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Found 2 results

  1. Russian Fighters Version 4 Acrylic Paint Set (02.112) Jim-Scale via Hobby Colours Jim Scale is a Russian-based brand of modelling supplies that concentrates heavily on painting and finishing, with a great many products aimed at the modeller of Russian Federation or Soviet subjects, but with a broad range that will suit almost any genre. Their location might cause concerns for some of our members at the moment, but these products have come to us via Hobby Colours from Greece, and might appeal to some of our members around the world, providing that supply doesn’t eventually become a problem. The range contains products that are water-based and alcohol-based, the water-based product codes beginning with 01., and with the colour or product number after the full-stop. This is good to know, as the packaging is written almost entirely in Russian, which isn’t a language many native English speakers are familiar with. Fortunately, our mobile (cell/handy) phones are becoming more competent with every generation, and translation from one language to another is the work of moments, simply aiming your phone’s camera at the text and tapping translate. This set provides three colours often seen on Russian fighter aircraft, particularly the Su-34, which is mentioned on the rear of the set, along with a profile and a few details about the aircraft. It arrives in a bubble package with a cardboard backing card, a clear vacformed front holding the paint bottles in place until you slide the card out from behind. Each bottle contains 18ml of paint, and is topped off with a dropper tip and yellow cap that screws onto the nozzle, preventing leakage. There is also a hefty shaker ball inside each bottle to assist with mixing the paint before use, and we are told that the paints can be sprayed or brushed just as easily. The 01. code tells us that this is a water-based acrylic, and there is little to no aroma from the bottles, unless you place the nozzle just under your nose. The three colours are as follows: 01.189 Light Blue (Su-34) 01.192 Light Blue 01.193 Green Blue (Su-34) As is usual with my tests, I used plastic spoons that had been prepared by a light roughening with a very fine sanding stick, and the bowl was sprayed with primer to prepare and harmonise the surface. Based upon the results of other tests that I have run with this system, the paint will adhere equally well directly to the spoon without primer, with no discernible difference between the finishes. I can also confirm that the paint brushes out well, reaching opacity in 2-3 thin coats using a flat brush to minimise brush-marks, which were negligible and could have been a result of my inexpert application, as I’m unused to painting large areas without an airbrush. Spraying was carried out by first laying down a medium coat now that I am more confident with the system, which was given a few seconds to gas off before adding another heavier layer, repeating extra layers as necessary to improve vibrancy. The paint went down very well with no spluttering, stoppages, or other issues, and as it dried the surface became very smooth with a slight sheen visible from some angles after initial drying had occurred. The patterning I had experienced previously during the mist-coat stages didn’t occur this time, as I had brushed the surface to remove dust with an anti-static brush by Tamiya, and was more aggressive with application. After several hours of drying, the paint had taken on a matt sheen that is pleasing to the eye, across all colours in the set. Two days after spraying paint on both primed and un-primed sides of the original tests, Tamiya tape was applied to all surfaces, burnished down firmly, and torn off 20 minutes later, with absolutely no caution whatsoever. This paint is as tough as old boots, and there wasn’t any lifting of the tape, regardless of priming or otherwise, so you can paint and mask to your heart’s delight and it won’t let you down if you prepare your model’s surfaces. Conclusion Now I have tested their primers and two paint sets, this system is really growing on me. It goes down well, doesn’t lift on removal of masking, the finish is excellent, and the sets aren’t expensive. I can live with the slightly longer curing time for the paint, as my modelling is sporadic anyway, and there is always something else to do in the meantime. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  2. T-90M ‘Breakthrough’ Main Battle Tank Acrylic Paint Set (02.124) Jim-Scale via Hobby Colours Jim Scale is a Russian-based brand of modelling supplies that concentrates heavily on painting and finishing, with a great many products aimed at the modeller of Russian Federation or Soviet subjects, but with a broad range that will suit almost any genre. Their location might cause concerns for some of our members at the moment, but these products have come to us via Hobby Colours from Greece, and might appeal to some of our members around the world, providing that supply doesn’t eventually become a problem. The range contains products that are water-based and alcohol-based, the water-based product codes beginning with 01., and with the colour or product number after the full-stop. This is good to know, as the packaging is written almost entirely in Russian, which isn’t a language many native English speakers are familiar with. Fortunately, our mobile (cell/handy) phones are becoming more competent with every generation, and translation from one language to another is the work of moments, simply aiming your phone’s camera at the text and tapping translate. This set is for painting the T-90M Breakthrough, an uprated variant of the T-90 tank, and arrives in a bubble package with a cardboard backing card, a clear vacformed front holding the paint bottles in place until you slide the card out from behind. Each bottle contains 18ml of paint, and is topped off with a dropper tip and yellow cap that screws onto the nozzle, preventing leakage. There is also a shaker ball inside each bottle to assist with mixing the paint before use, and we are told that the paints can be sprayed or brushed just as easily. The 01. code tells us that this is a water-based acrylic, and there is little to no aroma from the bottles, unless you place the nozzle just under your nose. The three colours are as follows: 01.138 Syrian Sand 01.258 HU-1200 01.274L Old Tires The old Tires bottle is slightly different from the others, having a different cap and sticker around the bottle, but otherwise the product is identical in use, other than the colour of course! As is usual with my tests, I used plastic spoons that had been prepared by a light roughening with a very fine sanding stick, and the outer face of the bowl was sprayed with Tamiya primer from a rattle can for purely practical reasons. The inside of the spoon’s bowl wasn’t primed to give those that don’t usually prime their models an indication of how well the paint sticks to bare plastic. Spraying was carried out by first laying down a light exploratory mist coat, which was given a few seconds to dry before adding another heavier layer, repeating extra layers as necessary. The paint went down very well with no spluttering, stoppages, or other issues, and as it dried the surface became very smooth with a slight sheen visible from some angle after initial drying had occurred. The inner face of the bowl sprayed similarly well, but with a slight patina during the early stage due to static charge lingering on the un-primed surface, which disappeared under subsequent coats. After several hours of drying, the paint had taken on a matt sheen that is pleasing to the eye, across all colours in the set. Sprayed on a Primed Surface Sprayed on a un-Primed Surface Two days after spraying paint on both sides, Tamiya tape was applied to all six surfaces, burnished down firmly, and torn off 20 minutes later, with absolutely no care whatsoever. This paint is as tough as old boots, and there wasn’t any lifting of the tape, regardless of priming or not, so you can paint and mask this paint to your heart’s delight and it won’t let you down if you prepare your model’s surfaces. In fact, if I had thought of it at the time, I’d have sprayed it onto an un-prepared spoon, and I suspect it would have stuck to that too. That’s for the next set though, so keep an eye out. Conclusion The paint is very tough, and results in a smooth matt surface, with the trade-off being that it takes a little longer to cure than some more delicate brands. If you’re not a modeller in a hurry, this shouldn’t be an issue. I’m impressed. Highly recommended. This set is currently out of stock, but a new batch is inbound this month, so check back soon Review sample courtesy of
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