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Rob G

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Posts posted by Rob G

  1. I've done the same with cheap Chinese dropper bottles. While the bottles will last and seem to be impervious to most thinners, the pointy bit on the top of the cap will crack off given a bit of time and pressure. Also, they don't seem to seal all that well - a long term storage option they are not, the paint dries out in a couple of months, but for mixing up a batch to use while working on a project, they're OK. I am in a hot tropical part of the world, yon cooler climes may (I stress 'may') be different, and the seal may be sufficient to keep long term. 

     

    I have AK and MIG bottles that seem to seal, at least the paint in those is still good - do those guys sell empty bottles? The OEM bottles seem to be of a better quality than the Chinese ebay version. Might be worth chasing some down. 

  2. On 10/2/2021 at 7:37 PM, JohnT said:

    Shades of Mad Max. 

     

    What is actually sad is that not one of those motorists noticed that they were following a cement bulkie, which doesn't look at all like a fuel tanker. There's all sorts of hazardous goods warning signs on a fuel tanker, for a start, not to mention prominent branding.

     

    Desperation, ignorance, or lack of observational skills? 

     

    Also, an explanation of the Giles cartoon (shouldn't need to log in/have an account to view the page) 

     

    https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=4296869863699758&id=279164765470308&__tn__=*W-R

    • Like 2
  3. On 10/4/2021 at 9:27 AM, Jo NZ said:

     

    Why oh why don't the creators of these files draw in full size in the first place. It was the first thing I was taught using 3D CAD in the early 80s - and then we had to set up the workspace, rather than it automatically fitting the workpiece as it does now.

     

    Numpties!

    They're not numpties, they just don't know any better. The answer is right there in your comment, where you say "It was the first thing I was taught". Most of those using CAD and printing at home haven't been formally schooled in 'the right way' and are either learning via YouTube or making it up as they go along, and are not receiving a sound base for further progress. Hence, we get the confuzzled mess that we see. I'm a photographer, and I see exactly the same thing. 

     

    It's one of the downsides of affordable technology, I guess. 

    • Like 2
  4. I've avoided this topic since it was first floated, but in for a penny... 

     

    At my current build rate (c.1/yr), and discounting kits that would take most people substantial time (1/12 cars that want detailing, 1/32 airyplanes etc), and assuming no long hiatus due to health &C (and also not counting the kits already in the 'to be sold off' pile), umm... 

     

    if it all went right, and if no one ever issued any more kits that I'd want (yeah, right), I'd clear them out by around 2400AD. Seeing as I won't make it that far, I'd better get my A into G and make a serious effort to sell off those that aren't priority, or else whoever I leave behind will have to deal with a mess such as I have recently faced when a friend died. 

     

    Sigh. 

    • Like 1
  5. Revell have done a sterling job on these little kits. I've nearly finished the D model boxing, and it's amazing, despite my fumble fingered mistakes and the loss of a couple of bits (it's been a long term build). Decal sheet by DACO, with full stripes for the ordnance... I'm looking forward to doing the A model in grey and white. 

    • Like 1
  6. That's a sweet little kit. With a bit of modification of the main gear mounts on the boom sudes (or possibly the tops of the legs...), you can avoid having to insert the legs early in the build, although I can't now recall exactly what I did - but if I figured it out, anyone can. 

     

    The booms align flawlessly, but do take a bit of time to make sure that mould lines and flash are removed, or there will be pain later on. That goes for the whole kit, actually - clean up where needed, and it's just about Lego. 

     

    Enjoy! 

    • Like 1
  7. The needle chuck nut should have no way of stopping the lever moving, as it's behind the lever and only secured to the needle. 

     

    Is the thing assembled correctly? (Do you have an assembly diagram?) Does it have a stopper screw on the rear of the handle that restricts the needle movement? If so, is that screwed in all the way? 

     

    I can post pics if visual explanation is required. 

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