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  2. Wow! Nicely done. What kit did you use? One of these day, I hope to get done to Cowtown and see this. Chris
  3. Hello mishmodel... from Chicago USA. Mostly aircraft with the occasional pirce of armor for good measure. Dennis
  4. Try HLJ, IIRC they do (did?) offer a spares service at a fee. Hasegawa themselves used (still do?) offer spare sprues at fee. Look at other Hsegawa Fw-190's as well as the parts should be (may be?) common
  5. The subject of this build is a Canadian-built Hurricane bearing the RCAF serial number 5389. This Hurricane was built in 1942 by the Canadian Car & Foundry, Fort William (now Thunder Bay), Ontario and was taken on strength on June 23, 1942. On July 3, 1942, 5389 was assigned to No. 133 (Fighter) Squadron, Lethbridge, Alberta and coded as FN*M. The Squadron code FN was typically not displayed on the aircraft at this time; only the individual aircraft letter was carried. On Oct 5, 1942, No. 133 (F) Squadron was transferred to the Western Air Command and relocated to RCAF Station Boundary Bay, British Columbia for home defense. It is at this location that the only known period photograph of 5389 exists (source Library and Archives Canada): During its service, 5389 was flown by a number of Canadian pilots, two of whom became aces in Europe: Don Laubman ( 15 victories) and Buck McNair (16 Victories). The Squadron transferred to Tofino on July 1, 1943 and two weeks later, 5389 suffered a crash, was sent for repairs, and ended up in “Stored Reserve”. In March of 1945, 5389 was flown to No. 23 EFTS, Yorkton, SK to intercept and shoot down Japanese fire balloons. The aircraft was struck from service in August of 1946 and purchased by a farmer in Southern Saskatchewan. After a private purchase in 1962 to be displayed in a museum in Calgary, my home town, the aircraft became the property of the City and is now being restored to mechanically functional but non-flying condition by the Calgary Mosquito Aircraft Society, of which I am a member. The aircraft as it appeared last fall, nearing application of fabric: This build also gave me an opportunity to display the unique paint scheme given these aircraft. They differ from their British-built counterparts in that the colours, generally equating to the British Temperate Land Scheme, were locally produced and, though close, were not quite the same. Also, the upper wing roundels were of the "A-Type" with the bright blues and reds used throughout all of the roundels and fin flashes rather than their more muted ETO versions. Thanks go out to Jim Bates and Terry Higgins, both members on this forum, for their invaluable contributions to our project. Insignia and "M" marking were masked and painted. Masks were home made using a Cricut digital cutter and stencil and s/n decals were printed on Testros clear decal paper using my inkjet printer. Exhaust shield are scratch-built and the Hamilton Standard prop, exhausts, and engine plug are resin parts by Ultracast. And now for the finished pics:
  6. Just bought it too! Less than a tenner including delivery
  7. looking good like that nonetheless.. maybe a dullcote on top of the wires?
  8. Thanks, I used acrylics on this, the horse was dry brushed many times.
  9. Lovely to see another Gamecock in the works. Your level of detail is amazing ( I think I'm more of a hacker ) I skinned mine with 20 thou ruled card to get the fuselage hatches, panels and ribs. Funny I went the other way with the struts. I used steel wires wit plastic glued over them for the interplane struts and then just plastic rod for the cabane struts and the anti flutter ones because they were pretty tricky with the w to the front and the n's to the side. I also used a resin Jupiter, the manifolds were difficult even in 1/48, but the kicker was the engine cowling, it took me a week of filing to get the engine into it. BTW mine is almost (almost) ready to roll just some more lights, gun barrels and the exhausts.
  10. Thanks for your kind comments guys, @nimrod54 , always dip in Klear before painting and glueing. I have bought some Humbrol Kristal clear to use for my next build & have heard good things about Guazy agent. @Colin W, the Hawk was well glossed before the decals went on, then Matt varnish, then a coat of Klear. Luckily I knew what a hawk canopy cover looked like.
  11. Sorry to hear that, it must've been frustrating.
  12. Is that a razor saw? Or just a razor blade? If that is a razor saw, than it's probably very similar to what I use. https://www.scalemates.com/kits/cmk-h1010-handle-our-saws--541096
  13. That's because it has masking tape on it as it had been painted white
  14. A very nice result on one of Kitty Hawk's earlier kits. The Demon seems to have been quite a large aircraft for the time. Michael
  15. With the two interior sub-assemblies complete, painted, and ready to install, I've gone ahead and joined the fuselage halves. I fitted their exterior panels in the process - fore-warned is fore-armed, and from reviews I was aware they needed some slight sanding in order to get a reasonably flush fit: While they were sitting aside to set thoroughly, I put a couple more sub-assemblies together, namely the stub wings and engine nacelles and their exhausts:
  16. That is a superb result from Kitty Hawk's first kit (I think it was). The Starfire was also an interesting aircraft, sort of an F-80 on steroids as it were Michael
  17. This is another kit I finished earlier this year and represents AE979, one of the few RAF Lightnings actually to wear roundels. The British and French ordered a total of 667 aircraft plus spares of the Lockheed Model 322. These differed from the version being ordered in small numbers by the USAAC in that the the first 143 aircraft would lack the superchargers fitted to the P38. After the fall of France the British took over the entire order calling the initial 143 Lightning I and the rest became Lightning IIs fitted with turbochargers. On test the Lightning I had a relatively poor performance and major concerns were expressed over control due to compressibility effects. This resulted in the USAAF (as the Air Corps had now become) taking over the order. The Lightning I became the P-322 and were used to convert some of the large number of new pilots being trained after Pearl Harbour and the Lightning II became incorporated in to the the P38F and P38G contracts. I have always liked the look of the Lightning in British markings since reading a conversion article by Alan Hall in the Airfix Magazine about 50 years ago and so when the RE models kit appeared I bought one. This is not a kit for beginners, the instructions are vague in places and the part numbers do match the instructions. to squeeze the maximum number of variants RS offer of alternative engine nacelles and I ended up marking the parts for use with a Sharpie to keep track of everything. There is also a lack any indication on a lot of parts as to position of undercarriage bays etc. Most major parts are butt joints and all need fettling to fit together, The cockpit interior needs work to fit it into the fuselage, especially with regards to depth and I do wonder if the manufacturer had built the kit. before release. Having said all that the one piece canopy was quite a good fit. The model was finished in Temperate Land Scheme with Sky undersurfaces using Mr Hobby Aqueous Hobby Colours that gave a bit of a contrast to other models I have finished in Xtracyrlix. Decals came from a Kits At War decal sheet. It needed a lot of weight to stay on its nose, but I am glad I persevered with it. Hope you like, Share and Enjoy!
  18. Has anyone done a side by side comparison between the HPH kit and the Bobcat masterpiece? Thank you.
  19. With the two interior sub-assemblies complete, painted, and ready to install, I've gone ahead and joined the fuselage halves. I fitted their exterior panels in the process - fore-warned is fore-armed, and from reviews I was aware they needed some slight sanding in order to get a reasonably flush fit: While they were sitting aside to set thoroughly, I put a couple more sub-assemblies together, namely the stub wings and engine nacelles and their exhausts:
  20. Been there. Done that too. I don't learn well. Chris
  21. Hi Glynn. Great to see you here with what should be another superb project! Very annoying about the lower hull tub - I can't offer any further suggestions to those provided above - not come across this issue with any kits....yet. Looking forward to seeing it in progress. Kind regards, Stix
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