and sensors all in suitable sizes. The final sections are the Kitography, which I’ve always felt is a tiny bit redundant as things change so quickly in our hobby, as we now have helpful sites like Scalemates that are updated constantly. It’s only three pages though, so nothing to fret about if that’s not your thing. lastly the Gallery section could be considered padding given the large number of photos available on-line now. Conclusion It’s a good reference for the Starfighter as a whole, and is a handy one-stop source of information for anyone wanting to improve their knowledge of the type. There is a lot of information within and a lot of excellent photos in full colour, which one of the bonuses of a book about a modern fast jet over a WWII type. Well worth a read, and it will be good source of reference down the line. As a modelling book I feel that more time devoted to modelling might help the perceived customer base more than the more numerous but less detailed builds included. Still overall recomended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. MDF Scaled Down #11 - The A-6 Intruder (9781999661687) Including KA-6D, EA-6A & EA-6b MA Publications The Intruder was the eventual replacement for the successful and long-lived Skyraider (as was the A-4), and was unusual in having a side-by-side cockpit arrangement for the pilots, which meant a wide nose that became well known due to its involvement in operations and deployments around the world. Entering service in 1963 in the Vietnam war, it performed all-weather and night attack missions extensively throughout the conflict for the US Navy and the Marines, it had a long service life that was ended prematurely by the need to cut costs after the Gulf War. The A variant was the first into service, and incorporated some leading edge systems to enable it to fly low over terrain with little to no visibility. Due to the complexity of the systems, it was also equipped with a self-diagnosis system that could be used to test and report faults from within the aircraft without costly and time-consuming strip-downs, thus saving many hours in the hangar. The following variants showed the versatility of the airframe from buddy-buddy refueller to electronic warfare in the EA-6 Prowler, but the definitive variant is considered to be the later E, which was upgraded in the 70s with the TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack Multi-Sensor) turret that allowed it to drop laser guided munitions, further extending its usefulness. The Prowler was the last Intruder based airframe to be drawn down in 2009 and was replaced by the EA-18G Growler that took over electronic warfare duties.. This book is the 11th in the Modeller’s Datafile Scaledown series, and arrives as a perfect-bound A4+ book in portrait format with 96 pages within the card cover. If you’re familiar with the series, you’ll know the content is split between the real aircraft and modelling them, but here’s a more thorough breakdown: Introduction Chapter I Design & Development - Birth of a Bomb Truck Chapter II Later Models - and specialised variants Chapter III The EA-6A Intruder - Early Electronic Warriors Chapter IV Beam Riders - The EA-6B Prowler Colour Side Views Four pages of colour side profiles of various types and operators Modelling the A6 and EA-6 Desert Strom Intruder - 1:48 Kinetic A-6E (Hong-Hwan Jang) Iron Works Bomber - 1:48 Kinetic A-6E (James Ashton) Flight of the Intruder - 1:48 Hobby Boss (Brian Wakeman) Green Machine - 1/72 Tamiya (Mike Williams) Jammin' Wizards - 1/48 Kinetic EA-6B (James Ashton) Scorpion on Deck - 1/48 Kinetic EA-6B (Hyun Soo Kim) Appendix I - Walkarounds A-6 Intruder EA-6B 160437 VAQ-142 Appendix II - Technical Diagrams 6 pages with pictures Appendix III - Intruder and Prowler Squadrons 2 pages of Squadron Details Appendix IV - A-6 Intruder General Characteristics 2 Pages of technical information. Appendix V - Kitography Available accessories, kits & decals at time of writing Plans 2 Pages of 1/72 A-6 Palnsa, and 2 pages of 1/72 EA-6B Plans There is a lot of text on the type during the first half of the book that cover the airframe beginning through prototype, the initial in-service details, followed by the subsequent upgrades to capabilities. After the discussion of the airframe comes 12 pages of side profiles of various marks and operators with some varied schemes on display, including camouflage for desert and special schemes, plus the ever-present grey jets. The modelling side of the book begins now, and extends to six builds of mostly 1:48 Kinetic kits, and a 1:72 Tamiya kit for a little variation, that are carried out by various modellers, the names of whom you can see in brackets in the list above. There are lots of different modelling techniques on display to accomplish the sometimes weathered looks carrier based aircraft acquired, with plenty of pictures and text to guide us along, we can all learn something from the builds here. The next section consists of a number of walk around photos printed on a cream background that shows the airframes in close-up detail, all of which is grist for the mill for us modellers, and includes some nice photos of the landing gear, airframe and sensors all in suitable sizes, strangely no credits to the photographers are included here? The final section is the Kitography, which I’ve always felt is a tiny bit redundant as things change so quickly in our hobby, as we now have helpful sites like Scalemates that are updated constantly. It’s only three pages though, so nothing to fret about if that’s not your thing. Conclusion It’s a good reference for the A-6 and later EA-6, and is a handy one-stop source of information for anyone wanting to improve their knowledge of the type. There is a lot of information within and a lot of excellent photos in full colour, which one of the bonuses of a book about a modern fast jet over a WWII type. Well worth a read, and it will be good source of reference down the line. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  5. A new modellers' guide to the Sea Fury to be released shortly: Should be available for pre-order in the next week or so, release in April, I'm told. (No, I didn't write the 'blurb')
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