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  1. Vampire F.3 Seat PRINT (648753 for Airfix) 1:48 Eduard Brassin PRINT The new Airfix De Havilland Vampire F.3 has been available since late 2021, and you can see our original review here. A number of Photo-Etch (PE) and 3D printed decal sets have been released already now, and that range is still growing. This new set provides a directly 3D Printed ejection seat for the Vampire in incredible detail. The set arrives in a flat Brassin pack with card insert keeping it and the instructions straight, and the parts themselves are safely protected inside a small clear plastic box to prevent crush damage and jostling. Inside the clear foil bag is the box containing the ejection seat, which has a small sticky label within to reduce the likelihood of excessive movement of the part. The detail is truly stunning, and there is more to come from the included Photo-Etch (PE) sheet of seatbelts, which attach to the rear cockpit bulkhead after opening up a small hole in the seat armour above the new seatback. The seat has a rolled quilted back cushion, and the adjustment mechanism is baked-in during the printing process. You will need to supply a piece of 0.6mm rod or wire to stretch behind the seat as part of the mounting/adjustment equipment, and once you have it installed in place of the kit seat, you can apply the nickel-plated pre-painted belts, complete with comfort pads under the buckles. You could argue that little will be seen within the gloomy black cockpit of a post-war British fighter jet, but if one thing will be visible, it’s the seat, and this one will be sure to impress. The photo above shows the two kit seats on the left and centre, with and without belts. There are no other parts for attachment to the kit seat, so no adjustment mechanism will be seen. The PRINT seat on the right is exactly as it comes off the printing block, after sanding back the underside where the block attached. The belts are added later, and if you were to fit the rather strangely-shaped pilot, you'd be hiding all that detail. The photo shows up some light layering, although that will disappear under a coat of paint or primer. The difference in detail is stunning, and the shape is much more authentic. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  2. MICA RF/IR Missiles (648749 & 648750) 1:48 Eduard Brassin The MICA series of missiles are a French designed medium-range air-to-air (A2A) missile that is a fire-and-forget weapon that is capable of tracking multiple targets, including those behind the firing aircraft, which is sometimes referred to as over-the-shoulder targeting. They are available in Infrared (IR) or active radar (RF) flavours that are designed to resist counter-measures, filtering out the clutter to keep track of the selected target. They can also be launched vertically from ships or other installations as the VL MICA. There are two types available from Eduard, and those are the two airborne variants, both holding eight missiles, and all parts save for the IR seekers 3D printed directly on thin bases. As is now usual with Eduard's smaller resin sets, they arrive in the new shallow Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. Each set has the missile bodies separately bagged from the nose cones and tails, and with my sample, a couple of the fins had been damaged due to the flexibility of the printing bases. They were simple to repair with super glue, but it may be worth the designers thickening the bases so that they aren’t able to flex and bang together in the bag. MICA RF Missile (648749) The main missile body is attached to the print-block by the front, and thanks to the way in which 3D printing is done, there is a socket waiting for you when you cut the body from the mount. This makes for much easier construction, and to test my theory I made one of the missiles up, which was extremely easy, fitting together perfectly without the use of glue. With a bit of super glue it will even stay together! That’s all there is to make one up, then following the painting instructions that are called out in the instructions, and the stencil instructions on the front page will see your missiles complete. Detail is excellent as usual. MICA IR Missile (648750) The missile body and exhaust parts are the same for this variant, with a different nose cone that has a socket in the front into which you slot the domed clear resin seeker window. Painting is different for the nose cone, having silver accents instead of a gold band. The stencils are subtly different too. Conclusion A couple of nice sets representing the most common MICA variants, with a generous eight missiles per set. With a thicker base plate to stop them clashing together in the box, the set would be perfect. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. F-15C/D/J/N Eagle Wheels (648744 for GWH) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. This set contains three resin wheels and a sheet of kabuki-tape masks. The main wheels and the nose wheel are cut from their casting blocks at the bottom, where the slight weighting can be seen. Each wheel is a drop-in replacement for the kit parts, and as mentioned are supplied with pre-cut masks from the Kabuki-tape sheet (not pictured) inside the package to make the job even easier. The detail is exceptional as we’ve come to expect from Eduard’s wheels, especially around the brake housings, and it has to be seen to be believed. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. Beaufighter Mk.VI Wheels (648754 for Tamiya) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. This set contains three resin wheels, four outer hubs to give you a choice of two styles, a replacement tail-wheel strut in tougher white resin, and a sheet of kabuki-tape masks. The smooth-tread main wheels are cut from their casting blocks at the bottom, where the slight weighting can be seen, with the balloon tail-wheel similarly prepared and slotted between the two legs of the new resin yoke. Each wheel is a drop-in replacement for the kit parts, and as mentioned are supplied with pre-cut masks from the Kabuki-tape sheet (not pictured) inside the package to make the job even easier. The detail is exceptional as we’ve come to expect from Eduard’s wheels, especially around the maker’s details, and it has to be seen to be believed. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Sopwith Camel Comic Lewis Guns (648726 for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin We’ve just reviewed the night fighter variant of the Camel - the Comic, and we may have mentioned that there was a separate resin set to upgrade the details of the twin Lewis Guns on the top wing that were characteristic of the type, in an effort to reduce the glare in the pilots’ eyes when firing their weapons. As is now usual with Eduard's smaller resin sets, they arrive in the new shallow Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. This set includes sixteen resin parts and a small fret of Photo-Etch (PE). There are two options available to the modeller, one with both guns facing forward, and the other with one gun facing forward and the other inclined to near diagonal to use when attacking aircraft above and in front of the aircraft. The first step of the instructions illustrates this choice, and the other sheet has one option detailed per side. The twin forward-firing option has a matching pair of J-shaped brackets onto which the gun, its plate-style magazine, PE grab-handle and forward sights are added. The left-most gun has an extended pistol grip, but is otherwise identical, and both mounts are supported by a C-shaped brace that has two small brackets added outside the mount joint. A PE ring-and-bead sight is inserted into the kit deck in front of the pilot, then the guns are dropped into their sockets in the wing and glued to the brace, adding a pair of small circular resin alternative mounts on the trailing edge of the wing to the side of the guns, as illustrated in the accompanying diagram. The other option has you making up the guns in the same manner, again having the longer pistol grip on the left, but initially only the left-most gun is fitted on its mount, the other mount is fitted minus gun, but with a pair of empty circular brackets that would otherwise be holding the gun in place. The missing gun is then mounted on the circular resin parts that are installed on the C-shaped brace and the trailing edge of the wing to the side of the forward mount, as per the other option. Although the colours are called out in the kit instructions anyway, there are the usual colour call-outs in Gunze Aqueous and lacquer (C & H codes) to assist you with your build. Detail is exceptional, having been 3D printed directly with no intermediate casting stage, so all the parts are retained on their print-bases by narrow fingers that are easily nipped away and cleaned with a fine sanding stick. To protect the long delicate parts in the box, those printing bases have raised sections to the sides, as does the separate magazine to save the delicate top detail from harm. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. Vampire F.3 Wheels (648741 for Airfix) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. This set contains three resin wheels and a sheet of kabuki-tape masks. The main wheels are cut from their casting blocks at the bottom, where the slight weighting can be seen, while the tail-wheel has an anti-shimmy groove around the middle, and is trapped between the two halves of the kit yoke. Each wheel is a drop-in replacement for the kit parts, and as mentioned are supplied with pre-cut masks from the Kabuki-tape sheet (not pictured) inside the package to make the job even easier. The detail is exceptional as we’ve come to expect from Eduard’s wheels, and it has to be seen to be believed. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. Mosquito Wheels (648746 for Tamiya) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. This set contains three resin wheels, four outer hubs to give you a choice of two styles for the mains, a replacement tail-wheel strut in tougher white resin, and a sheet of kabuki-tape masks. The square-tread main wheels are cut from their casting blocks at the bottom, where the slight weighting can be seen, with the tail-wheel similarly prepared and slotted between the two legs of the new resin yoke. Each wheel is a drop-in replacement for the kit parts, and as mentioned are supplied with pre-cut masks from the Kabuki-tape sheet (not pictured) inside the package to make the job even easier. The detail is exceptional as we’ve come to expect from Eduard’s wheels, especially around the tread and maker’s details, and it has to be seen to be believed. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  8. SR-71A Blackbird Wheels (648740 for Revell) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. This set contains nine of the special wheels that were used on the Blackbird, with its aluminium-impregnated, dotted tyres on the main wheels in groups of three, and twin nose wheels with circumferential tread. Each one is a drop-in replacement for the kit parts, and they are all supplied with pre-cut masks from the Kabuki-tape sheet (not pictured) inside the package to make the job even easier. The detail is exceptional as we’ve come to expect from Eduard’s wheels, and it has to be seen to be believed. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. Mi-24D Conversion Set (648730 for Zvezda) 1:48 The Mi-24D was an upgraded variant of the original Hind-A that was designed in the early 70s to be truer to the gunship ethos originally envisaged at the outset of the type’s design process, and as such it was armed with a 12.7mm four-barrel machine gun in the nose. On the winglets it was capable of carrying various ground support munitions on four hard-points, including rocket pods, bombs, the significantly better Phalanga anti-tank missiles and various other improvements, both in terms of weapons carriage and airframe changes. The most noticeable visual aspect was the splitting of the cockpit space and the removal of the single angular canopy, which was replaced by the more familiar twin-bubble style canopies that afforded the crew a better view of the battlefield. Poland tested one airframe, and East Germany had a pair of airframes in service, but the majority of the 600+ airframes were used by core Soviet forces. A few airframes were converted with twin controls that were known as the Mi-24DU for training purposes, and the type was also exported in some numbers. It was later replaced in service by the Mi-24V, which was capable of carrying more modern missiles than were available when the D was designed. This conversion set will allow the modeller to backdate the Zvezda Mi-24V kit to the earlier -D, and it arrives in a shallow Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. Some of the parts are directly 3D printed, as can be seen by the fine finger-like supports that surround them and their dark grey resin. There are also Photo-Etch (PE) parts and a slip of printed acetate for a screen on the instrument panel and the gunsight. There are twelve resin parts in total, used in various places around the airframe and within the cockpit. Construction begins with the gunsight, which is made from two printed parts plus two of the smaller acetate printed parts for the glazing. Oddly, the rest of the interior parts are left until the end. A pack of resin chaff and flare boxes are glued together and the joint secured by a PE plate, before the package is strapped to the tail boom by two PE ratchet-straps, fixing them first so the ends are hidden under the pack. A pair of new exhausts, or should that be old exhausts? Either way, these super-finely printed parts are attached to the exhaust apertures and are painted dark iron. The under-nose is then upgraded to accommodate two hanging blisters, one with twin inserts and a PE tip on the starboard underside, and the port side having a base from which hangs another faring that has a small stabilising vane on the rear, and another PE part slotted into the base. The final part is a small printed blister with a riveted flange that attaches to the curve of the fuselage just in front of the port blister. The rest of the parts that can be found on the pre-painted and nickel-plated fret are for the instrument panel, which uses the flat kit backing to add a two-layered panel plus a drop-down section, and a shallow folded-up box with the last piece of acetate in front, giving the impression of a screen. The panel dials have the new-style glossy faces that have a slight dome to them, and give the whole assembly a more realistic look. It’s worth noting that there are additional sets in abundance to convert your Hind more conclusively to a -D, including resin wheels, weapons and guns, plus stencils, 3D resin instrument panels of Löök and SPACE varieties, and a number of other detail sets. Someone has spent a lot of time and care working on these. You’ll need to find your own decals for the main scheme, but the stencil decals that have been produced are a worth purchase at the bare minimum. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  10. OV-10 Wheels (648735) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. This three-wheel set is a direct replacement for the kit parts, and has much finer detail all-around, from the tyre's tread pattern and maker’s information embossed on the sidewalls, to the hubs with brake detail on the rear sides of the main wheels. They’re designed to fit the range of new ICM kits, and will fit any and all versions, but you’d be well-able to use them on the old Testors kit with its too-close-together engine nacelles if you’re brave enough to tackle that with the ICM kit around. All the casting blocks are sensibly placed on the contact-patches of the tyres, with little work needed to make them ready for use. The smaller nose-wheel tyre has the anti-shimmy groove down the centre and deep hubs that have a depression in the centre to mate with the yoke on the kit nose gear leg. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. Chipmunk T.10 Wheels (648699 for Airfix) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE), small Brassin, and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. There are two wheels included in the package, each one on its own casting block, and there is also a small sheet of pre-cut kabuki tape masks, allowing you to cut the demarcation between tyres and hubs with little effort. Detail is excellent, and includes the raised Good Year name with winged boot and tyre stats on the sidewalls, a circumferential tread on the contact patch, and hub detail in the centre. The tyres have a very slight sag to simulate the weight of the aircraft on them, and they are joined to the casting block there, so clean-up is simple and you don’t risk damaging the detail. Once liberated from their block, they are a straight-forward drop-in replacement. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  12. A6M2 Update Sets (for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin We’ve just reviewed the first boxing of this new kit, being the Dual Combo that goes by the name of Tora Tora Tora! here, and already Eduard have created a quantity of aftermarket sets for when excellent detail isn’t quite enough for you. Here are some of the first. A6M2 Seat (648698) This is another of Eduard’s new range of directly printed 3D sets, and it arrives in one of their usual shallow card Brassin boxes due to the shape of the seat. Due to their goal of lightening the aircraft as much as possible, the engineers provided the pilot with a perforated seat that offered no protection other than a mixture of thin stamped metal and fresh air. This set includes a 3D SLA printed seat that is attached by thin tendrils to a slim base at a curious angle that made photography a little difficult without the assistance of some Blutak. In addition, there is a set of STEEL pre-painted and nickel-plated seatbelts on a small fret in a separate bag that is backed by a piece of white card. After removing the fingers from the underside of the seat and sanding them flush, it is a simple drop-in replacement for the kit part that provides a fine and highly detailed seat that has more finesse than the kit original. A6M2 Wheels (648693) Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. This set arrives in a flat pack and contains two main wheels with integrated hubs, and a slight weighting to the bottom of the tyres to give the impression of the airframe pressing down on them. It also includes a tail wheel strut with moulded-in cylindrical wheel, which is cast in a tougher white resin. The icing on the cake is a set of pre-cut kabuki tape masks that allows the modeller to cut the demarcation between tyre and hub effortlessly. A6M Undercarriage Legs BRONZE (648695) Inside the shallow Brassin box, the primary parts of this set are the two cast bronze gear legs, which are of high quality with little preparation work to do before they can be painted and added to your model. In addition, you get a full set of outer gear bay doors, which are cast at near scale thickness to give your Zero a more realistic look. A small hole should be drilled through the supports of the narrow leg door to permit the threading of a brake hose from your own 0.3mm wire stock, and you are shown how to do this in a small diagram on the instruction sheet. Conclusion The base kit is already highly impressive, and with the addition of some or all of these sets your Zero will really stand out from the crowd. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. US Mk.17 Depth Charges (648691) 1:48 Eduard Brassin The AN-Mk.17 Mod.2 depth charge was used by the US Navy during WWII, carrying 325lbs of either TNT or Torpex in a cylindrical casing with welded-on dome head, and having a drum-shaped tail fin for stabilisation during flight from the launching aircraft. A small spinner armed the fuse on the side as the weapon fell, and the single suspension lug was a triangular bracket welded to the body. As is now usual with Eduard's smaller resin sets, they arrive in a shallow Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. This is one of Eduard’s new Castless Print sub-variant, and the resin parts are SLA printed directly from the CAD files. Inside the box are two units that have already been removed from their bases, with just a fraction of a millimetre of the support lattice still visible on the bottom of the fin ring, which will be the work of moments with a sanding stick to remove. The charges are ostensibly complete save for the spinner on the nose, which is made from two PE parts and a short length of 0.4mm rod from your own stocks. The blades on the spinner will need twisting slightly with a pair of tweezers, then a PE ring is added to the front and the spinner is slipped over the rod and is glued in place. The front of the instruction sheet has a colour diagram showing the painting of the depth charges with their usual Gunze colour call-outs, plus the location of the few stencils that are applied to the finished article from the small sheet that accompanies the set. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  14. GBU-15(V)21/B (648646) 1:48 Eduard Brassin The GBU-15 series of guided munitions are based upon the same basic structure, fitted to a Mark.84 iron bomb and including a set of guidance vanes of the short-chord variety in the case of the 21/B, plus the seeker head at the front, which is a visual or TV guidance system, projecting a picture of the target into the cockpit of the releasing aircraft. An enhanced variant was introduced in the new millennium with improved guidance and more independence from its originating aircraft. As is now usual with Eduard's larger resin sets, it arrives in a deep Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, a layer of foam, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. There are two bombs in the set, both of which are found sealed inside a pink bubble-wrap bag, as they have their square rear fins moulded-in, which are quite delicate. Another bag contains the forward steering vanes, two clear seeker lenses, and a pair of FOD guards that require removal of a short length of the nose cone to fit. The forward vanes slot into cruciform sockets in the missile body, which upon testing makes for a nice firm joint, but take care to fit them all perpendicular to their neighbour. The clear lens fits over a realistic representation of the inner workings of the weapon in the nose, and they should be painted black, however a little dry-brushing to bring out the detail would look nice behind the lens. The front of the instruction sheet has a colour diagram showing the painting of the bomb with their usual Gunze colour call-outs, plus the location of the various stencils that are applied to the finished article from the small sheet that accompanies the set. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  15. Boeing B-17 Wheels Rhomboid Tread (648645 for HKM) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. As is now usual with Eduard's smaller resin sets, they arrive in the new shallow Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. One bag contains three wheels on their own pour blocks, plus two more blocks with four hub parts that are added once removed from their blocks. The tail wheel is a separate part, and all three have a slight flat at the bottom to represent the weight of the airframe on them. All wheels are incredibly detailed from tread to hubs and sidewall contours, with manufacturer and stencil data in raised writing, all perfectly crisp and legible. In addition, a set of kabuki tape pre-cut masks are included (not pictured) for all three wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation cleanly with little effort. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  16. AGM-142 Popeye Have Nap (648652) 1:48 Eduard Brassin The AGM-142 Popeye is an Israeli developed stand-off missile that has the hilariously inappropriate UN code “Have Nap” that is used in US service. It is powered by a rocket motor, although some later versions have a jet engine instead, and can be controlled by the launching aircraft or elsewhere, using inertial guidance, infrared or TV, and carrying a fragmentation or penetrator warhead, depending on the target. It is in use with a number of countries, and America was a user of the TV equipped variant up until 2004. As is now usual with Eduard's more compact resin sets, they arrive in the shallow Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, one of which is made from bubble-wrap, and the instructions folded around acting as further padding. There are two missile units in the box, and they are large, cylindrical pieces. The various fins, clear seeker lenses and nosecone are in a separate bag, while the decals are in their own bag. Construction is straight forward after removing the parts from their casting blocks, which should also be pretty easy due to Eduard’s commitment to keeping the pour gates to an absolute minimum area. The nose cone fits on a keyed joint, which will need a little fettling in order to get a good join, which I tested out to ensure I wasn’t talking nonsense. There is the option of a clear resin seeker lens in the nose cone, or you can fit the hemispherical FOD cap that is used to protect the lens on the ground. Two sets of tail fins are slotted into rectangular slots on the forward larger fins, and round pegs for the smaller aft fins. You will need to ensure that you get these parts perpendicular to the missile body and lined up with each other to ensure a good look, with another two “whisker” fins on the nose, fitting snugly into their slots. The painting guide is printed in colour on the instructions, and as usual quotes Gunze colour codes along with the colour names to assist with painting using other brands. The stencils dotted around the weapon are also shown on the same diagram, and from my experience with their decals, they should provide no issues. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  17. Lufttorpedo F5b (648627) 1:48 ICM via Hannants The F5b Torpedo was developed for the Luftwaffe by the Kriegsmarine from an earlier Norwegian design, adding a break-off wooden H-tail that helped ensure stable insertion into the water, which at a little under a tonne was an important part in its flight envelope. It was carried by a number of German bombers such as the He.111, which could carry a pair on a palette covering the bomb bay doors, and even the Fw.190 was configured to carry one under its belly. As is now usual with Eduard's smaller resin sets, they arrive in the new shallow Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in Ziploc bags, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. The set includes four main resin parts on separate casting blocks, and six small parts on another block, plus a large sheet of Photo-Etch (PE). There are two torpedoes, each of which is moulded in front and rear sections, the latter tapering off while the front section is tubular with a rounded nose. There are four variants that you can build with or without a drag fairing on the tail, and with rounded or angled fronts to the guidance fins, with enough common resin and PE parts for the two screws at the rear. The two halves of the torpedo have a keyed joint that almost guarantees a good fit as long as you don’t attack it with a machete or pick axe and remove the flash on the inner ledge, then it’s a case of bending the blades of the propellers in layer one, slipping it over the stub axle in the tail, adding a tapered spacer then fitting another prop and a final tapered section to finish off the rear. The guidance vanes of either type at the rear fit into slots at 90o to each other, and these are braced with fine PE slats. If you plan on fitting the rear fairing, there are two side panels that have a central finger that folds over for later gluing to the torpedo, and these side panels have etched slots on the inside for the location of the four horizontal slats. Take care fitting these absolutely perpendicular to the sides, then glue the assembly to two of the guidance vanes as shown in the scrap diagram. As usual, there are copious colour call-outs throughout the instructions using Eduard’s favourite brand of paints, Gunze Sangyo, and there is a 3D isometric rendering of two of the finished torpedoes in the centre of the instructions. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  18. Tempest Mk.II Landing Flaps (648686 for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Following the release of Eduard’s brand-new range of Hawker Tempests in 1:48, their latest Mk.II has been showered with priase from the modelling community and aftermarket from their own stable, allowing the modeller to add as much or as little as they’d like to augment the already exemplary detail of their kits. There is a small over-printing on the box, which says Print – Castless Brassin, which is new for Eduard, and the set arrives in their shallow cardboard box, which is better for the environment than their old plastic clamshells. This new style of flap sets embraces the march of technology in the field of 3D resin printing (SLA printing to those in the know), and presses it into service to create highly detailed flaps as single parts with all the detail already present. All that is required of the modeller is to free it from the finger-like attachment points that secure it to the printing platform during production. A quick wash in warm soapy water will help to remove any lingering residue from the parts, although they will have already been cleaned with IPA (not beer) at the factory. This reduction in workload for the modeller then leaves them to carry out the removal of the retracted flap surfaces from the lower wing, then scrape the upper wing edges thinner to accommodate the thickness of the PE bay skins. The PE bays have their fronts folded up to create the hinge area, and are then glued to the inside of the upper wing, with the flaps attached to the rear wall of the new bay, using small tabs to strengthen the bond. Repeat this for the other side, and you're done with construction. Simplification of the process makes adding deployed flaps much more appealing, and the more robust flaps will stand up to painting and handling much better than fragile glued-together PE. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  19. Me.163B (648684 for GasPatch) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip or sink-mark issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline, weighting and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also generally available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. This set includes seven resin parts for the two main wheels for the jettisonable launch trolley and the retractable tail wheel. Also included is a set of pre-cut kabuki tape hub/tyre masks (not pictured) to cut the demarcation with ease, and once liberated from their casting blocks they are a drop-in replacement for the kit parts. Detail is excellent, and each wheel has a subtle flat-spot at the bottom where the casting block attaches, giving the impression of the weight of the airframe, whilst also making it easy to remove from the block. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  20. B-17 Wheels Oval Tread (648644) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. This set includes seven resin parts for the two main wheels and the tail wheel, with two pairs of separate hubs on their own casting blocks. Also included is a set of pre-cut kabuki tape hub/tyre masks (not pictured) to cut the demarcation with ease, and once liberated from their casting blocks the hubs are inserted into the keyed depressions in each side of the wheels, and then are a drop-in replacement for the kit parts. You might also notice that the wheels have been cast with the raised maker’s marks and type stencils in different places on each side, so that when in place on the model they won’t line up. That all helps with realism. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  21. Bf.109G-10 Propeller (648672 for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Eduard’s newly tooled range of Bf.109G or Gustavs had a false start a few years previously with some scale issues that they corrected soon after with newly re-tooled releases, and went on to flesh out the range with various sub-variants that rapidly became the de facto standard in the scale for the discerning modeller. This prop is for the G-10, and as is now usual with Eduard's smaller resin sets, it arrives in the new shallow Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. This is a simple set that improves on the kit detail immensely, and gives the builder the option of showing the prop without various parts as if it was in maintenance. The set consists of three individual blades, a prop boss with backing plate, drive shaft, hollow spinner in resin, plus a PE ring to finish off the tip of the spinner after liberating it from the casting block. The interior of the spinner is detailed, and the hub is also superb. The props are aligned with the supplied resin jig, allowing you to insert one at a time and get the angle of the blade just right. Plastic backing plate H67 from the kit is still used behind the prop. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  22. F6F Exhaust Stacks (648683 for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Eduard have recently re-released their F6F Hellcat kit, which was originally released in 2008, and here are a set of resin exhausts to upgrade the details. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE), small Brassin sets and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. This set consists of four tiny resin parts on a single casting stub that will be simplicity itself to remove. Give them a quick soapy wash in warm water before you remove them to save losing them though, as they are quite wee. What they bring to the party is finesse and a more realistic looking hollow exhaust tip, all of which adds realism to your finished model. There’s not much more to say other than there are two paired pipes and two triples, all with clamps around them, the correct locations for which are shown on the front of the fuselage in the instructions. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  23. Sopwith Camel 20lb Bomb Carrier (648662 for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Print At the beginning of WWI it had barely occurred to the combatants to use aircraft as anything other than rudimentary reconnaissance platforms, but as time went by the crews began carrying pistols, then rifles, and eventually bombs. Initially, the bombs were lobbed from the cockpit by hand at ad hoc targets, but as time marched on the aircraft became more capable and racks were created to make dropping the ordnance more predictable and accurate. The Camel’s rack could carry four 20lb bombs with remote release from the cockpit, turning the Camel into a true ground attack aircraft. As is now usual with Eduard's smaller resin sets, they arrive in the new shallow Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, a piece of foam and the instructions folded around acting as padding. This set is augmented with a “Brassin Print” label, due to the fact that that these delicate parts have been printed directly, rather than cast from 3D printed masters. Inside the box are five resin parts (it’s still resin after all), plus a small fret of Photo-Etch (PE) brass. The finesse of the rack is incredible, and will take some care to remove from the webwork that connects it to the base. The bombs are attached to their base at their fins, and when cut free these parts are linked to the rack by a pin that fits into a socket on the bomb rack. Each bomb has a small PE clip affixed at the front between it and the rack, which prevents the arming spinner from rotating in the aircraft’s slipstream until the bomb is released from the rack. The rack attaches to the model by four rectangular pads that mate with depressions on the underside of the fuselage, completing the assembly. Colour call-outs are given throughout in Eduard’s usual brand of choice, Gunze Sangyo in order to do justice to the detail in this set. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  24. Sopwith Camel Engine – Clerget & Bentley (648676 & 648677) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Eduard’s newly tooled Sopwith Camel has reached our shelves and stashes now, and here are a pair of aftermarket engines in gloriously well-detailed resin to upgrade your kit parts. You can see our review of the kit here, but remember to come back and read the rest of this review after. The engines fitted to the aircraft were sourced from various manufacturers to prevent a bottleneck from slowing down production of these much-needed fighters. Bentley and Clerget were the major producers, and these two sets depict the differences between the two. As is now usual with Eduard's smaller resin sets, they arrive in the shallow Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. The differences between the two types are slight, but noticeable when viewed close up, mostly around the cylinders, push-rods and the exhaust collector ring. Clerget Engine (648676) The Clerget engine has finer cooling vanes on the cylinders and fewer joints on its exhaust collector tubing. The main resin part includes the cylinders, bell-housing and drive-shaft, with the exhausts slotting into a keyed hole in the rear, and the PE wiring loom plus aft ring slipping over the rear. The completed, painted assembly is then attached to the fuselage on the standard mounting point in the centre. Bentley Engine (648677) The Bentley engine has coarser cooling vanes on the cylinders and more joints on its narrower exhaust collector pipes, plus a slightly different construction order. The main resin part includes the cylinders, push-rods, bell-housing and drive-shaft, with a PE ring in front of the exhausts that slot into a keyed hole in the rear, then the PE wiring loom slipping over the rear. The completed, painted assembly is then attached to the fuselage on the central mounting point. Conclusion Detail is excellent in both variants, and as usual with Eduard sets the paint call-outs are given through the build in Gunze codes and colour names. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  25. Hey everyone I had a little rush of blood to the head earlier and I ordered the Brassin Tempest V Napier Sabre for the Eduard Tempest kit. So boyd by my Spitfire Mk.IXc (finished build) WIP I thought I'd get another WIP going in anticipation for when I get to start it. Box art.. And Napier Sabre... Cheers Iain
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